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  • 1. Systemati a ic Review c Systemetws EVIDENCE BASED s Revi Random Contro ized Randomized lled Tri ls als Controlled Tria DENTISTRY Coho rt Stu s dies t Studie Cohor Case s -Cont ie rol St o l Stud udies Contr Case- Case rt s Stud Repo ie s, Ca ase se Re s, C ports se StudieEdit Ca ns oria o ls, E O pini xpe ert rt O pini ls , Exp ia ons E d itor HSC-BAYLOR COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY ANNUAL REPORT 2009 - 2010
  • 2. EVIDENCE-BASED DENTISTRYEvidence-Based Dentistry (EBD) curricular initiatives are being implementedat HSC-BCD that will result in a graduating dentist who6 is better equippedto analyze and filter the massive amount of information to which he/she Systematic Reviewswill be subjected and to decide whether and/or how to incorporate this Randomizedinformation into the treatment of patients. A parallel effort to train Controlled Trialsdental school faculty in the principles and practices of EBD willenrich them professionally while enabling them to serve as role Cohort Studiesmodels for students. Still another offshoot is an enrichment Case-Control Studiestrack to nourish the aspirations of three dental studentsper class to engage in clinical research or enter Case Studies, Case Reportsacademic dentistry once they graduate. Editorials, Expert Opinions Central to EBD is the Pyramid of Evidence, which indicates the hierarchy of evidence strength provided by different research designs.
  • 3. 2009–2010 ANNUAL REPORT TEXAS A&M HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER BAYLOR COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY September 1, 2009 through August 31, 2010Prepared by Ann McCann, Ph.D., Director of Planning & Assessment, with assistance from Robert Hinton, Ph.D., Regents Professor of Biomedical Sciences
  • 4. 22009 and 2010 Dental Scholars with their mentor 2
  • 5. TABLE OF CONTENTS2009-2010 HSC-BCD ANNUAL REPORTINTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 5MISSION ACCOMPLISHMENTS ..................................................................................................................................................................... 6 Developing Exemplary Clinicians.................................................................................................................................................... 8 Developing Exemplary Educators ................................................................................................................................................. 11 Developing Exemplary Scientists ................................................................................................................................................. 13 Caring for the Needs of a Diverse Community .............................................................................................................................. 17 Serving as a Leader in Health Professions Education .................................................................................................................... 19 Seeking Innovations in Science, Education and Health Care Delivery ............................................................................................. 22DEPARTMENT/OFFICE ACCOMPLISHMENTS ............................................................................................................................................... 24 Academic Affairs ......................................................................................................................................................................... 25 Biomedical Sciences ................................................................................................................................................................... 26 Clinical Affairs ............................................................................................................................................................................. 27 Communications & Institutional Advancement .............................................................................................................................. 28 Continuing Education & Alumni Affairs ......................................................................................................................................... 28 Dental Hygiene ............................................................................................................................................................................ 28 Diagnostic Sciences .................................................................................................................................................................... 29 Endodontics ................................................................................................................................................................................ 29 Finance & Administration ............................................................................................................................................................. 29 General Dentistry......................................................................................................................................................................... 29 Library ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 29 Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery ..................................................................................................................................................... 30 Orthodontics ............................................................................................................................................................................... 30 Pediatric Dentistry ....................................................................................................................................................................... 31 Periodontics ................................................................................................................................................................................ 31 Public Health Sciences ................................................................................................................................................................ 31 3
  • 6. Recruitment & Admissions .......................................................................................................................................................... 32 Research & Graduate Studies ...................................................................................................................................................... 32 Restorative Sciences ................................................................................................................................................................... 32 Student Affairs ............................................................................................................................................................................ 33FACULTY, STAFF AND STUDENT ACCOMPLISHMENTS .............................................................................................................................. 34KEY INDICATORS......................................................................................................................................................................................... 38 Programs .................................................................................................................................................................................... 39 Students ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 40 Faculty ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 42 Patient Care................................................................................................................................................................................. 43 Community Service ..................................................................................................................................................................... 44 Research .................................................................................................................................................................................... 45 Giving ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 45STRATEGIC PLAN ACCOMPLISHMENTS ...................................................................................................................................................... 46 Goal 1. Education ........................................................................................................................................................................ 47 Goal 2. Faculty, Staff, Students, Alumni ....................................................................................................................................... 49 Goal 3. Research ......................................................................................................................................................................... 51 Goal 4. Patient Care ..................................................................................................................................................................... 52 Goal 5. Outreach ......................................................................................................................................................................... 53 Goal 6. Planning & Development ................................................................................................................................................. 54 INTRODUCTION 4
  • 7. INTRODUCTIONThis is a reporting of accomplishments by Texas A&M Health Science Center Baylor College of Dentistry (HSC-BCD) during the 2009-2010 academicyear, September 1, 2009 to August 31, 2010. Each department/office has a hard copy of this annual report and there is also one in the Library. Thedocuments also are posted on the College intranet under “Documents-Strategic Plan.” The following is a description of each section of this report.MISSION ACCOMPLISHMENTSThis section describes accomplishments related to the mission and vision of the College. It is organized by the statements within the mission. Theinformation was selected from the annual reports submitted by the leaders of the strategic plan and the department chairs/office managers.DEPARTMENT-OFFICE ACCOMPLISHMENTSThis section highlights the accomplishments of academic departments and offices of the College. The information was prepared by the departmentchairs, directors and office managers.FACULTY, STAFF AND STUDENT ACCOMPLISHMENTSThis section reports the accomplishments of faculty, staff and students. It was compiled by the Office of Communications & Institutional Advancementfrom information previously published in the Baylor Dental Record.KEY INDICATORSThis section presents data collected from departments/offices throughout the College. It focuses on the key indicators of quality at HSC-BCD.STRATEGIC PLAN ACCOMPLISHMENTSThis last section reports accomplishments that are specifically linked to the 2009 Revision of the 2005-2012 HSC-BCD Strategic Plan. The informationwas selected from the annual progress reports completed by the leaders of each strategic plan objective. This was the second progress reporting cyclefor the strategic plan. All of these accomplishments are described in other areas of the report. The strategic plan can be found on the College intranet.APPENDIX TO THE 2009-2010 BCD ANNUAL REPORTThis accompanying Appendix provides more detail about College accomplishments in 2009-2010. It includes an annual progress report for eachobjective in the 2009 Revision of the 2005-2012 Strategic Plan, departmental annual assessment reports for 2009-2010 and the 2009 FacultyPublication Report. 5
  • 8. MISSION ACCOMPLISHMENTS 6Co-Principal Investigators for the National Institutes of Health grant that funds EBD initiatives 6
  • 9. MISSION ACCOMPLISHMENTSThis section of the 2009-2010 Texas A&M Health Science Center Baylor College of Dentistry Annual Report highlights accomplishments that are related tothe mission and vision of the College. The mission and vision statements are listed below, and the related 2009-2010 accomplishments are described onthe subsequent pages. MISSIONThe mission of BCD is to improve the oral health of Texans and shape the future of dentistry by: Developing exemplary clinicians, educators and scientists. Caring for the needs of a diverse community. Serving as a leader in health professions education. Seeking innovations in science, education and health care delivery. VISIONFollowing a century of excellence, BCD will continue to be a leader in dental education by: Enhancing instruction through state-of-the-art simulation and management of patient information through digital technologies. Enhancing its national and international reputation for craniofacial and oral biomaterials research. Continuing its leadership role in assessment, institutional effectiveness, and competency based education. 7
  • 10. DEVELOPING EXEMPLARY CLINICIANSEntering Qualifications- The quality of incoming HSC-BCD students remains high. The average cumulative GPA of the 2010 entering first-year dental classwas 3.56 and 3.53 for first-year dental hygiene. The Dental Aptitude Test Academic Average score for first-year dental students was 19.2 (scale of 0-30).Diversity Pipeline- A number of Bridge to Dentistry programs have evolved at HSC-BCD to create a pipeline of potential dental students from culturallydiverse and/or disadvantaged backgrounds. The following programs were very successful this year: In the K-12 Dental Career Awareness, 2,157 pre-K-6th-grade students and 501 7th-12th-grade students from the Dallas Independent School District participated in dental awareness events and counseling activities. Six Future Dentists Clubs (FDC) were established. Four were in elementary schools, and one was in a middle school. A city-wide FDC was established for high school students. Twenty-one 10th-graders, 21 11th-graders, 25 12th-graders, 12 high school graduates and 25 college students participated in summer pre- dental enrichment programs. Sixteen students participated in the 2009-2010 Post-Baccalaureate Program. These students spent one year after college graduation in a rigorous curriculum focused on Dental Aptitude Test preparation and upper-division science courses. Students who met detailed performance criteria were accepted at HSC-BCD. Eleven of these students are now first-year dental students at HSC-BCD. Another 31 of these students are distributed throughout the D2-D4 classes here at the College.Funding for Bridge to Dentistry- The College’s Bridge to Dentistry program was funded by two different grants last year. The College’s Bridge to Dentistry program received a nearly $200,000 grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in March 1, 2008. HSC- BCD was one of only eight dental schools selected to receive funding to improve diversity among the student body or increase access to dental care in underserved areas through community-based education. The grant ends May 30, 2010. The Bridge to Dentistry program also received a Health Careers Opportunity Program (HCOP) grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). The project period is September 1, 2009 – August 31, 2012, and the total amount for the grant award was $2,315,713.Great Expectations Mentoring Program- This mentoring program is a collaboration between HSC-BCD and the Texas Section of the International College ofDentists (ICD). Mentoring is done within groups, each with an ICD leader, faculty mentors, and D1, D3 and D4 members.Over ninety-five percent of the D1 class participated in an ice cream social with their mentors, and almost ninety percent attended the Dallas County DentalSociety event. This program has been adopted by UT Houston and UT San Antonio dental schools and other schools are considering adoption. 8
