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3rd february,2014 daily global rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
3rd february,2014 daily global rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
3rd february,2014 daily global rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
3rd february,2014 daily global rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
3rd february,2014 daily global rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
3rd february,2014 daily global rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
3rd february,2014 daily global rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
3rd february,2014 daily global rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
3rd february,2014 daily global rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
3rd february,2014 daily global rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
3rd february,2014 daily global rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
3rd february,2014 daily global rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
3rd february,2014 daily global rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
3rd february,2014 daily global rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
3rd february,2014 daily global rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
3rd february,2014 daily global rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
3rd february,2014 daily global rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
3rd february,2014 daily global rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
3rd february,2014 daily global rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
3rd february,2014 daily global rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
3rd february,2014 daily global rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
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3rd february,2014 daily global rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine

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Daily Rice Global Rice e-Newsletter shared by Riceplus Magazine …

Daily Rice Global Rice e-Newsletter shared by Riceplus Magazine
Riceplus Magazine shares daily International RICE News for global Rice Community. We publish daily two newsletters namely Global Rice News & ORYZA EXCLUSIVE News for readers .You can share any development news with us for Global readers.
Dear all guests/Commentators/Researchers/Experts ,You are humbly requested to share One/Two pages write up with Riceplus Magazine .
For more information visit (www.ricepluss.com + http://publishpk.net/index.php/riceplus).
Share /contribute your rice and agriculture related research write up with Riceplus Magazine to riceplus@irp.edu.pk , mujahid.riceplus@gmail.com
For Advertisement & Specs mujahid.riceplus@gmail.com

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  • 1. 3rd February, 2014 Share developments in RICE and allied sectors, Promote the Concept of Knowledge Economy Dear Sir/Madam, YOUR IDEA has a great worth---JUST share it through RICE PLUS 10000+ stakeholders of rice industry read & apply various ideas and analysis written by the authors. Be the part of Rice plus authors Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 2. Visit: www.ricepluss.com,www.publishpk.net mujahid.riceplus@gmail.com riceplus@irp.edu.pk TOP Contents - Tailored for YOU Latest News Headlines…              Agri expert urges PHL to continue rice-sufficiency program Can Myanmar regain its position as the top exporter? Rice Revival Bangladesh says to speed up wheat imports to boost reserves NFA infuses more rice in markets Farmers close Bangkok-South road to demand payment for rice Farm Bill to affect rice farmers, provide some help for drought Commodity prices move up Rice prices may gain a tad over next few weeks India's wheat, rice exports raise hackles at WTO .RICE News shared by PhilRice News Agri expert urges PHL to continue rice-sufficiency program What’s NEW in RICE research? NEWS DETAILS: Agri expert urges PHL to continue rice-sufficiency program Category: Agri-Commodities 02 Feb 2014 Written by Alladin S. Diega / Correspondent AN agricultural development specialist has called on Asian nations not to abandon rice-sufficiency policy and urged them to revolutionize their farm sectors, as well.Sjarifudin Baharsjah made the statement during the awarding ceremony of the 2013 Dioscoro L. Umali Award in Agricultural Development where he was the recipient, held at Makati City recently.Baharsjah, 80, a former Indonesia agriculture minister, was recognized Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 3. for his efforts to promote food security in Indonesia through policies and measures, particularly the agribusiness approach, effectively increasing productivity of rice farms and uplifting the welfare of Indonesian farmers.In a speech, Baharsjah said: ―Indonesia became self-sufficient in rice in 1984 after decades of importing the grain largely through the application of the Green Revolution technology. ‖Although the rice varieties Indonesia used to raise output came from the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), these were further improved through the work of the Indonesia Agency for Agricultural Research and Technology (IAARD), according to Baharsjah.Indonesia depends largely on Java to produce rice, accounting for 60 percent of the national rice production, and to encourage more farmers to plant these varieties, the national government has launched extension services and the provision of subsidies, including fertilizers, and credit to farmers.