7th January, 2014

Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com
News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@...
Share developments in RICE
and allied sectors,
Promote the Concept of Knowledge
Economy
Dear Sir/Madam,

YOUR IDEA has a g...
TOP Contents - Tailored for YOU
Latest News Headlines…
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Rice Farmers Hit By 40% ...
Farmers along the Done-Tha-Mi River face severe rice shortages this year due to wet season flooding.Farmers
in Mon State a...
"We expect to spend not
more than Bt130 billion on
the pledge, lower than the
expected budget of Bt270
billion, which was ...
they were not paid by January 15.Another rally was also held in Phitsanulok, where about 500 farmers gathered in front of
...
Thailand’s
besieged
government faces a
major confidence vote
in financial markets
next week when a state
bank will try to ...
agreed the yield would be higher but said the government could put pressure on other state-owned banks to
subscribe to the...
BY RAPPLER.COM

those planning
disinformation campaigns and distributing rotten rice with NFA logos. Photo from the Intern...
TABLE-India Grain Prices-Delhi-Jan 07
Tue Jan 7, 2014 2:27pm IST

TABLE-India Grain Prices - Delhi - Jan 07
Rates by Asian...
instead of focusing on Mr. Tan, whose identity is yet to be confirmed.“We are not getting fixated on whether
he [Mr. Tan] ...
With basmati rice exports likely to touch 4 million tonnes in
2013/14, India's total rice shipments are expected at about ...
Rice farmers in five lower northern provinces
will stage a rally in Phichit today to protest
against the caretaker governm...
Fresh buying pushed Pusa-1121 and Sharbati rice prices
upwards, while other aromatic and non-basmati varieties
managed to ...
association. Khalid said the Pakistani embassy was making every effort to deepen the commercial and trade ties
between Chi...
producers and partners can expect from Big River,” said Mark Raley who heads business development for the
company.Operatio...
obsolete, while the state's American Indian bands fear any weakening could imperil a food source they
consider sacred and ...
Wednesday, January 08, 2014

Bhubaneswar: The State Government has decided to initiate stern action
against the rice mille...
controlled by an entity,' he said.Sevilla said they are 100% committed against smuggling and is also interested
in finding...
“I can’t make that recommendation. I can’t say what the limit should be,’’ Pastor noted.That will be up to the
Minnesota P...
time to see if the impact of sulfate to sulfide conversion changes over several more years, well beyond the two
years in t...
commissioner for intelligence.Dellosa said they noticed the “shift in strategy” in the last few months.He said at
least P7...
smuggling activities in various ports all over the country. However, he admitted that they have little information
about T...
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7th january,2014 daily global rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine

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  1. 1. 7th January, 2014 Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  2. 2. Share developments in RICE and allied sectors, Promote the Concept of Knowledge Economy Dear Sir/Madam, YOUR IDEA has a great worth---JUST share it through RICE PLUS 10000+ stakeholders of rice industry read & apply various ideas and analysis written by the authors. Be the part of Rice plus authors Visit: www.ricepluss.com,www.publishpk.net mujahid.riceplus@gmail.com riceplus@irp.edu.pk Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  3. 3. TOP Contents - Tailored for YOU Latest News Headlines…                      Rice Farmers Hit By 40% Crop Lost EC left with rice woes Farmers assured to get money from the rice pledging scheme within this month Thai govt seeks funds for rice scheme that fuelled protests Farmers from lower North block highway to demand rice-pledging payment NFA: No rice shortage TABLE-India Grain Prices-Delhi-Jan 07 Gov’t pledges to run after rice smugglers India's 2013/14 basmati rice exports to hit record 4 million tonnes : Sources Rice farmers plan anti-govt protest Govt's rice procurement down 8% at 16.39 million tonne Fresh bulk buying pushes up Pusa-1121, Sharbati rice Next-door neighbour: Delegation looks to promote rice exports to China Agspring Announces Formation of Big River Rice and Grain Includes Acquisition of Tubbs Rice Dryers and Raley Brothers MPCA releases wild rice sulfate studies Odisha Government to initiate stern action against erring rice millers over paddy procurement Customs stumped in search for 'David Tan' Wild rice research finds sulfate impact Chinese Scientists Cultivate Salt-Resistant Rice With High Yield Rice smugglers using courts to thwart BOC’ NEWS DETAILS: Rice Farmers Hit By 40% Crop Lost January 6, 2014 Author: Kha Hsu Nyar Tags: flood, food shortage, Karen State Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  4. 4. Farmers along the Done-Tha-Mi River face severe rice shortages this year due to wet season flooding.Farmers in Mon State and Karen State claim this years rice harvest is almost less than half and blame floodwaters for the shortage.Naw Ya Pu, a villager from Kya-Thaung-Seik in the eastern part of the Done-Tha-Mi River in Hpa-An Township spoke to Karen News. “Our paddies have produced less this year. We are down 40% on last years harvest. Our paddy plants this year were tinted yellow not green. Most of the people around here will have to buy-in rice this year.”Naw Ya Pu said last years heavy rains damaged the rice plants and to add to the villagers troubles insect plagues also attacked the rice crop.Naw Ya Pu estimates that one-acre of rice paddy produces 35 baskets, this year’s rice harvest produced less than 20 baskets.As many as 30villages from the eastern region of Done-Tha-Mi River, in Hpa-An Township, are facing a low rice yield this year.A community elder from Kya-Thaung-Seik village told Karen News that last year’s flloding was the worst she had witness.“We have had flooding before, but our paddies were not damaged as much as this. It is the worst this time.”Farmers said rice prices have risen this year, but they cannot take advantage of it as they need the rice to feed their families.Karen villages along the Done-Tha-Mi River earn their living by growing crops such as rice paddy, sesame seeds, sugarcane, beans and seasonal vegetables.Villages affected by flooding included, Kya-Thaung-Seik (east-west part), Pyin-Ma-Seik (east-west part) such as Kaw-Poe-Kho, Lay-Khaw-Hti, Htee-Pah-Doh-Khee, Htaw-Klaw-Hta, Myit-Kyo, Thoo-Ka-Bee, Kyoe-Wine-Ywar-Gyi, Kyoe-Wine-Ywar-Lay, Lay-Kay, Min-Zaw, Ta-Kay-Laung, Kyauk-Phya. EC left with rice woes Nakharin Srilert,Sayan Chucham The Nation January 8, 2014 1:00 am Govt needs EC-approved loan to pay for latest crop; farmers rallying over delay in payments Problems related to the government's huge rice stockpile are now being left at the Election Commission (EC)'s doorstep. The Commerce Minister wants the EC to advise him whether it is legal to sell rice from the stockpile, while the Finance Minister also wants to know if he can borrow more funds to pay for the latest crops, bought under the 2013/14 pledging scheme.Caretaker Finance Minister Kittiratt Na-Ranong said after the Cabinet meeting yesterday a report on funding for therice-pledging scheme showed Bt463.8 billion was spent out of a budget of Bt500 billion set for last year. That meant only Bt36.2 billion remained.Kittiratt expected there would be no more than 11 million tonnes of paddy rice for the 2013/2014 crop, ending next month. Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  5. 5. "We expect to spend not more than Bt130 billion on the pledge, lower than the expected budget of Bt270 billion, which was given initial Cabinet approval on September 3, 2013." He said the caretaker government would not spend all of the Bt270 billion it will seek, as spending would only be used for main crops, which account for not more than Bt130 bn."We have sought approval for the amount of this loan from the EC," Kittiratt said, adding that the size also depends on how much of the rice stockpile is released.Caretaker Deputy Prime Minister and Commerce Minister Niwatthumrong Boonsongpaisan said yesterday the government was waiting to hear from the EC on whether the caretaker administration had the legal right to enter into new rice sale deals. "In fact, about one million tonnes of rice is waiting to be sold to China," he said, adding that there were also other prospective buyers. "If the EC says 'No', everything will have to wait," Niwatthumrong said. He expected an answer from the EC by the end of the week. The rice-pledging scheme is highly controversial. Critics point out that it has caused massive financial losses, as the government buys rice from farmers at a high price, which makes it tough to sell stock without incurring a loss.Yesterday, farmers from five provinces blocked a highway in Phichit causing a serious traffic jam, while they demanded that the government quickly address their woes. "We want the payments by January 15," Kittisak Rattanawaraha said, in his capacity as the chair of the Northern Farmers Network. He said the government should also pay for interest on loans that the farmers needed to get from the Bank for Agriculture and Agricultural Cooperatives (BAAC) because of the delay in payment. "Farmers have to use the scheme's certificates of rice as collateral to get those loans, despite the fact the certificates should warrant immediate payment. So, the government should pay for the interest from such loans. " Kittisak said the government should also offer a one-year and interest-free moratorium to affected farmers related to other BAAC loans. "If the government doesn't answer our demands, we will combine our protest with the rally against the government," he said. Senior officials stepped in to negotiate with the protesting farmers, who agreed to only partly block the highway. Phichit Governor Surachai Khan-asa assured the farmers that Deputy Finance Minister Tanusak Lekuthai had confirmed that the government had already approved Bt70 billion for payments to them. That news satisfied the protesters, who ended their partial blockade of the highway in the evening. But they warned they would come out again if Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  6. 6. they were not paid by January 15.Another rally was also held in Phitsanulok, where about 500 farmers gathered in front of the provincial city hall yesterday to demand that the government provide quick help. They said they have waited for payment for months already. These farmers said the payment should be made by January 31.Phitsanulok Governor Rapee Phong-buppakit met with farmers and promised to relay their demands to the caretaker government. According to Niwatthumrong, all payments pending for the 2013/14 crop season will be paid to the rice farmers before the end of this month. This crop season runs from last October to next month. BAAC labour-union chief Prasit Pahome expressed concerns about the government's plan to use the BAAC's available cash to pay farmers participating in the rice-pledging scheme. "It affects our liquidity," he said. The BAAC had about Bt100 billion in liquidity and payments for the rice scheme would require about Bt50 billion, he thought. Supannee Phutpisut of the BAAC labour union said if BAAC used Bt50 billion for the rice scheme, depositors' confidence in the BAAC would falter. Meanwhile, the Election Commission has not had any notice from Cabinet about a Bt55-billion loan to fund the rice-pledging scheme, secretary-general Puchong Nutrawong said yesterday. He advised the Cabinet it would need to get prior approval from them to get such a loan, or to carry out any projects or policies before it tries to implement them. Farmers assured to get money from the rice pledging scheme within this month Date : 7 มกราคม 2557 BANGKOK, 7 Jan 2014 (NNT) – Deputy Prime Minister and Commerce Minister Niwatthamrong Boonsongpaisan has assured farmers who sold their rice to the government under the rice pledging scheme and have not yet received compensations will be able to collect their payments within this month. He said that his ministry is talking with the Election Commission (EC) to grant the authority to the Bank for Agriculture and Agricultural Cooperatives (BAAC) to start distributing the payments. Minister Niwatthamrong stressed however that any other long-term schemes of the ministry would have to wait until a new government. Since the scheme’s inception until December last year, it had paid 180 billion baht to farmers, the minister said, adding that rice farmers continue to sell their crops to the program, worth approximately one billion baht each month. The minister said the government has set aside 270 billion baht for the current cropping season as it is expecting 10 million tons of rice to be sold to the scheme. Thai govt seeks funds for rice scheme that fuelled protests nti-government protesters blow whistles and hold placards during a rally at Silom road in central Bangkok yesterday. Reuters/Bangkok Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  7. 7. Thailand’s besieged government faces a major confidence vote in financial markets next week when a state bank will try to raise about $600mn in a domestic bond to fund a rice-subsidy scheme that has helped fuel the country’s political crisis.The generous intervention scheme helped Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra win power in a 2011 election thanks to rural votes but hundreds of farmers, some unpaid since October, have joined demonstrations since November. More are considering joining protests next week aimed at ousting her, disillusioned by the government’s inability to reliably fund the controversial programme. “The 20bn baht ($605.79mn) is not enough to pay the thousands of farmers who are still waiting for their money and they are getting angry and thinking about protesting,” said Prasit Boonchoey, head of the Thai Farmers Association. He said he attended anti-government rallies in November.An attempt to raise money to meet late payments fell short in November after the Bank of Agriculture and Agricultural Cooperatives (BAAC), which runs the scheme, managed to raise just half the amount it needed as investors stayed away despite attractive terms. The bond could face a tough reception next week, when the protesters plan to shut down Bangkok and force Yingluck out, seeking to install an appointed “people’s council” after rejecting the Feb 2 election she called in an attempt to defuse the crisis.Any caretaker government would not be able to renew the rice scheme which runs until February, leaving big policy decisions to the next elected government.Millions of farmers in the northeast remain loyal to Yingluck and her brother, Thaksin Shinawatra, who brought in cheap healthcare and other measures to help them when he was in power until 2006, but farmers elsewhere may not be so solid. Thaksin was ousted by the military and now lives in exile but he is widely seen as the power behind his sister’s government. Churarat Sutheethorn, head of the Public Debt Management Office (PDMO), told Reuters the new tranche of the reopened three-year bond would be auctioned on Jan 16.