  • 11. Student Diversity- Efforts continue to increase the diversity of the student body. For the entering dental class of 2010, there were 12 African Americanentrants, 26 Hispanic entrants and six Native Americans. Underrepresented minorities (African American, Hispanic and Native American) made up 31percent of the entire dental school and 37 percent of the first-year dental class. HSC-BCD’s 2010 entering dental class leads all traditional U.S. dentalschools in diversity.Cultural Competence Course- A new course was implemented in the fall of 2008, Cultural Competence in Dental Health Care and Education (6850).Because the successful delivery of oral health care requires an understanding of each patient’s frame of reference, this course explores culturaldifferences and similarities to increase awareness of the values and beliefs that impact health care and daily interactions. The goals of the course are (1)to promote open-mindedness and respect for all individuals – faculty, staff, students, and patients, and (2) to heighten awareness of the role of culture inoral health treatment acceptance and outcomes. The course engages first-year dental students in two two-hour class sessions at the beginning of the fallsemester.Predoctoral Implant Curriculum- The College continues to develop an implant program for predoctoral students with the goal of every student having animplant experience. Almost all (91%) of the students in the D4 class of 2010 had an implant experience. There were a total of 600 implant procedures.Production from implants has increased from $5,248 in 2005-2006 to $109,166 in 2009-2010.National & Regional Examinations- HSC-BCD students continue to experience very high first-time passing rates on their national and regionalexaminations. The dental students graduating in 2010 had an 87 percent pass rate on the licensing exam conducted by the Western Regional ExaminingBoard. The graduating dental hygiene class of 2010 had a 90 percent pass rate on the Western Regional Examining Board. For the National BoardExaminations, the dental students had first-time pass rates of 95 percent for Part I and 74 percent for Part II. Dental hygiene students had a 100 percentpass rate on the National Board Examination.Developing Evidence-Based Thinking- Progress continues to be made toward the goals of the National Institutes of Health R25 Oral Health ResearchEducation Grant. Curriculum: As a continuation of our introduction of evidenced-based (EBD) content into the dental curriculum one year at a time, an EBD module was included in a critical thinking case scenario required of all D3 students. These scenarios were part of the case conferences in which D3 students present a report on a patient they are treating. Each scenario dealt with a challenging issue bearing on treatment; as part of this exercise, students were asked to evaluate the evidence for an issue pertinent to the scenario. This represents our initial effort to translate EBD knowledge learned in the D1-D2 years into a clinical context. Planning is underway for an extension of this process into the D4 year. Faculty Development: The traditional Research Day, reconfigured in 2009 to include clinical case presentations by D3 and D4 students, was further expanded to feature presentations of Critically-Assessed Topics (CATs) by D2 students. These students were chosen based on their excellent CATs presentations in the D2 course, Application of Evidence-Based Dentistry I (7400). Our summer course, Fundamentals of Evidence-Based Dentistry for Clinical Faculty, was attended by ten clinical faculty (6 from Restorative, 2 from General Dentistry, and one each 9
  • 12. from Dental Hygiene and Periodontics). Three speakers presented at the Clinical Colloquium in 2010, providing evidence-based updates on adhesive materials, implants, and CAD-CAM targeted to clinical faculty. Dental Scholars Track: The first three Dental Scholars, D1 students chosen for their nascent interest in a career in dental academics, did summer research projects, applied for (and in one instance, was awarded) AADR Student Research Fellowships, and attended research presentations and a teaching selective. A new cohort of three Dental Scholars was chosen in December 2010 from the class of 2014. Assessment: In spring 2009, both EBD trained and non-trained students were assessed with the PEAK (practices, experiences, attitudes and knowledge) instrument, and the trained students scored higher than non-trained on the knowledge questions (p<.001). Throughout the life of the grant, the PEAK instrument will be used to compare the EBD knowledge and skills of the trained versus the non- trained students as well as to track their learning over time. Focus groups are also held for the faculty who participate in the summer training program to measure the effectiveness of their training.Continuing Education- The Continuing Education officecontinues to provide numerous learning options for dentalpractitioners. For the 2009-2010 year, the office offered 37traditional courses with 2,755 participants and 10 distanceeducation courses with 322 participants. Small group teaching session for EBDMedicaid Provider Training- The Pediatric Dentistry departmenthas developed a curriculum to promote dentists becoming Medicaidproviders. The dental director for the Texas Medicaid program spoke to the 4th year students about becoming providers. She then returned to providethe required training session for billing the newly developed “first dental home” code should they decide to become Medicaid providers after graduation.Approximately 50 dental students were certified as “First Dental Home” providers in 2010. 10
  • 13. DEVELOPING EXEMPLARY EDUCATORSPreparing Educators- Several College programs prepared students for an academic career. The Health Professions Education Program is a master’s degree program for dentists seeking a degree in education. Three students were enrolled in 2009-2010. (Ernie) The Master of Science in Dental Hygiene program, approved in 1996, prepares dental hygienists for teaching or administration. Two students were enrolled in 2009-2010. Twelve students have graduated from the program. Of these graduates, eight have taught/are teaching in dental hygiene programs, and four are administrators of health care organizations in the Dallas area. The Kellogg/American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Comprehensive Dental Faculty Development Program and Baylor College of Dentistry fund the tuition or other educational expenses for selected graduate students who are primarily from underrepresented minority populations or disadvantaged backgrounds and are interested in teaching (2004-2009). In exchange, the students commit to teach at a dental school after graduation for the number of years they were funded. Four students were enrolled in the program in the 2009-2010 academic year. Four participants have already graduated, and they all entered academics upon completion of the program.Selective Course about Teaching- A selective course, Exploring Dental Academia (S020), was offered for the first time in summer 2007. It provided anopportunity for dental students to investigate dental education as a career option and to gain a foundation in the pedagogical skills necessary for success inacademia. Participants receive financial stipends which decrease the need for summer employment and improve their availability for coursework in and outof the classroom. Twenty students enrolled in 2007, 19 in 2008, 17 in 2009 and 18 in 2010. One recent graduate who took this course has declared herintent to teach at a dental school.Faculty Development- The Office of Faculty Development was created in 2005 to address a growing national shortage of dental professionals who chooseacademic careers. Numerous development opportunities were provided to faculty during the 2009-2010 year, including the following sessions: Brauman-Bell Alpha Omega Lectureship - The Clinical Implementation of CAMBRA (October 27, 2009) Mini Faculty Retreat - 2011 CODA Accreditation (November 24, 2009) Faculty Retreat - Web 2.0 and Education 2.0: Implications for Dental Education (January 7, 2010) Morris Minton Lectureship - New Honor Codes for a New Generation (March 24, 2010) Faculty Calibration Workshop - Quality Assessment of Student Performance (June 22, 2010)Faculty Peer Review- To help faculty members improve their teaching and document their teaching efforts, a peer review process was developed. A taskforce developed materials to assist faculty members in evaluating their faculty peers. The task force designed evaluation instruments with criteria for clinical, 11
  • 14. classroom and laboratory teaching. Video vignettes were recorded for calibrating task force members, as well as for demonstrating good teachingpractices to all faculty members. The plan was presented to faculty members for their review at the Faculty Retreat on January 4, 2006, and it wasrevised based on the feedback received. Since the program began in January 2006, 16 faculty members have completed the peer review process.New Faculty Orientation- To introduce new faculty members to the resources and policies of the College, a task force was convened in 2005 to plan anHSC-BCD faculty orientation process. The committee identified and collected documents for an electronic faculty manual that was posted on the Collegeintranet site. New Faculty Orientation Seminars were held twice in 2005-2006 (December 14, 2005, and June 23, 2006). Since then the orientation hasbeen held once a year in December. To date, 46 faculty members have participated in these sessions. HSC-BCD Faculty Awards- Awards are presented annually to faculty members at the faculty retreat in January to recognize excellence in each of the college’s mission areas: teaching, research in basic science, research in clinical science and service. Faculty members are awarded funds to improve their efforts in these areas. In January 2010, three awards were presented to faculty members: professional service (Dr. John Wright), basic science research (Dr. Chunlin Qin) and clinical research (Dr. Lisa Cheng). External Educator Awards- The Dallas County Dental Society (DCDS) annually provides an award to a Baylor faculty member who is an outstanding teacher and contributor to their organization. Dr. Jordan Schweitzer won the DCDS Baylor Faculty Award in 2010. 2010 Faculty Scholars learning EBD 12
  • 15. DEVELOPING EXEMPLARY SCIENTISTSResearch Collaborations with Health Care Institutions- Collaborations are ongoing between researchers in the department of Biomedical Sciences and theBaylor Research Institute. So far, these have resulted in two scientific collaborations, two grant applications and three in-progress publications.Student Summer Research Program- Student research has been strength at HSC-BCD since the 1970s. At that time, the Short-Term Training Program wasimplemented to encourage undergraduate students to conduct research, as was the Student Research Day, which provided a venue for presenting researchfindings. Over the years, support for student research has grown to include greatly increased funding, faculty mentoring and student travel to researchconferences. The program is currently supported by HSC-BCD’s intramural research funds and the Baylor Oral Health Foundation. Dental students have theopportunity to work on a research project with a faculty member in the summer prior to entering the first year of the dental program or after their first year. Insummer 2010, 34 students participated in the program.The BCD Student Research Group has had an active participation within the national student organization, with a student elected to an officer positionwithin the American Association of Dental Research (AADR) National Student Research Group (NSRG) each year since 2003. One student was elected to aleadership position at the 2010 AADR meeting. Clinicians Using Science Produce Inspired DentistsStudent Research Presentations- Twenty-seven students presented papers atthe 2010 AADR meeting and one at the ADEA meeting, both held in WashingtonDC. Seven students presented at the 2010 Hinman National Student ResearchSymposium in Memphis.Presentations at IADR/AADR- HSC-BCD faculty members and students were highlyvisible at the annual meeting of the IADR-AADR in Washington, DC, March 3-6, 2010.There were 48 presentations by HSC-BCD faculty and students at this meeting.Faculty Presentations at ADEA- HSC-BCD faculty members were also visible at theannual meeting of the American Dental Education Association in Washington, DC,2010. There was one Presidential Symposium (by three faculty members), anothersymposium (by one faculty member), two Lunch and Learn sessions (by threefaculty members), four research posters (by seven faculty members) and one section The EBD initiative at HSC-BCD is symbolized by the CUSPID logo.program.NIDCR Summer Research Fellowship for Predoctoral Students- Two students received an NIDCR Summer Research Fellowship. In this program, theyconduct research with the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) and other National Institutes of Health (NIH) researchers inBethesda, Md., for eight weeks. 13
