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Game Informed Learning - Newcastle Keynote 2008
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Game Informed Learning - Newcastle Keynote 2008

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  • 1. Game Informed Learning & Teaching Michael Begg Learning Technology Section College of Medicine & Veterinary Medicine University of Edinburgh
  • 2.  
  • 3.  
  • 4.  
  • 5.  
  • 6.  
  • 7. But
    • Games are immersive
      • And immersion is active not passive
    • Narratively rich
      • And emergent
    • Responsive environments
      • Players are consequential agents
    • Games are replayable and are replayed
      • And communities grow around them
  • 8. Playing, Stories and Learning
    • We begin, grow and end through our stories
      • Be good and the stories persist after you end!
    • Play is pleasurable engagement
    • Our sense of play evolves with us
    • Play is more hard than easy
    • Play implies striving to succeed
  • 9. Process of engagement
    • Player adopts a character role
    • Player enters an environment containing goals, challenges and puzzles
    • Player adopts the required vocabulary
    • Player uses lessons learned to inform approach to future challenge
  • 10. Process of engagement
    • Student adopts a character role
    • Student enters an environment containing goals, challenges and puzzles
    • Student adopts the required vocabulary
    • Student uses lessons learned to inform approach to future challenge
  • 11. Game Environments
    • Multiple streams of immediate feedback
    • Compelling sense of immediacy
    • Adaptive and responsive
    • Motivation is intrinsic
  • 12.  
  • 13.  
  • 14.  
  • 15.  
  • 16.  
  • 17.  
  • 18. Game Based Learning
    • Knows all of this!
    • Persists in the idea that IT has to be a game
    • Consequence;
      • Extrinsic motivation, expensive, costly, platform issues
    • Undermines the playful, explorative, rich stuff of learning itself
  • 19. Game Informed Learning
    • Considers learning and teaching to have the potential to be playful
    • Makes use of professional narratives
    • Maintains intrinsic motivation
    • Contextualizes learning activity
    • Does not insist that the product is a game
  • 20.  
  • 21. Virtual Patients
    • “ The concept of virtualisation is an extremely powerful one. It involves any mental operation that leads from the here and now, the singular, the usable for once-and-for-all, and the solidly embodies to the timeless, abstract, general, multiple, versatile, repeatable, ubiquitous, immaterial, and morphologically fluid… It is through the consideration of the virtual as potential that the mind puts together representations that can act upon the world” Marie-Laure Ryan, Narrative as Virtual Reality
  • 22.
    • Remind me why we might need this?
      • Opportunistic learning is not an option*
      • Student access to patients is increasingly problematic
      • Indicators of competence are presently hard to measure
      • Requirement for increased validity of assessment of complex cognitive processing
      • Rehearsal, reinforcement, thin-slicing
    Virtual Patients * General Medical Council (1993). Tomorrow's Doctors. UK, General Medical Council.
  • 23. Game Informed Virtual Patients
    • character and context
    • Narrative
    • emergent
    • consequence and agency
    • Individual experience
    • Choice
    • Replay value
    • Moratorium
    • See Also: Begg, M., D. Dewhurst, et al. (2005). "Game Informed Learning: Applying computer game processes to Higher Education." Innovate 1 (6).
  • 24. Labyrinth
  • 25. Labyrinth: Game Informed
    • Context
    • Consequence
    • Realism
    • Feedback
    • Replayability
  • 26. Labyrinth: Flexibility
    • Client delivery
    • Flexible counters
    • Audio / Video
    • Session Capture
    • Open Source
    • Growing CoP
  • 27. Labyrinth: Usage
    • UG Clinical Skills
    • Simulation Prep
    • Student Projects
    • Professional training
    • Context for KB
    • VP based curriculum
    • Assessable?
  • 28. But what about teaching?
  • 29.  
  • 30.  
  • 31.  
  • 32.  
  • 33.  
  • 34.  
  • 35.  
  • 36. EEK! Is that the time?
    • Stories and games are fun
    • The processes of learning and play seem very similar
    • Reframing our teaching approaches to accommodate GIL may …
    • Why does formal education remove us so far from our natural inclination to play and tell stories anyway?
  • 37. Thank You Play with me, daddy. Tell me a story