“It is part of the total 75bn baht in bonds we aimed to issue to fund the 2013/14 rice scheme,” she said, adding the bank could return to the debt market again in March to raise more funds. A source at one of the arranging banks said the environment was even more difficult now than in November.“Last time there was no violence, the situation was not so bad, there was no deadline then for the upcoming elections.”The source, who asked not to be identified, said the BAAC might have to cut the price and offer a higher yield than November’s 3.53% to attract investors.Another local analyst Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  8. 8. agreed the yield would be higher but said the government could put pressure on other state-owned banks to subscribe to the issue, which will be guaranteed by the state. The Yingluck government won a landslide election in July 2011, helped by its promise to pay farmers 15,000 baht per tonne of paddy, way above the market price. The scheme made Thai rice uncompetitive in the export market and in 2012 Thailand lost its crown as the world’s top exporter, with India taking over. The state amassed huge stockpiles which it is still struggling to sell.Anti-Thaksin protesters say the scheme is corrupt and has helped wealthy farmers and regional politicians more than the poor. It helped fuel opposition to Yingluck before the outbreak of street protests in November.The BAAC, acting for the state, has spent up to 680bn baht buying rice and the scheme is expected to run up huge losses if grain is eventually offloaded at market prices.The government has not put an official estimate on the losses but industry insiders and some academics say they could be as high as 425bn baht.As a comparison, the projected government budget deficit for fiscal 2013/14 is 250bn baht, about 1.9% of gross domestic product (GDP). Farmers from lower North block highway to demand rice-pledging payment Date : 7 มกราคม 2557 PHICHIT, 7 January 2014 (NNT) - Rice growers from five lower Northern provinces have blocked a major highway in Phichit in a bid to pressure the government to speed up payment owed under the rice-pledging scheme. About 500 farmers from Phitsanulok, Nakhon Sawan, Phichit, Sukhothai and Kamphaeng Phet have sealed off highway number 117, which links the province to the rest of the northern region and to Bangkok. They have expressed their anger at the government’s delay in distributing the funds from the scheme, which is five months overdue. Police have opened up another lane on the highway to alleviate traffic after the Bangkok-bound lane was closed off. Plans to block more lanes are being mulled by the protesters. The group demanded that the government pay the full amount of money owed them by January 15 and postpone their date of payment of debt to the Bank of Agriculture and Agricultural Cooperatives (BAAC). If their demands are not met, protests will be escalated to pressure the government to resign. Their plan was unveiled on Monday by Warong Detkitwikrom, a former Democrat MP for Phitsanulok, during a speech at the main protest rally venue near the Democracy Monument. NFA: No rice shortage Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  9. 9. BY RAPPLER.COM those planning disinformation campaigns and distributing rotten rice with NFA logos. Photo from the International Rice Research Institute.MANILA, Philippines – The National Food Authority (NFA) warned against groups that launched a campaign to project the image of a rice shortage.The NFA released a statement Monday, January 6, saying the Philippines has enough rice and there's no reason to raise prices.NFA spokesman Rex Estoperez said the NFA received reports of a planned disinformation campaign. POSTED ON 01/06/2014 6:53 PM | UPDATED 01/07/2014 8:16 AMWARNING. The National Food Authority warns against The plan included the distribution of thousands of sacks of rotten rice. The sacks would be marked with the NFA label “so as to put the agency in a bad light.”Estoperez added, "the saboteurs could now dispose of their old rice stocks while also discrediting the agency’s leadership."The plan was reportedly meant to divert public attention away from a recently exposed rice smuggling operation. Estoperez added that NFA rice is "newly-milled from 2012 to 2013." The NFA has also buffered its stock with 22,500 metric tons of rice imported from Vietnam, part of some 500,000 metric tons procured from Vietnam through a government-to-government agreement. (READ: PH to import rice for buffer stock after Yolanda).The remaining 380,000 metric tons is expected to reach the Philippines within the first quarter.Related to this, the agriculture department wants to create a prosecution office within its department to go after profiteering efforts. Agriculture spokesman Emerson Palad said a draft bill is being set up for it, and that it has been discussed with the Palace legislative liaison office. – Rappler.com Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  10. 10. TABLE-India Grain Prices-Delhi-Jan 07 Tue Jan 7, 2014 2:27pm IST TABLE-India Grain Prices - Delhi - Jan 07 Rates by Asian News International, New Delhi Tel: 011 2619 1464 Indicative Previous Grains opening close (in rupees per 100 kg unless stated) ---------------------------------------------------------Wheat Desi 2,000-3,000 2,000-3,000. Wheat Dara 1,725-1,825 1,700-1,800. Atta Chakki (per 10 Kg) 215-240 215-240. Roller Mill (per bag) 1,750-1,900 1,750-1,900. Maida (per bag) 1,910-2,015 1,880-1,980. Sooji (per bag) 1,900-2,000 1,900-2,000. Rice Basmati(Sri Lal Mahal) 12,050-14,500 12,050-14,500 Rice Basmati(Lal Quila) 12,000-14,400 12,000-14,400 Rice Basmati(Common) 8,400-9,400 8,500-9,500. Rice Permal 2,100-2,400 2,100-2,400. Rice Sela 2,800-2,950 2,850-3,000. I.R.-8 1,850-2,000 1,850-2,000. Gram 3,100-3,200 3,050-3,150. Peas Green 3,350-3,650 3,350-3,650. Peas White 2,800-3,000 2,800-3,000. Bajra 1,300-1,650 1,300-1,650. Jowar white 1,550-2,250 1,550-2,250. Maize 1,400-1,600 1,400-1,600. Barley 1,350-1,425 1,350-1,425. Guwar 3,300-3,900 3,300-3,900. Source: Delhi grain market traders. Gov’t pledges to run after rice smugglers CUSTOMS Commissioner John Philip P. Sevilla yesterday vowed to go after companies involved in rice smuggling amid reports that a certain David Tan from Davao allegedly cost the government some P7 billion in lost revenues due to his illegal activities.In his first press conference since assuming the Customs chief post, Mr. Sevilla said that the Bureau of Customs (BoC) would rather go after companies involved in rice smuggling Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  11. 11. instead of focusing on Mr. Tan, whose identity is yet to be confirmed.