  • 16. Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences- Academic Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in biomedical science are granted by the School of Graduate Studies(SGS). The HSC-BCD SGS campus has a Graduate Program Director for Biomedical Sciences and an institution-wide Graduate Program in BiomedicalSciences Committee that oversee these graduate students. The program is overseen by the SGS and in part by the Office of the Associate Dean forResearch and Graduate Education. This program trains advanced students for positions in academic dentistry with an emphasis on modern dental andcraniofacial research, including basic, translational and clinical areas of investigation. During the 2009-2010 academic year, 25 students participated,including 11 M.S. students and 14 Ph.D. students. Two of the Ph.D. students were participating in a joint D.D.S./Ph.D. program. Four M.S. studentswere in a joint clinical specialty/M.S. program.HSC-BCD Clinical Research Program- In 2006, the college implemented a new Clinical Research Program to develop clinical researchers, which aretypically clinicians who are part-time researchers. The program is a one-year flexible mentoring program customized to the needs of the scholar, withfunds for a clinical research project. The program can be extended an additional 12 months to complete the research project and provides the funds forthe scholars to present and publish their findings. There were eight faculty scholars engaged in clinical research in 2009-2010. Below is a summary oftheir projects. STARTING DATE/INVESTIGATOR PROJECT TITLE/STATUS 2006 CELESTE ABRAHAM, D.D.S., M.S. "A study of tissue fluorescence in patients with oral lichen planus using the VELscope™" (Periodontics) Study completed and abstract presented at the 2010 IADR meeting in Barcelona, Spain. Journal submission in preparation. 2006 JIANING HE, D.D.S., PH.D. "An evaluation of post-operative discomfort and treatment outcome of root canal therapy with or (Endodontics) without patency filing" Study completed and abstract presented at the 2010 IADR meeting in Barcelona, Spain. Journal submission in preparation. 2007 SUSAN ROSHAN, D.D.S. "Clinical evaluation of single-tooth implant restorations 12 to 36 months after placement at BCD" (General Dentistry) Study completed and abstract presented at the 2010 IADR meeting in Barcelona, Spain. Journal submission in preparation. 2007 MARGARET YANUS, M.ED., D.D.S. "Is there a clinical association between vitamin A deficiency and denture stomatitis in patients (Removable Prosthodontics) treated at BCD between 2004 and 2007?” Study completed and abstract presented at the 2010 IADR meeting in Barcelona, Spain. Journal submission in preparation. 14
  • 17. STARTING DATE/INVESTIGATOR PROJECT TITLE/STATUS 2008 BEN MEYRAT, D.D.S., M.S. "A comparison of salivary and serum levels of CTX in untreated periodontal disease patients (Periodontics) before and after treatment" Investigator left the College in December 2009, so clinical portion was completed by Co-PI Ms. Kelly Muhney, RDH, MS (Dental Hygiene). She presented an abstract at the 2010 IADR meeting in Barcelona, Spain. Laboratory work is still in-progress and requires the hiring of a new techni- cian to process the remaining samples. Dr. Rivera will complete the study. 2009 MILES BEACH, DDS, MS, MBA Preparing his proposal to be submitted to the IRB December 2010-January 2011. Director, Predoctoral Periodontics (Periodontics) 2009 SUSAN HUMMEL, DDS, MS Preparing her proposal to be submitted to the IRB December 2010-January 2011. Director, Removable Prosthodontics (Removable Prosthodontics)KL2 Clinical Research Scholar Award Program- The KL2 Clinical Research Scholar Award Program is complementary to the HSC-BCD ClinicalResearch Program. The KL2 Program is part of a 34 million NIH Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) funded to University of TexasSouthwestern Medical Center and its partner HSC-BCD for the purpose of developing the clinical research infrastructure in North and Central Texas.This program pays the salary of a selected clinical faculty member while he or she is in multi-year training and provides opportunities for pilot researchfunding. Dr. Kim Perry from HSC-BCD was the first dental scholar in the United States to take part in this program. She has now completed the programand has been awarded a MS in Clinical Sciences. Dr. Takashi Komabayashi is in the third year of the program. These newly trained clinical scholars willhelp expand the clinical research program at HSC-BCD.College Support for Faculty Research- In 2009-2010, the College internally supported research with $2,122,990. In addition, the College returned$487,178 of salary savings from grant activity back to departments.Research Awards- One student placed 2nd in the prestigious 2009 AADR Hatton Competition and won a trip to the 2010 IADR meeting in Barcelona,Spain to present her research. Another student was awarded a $1000 travel grant from the AADR to participate in the 2010 AADR meeting. At the2010 AADR meeting, one student placed third in the Dentsply/Caulk Basic Sciences Category. At the Hinman National Student Research Competitionin Memphis, Tennessee, Manshi Patel won Most Outstanding Presentation in Basic Science Research for her presentation “Regulation of Human Bmp4 15
  • 18. Promoter by Pax9, Msx1 and Msx.” Her mentors were Drs. Gabriele Mues and Rena D’Souza. Six other students competed in the competition, IdaKhobahy, Greg Knutsen, Caytlyn Foy, Karen Liang, Drew Vanderbrook and Patrick Whittington.NIDCR Training Program- A comprehensive training program was funded in July 2008 by a $1.6 million National Research Service Award InstitutionalResearch Training (T32) Grant from the NIDCR. This four-year project, the largest T32 grant awarded in Texas A&M Health Science Center history,will provide research training and career development for dentist-scientists. The program is named B-STARS and offers three tracks:a dual degree program (D.D.S./Ph.D.) for predoctoral students,a Ph.D. program for students holding a D.D.S. and a fellowshipfor postdoctoral students. Participants are mentored by facultyfrom HSC-BCD, HSC-Institute of Bioscience and Technology, UTSouthwestern and Rice University in Houston. The T32 program iscurrently in its third year and supports nine trainees.Training for Junior Clinical Faculty- In December 2009, Dr. John Ivypresented a daylong seminar at the college on grant writing. TwentyBCD faculty members attended the general seminar, and eight facultymembers later had individual conferences with Dr. Ivy about grantsthey were going to submit.Clinical Researchers- There are 13 DDS/PhD faculty in eight of theeleven College departments. One of the three departments without aDDS/PhD faculty member has a PhD degreed faculty member, andanother has a very active research program with several DDS-MSfaculty members. There are three faculty members with M.D. degreesand 19 PhD only faculty members.Pathway to Excellence Seminar Series- Since the program startedin 2007, HSC-BCD has hosted 19 speakers. In winter/spring 2010,three speakers were hosted. The presentations were rated highly forrelevance and currency in faculty evaluations. As of September 2010,five faculty members have reported a total of eight collaborationsresulting from these visiting speakers. 16
  • 19. CARING FOR THE NEEDS OF A DIVERSE COMMUNITYHSC-BCD Clinics- Within the various clinics at HSC-BCD, 18,510 patients were seen last year in 104,902 visits. The total net income for patient care bystudents was $7,748,600 and $1,982,400 for faculty professional services. The latter group provided $1,177,400 in uncompensated (charity) care.Quality Assurance- Clinical staff, faculty and students attended the Annual Quality Assurance/Risk Management meeting on June 8, 2010. Presentationsincluded emergency response procedures, bloodborne exposures, quality assurance data review, security and safety issues, informed consent, electronicrecord management and the complaint/investigation process of the Texas State Board of Dental Examiners.Community Clinics- The total net income for patient care generated in the various community clinics was $2,377,700.Community Service- HSC-BCD provided community service for over 295,000 individuals last year. This included: treatment in various communityclinics, hospitals and nursing homes; spit tobacco awareness and oral cancer detection training for lay people and health care providers; oral healtheducation at local schools; and oral screenings at health fairs.Community Service Training- Staff attended Staff Development Day on January 5, 2010, that included three customer-service workshops: “Have youmet Johnny?”, “Working with you is killing me” and “When generational issues and health care chaos collide.”Dental Students in the Community- In the D3 year, dental students are required to plan and conduct two educational presentations at such sites aselementary schools, community colleges, nursing homes and senior citizen centers. Last year, D3 students provided education to 6,074 people at 68different events. In the D4 year, students are required to provide oral health screenings and/or treatment at two community sites. Last year, D4 studentstreated 970 patients at 97 community dental clinics and screened 13,491 people at 46 health fairs and 650 students at two schools.As part of the Community Dentistry Externship (9080), D4 students spend up to 10 days on rotations through the Juvenile Detention Center, CommunityDental Care’s Vickery Meadow dental clinic and the Dallas County Sealant Initiative. At the Juvenile Detention Center, students provide emergency andrestorative care to children ages 5-18. At Vickery Meadow, students treat both adults and children. In the Sealant Initiative, students place sealants onDISD second-grade students. In the academic year 2009-2010, students treated 1,727 patients at the Juvenile Detention Center, 1,419 at the VickeryMeadow and other Community Dental Care clinics and 990 as part of the Dallas County Sealant Initiative.Dental Hygiene Students in the Community- As part of Public Health/Community Health (4530), second-year dental hygiene students educate thepublic on oral health through various outlets in the community including health fairs, elementary schools, PTA functions, Dallas Dental Hygienists’Society events and HSC-BCD Sealant Days. The students are required to make two school site visits and participate in at least two dental health-relatedcommunity service activities. They also are asked to identify an “at risk” community, assess its needs and provide education, as part of a final projectfor the course. This final project encourages the students to provide services in diverse areas such as nursing homes, teen pregnancy centers, juveniledetention centers and diabetes outpatient clinics. In the academic year 2009-2010, dental hygiene students provided oral health education outreach toapproximately 3,710 individuals in community settings. 17
  • 20. Elective Dental Preceptor Experience- Seventy-four students in the D4 class selected a Community Preceptor Program course in summer 2010.Eight students did dual preceptor programs. Under the guidance of 57 preceptor dentists, students treated patients in various clinics including theIndian Health Service, the Public Health Service’s Community-Oriented Primary Care clinics and Federally Qualified Health Centers. They also observedtreatment management in various group and solo practices.Mayor’s Back to School Fair- The Mayor’s Back to School Fair was held August 5, 2010, at the Fair Park Centennial Building in Dallas. The fair wasfree for Dallas school children from low-income families. By visiting four categories of service providers during the event, the children received freeschool supplies. Seventy-one student, faculty, and staff volunteers from HSC-BCD were involved in treating 1,300 K-6th-grade children. Cliniciansprovided quick “flashlight exams,” fluoride varnish and referrals for further treatment if needed. Spanish translators were available to convey to parentswhat was seen during the mini screenings. Former Dallas Mayor Laura Miller personally invited HSC-BCD to participate six years ago, and the College’sservices have become an integral and valued part of the event. Other than immunizations, the HSC-BCD booth is the only one that performs a servicethat immediately benefits the children.Screening Process Updated- A more efficient method of scheduling screening appointments resulted in a decreased number of no-shows andcancellations as patients were seen within one week of scheduling. In addition, a panoramic x-ray was obtained at the appointment which provided amore accurate assessment of patient needs and resulted in more efficient student assignment. Crystal Charities Funding for Southeast Dental Clinic- The Crystal Charity Ball awarded funding for a new dental clinic in Pleasant Grove. It will be operated by Community Dental Care and coordinated with HSC-BCD programs. Clinic operations are planned to begin in April 2011. Volunteerism- Students, faculty and staff at the HSC-BCD volunteer their time to help meet the needs of the local community. Some of the fund raising activities include: Community Dental Care’s Annual SMILE Walk, the Miles for Smiles runathon benefiting the HSC-BCD’s Social Services Dental Care Fund, the Student National Dental Association’s Oral Cancer Walk and the Texas Association of Women Dentists participation in the Komen Dallas Race for the Cure. The Asian-American Student Dental Association provided a free dental and oral cancer screening and sealant event, and the Psi Omega fraternity and the Student National Dental Association sponsored a food drive for the East Dallas Food Pantry. SERVING AS A LEADER IN HEALTH 18