―When the country decided to adopt an export-driven growth policy, the agriculture sector was confident that it could support the policy, in part, not only because of its rubber, crude palm oil and cacao exports playing a significant role, but also because it was confident in its ability to produce enough rice to create the low-cost condition, which would make the country‘s exports of industrial products competitive in the world market,‖ the agriculture research awardee said.According to Baharsjah, Indonesia had 238 million people to feed in 2010, and the population growth rate is 1.5 percent yearly.Baharsjah also said that the per capita rice consumption per year of his country is higher than that of the Philippines at 139 kilos, while the hectarage for irrigated rice fields (sawah) in Java is now down to 3.3 million hectares, with the annual decrease of farms estimated at 50,000 hectares annually. Moreover, he noted that Indonesia‘s rice production has stagnated at 5 metric tons (MT) per hectare, which is still higher than the average of 3.9 MT per hectare in the Philippines.Rice self-sufficiency has proven to be an effective tool to improve the economy of a developing economy, however, the goals have to be met to avert dire consequences, the awardee warned.―A serious impact of the agricultural policy which insisted on maintaining self-sufficiency in spite of failures to actually achieve the goals, coupled with the opening of the domestic market to foreign produce was the rise in poverty and unemployment in rural areas, a rural agriculture economic involution, even within a seemingly healthy national economy,‖ Baharsjah noted.The Philippines‘s Department of Agriculture has declared 98 percent in food self-sufficiency program for 2013, citing the series of strong tropical typhoons that visited the country last year as the reason for the shortage. ―As most of the country‘s population lives in the rural areas, and unless the agriculture economic involution of the rural areas is not properly addressed, it may become an ever enlarging balloon of poverty which endangers the national economy,‖ Baharsjah added.Referring to his own country primarily, Baharsjah stressed that current ―agricultural policy‖ which mainly consists of setting targets to reach self-sufficiency in rice, corn, sugar, soybean and meat, may lead simply to a repetition of serious policy failures which would lead to an agricultural catastrophe.A new agricultural policy, based on the actual availability of natural resources and the best possible agricultural practices has to be formulated which would lead future development of our agriculture to achieve long-term goals, namely, the ability to produce enough food for our people, to raise income and welfare of our farmers, and to contribute significantly to national development, Baharsjah concluded. Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 4. Can Myanmar regain its position as the top exporter? The position Myanmar once occupied as the world‘s largest rice exporter has become a shorthand of sorts for all the country‘s lost opportunities under nearly 60 years of military rule.Once Asia‘s rice bowl, inept management during the Ne Win regime and the junta that succeeded it transformed Myanmar into a basket case as far as exports of the cereal are concerned.Now many are wondering whether Myanmar is due for a rice revival.There‘s no doubt that Myanmar has the potential to regain its standing as a major rice exporter, although it‘s unclear it will ever regain the position it held between 1961 and 1963 as the world‘s largest.―That‘s what we‘re aiming for,‖ says U Aung Zaw Oo, joint-secretary of the Myanmar Rice Federation. ―But it will take time—in my view, a minimum of five to 10 years.