“We are not getting fixated on whether he [Mr. Tan] is a real person or not,” Mr. Sevilla told reporters. Mr. Sevilla said there are roughly 20 to 25 consignees connected to the alleged rice smuggling activities of Mr. Tan. “[The consignees are] legally accountable to the Bureau of Customs so even if we do not know if David Tan is a real person or not, we will still chase the consignee because we know who the consignees are who are bringing in rice without import permits,” the Customs chief said.Federation of Philippine Industries Chairman Jesus L. Arranza earlier identified Mr. Tan as the alleged “Goliath of rice smuggling” in the country.Customs Deputy Commissioner Jessie D. Dellosa said the BoC is trying to track down the different players involved in rice smuggling in the country.Mr. Dellosa also said the BoC has recently seized P725 million worth of imported rice without permit. “1,937 containers holding 48 million kilograms of rice worth P725 million are currently on hold,” he told reporters in the same press conference. Mr. Sevilla said the bureau is looking beyond just catching the culprits.He said process and systems reforms are needed to be done to prevent the same thing from happening again in the future.“We need to think about not just catching the smugglers but also how do we prevent this from happening in the future,” he said.“Preventing smuggling in the future is not just a matter of justice but a matter of economics also,” the Customs chief added.Meanwhile, the BoC is targeting to create a single information technology (IT) platform by the end of this year.Mr. Sevilla said the bureau is currently looking into the implementation of a single IT platform for all transactions at the bureau including record-keeping of trade data and import certificates.In Davao City, Mayor Rodrigo R. Duterte yesterday met with local authorities as well as the Davao City Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Inc. to discuss the city government’s all-out drive against all forms of smuggling. The meeting was called a few days after Internal Revenue chief Kim S. Jacinto-Henares asked Mr. Duterte’s support to curb rice smuggling in the city. “Unless the Customs collector signs the assessment of the goods, it will not be released and once it is released then that is smuggling,” Mr. Duterte said in the vernacular.The mayor said everybody should be on full alert against smuggled goods and should flag the vehicles that are carrying them.Mr. Duterte has ordered the setting up of checkpoints all over the city to make sure that smuggled goods are intercepted.Once caught, he said he will check the name that signed for the release of the smuggled goods and will personally arrest the signatory “in my capacity as Mayor of Davao City fully charged with the enforcement of all national laws, ordinances and executive orders.”He also reiterated his call to smuggled rice traders to stop their trade. “Smuggling is not an exclusive property of the Customs so any law enforcement guy can interdict,” he said.“We have a functioning government here in Davao and it will continue to fu nction,” he added. -- MLVA with C. A. Carillo India's 2013/14 basmati rice exports to hit record 4 million tonnes : Sources By Reuters | 7 Jan, 2014, 04.26PM IST Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  12. 12. With basmati rice exports likely to touch 4 million tonnes in 2013/14, India's total rice shipments are expected at about 10 million tonnes this year.NEW DELHI: Indian traders are set to export a record 4 million tonnes of basmati rice in the year to March on higher demand for the premium grade from the Middle East, bringing total sales to about 10 million for a third straight year, sources said. More supplies from India, which toppled Thailand in 2011/12 to become the world's top rice exporter, could further hit Thai benchmark prices that shed 3.4 percent over the past week amid bulging supplies at other key suppliers Thailand and Vietnam. While New Delhi does not allow exports of the grain from government warehouses, private traders have annually sold about 10 million tonnes a year over the past two years. India's basmati rice exports rose 15 percent to 2.88 million tonnes between April and December, Vijay Setia, former president of All India Rice Exporters Association, told Reuters. "A lot of deals are taking place due to a spurt in demand. Other than some parts of Iran and Afghanistan, where you can find some basmati from Pakistan, India's basmati is in huge demand," said Setia, also a leading exporter. India and Pakistan exclusively grow long-grain, aromatic basmati in the foothills of the Himalayas. The superior variety carries a premium over non-basmati, or common grades of rice. Setia expects basmati rice sales to Iran, the top buyer of Indian rice, to remain steady at about 1.1 to 1.2 million tonnes in 2013/14 due to relatively higher government stockpiles there. But a rise in demand from buyers such as Kuwait and Saudi Arabia would help India push 2013/14 exports of the premium grade to a record high, said Rajen Sundareshan, executive director of the All India Rice Exporters Association. Basmati rice exports have risen 15 percent so far this year, shrugging off a more than nearly 18 percent rise in India's export price. Last year's average rate was $100 a tonne, said officials at two New Delhi-based rice mills. "The trend clearly suggests that buyers are willing to pay more for premium rice varieties. Basmati is the most premium rice variety, giving India an avenue to raise exports further," Setia said. Rising income levels in the Middle East have also helped boost demand for basmati rice, traders said. With basmati rice exports likely to touch 4 million tonnes in 2013/14, India's total rice shipments are expected at about 10 million tonnes this year, Sundareshan said. In 2012/13, India's overall exports totalled 10.1 million tonnes, including 3.5 million tonnes of basmati. Rice output in India, the world's No.2 producer, stood at 104.40 million tonnes in the crop year to June 2013, more than sufficient to cover demand for its 1.2 billion people. Summer rice crop had been estimated at about 92 million tonnes this year, on par with the previous crop year. Rice farmers plan anti-govt protest Published: 7 Jan 2014 at 08.57 Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  13. 13. Rice farmers in five lower northern provinces will stage a rally in Phichit today to protest against the caretaker government's delay in paying them money owed under the ricepledging scheme.Their plan was unveiled on Monday by Warong Detkitwikrom, former Democrat MP for Phitsanulok, during a speech at the main protest rally venue near the Democracy Monument.The farmers from Phitsanulok, Nakhon Sawan, Phichit, Sukhothai and Kamphaeng Phet will gather at Pluak Sung Intersection in Phichit, tired of having waited for five months for the money from their pledged harvest and still not been paid.The protesters plan to block a road linking Phitsanulok and Nakhon Sawan if the government fails to pay them, Mr Warong said. Govt's rice procurement down 8% at 16.39 million tonne PTI Jan 6, 2014, 03.35PM IST  NEW DELHI: Government's rice procurement is lagging behind by 8 per cent over last year at 16.36 million tonne so far in the 2013-14 marketing year due to lower production estimate and relatively strong open market prices.Food Corporation of India, government's nodal procurement agency, had procured 17.78 million tonne rice