Whole Grain Goodness

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Amaranth, quinoa, and millet, oh my! If your whole-grain food choices are limited to wheat bread and brown rice, this class is for you. Come discover some less common (but still delicious!) whole grains that are easy to cook and incorporate into meals, and learn about the benefits of whole grains. Taste samples included.

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Whole Grain Goodness

  1. 1. Cristin Stokes, RD, LN MUS Wellness Spring 2014
  2. 2.   Amaranth, quinoa, and millet, oh my! If your whole- grain food choices are limited to wheat bread and brown rice, this class is for you. Come discover some less common (but still delicious!) whole grains that are easy to cook and incorporate into meals, and learn about the benefits of whole grains. Taste samples included. Objectives
  3. 3.  What is a whole grain? Whole grain = 100% of the original kernel-- bran, endosperm, and germ-- present in the original proportions
  4. 4.   Common whole grains/grain products:  Whole wheat bread, crackers, tortillas, pasta  Whole grain cereal  Brown rice  Oatmeal/granola  Corn What is a whole grain?
  5. 5.   Not-so-common whole grains:  Millet  Teff  Sorghum  Kamut  Quinoa  Wild rice  Amaranth  Barley  Bulgur What is a whole grain?
  6. 6.   Nutrients found in whole grains:  Fiber  Protein  B-vitamins  Thiamin, Niacin, Riboflavin, Folate  Minerals  Iron, Magnesium, Selenium  Antioxidants Benefits of whole grains
  7. 7.   Prevention of chronic disease  Strongest research evidence for reduced risk of:  Type 2 Diabetes  Heart disease  Stroke  Obesity/overweight  Growing research evidence for reduced risk of:  Asthma  Colorectal cancer  Hypertension  Periodontal disease Benefits of whole grains
  8. 8.   Read the ingredient list  Look for the word “whole” in the first ingredient  whole or whole grain [name of grain], whole wheat, brown rice, oats or oatmeal  Not a whole grain: enriched flour, wheat germ, bran  Probably not a whole grain: wheat flour, 100% wheat, seven-grain, multigrain, stoneground, multigrain, organic flour, semolina, durum wheat  Don’t rely on fiber content or color Identifying whole grains
  9. 9.  Identifying whole grains
  10. 10.   Gluten = a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley that is responsible for the elastic nature of dough  Celiac disease (CD): autoimmune disease that causes damage to the lining of the small intestine when gluten is consumed  Gluten intolerance: sensitivity to gluten, typically presenting with GI symptoms  Bottom line: No need to avoid gluten unless you have CD or are gluten intolerant What about gluten?
  11. 11.  Recommended whole grain intake • Make at least half your grains whole
  12. 12.   Add whole grains to  Soups  Stews  Salads  Baked goods  Try bringing a whole grain salad for lunch  Batch cook on the weekend  Substitute whole grains in baked goods Incorporating whole grains
  13. 13.   Basic directions: Cook like rice. Combine grain and liquid. Bring to a boil. Simmer until water is absorbed and grain is soft/chewy.  Store grains in airtight containers in a cool, dry pantry  Intact grains: up to 6 months or a year in the freezer  Flours & meals: 1-3 months or 2-6 months in the freezer  Depends on fat content Cooking whole grains
  14. 14.  Questions?
  15. 15.   www.montanamovesandmeals.com  www.wellness.mus.edu  www.facebook.com/MUSWellness  Pinterest  Twitter  @montanameals  @montanamoves Connect with us!

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