‖ Others are less sure.It‘s got a long way to go. Myanmar ranked 10th on a list of rice exporting countries released by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization last November. India, with 8.58 million tonnes, topped the list of average yearly exports from 2011 to 2013, followed by Thailand (8.063 million tonnes) and Vietnam (7.244 million tonnes). Average yearly exports from Myanmar for the period were 646,000 tonnes, behind even middling rice producer countries such as Cambodia and Uruguay.About eight million hectares of rice was grown in Myanmar in 2011, when the country produced about 30 million tons, most of it for domestic consumption. The Myanmar government wants to double rice exports this year and next to 2.5 million metric tonnes.That‘s an ambitious target. Yet U Aung Zaw Oo notes the strides Myanmar has taken in recent years: cross-border exports to China are up, the European Union has become a customer after reopening its market to Myanmar last summer, and east Africa and Russia are big buyers of Myanmar parboiled rice. U Aung Zaw Oo says Myanmar has even begun selling rice to Japan, one of the world‘s fussiest markets.But as it prepares to boost production and re-enter the international market in an even bigger way, Myanmar must grapple with competing visions on how best to crack the world market. What‘s emerging as the central question in this debate is whether Myanmar should aim at the high-end of the market, or as low as it can go?One camp in this debate is represented by the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), the global rice ―think tank‖ at Los Banos, just outside the Philippines capital, Manila.IRRI researchers believe Myanmar lags too far behind to go toe-to-toe with its regional competitors. That‘s because becoming a major exporter is not just about growing the rice. Capacity must also be developed to harvest, mill and grade the crop.It‘s an intricate and multifaceted system, and Myanmar is behind on almost all fronts.U Aung Zaw Oo notes that Myanmar rice mills have long relied on low-quality Chinese machinery. International markets demand better. But milling companies will not be able to afford the state-of-the-art equipment they need unless they have access to finance and that means modernizing Myanmar‘s banks. ―Our banking system needs to be competitive with other ASEAN nations,‖ U Aung Zaw Oo says. That‘s not all. After it‘s been milled, rice must be aggregated in appropriate volumes for international shipping, trucked and warehoused, then loaded on a ship at port.U Aung Zaw Oo says Myanmar is too dependent on trucks, an expensive way to move product that drives costs up and makes Myanmar rice less competitive. More needs to be done, he says, to boost alternatives such as water transport. Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 5. Hence the concern at IRRI about Myanmar‘s ability to compete with its neighbours.―The whole delivery chain – including the capacity to negotiate contracts and accept international bank-to-bank payments, and covered by agreements that meet international standards,‖ said Bruce Tolentino, IRRI‘s deputy director general for communications and partnerships.All this must be done on schedule, by contract, and on a consistent, reliable basis. Another possible complication is that all transactions must be governed by the terms of arbitration agreements between parties – ensuring that an objective referee will be able to step into the process in the event a deal goes sour. Meanwhile, there‘s the need for marketing to make buyers outside Myanmar aware of product that will for the most part be unknown to them.Myanmar must build all this capacity – virtually from nothing. It‘s a tall order. To make the point, Mr Tolentino draws a dramatic analogy: ―They‘ve been quite isolated for a long time, and as a result their internal capacity to manage large volumes of trade in almost anything is relatively weak. The example we ought to look at is Vietnam after the war.‖ Rice Revival So Myanmar is as badly off now as a country pummeled by years of privation and international conflict. Granted, in the 1980s Vietnam was able to overcome the shambles of its post-war situation to become a major rice exporter, in just three years. ―From almost zero, that‘s all it took,‖ says Mr Tolentino.Myanmar is unlikely to duplicate Vietnam‘s rapid ascent.―It‘s a different world right now,‖ Mr Tolentino argues. ―When Vietnam entered the market, there weren‘t many competitors — only Thailand.‖Now that market is crowded by Thailand — still one of the world‘s top exporters despite a misguided rice-subsidy program — as well as Vietnam, India and Pakistan.What to do? For one thing, IRRI has been advising Myanmar not to aim too low.―Competing at the lower end of the market may mean a race to the bottom, which is going to be tough,‖ Mr Tolentino says. ―What we have been advising the government to think carefully about doing is for it to compete at the higher end of the market. Myanmar has the capability to produce high quality rice and that‘s the more lucrative end to compete in.