  • 21. SERVING AS A LEADER IN HEALTH PROFESSIONS EDUCATIONFaculty Leadership in Professional Organizations- A survey of the HSC-BCD faculty members (84 responses) in December 2010 confirmed that theywere leading their professions. Faculty members were actively contributing to the knowledge base of dentistry and providing future direction for dentaleducation, research and professional service. Editors and Reviewers of Journals- At least 48 faculty members served either as editors or reviewers of professional journals. The average number of journals on which they served was two, with a range of one to twelve. Officers of Professional Organizations- At least 25 faculty members served as officers of professional organizations at the local, state or national levels. Committee/Council Members of Professional Organizations- At least 38 faculty members served on the committees and councils of professional organizations. Consultants to the Commission on Dental Accreditation- At least eight faculty members performed work for the Commission on Dental Accreditation. Some served as site visitors at dental schools to evaluate whether or not the programs met accreditation standards (n=4). Others served on peer review committees (n=2) and/or as commissioners (n=3). Specialty Board Certification Examinations- At least eight faculty members served on specialty board certification examinations as examiners. National Board Test Construction- At least four faculty members served on National Board Test Construction Committees, constructing the National Board Examinations. Grant Reviewers- At least nine faculty members served as grant reviewers for the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (n=3), other National Institutes of Health agencies (n=3), Clinical and Translational Science Awards (n=1), the HSC VP Research Grants (n=1) and others (n=2).ADEA Leadership Institute- Each year 15-20 dental or dental hygiene faculty members are chosen to become fellows of the Leadership Institute ofthe American Dental Education Association. The ADEA Leadership Institute is a year-long program designed to develop the nation’s most promisingindividuals at dental institutions to become future leaders in dental and higher education. During this program, fellows experience an intensiveassessment of their leadership potential, enhance their leadership skills and conduct a group project with national scope. HSC-BCD has sent sevenfellows to the Leadership Institute since 2002: Drs. Ann McCann, Gary Coleman, Robert Cederberg, Lavern Holyfield, Miles Beach, Steve Griffin andErnie Lacy. 19
  • 22. Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine Program- Dr. Rena D’Souza was one of 53 senior women faculty named in July to EBD Faculty Scholars the 2009-2010 class of fellows in the Hedwig van Ameringen Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) Program for Women at Drexel University College of Medicine. ELAM is the only national program dedicated to preparing senior women faculty for leadership at academic health centers. The new fellows Beverly York Brent Hutson Charles Arcoria Janet DeWald Burt Bryan represented 49 medical, dental and public health schools. Dr. DSouza started the program in September 2009 and successfully completed it in April 2010. She achieved new competencies in personal, professional and leadership effectiveness, strategic Christine Beninger Lavern Holy eld Sandra McCarthy Kim Perry Steven Karbowski finance and organizational dynamics. The latter included learning about leadership approaches and responsibilities within the organizational structure. Kellogg/ADEA Comprehensive Dental Faculty Development Celeste Abraham Stanley Ashworth Michael Lillard Grace Snuggs Program- HSC-BCD was one of seven dental schools in the United Susan Roshan Summer 2009 Summer 2010 States to be awarded the Kellogg/ADEA Comprehensive Dental P Ortiz, no photo Faculty Development Program (2004-2009). Grant funding was to be used primarily for direct educational assistance to increase thenumber of underrepresented minority students recruited to and entering dental academic careers and to establish academic partnerships that facilitateadvanced training and career development. At HSC-BCD, the funds were used to pay for the tuition of selected graduate students who were interested inteaching. In exchange, the students committed to teach at a dental school after graduation for the number of years they were funded. Four students havegraduated so far and all entered academics upon completion of the program.Using Assessment for Institutional Effectiveness & Improvement- HSC-BCD has established itself as a leader in institutional effectiveness, a processof improving an organization based on evidence collected through assessment. Planning and assessment occurs on two levels at the college, at theinstitutional level with annual progress reports by strategic plan leaders and at the departmental-office level with annual assessment reports. Thesedetailed reports are found in the Appendix. The following section highlights some ways that assessment was used at the College last year. National Presentations- Drs. Ann McCann, N Sue Seale and Barbara Miller presented a presidential symposium at the 2010 ADEA Annual Meeting in Washington, DC entitled Changing Institutional Culture Through Planning & Assessment. This presentation highlighted how planning and assessment have improved programs at HSC-BCD. Drs. Ann McCann and Robert Hinton presented a Lunch and Learn workshop 20
  • 23. at the same meeting entitled Creating the Future for Your Dental Schoolthrough Strategic Planning and Assessment. They presented the planning andassessment practices of HSC-BCD to the participants.Electronic Course Evaluations- A new electronic course evaluation systemwas implemented at HSC-BCD called CoursEval. This system has severaladvantages over PICA, the previously used Texas A&M University system. WithCoursEval, all evaluated faculty members, both full and part-time, can accesstheir own results, using their BCD passwords.Electronic Process for Strategic Planning & Assessment- The HSCimplemented a new electronic system for strategic planning and assessmentcalled TracDat. The HSC-BCD strategic plan was entered into the system inJune 2010, and results were requested of strategic plan leaders in September2010. This system will greatly facilitate entering results and report creation.Staff Satisfaction Survey- A team of Planning & Assessment Committeemembers and volunteer staff developed an HSC-BCD Staff Satisfaction Surveythat was administered in March 2010. The results were presented at two StaffForum meetings. Dr. Cole presented an action plan for addressing the results atthe October 2010 meeting.Student Satisfaction- All dental and dental hygiene students annually completethe Student Quality Survey to assess their satisfaction with how they weretreated by the various departments at the college. In May 2010, 97 percent ofthe dental and dental hygiene students were “satisfied” or “very satisfied” with the quality of their personnel interactions with College units(35/36). The level of dissatisfaction at the college was very low, with 91 percent of the units (33/36) having less than five percent of thestudents dissatisfied with their personnel interactions.Another measure of student satisfaction is derived from the Dental and Dental Hygiene Graduation Surveys administered to graduatingstudents in May 2010. Ninety-four percent of the graduating dental students and 100 percent of the dental hygiene students were “satisfied”or “very satisfied” with their education at HSC-BCD. 21
  • 24. SEEKING INNOVATIONS IN SCIENCE, EDUCATION AND HEALTH CARE DELIVERYAdvanced Technology Clinic- The Department of General Dentistry developed the Advanced Technology Clinic, an innovative clinic-within-a-clinic thatopened at the start of the 2007 fall semester. The purpose of this clinic is to provide fourth-year dental students with experience in a contemporary dentalclinic setting prior to transitioning into private practice. All fourth-year students have multiple opportunities to utilize the clinic. The Baylor Oral HealthFoundation provided a $250,000 grant in 2005 to create the clinic.Located within the third-floor main clinic, the Advanced Technology Clinic has five operatories equipped with the latest instruments and equipment includinga newly acquired microscope to assist with dental restorations. Each operatory features two monitors, an intraoral camera, digital radiography, an integratedelectronic patient management system, electric handpieces, a state-of-the-art chair providing multiple access points to the patient and patient educationprograms. Also available in the clinic are an optical impression system that allows digital capture of preparations, thus avoiding traditional impression-taking, andmilling units that can create a CAD-CAM restoration within an hour. To ensure the currency of the technology, the contributing companies agreed to upgrade orreplace their equipment at least every 18 months.Sim Man in Oral Surgery- “Sim Man,” a full-size, lifelike manikin, joined Baylor College of Dentistry this year. He provides very realistic instruction forstudents in the Medical Emergencies courses, 8500 and 4110. The Baylor Oral Health Foundation purchased the $50,000 manikin, and facilities servicespersonnel created a true-to-life operatory setup.Third-year dental students and senior dental hygiene students–about 130 in all–took the medical emergencies course last summer and began rotating ingroups of four through the Sim Man operatory in the fall. Graduate oral surgery and periodontic residents holding anesthesia permits will begin anesthesia-related emergency simulation exercises in the spring.Grant Support- In 2009-2010, 68 grants were submitted and 22 were funded for a funding rate of 32 percent. The total research expenditures for the yearwere $4,261,950 (direct and indirect funds).Office of Technology Development- The Office of the Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies added an Office of Technology Development in2006 with Dr. Lynne Opperman as the first director. The goal of the office is to increase the development of intellectual properties within the College andincrease the amount of sponsored research done with industry. This program is in line with the Texas A&M University System Board of Regents addingpatent application and research commercialization to the criteria for tenure.There were seven new faculty disclosures in 2007, eight in 2008 and five in 2009. Two joint disclosures were submitted in 2009 with Southern MethodistUniversity and University of Texas at Houston. One patent was licensed in 2010.Ten grant proposals were submitted in 2007, 14 in 2008 and 14 in 2009. Eleven proposals were funded (8 in 2008), generating $388,371 ($154,843 in2008) in direct costs and $194,316 ($39,176 in 2008) in facilities and administrative costs for total costs of $581,647 ($194,010 in 2008). 22
  • 25. Transition to Banner Information System- While the general person and financial aid modules of Banner went live earlier in 2009, the course inventory,scheduling, registration and academic records modules went live in the fall. These modules included the migration of student data from fall 2001 forward,the ability to print transcripts from Banner and scheduling of courses through Banner. In addition, the self-service modules of Banner went live as well. Forthe first time ever, students on the Dallas campus were empowered to print their schedule, print an unofficial copy of their transcript and view grades at theirconvenience from any computer. Faculty were also able to post grades via the web and received training on this procedure.This period also saw the unification of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board enrollment reports. In the past, each campus had to run their ownreports from their respective systems and concatenate the data. With Banner, the HSC can run one report for the entire institution rather than for eachlocation.Personnel at the Baylor College of Dentistry were instrumental in meeting the go-live goals, not only of Banner, but of COGNOS, the reporting tool attached toBanner. Their leadership made it possible to go live not only with the student system, but with the reporting tool as well.While scanning of legacy documents is ongoing, the Banner Document Management System was also implemented in FY 2010. This tool will allow theinstitution to move away from the use of paper documents and to have a reliable storage mechanism for historical documents. Students learn to ask a focused, “searchable”, clinical question using the PICO Process P patient, population or condition I intervention (therapy, diagnosis, exposure) C comparison (alternative) O outcome 23
  • 26. DEPARTMENT/OFFICE ACCOMPLISHMENTS 24 24
  • 27. DEPARTMENT/OFFICE ACCOMPLISHMENTS This section describes significant accomplishments by HSC-BCD departments and offices.ACADEMIC AFFAIRSAPT Decisions- During the 2009-2010 academic year, the HSC-BCD Appointment, Promotion and Tenure Committee made 15 decisions about facultymembers. Seven decisions were for promotion and tenure, six for post-tenure review and two for appointments. This office initiated the APT process, andprepared the faculty dossiers. It also facilitated the reviews by the external evaluators, department review committees, department chairs and College andHSC APT committees.CODA- This office is in charge of preparing the self-study document for the Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) and arranging the site visit forOctober 2011. A steering committee of 11 individuals was appointed to oversee the writing of the self-study document, and 17 subcommittees were alsoappointed to help with this effort. Three drafts of the document have been prepared by the subcommittee chairs and reviewed by Dr. Berry and otherindividuals.Curriculum Committee- Several activities related to the 2011 CODA self-study were accomplished, including the response to standards 2.3 – 2.11,assistance in the explanation and management of new standard 2.26, re-formatting of a succinct CODA-friendly syllabus format for all courses, reviewand contemporization of the course-competency-assessment database and special D1-D4 course reviews. A phased series of Public Health Sciencescurricular changes (previously involving 6520, 6690, 6860, 7330 and 7400) was completed with the deletion of 8020 and the modification of 8140. Areport on implant cases was completed, indicating a continued increase in student implant activity with over $109,000 generated in fees. There wereseveral Curriculum Action Forms approved (6570, 8020 and 9200). The new course 9200 Comprehensive Care for the Medically Compromised andSpecial Needs Patients was implemented into the D4 curriculum to further support CODA standard 2.26, as well as the D4 special care rotation andoptimal management of our patients.Faculty Development Committee- The Faculty Development Committee conducted a calibration session for 54 faculty members on June 22, 2010. Thetopic was “Quality Assessment of Student Performance.” The Committee also planned and conducted two retreats last year. The first half day mini-retreat, “2011 CODA Accreditation,” was held on November 24, 2009 and attended by 45 individuals. The second all-day retreat, “Web 2.0 and Education 2.0: Implications for Dental Education,” presented by Dr. Elaine Demps, was held on January 7, 2010 and attended by 66 individuals. 25