in the same period of 2012-13 marketing year (October-September)."Procurement is happening very slowly in most states as open market prices are relatively ruling strong due to lower kharif crop estimate," a senior Food Ministry official said.Procurement in eastern and southern states was also delayed by late rains and is expected to pick up this month, the official added. The rice production is estimated to be lower at 92.32 million tonne during the kharif (summer) season of 201314, as against 92.76 million tonne in the year-ago season.Currently, spot prices of common grade rice are ruling in the range of Rs 1,835-3,750/quintal in major producing states, according to traders.Of the total rice procured so far, FCI has purchased 8.1 million tonne in Punjab, 2.46 million tonne in Chattisgarh, 2.39 million tonne in Haryana and 1.54 million tonne in Andhra Pradesh, as per FCI data.The government has set 34.5 million tonne as target for rice procurement for 2013-14, as against 34.1 million tonne last year. In 2011-12, it was a record 35.06 million tonne.Looking at the procurement trends, market experts are of the view that total rice procurement could reach 32 million tonne. Fresh bulk buying pushes up Pusa-1121, Sharbati rice KARNAL, JAN. 7: Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  14. 14. Fresh buying pushed Pusa-1121 and Sharbati rice prices upwards, while other aromatic and non-basmati varieties managed to maintain their previous levels on Tuesday.Amit Chandna, proprietor of Hanuman Rice Trading Company, told Business Line that bulk buyers bought Pusa-1121 and Sharbati varieties. A marginal uptrend was anticipated and not an upward movement of Rs 200-500 a quintal, he said.It is unlikely to see any major alteration this week and the market may continue to rule around current levels, said Chandna. In the physical market, Pusa-1121 (steam) moved up by Rs 500 to Rs 9,000 a quintal, while Pusa-1121 (sela) improved by Rs 400 to Rs 8,000.Pure Basmati (raw) was quoted at Rs 12,500/quintal. Duplicate Basmati (steam) was sold at Rs 7,000.Pusa-1121 (second wand) was sold at Rs 7,000, Tibar at Rs 6,000, and Dubar at Rs 5,000.In the nonbasmati section, prices of Sharbati (steam) increased by Rs 200 to Rs 5,000; Sharbati (sela) was up by Rs 300 to Rs 4,800. Permal (raw) was sold at Rs 2,300, Permal (sela) at Rs 2,350, PR-11 (sela) at Rs 2,900, while PR-11 (raw) was sold at Rs 2,800. PR14 (steam) sold at Rs 3,200. Paddy Arrivals About 10,000 bags of different paddy varieties arrived at the Karnal Grain Market Terminal. About 5,000 bags of Pusa-1121 arrived and were sold at Rs 4,250; 2,000 bags of Sugandha 999 were sold at Rs 2,600-2,650, 2,000 bags of PR were sold at Rs 1,325-1,350, and 1,000 Sharbati bags at Rs 2,200-2,225. (This article was published on January 7, 2014) Keywords: Fresh buying, Pusa-1121, Sharbati rice Next-door neighbour: Delegation looks to promote rice exports to China By APPPublished: January 7, 2014 Pakistan is striving to improve its technological and agricultural capacity to increase rice exports in the face of stiff competition. PHOTO:FILE BEIJING: A delegation of the Rice Exporters Association of Pakistan (REAP) arrived in Beijing to explore possibilities of enhancing exports to China. Pakistan Ambassador to China Masood Khalid hoped that rice exporters will utilise the opportunities China has to offer and contribute in taking Pakistan’s export trade trajectory further upward. He expressed these views while addressing a reception for the delegation of REAP, led by Chela Ram, senior vice chairman of the Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  15. 15. association. Khalid said the Pakistani embassy was making every effort to deepen the commercial and trade ties between China and Pakistan and the current visit will complement those efforts. He pointed out that Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif has set out a very clear and coherent vision to expand Pakistan’s business, trade, financial and commercial ties with China.“China is set to invest billions of dollars worldwide in the next few years, as China’s ICBC bank has opened its branches in Pakistan,” said the envoy. “Along with this, we have a free trade agreement, currency swap arrangements and such steps will help promote economic ties between the two countries.”Khalid said that the country was constantly striving to improve its technological and agricultural capacity to increase volume of its rice exports in the face of stiff competition from its competitors and its rice quality matches the highest international standards.“We need to make every effort to expand rice exports across the world, particularly to China,” he noted. Highlighting the importance of trade and economic relations between Pakistan and China, Khalid emphasised the need for further increasing the volume of trade between the two countries, particularly of rice exports.“I believe that with China’s assistance, Pakistan can achieve a great deal of economic transformation.” Khalid said.Regarding the REAP delegation’s meeting scheduled for Monday with the China Oil and Food Corporation (COFCO), Khalid said the COFCO is the largest supplier of diversified products and services in the agricultural products and food industry in China.He said the Cofco serves as the main importing and exporting channel in China for bulk agricultural products such as wheat, corn, rice and sugar.He said that in 2012 Pakistan exported rice worth $268 million to China. Out of that COFCO imported 70%, all IRRI-6 variety.The REAP delegation also planned to travel to other cities, including Guangzhou, to deepen trade cooperation and coordination with their Chinese counterparts. Published in The Express Tribune, January 7th, 2014. Agspring Announces Formation of Big River Rice and Grain Includes Acquisition of Tubbs Rice Dryers and Raley Brothers Kansas City, KS (PRWEB) January 07, 2014 Today Agspring announced the formation of Big River Rice and Grain, a new grain storage and merchandising entity operating in Louisiana. As part of the formation of the entity, Agspring also announced the acquisition of Tubbs Rice Dryers and Raley Brothers, two established agri-businesses located in Northeastern Louisiana.“We are excited what our presence as part of the Agspring family will mean for our producer clients and partners in Louisiana,” said Larry Tubbs, CEO of Big River Rice and Grain. “Our desire is to provide excellent operating infrastructure and a stable partner who is committed to handling transactions quickly.”Big River will feature expanded operations including a new barge loader and expanded overall capacity.“I think the fact that we closed these deals right before the harvest and yet experienced no interruption in service shows what our Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  16. 16. producers and partners can expect from Big River,” said Mark Raley who heads business development for the company.Operations will continue to be managed locally, while Big River will benefit from corporate support, national supply chain planning and financial backing from Agspring headquartered in Kansas City.