‖IRRI can help Myanmar with this strategy. During a trip to the Philippines last December, President U Thein Sein and a group of cabinet ministers visited IRRI and discussed building a stronger partnership with the institute.Mr Tolentino suggests a tantalizing possibility for Myanmar‘s rice future — exporting the traditional varieties farmers have grown for eons, and which remain unknown outside the country.One such variety is paw san, which boasts roughly the same aromatic and taste qualities as the high-end Thai variety known as hommali, a type of Jasmine rice. ―If it is promoted as a particular Myanmar brand variety, then there‘s a really good chance that that market can expand and Myanmar can capture that part of the market,‖ says Mr Tolentino.U Swe Zin Myint Thein, a Myanmar research scientist at IRRI, says paw san is ―fluffy, delicate and aromatic‖ — perfect for the premium market, and able to compete against the best Thai product. But paw san is also a relatively low yield variety. That‘s problematic for a country where farmers continue to face challenges in the post-harvest stage of production, cutting into already low margins. U Swe Zin Myint Thein is breeding hardy rice varieties capable of Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 6. withstanding Myanmar‘s at-times stressful growing conditions, particularly as global warming continues to put new pressures on the crop.Challenges such as those outlined above are why some experts counsel a different marketing strategy as Myanmar tests the waters of the international rice market.Concepcion Calpe, a senior economist at the United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organization says that both Thailand and Vietnam are increasingly targeting the high-quality segment of the international market, using high-grade rice as a way of dealing with production constraints that affect how much lower-grade rice they can export. ―Both countries, as well as India and China, are now focusing on maximizing the value, rather than the volume, of their exports, precisely by raising the quality of the rice they are selling,‖ Ms Calpe told Mizzima Business Weekly by email. ―If anything, these countries‘ strategies might help Myanmar gain a foothold in lower-quality markets in Africa and Asia, while making it far more difficult for the country to access the higher-quality consumer centres.‖Although Ms Calpe agrees that Myanmar‘s high-quality rice varieties will play a role in its export strategy, ―these will remain niche markets and would not propel the country among the major rice sources.‖She says the hurdles that some say might prevent Myanmar from competing at the bottom of the market may be exaggerated. Ms Calpe said the rice industry will benefit from big investments being made in the rice sector by companies from China, Japan, India and Vietnam. ―Because such investments explicitly target export markets,‖ she says, ―it may not take too long for Myanmar to emerge as a leading rice exporter.‖There‘s a good reason why it might be challenging to sell high-quality but low-yield paw san on international markets: the voracious appetites of Myanmar diners.U Aung Zaw Oo saysthe local appetite for the low-yield variety continues to price it out of the world market. ―Paw san is more expensive than Thai rice because local demand is huge,‖ he says.It takes time to convince foreign buyers to accept high price tags for a product they do not know.―In terms of quality and fragrance, we‘re the best,‖ says U Aung Zaw Oo. ―But we need to take the time to develop that niche market internationally.‖ Bangladesh says to speed up wheat imports to boost reserves BY RUMA PAUL DHAKA Mon Feb 3, 2014 2:02pm IS Feb 3 (Reuters) - Bangladesh will take advantage of a slump in global prices for wheat by speeding up imports to build state reserves, and soon plans to issue tenders for 100,000 tonnes of the grain, a top procurement official said on Monday.Such imports are crucial for the South Asian nation to feed its poor and keep domestic prices stable at a time when political turmoil has hit supply chains and government reserves are at five-year lows Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 7. ."We are soon going to issue tenders to import 100,000 tonnes of wheat," Mohammad Badrul Hassan, procurement director in the Directorate General of Food, told Reuters."The food scenario is not like that in 2008 when wheat and rice prices surged to record highs ... We can import grain at reasonable prices."In 2008, like many countries Bangladesh suffered as record food prices led to huge cancellation of wheat import deals and sparked protests in a country where more than a third of population still lives on less than $2 a day.Political unrest, accompanied by transportation blockades, over the last few months ahead of an election in January that was boycotted by the main opposition had crippled the country's supply chain, sending annual inflation higher for the second month in a row in December.Bangladesh's state grains agency has so far in the financial year that began in July bought or agreed to buy 300,000 tonnes of wheat in tenders. It is also buying 200,000 tonnes of wheat in a government-to-government deal with Ukraine at $307 a tonne CIF liner out.Glencore Xstrata in a tender that opened last week offered to sell 50,000 tonnes of wheat to Bangladesh for $303 a tonne CIF liner out, the lowest price offered to the