  • 28. Media Resources Classroom Technology- Educational technology continues to bring changes in the way we educate our students. Lecture capture with Camtasia software is a big hit with the students. Media Resources successfully processed over 800 hours of lecture material in 2009-2010. Continuing efforts to go green, all rooms now use rechargeable batteries. Print Shop- In 2009, faculty-produced color manuals were printed by the new Production Color Copier in the print shop. The print shop also added three new low volume color copy machines for departmental use on several floors of the college. Yearbook- The Baylor Burr yearbook also went all color for the first time in its history. The book was a sellout. Photo Store- Media was once again responsible for taking those all important graduation photos. Students and family members could view proofs and order photos directly from the new online Photo Store which debuted with the new BCD website. They also had the opportunity to purchase a DVD video of the event and to post a video of their walk across the stage to YouTube for friends and family to see. Posters and Table Clinics- Faculty and students created 84 posters and table clinics with the assistance of Media Resources personnel.Planning & Assessment Committee- The Planning & Assessment Committee completed a review of the 2009 strategic plan progress reports. Thisreport is available on the intranet site at: http://exchange.bcd.tamhsc.edu/intranet/Documents/strategicplan.htmThe committee also conducted several assessment projects, as listed below. The 2010 Dental Student Graduation Survey report is available at: http://exchange.bcd.tamhsc.edu/intranet/Departments/AcademicAffairs/Surveys.html The 2010 Staff Satisfaction Survey report is available at: http://exchange.bcd.tamhsc.edu/intranet/Departments/AcademicAffairs/Surveys/ StaffSatisfactionSurveyResultsWithCommentSummary2010.pdf.SACS- The Texas A&M HSC is engaged in a regional accreditation reaffirmation effort with the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS).The academic deans from each component are responding to the 17 academic standards and providing information for other self study standards. Thesecond phase of the accreditation process involves a Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) project that focuses on evidence-based decision making. The sitevisit by the SACS evaluators will occur in early spring 2012.BIOMEDICAL SCIENCESCurriculum- The evidence-based dentistry initiative is becoming more established in the curriculum with the addition of the D2 course, 7400 Applicationof Evidence-Based Dentistry. Integrative Sciences (6570) is successfully teaching students how to evaluate cases using their basic science knowledgefor diagnosis and treatment planning. 26
  • 29. Bioengineering- With the hiring of Dr. Xiaohua Liu, the department and HSC-BCD now have a faculty member with bioengineering expertise, who will collaborate with clinical faculty on translational research projects. Research funding- Research funding remained strong with 40 new and continuation grants submitted; funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) supported seven grant applications. Junior faculty members have begun to attract funding; Dr. Douglas Benson was awarded an NIH R03 grant in spring 2010. Publications/Presentations- The department has continued to produce a substantial number of published articles (about 100) and presentations at scientific meetings (87 abstracts submitted). DDS/PhD Program- Interest in the DDS/PhD program was created by faculty presentations given to the dental applicants when they came to interview.CLINICAL AFFAIRSInstrument Leasing Program- As a result of student and class interviews, errors in pre-clinical leasing kits have been identified and corrected andspecific dispensing procedures have been altered. Significant organizational structure changes were made in the Office of Clinical Affairs for clinical andstudent instrument services and patient services which capitalized on current technology. This resulted in more efficient service with fewer employees.Radiological Task Force- The results of the last two years’ task force led to the current first floor renovations and future relocation of the Imaging Center.Renovations- The design and implementation of a three phase renovation project on the first floor was initiated in May 2010. This renovation capitalizedon opportunities realized through elimination of hallways and the record room and downsizing the office staff. Its completion will include a new officesuite for the Office of Clinical Affairs, an increase in the number of Oral Diagnosis/Screening operatories and a new state of the art Radiology/ImagingCenter.Screening Process Updated – A more efficient method of scheduling screening appointments resulted in a decreased number of no-shows andcancellations as patients were seen within one week of scheduling. In addition, a panoramic x-ray was obtained at the appointment which provided amore accurate assessment of patient needs resulting in more efficient student assignment. 27
  • 30. COMMUNICATIONS & INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENTExpanding Communication Network- The department is increasing the reach of College-related and alumninews through a multifaceted approach that incorporates print and video content distributed through variouscommunication outlets, such as the online newsletter, website, magazine and social networking sites(Facebook and Twitter).Website Redesign- The overall BCD website was redesigned in graphical presentation, layout andnavigation consistent with the main HSC site. New sites were launched in June 2010.Website Update- The department administered updates to the content on the more than 500 pages of theBCD public website.Fund-Raising- The FY10 development (fund-raising) goal was exceeded.CONTINUING EDUCATION & ALUMNI AFFAIRSFaculty Presentations- The number of faculty members presenting continuing education programs at theCollege is progressing very well.Online Payment- The method of payment for continuing education courses is now primarily online with amajor credit card.Donations- Donations have increased from last year, despite difficult market conditions.Off Campus Course for Alumni- The continuing education program for alumni occurs once each year in November.DENTAL HYGIENECompetency Curriculum Review- The program completed a course and curriculum review with respect to the existing Competency Document. Based on thisreview, competencies supported by courses and methods of evaluation were documented. The report was reviewed by the dental hygiene faculty. No changesto the Competency Document were recommended. No Curriculum Action Forms were recommended. Clinical board and written examination outcomes wereexcellent.WREB- The clinical board outcomes of the program remained excellent with 90 percent of the students passing.Presentations- Posters were presented at the American Dental Hygienists’ Association meeting as well as presentations at state and national meetings. 28
  • 31. DIAGNOSTIC SCIENCESPresentations- The faculty provided over 30 invited lectures/continuing education courses externally last year.Distance Education- Some faculty members are teaching the dental students at A.T. Still University-Arizona School of Dentistry by distance education.Services- The Biopsy Service and Imaging Center are a significant resource to the practicing community as well as patients and departments of BCDENDODONTICSNational Boards- D4 students performed above the national average in endodontics on the National Board Examination.In service training- Hands-on training was provided for both D3 and general dentistry faculty on diagnostic terms, vital pulp therapy and making post spacein teeth that have carrier-based obturation.FINANCE & ADMINISTRATIONSecuring Funding- The office secured recurring dollars for a 3% merit pool. It also secured $2.5M in funding for special projects, upgraded facilities, andresearch. College reserves grew by 52%.GENERAL DENTISTRYCourse Revision- The 9030 Diagnosis and Treatment Planning course for the D4 students was completely revised and enhanced.Advanced Technology Clinic- A microscope was obtained for the Advanced Technology Clinic.LIBRARYCollection Development Plan- A team of librarians revised the Library’s Collection Development Plan. This will allow the Library to launch a major printweeding project in FY11.Response to Survey- In response to a student survey, the Library began allowing food in group study areas, while keeping the Quiet Study Room free offood by student request. 29
  • 32. ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERYSimulation Lab- The SimMan lab construction was completed, and theSimMan was installed. EVIDENCENew Clinical Studies- Two new clinical studies were initiated.New Faculty Member- Dr. J. Michael Ray was appointed. NCE EXPERIENCE PATIENTCODA Site Visit- The department had excellent results from the CODA site & JUDGMENT ME MENT PREFERENCES PRE E EFvisit.ORTHODONTICSABO- All students passed the American Board of Orthodontics Phase 2 PATIENTexaminations. CIRCUMSTANCESResearch Awards- Drs. Hideki Ikeda and Cody Moore, orthodonticresidents, won Graber research awards, which represented two of thefive total research awards given each year by the American Association Evidence is one of several factors that may be incorporated intoof Orthodontists (AAO). They received these awards at the AAO meeting in the clinical decision-making process.Washington, DC, May 2010 and also presented their results there.Thesis Publications- Three of six Master’s Theses were accepted for publication, and the other three have been submitted.Publications- Department members published two book chapters, 23 peer-reviewed publications and eight abstracts in the Journal of Dental Research.Faculty Presentations- Faculty members presented at the following: American Association of Orthodontists Conference, the IADR/AADR meeting, the 4thAnnual World Micro Implant Congress, the Angle International Biennial Meeting, the 37th Annual Moyers Symposium and the XVII Congreso InternacialAsociacion Iberoamericana de Orthodontistos.CODA Consultants- Two faculty members were appointed as consultants to the Commission on Dental Accreditation to review U.S. graduate orthodonticprograms. 30
  • 33. PEDIATRIC DENTISTRYHighest Score on National Examination- One recent graduate, Dr. Thane Hisaw, made the highest score of all candidates taking the Oral Clinical Examof the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry. Previously, Dr. Hisaw had scored in the top 3% for the written portion of the board certification process.Poster Competition- A graduate student won 3rd place in the poster competition at the American Association of Pediatric Dentistry meeting in Chicago.Leadership Training- Dr. Caroline Kerins was selected to attend the three-year Leadership Institute in conjunction with the American Association ofPediatric Dentistry/Kellogg School of Management.PERIODONTICSPaperless Clinic- The Stomatology Clinic is now paperless. All new records are in Axium as well as all digital photographs, and they are on a server forretrieval.Clinic Revenues- Clinic revenues have increased dramatically since the new implant suite was placed in the Periodontics graduate clinic. Revenuesachieved were 150% over the budgeted goals for the fiscal year. More patient care was provided in this facility with no increase in staffing.Research Award for Stomatology- Clinical research in Stomatology has been recognized by the NIDCR through awarding of the “Salivary Researcher ofthe Year” in 2009 to Dr. Ibtisam Al-Hashimi, Director of the Salivary Dysfunction Clinic. This marks the first time this award has been given to a womanin this field.Scholarly Activity- The faculty has remained active in scholarly activity, giving 15 presentations at national or international conferences and having 18publications during this academic year.PUBLIC HEALTH SCIENCESEditing the Texas Dental Journal- Dr. K. Vendrell Rankin edited the June issue of the Texas Dental Journal, which focused on oral cancer andmanagement of cancer treatment sequelae.Kwanzaa Fest- Public Health Sciences coordinated the BCD volunteer effort at Kwanzaa Fest for the first time. This will become an annual event for thedepartment.Tarrant County Back To School Roundup- Public Health Sciences coordinated BCD volunteers at the first Tarrant County Back To School Roundup, anevent similar to the Dallas Mayors Back To School Fair. 31
  • 34. RECRUITMENT & ADMISSIONSDiversity- The underrepresented minority enrollment of the 2010 D1 class reflected the diversity of Texas. There were six African-American malestudents in the new class of 102 students.RESEARCH & GRADUATE STUDIES Question: What is a CAT?Accreditation Self-Studies- The office oversaw the CODA self-study process for two Answer: CAT stands forgraduate programs along with Dr. William Nagy; they received approval. The office iscontinuing to oversee the CODA self-study process (writing some parts) with Dr. Nagy Critically Assessed Topic, a way offor eight other graduate dental programs. The office also compiled the research sectionof the CODA self-study document for the predoctoral dental program. Finally, the office summarizing a question, the searchis editing the HSC-BCD portion of the SACS self study for the School of GraduateStudies program in Biomedical Sciences with Dr. Svoboda. process (e.g., keywords),Grant Writing- Dr. Larry Bellinger worked with Dr. Lynne Opperman and clinical faculty its results, and the bestmembers on the submission of NIH grants. Dr Francisco Rivera received $299,000 fora R43 subcontract for a clinical trial, and Dr. Kathy Svoboda received $100,000 from evidence found by the searcha company for a translational study. Dr. Bellinger also worked with Dr. Robert Spearsto have one of the largest Predoctoral Research Training Fellowship programs to datewith 30 students presenting at the spring AADR national meeting (tied for largest number of students presenting from one school) and 38 studentsparticipating in the 2010 summer program.Grant Support- In 2009-2010, 68 grants were submitted and 22 were funded for a funding rate of 32 percent. The total research expenditures for theyear were $4,261,950 (direct and indirect funds).RESTORATIVE SCIENCESImplants- The undergraduate Implant program has undergone a significant improvement due to a change in location. Previously located in a smallfirst floor clinic next to Oral Diagnosis, the Implant Clinic has been relocated to the third floor main clinic area. The small lab used for fabrication ofradiographic and surgical stints was also moved and is located conveniently across the hall from the clinical component. Access of students to implantfaculty has been improved dramatically. The implant faculty now has immediate access to cases in progress in the main clinic. The new clinic consistsof a treatment planning area with computers and an ample work surface for examination of mounted casts and radiographs. There is one clinical chairdedicated to patient examination with radiographic capability. 32