“We have to think globally but, at the same time, bring concrete benefits to the farmer down the road,” said Brad Clark, President of Agspring. “Trust in our operating companies, our growers and customers is built around a common purpose to help small to mid-sized agribusinesses to compete in an increasingly global marketplace.” Tubbs Rice Dryers, a long-standing family-owned elevator operation, has facilities in Mer Rouge and Pioneer, Louisiana, handling rice, corn, soybeans, soft red winter wheat and sorghum. Tubbs expanded operations in 2011, adding storage separations, drying and handling capacity to receive 60,000 bushels per hour and dry 16,000 bushels per hour.Raley Brothers, a third generation family-owned agribusiness has served the farmers of North Louisiana for more than half a century as a retailer and grain merchant. Today the company operates a grain merchandising business with operations across six locations. Big River local headquarters are in Pioneer, Louisiana, centrally located among facilities in Delhi, Mer Rouge, Monticello, Lake Providence and Crowville, Louisiana. Agspring combines entrepreneurial teams, essential agriculture supply chains, and superior capital partners for global success feeding our changing world. Deep equity and credit relationships provide Agspring a solid platform for capital improvement and expansion. Agspring maintains decentralized operations and puts leadership teams in place who desire to grow into new markets including grains and oil-seeds; livestock feed ingredients; and consumer food ingredients. MPCA releases wild rice sulfate studies 13 hours ago • By STEVE KARNOWSKI The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency said Tuesday it plans to make preliminary recommendations by the end of February on whether a state standard meant to protect wild rice from sulfate discharges should be changed based on a stack of reports and data just released from a major study.But the agency deferred drawing any immediate conclusions from the extensive field and laboratory research, which was conducted by scientists at the University of Minnesota's Duluth and Twin Cities campuses. MPCA officials need to do more work to evaluate the research before they can recommend whether the sulfate standard should be changed, said Shannon Lotthammer, director of the MPCA's environmental analysis division.Minnesota limits sulfate discharges from mines and other sources into waters that produce wild rice to 10 milligrams per liter, based on research from the 1940s suggesting that higher levels can stunt development of the plants. Supporters of iron and copper-nickel mining have argued that the standard is Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  17. 17. obsolete, while the state's American Indian bands fear any weakening could imperil a food source they consider sacred and central to their cultural identity. The theory behind the overall three-year study is that higher concentrations of sulfates can harm wild rice plants when they're converted into sulfides in the sediments where the plants grow. While the study summary says some of the reports on specific aspects of the research include data about sulfate and sulfide concentrations and their effects on wild rice, it would be "premature" to say whether they show that the standard should be changed."Each Study component uses a different approach to examine how sulfate might affect wild rice. The results of each component must be analyzed and integrated with the other components before any recommendations can be made about the standard," the report said.John Pastor, a UMD biologist who was the lead researcher, agreed with that assessment."People may think that whether the standard is correct or not is a simple yes-or-no question that is easily answered by the data. But it isn't and never was because the transformations and cycling of sulfur in wild rice beds are complicated. That's just the way Nature is," Pastor said in an email.The mining industry has argued that companies shouldn't be required to invest large sums in sulfate treatment technology that might not be needed."We want to protect wild rice, but we believe that any standard for the level of sulfate in wild rice waters has to be based on science," said Frank Ongaro, executive director of the industry group Mining Minnesota. "That's what this study was supposed to do, so we'll see what the agencies make of the results."Tom Howes, natural resources manager for the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians, who harvest wild rice in waters downstream from the state's main mining area, said he hadn't fully digested the reports and data and didn't want to speculate on what the MPCA might conclude. "I'd rather they were cautious than hasty. It's an important study," he said.But Howes said a virtue of the current standard is that it was set conservatively, instead of close to a breaking point."It's protective. To me that's a good standard," he said.The Minnesota Center for Environmental Advocacy will take a close look at the results, said Scott Strand, executive director of the group, which has defended the current standard."The burden is on the people who want to change it, not the people who think it's appropriate where it is," he said.Lotthammer said there will be opportunities for public and expert reviews of the research, and there will be a formal public comment process if the MPCA decides there's a scientific justification for changing the standard."We're definitely very excited about getting to this point with the study. The reports ... represent a significant amount of scientific work that we believe is going to be very valuable in further informing the standard. This was a very important milestone," she said. Odisha Government to initiate stern action against erring rice millers over paddy procurement Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  18. 18. Wednesday, January 08, 2014 Bhubaneswar: The State Government has decided to initiate stern action against the rice millers. Food Supplies and Consumer Welfare Minister Pratap Keshari Deb said he has directed the district Collectors to raid the rice mills in their districts. Admitting that Government has failed to collect cent percent CMR from the millers every year, he said the Government used to collect the CMR either by seizing them from the mills or collecting penalty from the millers. This year, the Government has decided to exclude the millers from paddy procurement who have failed to return the CMR by December 31 last. The Government incurs a loss of around `12 crore every year due to the callousness of the millers, but now these erring millers would be taken to task by confiscating their deposited money and filing cases against them, Deb said. Sources in the Food Supplies and Consumer Welfare Department said that around 1,100 millers procure paddy from farmers on behalf of the Government every year and return the CMR to the Government by December 31. However, some millers do not return the CMR as they either sell the rice to other parties or hoard them to sell at a higher rate later. Customs stumped in search for 'David Tan' By Jorge Cariño, ABS-CBN News Posted at 01/07/2014 11:50 AM | Updated as of 01/07/2014 5:18 PM MANILA (UPDATED) - The Bureau of Customs does not know David Tan.The name David Tan was identified in a Senate Joint Committee hearing in February last year, as one of the financiers who bankrolled the syndicate of bogus cooperatives and enterprises that cornered a hefty chunk of the National Food Authority's rice imports under the Aquino administration.The report also said