  • 35. Evidence-Based Dentistry- The College received an NIH R25 grant for the introduction of evidence-based dentistry (EBD) concepts into the curriculum.This occurred three years ago, and two courses in D1 and D2 have been created to further that goal. The goal is to implement these concepts throughoutall four years of the undergraduate program. Restorative Science has provided faculty to assist in the small group sessions that are part of the D2Application of Evidence Based Dentistry I course (7400), and eight faculty members have participated in an intensive course in EBD over the past twoyears. Restorative Sciences faculty members have taken the lead in creating case based scenarios that are designed to continue the implementation ofEBD into the D3 curriculum. Group leaders in the 8034 Comprehensive Care program, along with basic science faculty members, act as facilitators insmall group meetings where the students present the results of evidence searches to support treatment decisions based on case scenarios. Plans arebeing made to incorporate EBD into the D3 spring semester 8034 Comprehensive Care Treatment Planning sessions. This is most likely to occur in 2012.Department Merger- In March of 2010, the Department of Biomaterials Science was merged into the Department of Restorative Sciences. This includedtransfer of a sizable physical facility and a large inventory of equipment, as well as personnel and faculty. The new division of Restorative Sciences islocated on the first floor of the Sciences Building. Beyond the planning and implementation of new policies and protocols, there has been an ongoingcooperative effort with the department of Biomedical Sciences to develop a plan for space sharing within the building. Future plans for this new divisionof Restorative Sciences include participation in the College’semphasis on developing translational research.STUDENT AFFAIRSBanner Implementation- Students are now using the GroupStudio for organization communication. Other online serviceshave been implemented, and students can access theiracademic information 24/7. 2009 Student Research Group 33
  • 36. FACULTY, STAFF AND STUDENT ACCOMPLISHMENTS 34 Steering Committee for the EBD initiative 34
  • 37. FACULTY, STAFF AND STUDENT ACCOMPLISHMENTSAmerican Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology: Dr. Harvey Kessler, professor and director of pathology in diagnostic sciences, was electedpresident of the American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology.American Academy of Oral Medicine: Dr. Ibtisam Al-Hashimi, professor of periodontics, was honored by the American Academy of Oral Medicine andreceived a certificate of appreciation for "Exceptional and Meritorious Service to the American Academy of Oral Medicine."American Association for Dental Research: Dr. Rena DSouza, professor and chair of biomedical sciences, was elected vice president of the AmericanAssociation for Dental Research. The TAMHSC-BCD Student Research Group received two student awards: a certificate and check for $300 honoringthe most student abstracts accepted to the meeting and a certificate and check for $200 for the most new student members to the AADR.American Association of Dental Editors and the William J. Gies Foundation: Dr. Roger Alexander, professor emeritus of oral and maxillofacialsurgery, was awarded third place in the 2009 William J. Gies Editorial Award competition for the most valuable dental editorials to appear in dentaljournals or periodicals in 2008.American Association of Endodontists: Dr. Gerald N. Glickman, professor and chair of endodontics, was named immediate past president of theAmerican Association of Endodontists.American Association of Orthodontists: Drs. Hideki Ikeda and Cody Moore, 2009 orthodontic graduates, were awarded the 2010 Thomas M. GraberAward of Special Merit from the American Association of Orthodontists.American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology: Dr. John Wright, Regents Professor and chair of diagnostic sciences, assumed the presidency ofthe American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology.American College of Dentists: Dr. Lavern J. Holyfield, assistant professor in public health sciences, and Dr. Brad Crump, clinical assistant professor inperiodontics, were formally inducted as fellows of the American College of Dentists.American College of Prosthodontists: Dr. Ronald D. Woody, professor and director of implant dentistry in restorative sciences, received theDistinguished Service Award from the American College of Prosthodontists.American Dental Association: Dr. Ronald D. Woody, professor and director of implant dentistry in restorative sciences, was honored by the AmericanDental Association upon the completion of his four-year term as a commissioner on the ADA Commission on Dental Accreditation and chair of the ADAprosthodontic review committee. 35
  • 38. American Dental Education Association/Sigma Phi Alpha Linda DeVore Scholarship: Marlaina Reich, clinical assistant professor in dental hygiene,received the American Dental Education Association/Sigma Phi Alpha Linda DeVore Scholarship.American Dental Hygienists’ Association: Jane Cotter, a recent graduate student and assistant professor in the Caruth School of Dental Hygiene, won the 2009graduate research competition hosted by the American Dental Hygienists’ Association.American Dental Hygienists’ Association and Sunstar: Kate Steininger, a senior dental hygiene student, produced a children’s video on tooth brushingfor YouTube and won second place in a national contest, the first of its kind hosted by ADHA and Sunstar.American Dental Hygienists Associations Institute for Oral Health: Dr. Ann McCann, associate professor and director of planning & assessment, wasselected to serve on the Research Grant Review Committee of the American Dental Hygienists Associations Institute for Oral Health in 2010 and 2011.Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology: Dr. Kathy Svoboda, professor and vice chair in biomedical sciences, was named a SilverFellow by the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology.Baylor College of Dentistry Alumni Association: Dr. William “Bill” Gaylord ’64 received the 2009 Distinguished Alumnus Award.Childrens Medical Center in Dallas: Dr. Bob Morgan, clinical assistant professor in pediatric dentistry, was elected to serve as president of themedical/dental staff at Childrens Medical Center in Dallas.Dallas County Dental Society: Dr. Jordan Schweitzer, associate professor and director of the preclinical program in endodontics, won the BaylorFaculty Award. The award is given annually to a Baylor faculty member who is an outstanding teacher and contributor to the Dallas County Dental Society.Dallas Dental Hygienists Society 2010 Table Clinic Awards: Dental hygiene students Maria Ortega and Jenna Williams (mentor Patricia Campbell)won first place for "Hypnosis in Dentistry"; Minoo Pirasteh and Anna Uglunts (mentor Kathleen Muzzin) won second place for "Occupational HearingLoss in the Dental Office"; and Christine Stockholm and Briana Smith (mentor Marlaina Reich) won third place for "Better than the Tooth Fairy: the Futureof Dental Stem Cells."Edward H. Angle Society of Orthodontists: Dr. Peter Buschang, professor and director of orthodontic research, was inducted as an honorary member of the EdwardH. Angle Society of Orthodontists.International Association of Oral Pathologists: Dr. John Wright, Regents Professor and chair of diagnostic sciences, was installed to a two-year term as president ofthe International Association of Oral Pathologists.Journal of Dental Education: Dr. Ann McCann, associate professor and director of planning & assessment, was appointed to the editorial board of the Journal ofDental Education for a three-year term. 36
  • 39. Oak Cliff Dental Study Club: Third-year dental student Kenner Misner received the Faulkner Scholarship from the Oak Cliff Dental Study Club.Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology and Endodontology: Six faculty members from the departments of diagnostic sciences and biomedicalsciences were the recipients of the 2009 Larry J. Peterson Best Paper Award. The award recognizes their journal article titled "The effects of bisphosphonates onosteoblasts in vitro."Pediatric Dentistry and the Journal of Dentistry for Children: Dr. N. Sue Seale, Regents Professor in pediatric dentistry, became the editor in chief of PediatricDentistry and the Journal of Dentistry for Children, which is the official publication of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, the American Board of PediatricDentistry and the ABPDs College of Diplomates. Sigma Phi Alpha: Chris Wilcutt, Kacy Brown and Neelie Bruce, 2009 Caruth School of Dental Hygiene graduates, were inducted into the Beta Chapter of Sigma Phi Alpha. Teacher-of-the-Year Awards: Dr. David M. Grogan, associate professor and chair of oral and maxillofacial surgery, and JoAnn C. Scofield, associate professor and clinic coordinator in the Caruth School of Dental Hygiene, were named the 2010 recipients of the Dental and Dental Hygiene Teacher-of-the-Year Awards. This honor is voted on by students and presented annually by the Baylor College of Dentistry Alumni Association. Texas A&M Health Science Center: Dr. Rena DSouza, professor and chair of biomedical sciences, received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Research, which honors significant contributions that enhance, facilitate or accelerate the HSC research enterprise. Dr. Ernestine Lacy, director of student development and associate professor of restorative sciences, received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Education and Mentorship, which honors exceptional contributions and achievements as an educator or mentor. Dr. Lynne Opperman, director of technology development and professor of biomedical sciences, was elected co-chair of the Texas A&M Health Science Center TechnologyCommercialization Advisory Committee. Dr. Beverly York, assistant professor in restorative sciences, and Dr. Bob Hutchins, associate professor of biomedicalsciences, submitted the winning proposal for the Quality Enhancement Plan, a specific accreditation requirement of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.Texas A&M University: Jon Wheeler 99, 01 was named on the 2009 "Aggie 100,” a list of the 100 fastest-growing businesses in the world owned by Texas A&MUniversity alumni.Texas Dental Association: Dr. Gene Huff, clinical assistant professor of pediatric dentistry, received the 50 Year Award from the Texas Dental Association. The awardis given in honor of dentists who have been actively involved with the organization for 50 years. 37
  • 40. KEY INDICATORS 38 38
  • 41. KEY INDICATORS This section identifies key indicators of quality at the College. PROGRAMSEducational Programs Offered Baccalaureate and master’s degrees in Dental Hygiene Doctor of Dental Surgery Postgraduate residency training in General Dentistry, Endodontics, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (M.D./O.M.S.), Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Orthodontics, Pediatric Dentistry, Periodontics, and Prosthodontics M.S. in Oral Biology, Biomaterials and Health Professions Education awarded by the College M.S. and Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences awarded by the HSC School of Graduate Studies 2009-2010 National Board & Licensing Examination (WREB) Results * NBDE Part I NBDE Part II NBDHE WREB Program (2-09 to 1-10) (5-09 to 4-10) (3-10) (5-10) BCD Nat’l % Pass BCD Nat’l % Pass BCD Nat’l % Pass % Pass Dental 81.8 82.4 95% 76.9 77.8 74% —— —— —— 87% Dental Hygiene —— —— —— —— —— —— 85.2 81.8 100% 90% *Pass rates represent percent passing on the first attempt 2009-2010 State Performance Indicators Indicators Goal 2009­2010 Results % Dental students passing NBDE Part I on 1st try 90% 95% % Dental students passing NBDE Part II on 1st try 90% 74% % Dental graduates licensed in Texas 75% 77% % Dental graduates admitted to Advanced Education Programs in General Dentistry 10% 17% % Allied health graduates passing licensure exam on 1st try 90% 90% % Allied health graduates licensed in Texas 70% 97% 39
  • 42. STUDENTSFall 2010 Applications for the Dental and Dental Hygiene Programs Dental Dental Hygiene Ethnicity White 745 72 African American 84 14 Hispanic 149 36 Asian 664 24 Native American 14 1 International 4 0 Unknown 20 15 Multiple 10 0 Residence Texas 741 135 Out of State 750 10 Foreign 0 0 Not Reported 0 17 Gender Males 839* 6 Females 851* 156 Total 1,491* 162*Total adds up to 1690 since 199 reported 2 ethnicities 40
  • 43. STUDENTS2009-2010 Student Characteristics and GraduationFirst Year Students Dental Hygiene Predoctoral Dental(Entering Fall 2010, First Time Only Students)GPA- Cumulative 3.53 3.56GPA- Science 3.48 3.48DAT- Academic Average —— 19.2Gender Males 0 53 Females 31 49Diversity Asian 6 14 Hispanic 4 26 African American 5 12 Native American 0 0 White 16 50Total 1st Year Enrollment 31 102All Students Dental Hygiene Predoctoral Dental Graduate(2009-2010 Student Body)Gender Males 3 187 72 Females 58 207 45Diversity Asian 11 76 22 Hispanic 10 81 17 African American 0 54 7 Native American 0 6 0 White 40 177 71Total Student Enrollment 61 394 117Students Graduated  (8-09 to 8-10) 30 86 40*!"#$%&()*+,-.+#/&0+.1&+/+2+(-*3&%-4/+/5&6#.1&,%4.+7,-.%3&-/&$-3.%483&%54%%3 41
  • 44. FACULTY2010 Faculty by Race/Ethnicity 2009 Faculty Scholarly Activity*Full-Time Unique Number Total Number ReportedFaculty* # % All Faculty # % Category of Publications** By Faculty ***White 84 72% White 183 75% Articles 109 162Black 5 4% Black 10 4% Chapters 10 11Hispanic 10 9% Hispanic 17 7% Abstracts/Posters 105 139Asian 16 14% Asian 33 14% Books 3 3Native Am 1 1% Native Am 1 <1% Total 227 315Total 116 100% Total 244 100% *These totals are for the 2009 calendar year.Total URM** 16 14% Total URM 28 11% **No duplicate publications ***Reflect the number of faculty reporting publications. Any given*Full time is 80% FTE and above publication may have multiple authors.**Underrepresented minority2010 Faculty by Rank and GenderFull-Time Faculty* All FacultyRank Male Female Total Male Female TotalProfessor 27 7 34 32 11 43Associate 28 15 43 39 18 57Assistant 17 26 43 87 54 141Instructor 0 1 1 0 1 1Total** 72 49 121 158 84 242Tenured 33 14 47*Full time is 80% FTE and above**Race/Ethnicity and Rank and Gender tables are from different databases so the total numbers of faculty are slightly different 42
  • 45. PATIENT CARE2009-2010 Service Provided in HSC-BCD Clinics*Total Patient Visits Total Patients Seen104,902 18,510*Includes treatment by dental hygiene, dental, and advanced education students and faculty in various professional service clinics at the College2009-2010 Service Provided in HSC-BCD Specialized CentersSpecialized Centers Type of Service Patient ServiceCenter for Maxillofacial Replaces lost facial structures due to acquired or congenital defects and disabilities, 1,986 patient visitsProsthodontics using the latest technologyLimited Care Clinic Treats dental emergencies and conducts quality assurance activities 1,067 patient visitsOral and Maxillofacial Advanced diagnostic imaging for management and treatment of complex dental cases 4,840 patients imagedImaging CenterOral Pathology Biopsy service for the community 8,249 biopsiesDiagnostic ServiceSalivary Dysfunction Clinic Serves patients suffering distress caused by disorders or damage to the salivary glands 282 patient visitsSjögren’s Multi­Specialty  Enhances collaboration among medical and dental specialists in the care of patients with (in above SalivaryReferral Center Sjögren’s syndrome, a debilitating chronic autoimmune disease Dysfunction totals)Stomatology Center Facilitates diagnosis and treatment of patients with debilitating problems of the mouth 781 patient visitsTobacco Intervention and 360 patient visits & Offers tobacco cessation, counseling and pharmacotherapy for patients of recordEducation Clinic phone callsTotal 17,565 patient visits 43
  • 46. COMMUNITY SERVICE2009-2010 Community-Based Service Location Service # Served Provider* Office** Baylor Emergency Room Emergency care 1,108 Grad OS Pedo, Perio Grad Children’s Medical Center Treatment of medically compromised children & siblings 3,590 Endo DH DH Treatment for underserved children, adults and seniors at East Grad Pedo Community Dental Care Clinics Dallas, Bluitt Flowers, deHaro-Saldivar & Vickery Meadow 1,419 DDS PHS clinics DH DH Community Clinics Dental treatment 970 DDS PHS Community Service Screenings, health fairs 14,141 DDS SS Comprehensive Tobacco Prevention Tobacco prevention education 17,216 Faculty & Staff AA Network Dallas County Sealant Initiative Sealants (elementary schools) 990 DDS & DH PHS Cancer education for health providers & other non- Faculty PHS Dental Oncology Education Program 239,475 professionals and screenings 1,727 Students & Juvenile Detention Center Dental treatment PHS Faculty Faculty, Staff & Mayor’s Back to School Fair (August) Screening and fluoride varnish 1,300 PHS Students Mobile Dentistry Treatment for geriatric patients in special facilities 82 DH DH Project Dental Awareness Health education and career awareness (K-12 schools) 635 Staff SA Schools, Churches, Health Fairs, Community Oral screenings, oral examinations, health education 3,710 DH DH Programs, Industry Special Projects Miscellaneous 1,557 DDS & DH SS TX Scottish Rite Hospital Treatment for medically compromised children Grad 2,026 Pedo Tooth Talk Health education at schools, Science Place & other (K-12) 5,439 DDS & DH SS Total People Served 295,385 *Provider: DDS- Dental students; DH- Dental Hygiene students (there is some overlap in the count between dental hygiene and dental services); Grad- Graduate students** Office: AA- Academic Affairs; DH- Dental Hygiene; Endo- Endodontics; OS- Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery; Pedo- Pediatric Dentistry; Perio- Periodontics; PHS- Public Health Sciences; SA- Student Affairs; SS- Social Services 44
  • 47. RESEARCH2009-2010 Expenditures for Research & Other Sponsored Programs Direct Costs Facilities & Administration Total Research $3,415,984 $845,967 $4,261,951Note: Total does not include $ 535,724 for the HRSA grant “HCOP Bridge to Dentistry” and the $727,725 for the HRSA grant “Expanded Training in General, Pediatric, and Dental Public Health for Predoctoral Dental Students.” GIVING2009-2010 Gifts to HSC-BCD Number of Gifts Amount of Gifts 172 $1,523,726Note: Totals do not include giving to Baylor Oral Health Foundation, Baylor College of Dentistry Alumni Association and Texas A&M Health Science Center Foundation to benefit HSC-BCD. 45
  • 48. STRATEGIC PLAN ACCOMPLISHMENTS 46 46
  • 49. STRATEGIC PLAN ACCOMPLISHMENTSThis section highlights accomplishments from HSC-BCD’s 2009 Revision of the 2005-2012 Strategic Plan. The number in parentheses at the end of eachaccomplishment identifies the specific objective that is being addressed. This information represents the fifth reporting of progress on the 2005-2012strategic plan and the second reporting of the 2009 revision of that plan. A number of the objectives from the original plan in 2005 have been achieved.GOAL 1. EDUCATIONBaylor College of Dentistry is committed to providing educational programs that prepare its students to be dentists, dental hygienists, dentalspecialists, educators and scientists, while fostering professionalism, critical thinking and commitment to life-long learning.National Board & WREB Performance- The dental students had a 95 percent first-time pass rate on the National Board Examination Part I, 74 percenton Part II and 87 percent on the WREB. Dental hygiene students excelled with a 100 percent pass rate on the National Board Examination and 90 percenton the WREB. (objective 1.1)Implant Curriculum- Within the D4 class, 91 percent had some type of implant experience. Production from implants has increased from $5,248 in2005-2006 to $109,166 in 2009-2010. (objective 1.2)Competency-Based Curriculum Review- The competency database is in the final stages of refinement and was reviewed by a subcommittee of theCurriculum Committee in October 2010. (objective 1.3)Continuing Education- For the 2009-2010 year, the office offered 37 traditional courses with 2,755 participants and 10 distance education courses with322 participants. The number of online courses sold were 322 for the year and 27 per month. The number of of Camtasia presentations sold per monthwas 27. (objective 1.10)Exploring Dental Academia Course- To date, four classes have participated in this summer elective course. Eighteen students participated in summer2010. One student in this class has indicated intent to teach. (objective 1.11R)Developing Evidence-Based Thinking- As a continuation of our introduction of EBD content into the DDS curriculum one year at a time, an EBD modulewas included in a critical thinking case scenario required of all D3 students during case conferences. Each scenario dealt with a challenging issue bearingon treatment; as part of this exercise, students were asked to evaluate the evidence for an issue pertinent to the scenario. This represents our initialeffort to translate EBD knowledge learned in the D1-D2 years into a clinical context. Our summer course, “Fundamentals of Evidence-Based Dentistryfor Clinical Faculty,” was attended by ten clinical faculty, up from 6 in 2009. Three speakers presented at the Clinical Colloquium in 2010, providingevidence-based updates on adhesive materials, implants, and CAD-CAM targeted to clinical faculty. Further transforming the Research Day from a 47
  • 50. traditional basic science focus, presentations of Critically-Assessed Topics (CATs) by D2 students were added to case presentations by D3-D4 studentsintroduced in 2009.In spring 2009, both EBD trained and non-trained students were assessed with the PEAK (practices, experiences, attitudes and knowledge) instrument,and the trained students scored higher than non-trained on the knowledge portion (p<.001). A focus group was also held for the faculty who participatedin the summer training program to measure the effectiveness of their training. (objective 1.12R)Advanced Technology Clinic- All D4 students spend at least five days in this clinic. Fifty percent of the students were able to complete an indirectrestoration in one session. Seventy-five percent used only optical impressions for indirect restorations. (objective 1.13R)Access to Care- About 50 students were certified as “First Dental Home” providers for the Texas Medicaid program in 2010. (objective 1.14R)E-Learning Resources- As of fall 2009, entering students are asked to bring a laptop as they enter school. Computer services loads software in the firstweek of school for student use in D1 courses. Blackboard utilization continues to grow. Ninety-six courses had material in Blackboard (49 in 08-09).Camtasia software utilization also continues to grow. Fifty-three courses (26 in 08-09) posted 836 recorded lectures online last year. (objective 1.15R)Faculty Pipeline with T32 Grant Program- There are three D.D.S./Ph.D. students funded by the NIH T32 grant. All three trainees submitted NRSAfellowships and have received promising scores. The hiring of two new bioengineering faculty will increase the mentor pool for these trainees.(objective 1.16R) Dental students learn how to efficiently search the PubMed database for evidence. !"#$%&($)*"#$(&"%+#,-.$-"/01"#$&2("%+0,$,"3)45"**%$%4%("6-+"71*"#0" 48
  • 51. GOAL 2. FACULTY, STAFF, STUDENTS, ALUMNIBaylor College of Dentistry is committed to recruiting, retaining, developing and investing in exemplary and diverse faculty, staff and students andto fostering strong alumni relations in an environment that is conducive to personal and professional growth.Kellogg/ADEA Comprehensive Dental Faculty Development Program- This grant program funds all the tuition for the selected graduate studentswho primarily are underrepresented minorities or from disadvantaged backgrounds. In exchange, the students commit to teach at a dental schoolafter graduation for the number of years they were funded. The college has had four graduates, all of whom entered academics upon completion of theprogram. Three students are still enrolled in the program. (objective 2.1)Faculty Diversity- Eleven percent of both the full time faculty and all faculty members were underrepresented minorities. Thirty-eight percent of the fulltime faculty and 35 percent of all faculty members were women. (objective 2.1)Faculty Orientation- Seven faculty members attended the New Faculty Orientation in December 2010. Since its inception in 2005, 48 faculty membershave participated in these sessions. (objective 2.2)Peer Review for Faculty- Since the program began in January 2006, 12 faculty members have completed the peer review process, having theirteaching evaluated by fellow faculty members. Two faculty members participated in peer review of their teaching in 2007 (one lecture and one clinic),two in 2008 (lectures), six in 2009 (one clinic and five lectures) and two in 2010 (one lab and one clinic). Sixteen different consultants led these reviews(two-three per review). (objective 2.2)Diversity Pipeline- A number of Bridge to Dentistry programs have evolved at HSC-BCD to create a pipeline of potential dental students from culturallydiverse and/or disadvantaged backgrounds. The following programs were very successful this year: In the K-12 Dental Career Awareness, 2,157 pre-K-6th-grade students and 501 7th-12th-grade students from the Dallas Independent School District participated in dental awareness events and counseling activities. Six Future Dentists Clubs (FDC) were established. Four were in elementary schools, and one was in a middle school. A city-wide FDC was established for high school students. Twenty-one 10th-graders, 21 11th-graders, 25 12th-graders, 12 high school graduates and 25 college students participated in summer pre- dental enrichment programs. Sixteen students participated in the 2009-2010 Post-Baccalaureate Program. These students spent one year after college graduation in a rigorous curriculum focused on Dental Aptitude Test preparation and upper-division science courses. Students who met detailed performance criteria were accepted at HSC-BCD. Eleven of these students are now first-year dental students at HSC-BCD. Another 31 of these students are distributed throughout the D2-D4 classes here at the College. (objective 2.4) 49
  • 52. Bridge to Dentistry Funding- The College’s Bridge to Dentistry program received a nearly $200,000 grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundationon March 1, 2008. HSC-BCD was one of only eight dental schools selected to receive funding to improve diversity among the student body or increaseaccess to dental care in underserved areas through community-based education. The grant ended May 30, 2010.The College’s Bridge to Dentistry program also received a Health Careers Opportunity Program grant for the project period of September 1, 2009 –August 31, 2012. The total amount of the grant award is $2,130,456. (objective 2.4)Diverse First Year Dental Class- For the entering dental class of 2010, there were 12 African American entrants and 26 Hispanic entrants.Underrepresented minorities (African American, Hispanic and Native American) made up 31 percent of the entire dental school and 37 percent of thefirst-year dental class. BCD’s 2010 entering dental class (2010-2011 D1 class) leads all traditional U.S. dental schools in diversity.The increase in diversity during the last several years is largely due to the Admissions Committee placing more emphasis on considering the entirestudent in a "whole-file review." Although the overwhelming criterion for admission is still academic achievement, a range of non-academic factors areconsidered in order to assemble a class of qualified students that is richly diverse in a variety of ways. (objective 2.4)Student Retention Strategies- Sixty-four students sought academic counseling in the 2009-2010 year. Forty-nine percent of the D1 students, 30percent of the D2, 17 percent of D3 and D4 and four dental hygiene students sought personal counseling. Two additional students were offered outsideprofessional services. Due to these efforts, 100 percent of dental students, 90 percent of first year dental hygiene and 100 percent of second year dentalhygiene students were retained in the 2009-2010 year. (objective 2.5)Career Development Programs- Students had the opportunity to attend a number of professional meetings, including meetings of the American DentalEducation Association, the American Student Dental Association, the Student National Dental Association and the Hispanic Dental Association. Studentattendance at professional functions was quite high: 100 percent at the Texas Dental Association (TDA) D1 luncheon, 80 percent at the TDA JuniorLuncheon, 86 percent at the TDA Senior Evening and 100 percent at the American Dental Association Success Seminars (objective 2.6)Faculty Salaries- Sixty-two percent of the full-time faculty were at or above the ADEA median for salaries in 2008. This was above the target of 57percent. Another analysis will be conducted in December 2010. (objective 2.8R)Recruitment of Clinical Research Faculty - While the goal is to have a DDS/PhD faculty member in every department, only eight of the eleven departmentshave such an individual. One of the three without one has a PhD faculty member and another has a very active research program with several DDS-MSfaculty members. There are three faculty members with M.D. degrees and 19 with PhD only. (objective 2.9R)Great Expectations Program- This mentoring program is a collaboration between HSC-BCD and the Texas Section of the International College ofDentists (ICD). Mentoring is done within groups, each with an ICD leader, faculty mentors, and D1, D3 and D4 members. Ninety-five percent of the D1class participated in the Ice Cream Social and 85-90 percent attended the Dallas County Dental Society meeting. This program has been adopted by UTHouston and UT San Antonio dental schools, and other schools are considering adoption. (objective 2.10R) 50