that Tan had reportedly given as much as P6 billion in kickbacks to Customs officials and employees who facilitated the entry of his shipments of smuggled rice over the last two years.Last month, Malacanang said the Department of Justice came out empty handed on the hunt for David Tan because National Bureau of Investigation agents were unable to unveil the identity and the whereabouts of a certain David Tan and a certain Danny Ngo.The Department of Justice is looking on the possibility of reorganizing the investigation team handling the issue of rice smuggling, after NBI operatives came up empty handed on the hunt for a certain David Tan. At a press conference Tuesday morning, Customs Commissioner John Sevilla said even their deputy commissioners have no information on the David Tan named in the Senate hearing. But the Commissioner assured that their effort against rice smuggling will not be hindered despite the inability to identify David Tan.The Commissioner explained that they are now focused on targeting rice importers which numbered between 20 to 25."We will start with the actual import and we can check if the company is a dummy or Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  19. 19. controlled by an entity,' he said.Sevilla said they are 100% committed against smuggling and is also interested in finding out the real identity of Tan.Deputy Commissioner for Intelligence Jaime Dellosa said the Bureau is trying to profile the rice importers in the country and looking at ways on their mode of business.Dellosa said there are now 1,937 container vans of rice that were put on hold since October to December of last year, in different ports of the country. Each van contains an approximate load of 25,000 kilos of rice.Part of the reforms being instituted by the Bureau right is now is transparency in transactions made by the Bureau of Customs.Sevilla said imports are being posted on the website of their agency and if the public sees a discrepancy in the valuation of the imports, the people can send feedback to the Bureau of Customs so that rectifications can be made on the specific goods or value that is being questioned.Sevilla called on the public to help the Bureau of Customs get rid of corruption and smuggling. He said bad practices in the agency cannot be eradicated by the mere act of 3,600 employees of the Customs. Wild rice research finds sulfate impact Results of two years of field and laboratory work on how sulfate impacts wild rice were released today, but any decision on the state’s wild rice standard and its impact on the mining industry is still many months away. By: John Myers, Duluth News Tribune Results of two years of field and laboratory work on how sulfate impacts wild rice were released today, but any decision on the state’s wild rice standard and its impact on the mining industry is still many months away.The data was collected by studying wild rice in outdoor tubs and indoor labs at the University of Minnesota Duluth and by University of Minnesota Twin Cities campus scientists studying wild rice in rivers and lakes across the state.The $1.5 million effort concluded in December, and preliminary results made public today appear to show that sulfate at certain levels does indeed impact wild rice, as suspected.But it’s not a direct, toxic effect, according to John Pastor, the lead UMD scientist on the project.“Sulfate on its own did not have a detrimental effect on wild rice; it wasn’t directly toxic to wild rice,” Pastor told the News Tribune. “But when sulfate is converted to sulfides, that’s what has an effect.’’ That conversion happens in the sediment as the plant tries to pick up nutrients, Pastor said.Once sulfate is converted to sulfide “the issue is not with germination. The seeds germinate. But it adversely impacts the growth of the seedling,’’ Pastor added. Where sulfate wasn’t converted to sulfide, wild rice generally wasn’t damaged, he said.The laboratory work corroborated the field work, Pastor noted, and all of it corroborated work done in the 1940s by a state scientist -- John Moyle -- who found wild rice did not grow well in water high in sulfate.“Moyle made the correlation correctly. What he didn’t know is how it happened,” Pastor said. “Now, we know a lot more about how it happens.’’But knowing how it happens is different than deciding how much sulfate is too much for wild rice, and what limit to apply to industrial discharges, especially mining. Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  20. 20. “I can’t make that recommendation. I can’t say what the limit should be,’’ Pastor noted.That will be up to the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency. PCA officials will take the study results and use them to help make a decision on what, if anything, to do with the state’s current standard of 10 parts per million sulfate in waters that hold wild rice stands.For the next few months PCA staff will “analyze the data as a whole, and review existing monitoring data’’ and other relevant scientific studies, and by April decide whether the standard should be changed.If the answer is yes, the PCA would come up with a proposed new standard and kick-off a months-long rulemaking process that would include public input, testimony and hearings headed by an administrative law judge, all under the watchful eye of the federal Environmental Protection Agency.Several Minnesota taconite operations are in violation of the state’s 10 parts per million sulfate limit and are waiting for the state’s decision. The PCA is getting input and guidance from a 32-person “advisory committee” representing taconite companies, business groups, environmentalists, Indian resource agencies and research universities.Shannon Lotthammer, director of the PCA’s Environmental Analysis and Outcomes Division, told the News Tribune Tuesday that it’s “just too soon to draw any general conclusions from the data about the impact of sulfate on wild rice,’’ saying additional analysis is needed. The study results “include information about the concentrations of sulfate or sulfide at which effects on wild rice were observed, and we continue to see correlations in the field data regarding sulfate and sulfide concentrations and wild rice presence,” Lotthammer said. “With that said, we need to review the results… complete our own statistical analyses, and compare the results across the individual study components before we are in a position to say anything about the general consensus or conclusions about what impact sulfate has on wild rice.”Sulfates are ions that can come from decaying plants and animals as well as some industrial processes such as mine discharges, mine stockpiles and waste piles, tanneries, steel mills, pulp mills, sewagetreatment plants and textile plants. High sulfate levels are known to damage plants, in some cases by limiting uptake of nutrients.The PCA is under pressure from business and mining groups to relax the standard, noting several taconite mines and other industries may not be able to meet it without huge investments that might impact Minnesota jobs.It’s also suspected that runoff from proposed copper mining operations will be high in sulfate and that the standard could affect future mining projects. The proposed PolyMet copper mine, for example, can meet the existing sulfate standard, an environmental review concludes, but only by treating water that leaves the site for decades, possibly centuries to come. Environment and tribal groups want to keep the old standard, saying higher sulfate standards could decimate wild rice beds and may cause other harmful environmental effects.Minnesota lawmakers tried, on their own, to relax the state sulfate rule in 2011 in an effort to help industry. But the EPA said they could not change a law tied to the Clean Water Act without scientific backing. So the Legislature also approved money for what became the state’s largest ever study of wild rice.The current standard of 10 parts per million was upheld in December, 2012 by a state court of appeals ruling. The original lawsuit was filed by the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce in 2010 asking the court to throw out the state's 1973 sulfate rule, claiming it was unfounded, based on poor science and was overly restrictive, especially for the state's mining industry. The court ruled that the Chamber would have to wait for the study to conclude and the state to determine any new standard.While the state-funded study is over, Pastor said his efforts have received a $200,000 SeaGrant grant and another $60,000 from the Fond du Lac Band of Ojibwe to continue his work over a longer period of Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  21. 21. time to see if the impact of sulfate to sulfide conversion changes over several more years, well beyond the two years in the state study. Tags: news, updates, rice, umd Chinese Scientists Cultivate Salt-Resistant Rice With High Yield Featured Research January 8, 2014 Chinese scientists have cultivated a high-yield salt-resistant rice variety that boasts an output of six tons per hectare.AsianScientist (Jan. 8, 2014) – Chinese scientists have created a high-yield salt-resistant rice variety that boasts an output of six tons per hectare, according to China’s state-run Xinhuanews agency.Researchers from Hainan University began their research on the development of salt-resistant varieties as early as 1992. In the late 1990s, they managed to cultivate salt-resistant vegetables, including tomatoes, eggplant, cowpeas and pepper. Six years ago, the researchers inserted a salt-resistant gene from a wild plant into a normal rice variety, and after five years of screening, they obtained 18 salt-resistant rice varieties.They planted 18 salt-resistant varieties on saline-alkali land along the seacoast in the city of Yancheng in eastern Jiangsu province. One variety was identified as matching the output of varieties growing on normal farmland, according to Hainan University Professor Lin Qifeng.They now plan to expand the experimental plantation to 100 mu in Yancheng to further evaluate the performance of the salt-resistant varieties.China has nearly 13.3 million hectares of saline-alkali soils with the potential to be cultivated, equivalent to one-tenth of the country’s total farmland, according to data from the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Rice smugglers using courts to thwart BOC’ (The Philippine Star) | Updated January 8, 2014 - 12:00am MANILA, Philippines - Rice smugglers are turning to the courts to prevent the Bureau of Customs from seizing rice cargo that has no import permit, a BOC official said yesterday.“The strategy is to seek an injunction to prevent the BOC from implementing the seizure of shipments. We would contest very vigorously the injunctions against us… We would go after the consignees and importers that bring in these shipments,” said Jessie Dellosa, BOC deputy Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  22. 22. commissioner for intelligence.Dellosa said they noticed the “shift in strategy” in the last few months.He said at least P725 million worth of smuggled rice had been seized since September. These were in 1,936 shipping containers, of which 411 were abandoned.The rice imports entered the country through the ports of Manila, Davao, Cebu, Cagayan de Oro and Batangas.Dellosa said the BOC issues a warrant of seizure and detention in favor of the government if consignees leave the rice imports unclaimed for 30 days.BOC Commissioner John Sevilla said the 1,936 shipping containers yielded around 48 million kilos of rice with an estimated value of P725 million. BOC slammed Meanwhile, a rice importer slammed the BOC yesterday for defying court orders allowing the release of their shipments, which were seized last year for allegedly being smuggled.Starcraft and Bold Bidder Marketing said BOC’s refusal to release the shipments is “an open defiance to the judiciary” and “utter disrespect of judicial proceedings.”Starcraft’s lawyer Benito Salazar cited separate orders of the Manila Regional Trial Court Branch 54, Batangas RTC Branch 5 and Davao RTC Branch 16 granting their petition for writ of preliminary injunction.He said the court orders prevent the National Food Authority (NFA) from requiring those bringing rice into the country to secure import permits.“Despite the mandatory nature of the said writs, the BOC has unlawfully refused to implement and/or disseminate to the concerned BOC offices/official directives on the implementation of the subject writs,” he said during a press conference in Manila.Salazar said his client had written Sevilla and the Office of the Solicitor General on Jan. 2 reminding them of the orders of the courts. He said the BOC refused to release the rice shipments, insisting that the NFA has the authority to issue discretionary import permits for rice in light of the expiration of the country’s right to impose limits and restrictions in its importation.Salazar, however, noted that such restriction is in violation of the World Trade Organization-General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade.He also belied the NFA’s claim that the importers were involved in rice smuggling in Davao. He said the rice shipments were fully declared as rice and there was no mis-declaration.“Our clients did not smuggle rice; they brought the rice into the country legitimately and openly,” he said.“How can the NFA accuse us of smuggling rice into the country when my clients openly declared that they were importing rice into the country without an import permit, a fact they made known to NFA officials in letters sent to them on Aug. 20, 2013 and Sept. 10, 2013?” he asked. 100 percent committed Commissioner Sevilla assured the public that the BOC is “100 percent committed” to curb rice smuggling.He said they are also looking into the involvement of a certain David Tan, alleged to be behind large-scale rice Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  23. 23. smuggling activities in various ports all over the country. However, he admitted that they have little information about Tan’s real identity.When asked if it was possible that Tan is a fictitious name, Sevilla said “positive.” No David Tan There is no David Tan registered as rice trader with the NFA in Davao City, NFA-Southern Mindanao manager Felimon Cangrejo told The STAR.There were reports saying David Tan’s real name was Davidson Tan Bangayan, but Cangrejo said that name was also not in the NFA’s list of rice traders. – With Edu Punay, Edith Regalado For Advertising SPECS & RATES Contact: Advertising Department Mujahid Ali mujahid.riceplus@gmail.com +92 321 369 2874 Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874

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