  • 53. Staff Retreat- The Staff Development Committee planned and presented the fourth Staff Development Day on January 5, 2010. The topics includednutrition, getting along with co-workers, managing high-maintenance patients and generational issues in the workplace. The event was attended byapproximately 120 staff members. (objective 2.11R)GOAL 3. RESEARCHBaylor College of Dentistry is committed to expanding the research culture of the College to ensure that its research activities contribute to theunderstanding of basic biological and pathological processes and are translated into advances in patient care.Grant Support- In 2009-2010, 68 grants were submitted and 22 were funded for a funding rate of 32 percent. The total research expenditures for theyear were $4,261,950 (direct and indirect funds). (objective 3.1)Training for Junior Faculty- In December 2009, Dr. John Ivy presented a day-long seminar at the college on grant writing. Twenty HSC-BCD facultymembers attended the general seminar, and eight faculty members laterhad individual conferences with Dr. Ivy about grants they were going tosubmit. (objective 3.2)Clinical Research Projects- The College has eight clinical grants (Drs.Ajlouni [2], Glickman, Grogan/Sharma, He, Rivera-Hidalgo, Triplett andKerins/Viswanathan). Three departments have senior faculty membersfunded by large NIH grants (Diagnostic Sciences, Orthodontics andPeriodontics). (objective 3.2)Southwestern Medical School Clinical Research Program- Dr. Perryhas finished the program, and Dr. Komabayashi is in the third year of theK12 program (Clinical Research Career Development Program) with UTSouthwestern Medical School. (objective 3.2)Summer Research Program- Dental students have the opportunity to workon a research project with a faculty member in the summer following theirfirst year in the dental program. In summer 2010, 34 students participated inthe program. The BCD Student Research Group has had a student elected to an officer position within the AADR National Student Research Group each yearsince 2003. Another student was elected to a leadership position at the 2010 AADR meeting.Twenty-seven students presented papers at the 2010 AADR meeting and one at the ADEA meeting, both held in Washington DC. Seven students presentedat the 2010 Hinman National Student Research Symposium in Memphis. 51
  • 54. Two students received an NIDCR Summer Research Fellowship. In this program, they conduct research with NIDCR and other National Institutes ofHealth researchers in Bethesda, Md., for eight weeks. (objective 3.3)Commercialization of Dental-Related Inventions- There were two speakers on commercialization at HSC-BCD last year. Also, eight collaborationsbetween faculty and industry have occurred. There were seven new faculty disclosures in 2007, eight in 2008 and five in 2009. Two joint disclosureswere submitted with Southern Methodist University in 2009 and one with UT Houston. One patent was licensed in 2010.Ten grant proposals were submitted in 2007, 14 in 2008 and 14 in 2009. Eleven proposals were funded (8 in ’08), generating $388,371 ($154,843 in’08) in direct costs and $194,316 ($39,176 in ’08) in facilities and administrative costs for total costs of $581,647 ($194,010 in ‘08). (objective 3.4R)BCD Clinical Research Program- In 2006, the Dean implemented the Clinical Research Program that allows for release time for clinical faculty to doresearch. Since then, eight faculty members (Drs. Celeste Abraham, Stan Ashworth, Jenny He, Ben Meyrat, Susan Roshan, Margaret Yanus, Miles Beachand Susan Hummel) have participated in the program. Five scholars presented findings at the IADR Meeting in Barcelona, July 2010. The Associate Deanfor Research and Graduate Studies continues to support these junior clinical faculty members’ research with $10,000 grants. (objective 3.5R)Pathway to Excellence Seminar Series- Since the program started in 2007, HSC-BCD has hosted 19 speakers. In winter/spring 2010, three speakerswere hosted. The presentations were rated highly for relevance and currency in faculty evaluations. As of September 2010, five faculty members havereported a total of eight collaborations resulting from these visiting speakers. (objective 3.6R)North/Central Clinical and Translational Science Initiative- Two HSC-BCD faculty members participated in the Clinical Scholars program during the2009-2010 year. More than five faculty members have received statistical help at the UT Southwestern Medical School. (objective 3.7R)GOAL 4. PATIENT CAREBaylor College of Dentistry is committed to providing quality care in an environment that is sensitive to the needs of each patient.Quality Assurance- The comprehensive quality assurance program continues to provide results that lead to improvement. On post-treatment reviews, only5 percent needed re-treatment (target of ≤10 percent). On audited patient records, 32 percent were deficient with two or more errors (target ≤40 percent).On the Patient Satisfaction Survey, 98 percent rated their satisfaction as “very good.” The total number of injuries/exposures was higher than targeted at63 (target <50) as well as the number of patient complaints, 262 (target <250). Both of these deficiencies will be discussed at the Annual Quality AssuranceMeeting. (objective 4.3)Central Sterilization & Instrument Leasing Program- In conjunction with a new facility for the central sterilization of clinic instruments, an instrumentleasing program was fully implemented in August 2009. As a result of student and class interviews, errors in pre-clinical leasing kits have been identifiedand corrected, and specific dispensing procedures have been altered. Significant organizational structure changes were made in the Office of ClinicalAffairs for clinical and student instrument services and patient services capitalizing on current technology. This resulted in more efficient service withfewer employees. (objectives 4.6R & 4.7R) 52
  • 55. GOAL 5. OUTREACHBaylor College of Dentistry is committed to providing outreach programs for the benefit of the community and the state.Elective Community-Based Experience for Dental Students- Seventy-four students in the D4 class selected a Community Preceptor Program course insummer 2010. Eight students did dual preceptor programs. Under the guidance of 57 preceptor dentists, they treated patients in various clinics, includingthe Indian Health Service, the Public Health Service’s Community-Oriented Primary Care clinics and Federally Qualified Health Centers. They alsoobserved treatment management in various group and solo practices. (objective 5.1)Dental Students in the Community- In the D3 year, dental students are required to plan and conduct two educational presentations at such sites aselementary schools, community colleges, nursing homes and senior citizen centers. Last year, D3 students provided education to 6,074 people at 68different events. In the D4 year, students are required to provide oral health screenings and/or treatment at two community sites. Last year, D4 studentstreated 970 patients at 97 community dental clinics, screened 13,491 people at 46 health fairs and screened 650 students at 2 schools.As part of the Community Dentistry Externship (9080), D4 students spend up to10 days on rotations through the Juvenile Detention Center, Community DentalCare’s Vickery Meadow dental clinic and the Dallas County Sealant Initiative. Atthe Juvenile Detention Center, students provide emergency and restorativecare to children ages 5-18. At Vickery Meadow, students treat both adults andchildren. In the Sealant Initiative, students place sealants on DISD second-gradestudents. In the academic year 2009-2010, students treated 1,727 patientsat the Juvenile Detention Center, 1,419 at the Vickery Meadow and otherCommunity Dental Care clinics and 990 as part of the Dallas County SealantInitiative. (objective 5.1)Dental Hygiene Students in the Community- As part of Public Health/Community Health (4530), second-year dental hygiene students educate thepublic on oral health through various outlets in the community including healthfairs, elementary schools, PTA functions, Dallas Dental Hygienists’ Societyevents and HSC-BCD Sealant Days. The students are required to make twoschool site visits and participate in at least two dental health-related communityservice activities. They also are asked to identify an “at risk” community, assess its needs and provide education, as part of a final project for the course.This final project encourages the students to provide services in diverse areas such as nursing homes, teen pregnancy centers, juvenile detention centersand diabetes outpatient clinics. In the academic year 2009-2010, dental hygiene students provided oral health education outreach to approximately 3,710individuals in the community. (objective 5.1) 53
  • 56. Service to the Community- The total number of people impacted in the external community (educated, treated or helped in some way) by HSC-BCDstudents is 38,694. When faculty grant endeavors are added to this number, the total number of individuals impacted in the larger community is295,385. (objective 5.1)Mayor’s Back to School Fair- The Mayor’s Back to School Fair was held August 5, 2010, at the Fair Park Centennial Building in Dallas. The fair wasfree for Dallas school children from low-income families. By visiting four categories of service providers during the event, the children received freeschool supplies. Seventy-one student, faculty, and staff volunteers from HSC-BCD were involved in treating 1,300 K-6th-grade children. Cliniciansprovided quick “flashlight exams,” fluoride varnish and referrals for further treatment if needed. Spanish translators were available to convey to parentswhat was seen during the mini screenings. Former Dallas Mayor Laura Miller personally invited HSC-BCD to participate six years ago, and the College’sservices have become an integral and valued part of the event. Other than immunizations, the HSC-BCD booth is the only one that performs a service thatimmediately benefits the children. (objective 5.4R)Crystal Charities Funding for Southeast Dental Clinic-The Crystal Charity Ball awarded funding for a new dental clinic in Pleasant Grove. It will beoperated by Community Dental Care and coordinated with HSC-BCD programs. Clinic operations are planned to begin in April 2011. (objective 5.5R)GOAL 6. PLANNING & DEVELOPMENTBaylor College of Dentistry is committed to creating its future by developing new resources to support the goals of the College, to enhance itsreputation and to plan a state-of-the-art dental school.Fund Raising- The HSC-BCD fund raising goal for FY 2010 was $1.075 million. The actual funds received, $2.03 million, exceeded this goal. (objective6.3R)Web Profile- The public launch of the new HSC-BCD website was on June 1, 2010. There was a 15.64 percent increase in visitors per day on thewebsite. There was also an overall performance rating of 90 percent as compared with over 3 million websites previously evaluated for marketingeffectiveness, including social media.The latter is measured by the Hubspot Website Grader and indicates the social networking capabilities of the site.(objective 6.4R)Collaborations with Health Care Institutions- Collaborations with the Baylor Research Institute and the biomedical sciences department have resulted intwo scientific collaborations, two grant applications and three in-progress publications. (objective 6.5R)Transition to Banner Information System- While the general person and financial aid modules of Banner went live earlier in 2009, the course inventory,scheduling, registration and academic records modules went live in the fall. These modules included the migration of student data from fall 2001forward, the ability to print transcripts from Banner and scheduling of courses through Banner. In addition, the self-service modules of Banner went live 54
  • 57. as well. For the first time ever, students on the Dallas campus were empowered to print their schedule, print an unofficial copy of their transcript, andview their grades at their convenience from any computer. Faculty were also able to post grades via the web and received training on this procedure.This period also saw the unification of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board enrollment reports. In the past, each campus had to run their ownreports from their respective systems and concatenate the data. With Banner, the HSC can run one report for the entire institution rather than for eachlocation.Personnel at the Baylor College of Dentistry were instrumental in meeting the go-live goals, not only of Banner, but of COGNOS, the reporting toolattached to Banner. Their leadership made it possible to go live not only with the student system, but with the reporting tool as well.While scanning of legacy documents is ongoing, the Banner Document Management System was also implemented in FY 2010. This tool will allow theinstitution to move away from the use of paper documents and to have a reliable storage mechanism for historical documents. (objective 6.7R) 55
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  • 59. Texas A&M Health Science CenterBaylor College of Dentistry2009 - 2010 Annual Report3302 GASTON AVENUEDALLAS, TEXAS 75246PRODUCED MARCH 2011GRAPHIC DESIGN & ILLUSTRATION BY PATTI HASKINS,COMPUTER GRAPHICS SPECIALIST, MEDIA RESOURCES

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