country this fiscal year.The state buyer imported around 350,00 tonnes of wheat in the previous financial year.Chicago wheat futures, the global benchmark, are near 3-1/2 year low.Rice is the staple food for Bangladesh's 160 million people while wheat consumption is rising, with domestic production having stagnated at nearly 1 million tonnes. (Editing by Joseph Radford) NFA infuses more rice in markets Sunday 2nd of February 2014 QUEZON CITY, Feb. 2 -- More good quality, affordable NFA rice is available in the market, the National Food Authority (NFA) said Friday. NFA in a statment said it increases the volume of rice allocation for accredited rice outlets in markets in so-called hotspot areas in Manila, San Juan and Quezon City to boost the presence of the affordable government rice particularly in Kamuning, Frisco and Muñoz markets.From 25 bags, the NFA is increasing the allocation of NFA-accredited outlets inside markets to 50 bags per day. For rice outlets outside markets, the NFA is increasing the allocation to 20 from 10 bags each. The food agency said this is being done to augment the presence of cheap rice in the market so consumers will have access to the cheaper staple. NFA rice is being sold at P27 and P32 per kg. Prices of commercial rice were reported to have gone up, but the NFA assures that there is enough rice stocks in the markets. NFA said the country‘s total rice stocks stands at 7.5 million bags.The NFA regularly conducts market monitoring activities nationwide to ensure that good quality but affordable government rice is available especially for consumers with limited budget.The public may send any complaints, suggestions or inquiries via the Text NFA hotline number 0906-4363133.(NFA Public Affairs Department) Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 8. Farmers close Bangkok-South road to demand payment for rice Monday, 03 February 2014By MCOT RATCHBURI, Feb 3 – The road linking Bangkok and Thailand‘s South was completely blockaded in Wang Manao sub-district today in an intensified protest by disgruntled farmers who demanded the government‘s payment for the rice they have sold. The farmers from six southwestern provinces of Ratchburi, Kanchanaburi, Prachuap Khiri Khan, Phetchburi, Nakhon Pathom and Samut Songkram want the government to pay for the rice delivered already under the Yingluck Shinawatra government‘s rice pledging scheme.Rama II Road was closed on both sides at kms 83-84 in Wang Manao sub-district of Pak Tho district, disrupting traffic between Bangkok and 14 southern provinces.Farmers said the road would remain blocked until they received payment from the government.More farmers and supporters of the anti-government People‘s Democratic Reform Committee have joined the rally which was kicked off Saturday. Farm Bill to affect rice farmers, provide some help for drought By HEATHER HACKING/MediaNews Group and Democrat staff CREATED: 01/31/2014 12:30:48 AM PST WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The House of Representatives Wednesday passed the 939-page Farm Bill, with the Senate expected to do the same next week.As California heads into a harsh planting season amidst a drought, the Farm Bill will help.Rayne Pegg, manager of the California Farm Bureau Federation, said the bill contains a number of provisions that aid livestock producers harmed by weather disaster, including cattle, honeybees and farmed fish. Some provisions are retroactive.A tree assistance program is also available for disasters including drought, fire, freeze and earthquake, Pegg noted.For farmers of staple crops, including rice, wheat, corn and soy, the farm bill does away with direct payments.For Yolo County, rice was a $60 million industry in 2012, according the the latest Yolo County Agricultural Crop report. In that year, there was 40,561 acres harvested for 157.912 tons. That amount was actually less than in 2011, when $58.1 million of rice was sold off 42,476 acres, for 175,426 tons."It is a new day growing rice in the Sacramento Valley, said Tim Johnson, president of the California Rice Commission.In the past, growers "could count on every year getting some payment on production of a crop."Instead, growers will need to choose between a revenue protection program or a price loss program. Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 9. Johnson explained that this would set a floor of $16.10 per 100 pounds of rice, and applies to 85 percent of acres.Right now, the average cost to produce 100 pounds of rice in California is $19, according to UC Cooperative Extension, Johnson said.Growers will need to choose one program or the other for five years, he said.Growers of all crops, including commodities or specialty crops, can also buy crop insurance, which is subsidized by the federal government. But this insurance won't be available until 2015, which won't help with the upcoming crop season.Johnson said a lot of number crunching will be done to make decisions. The Rice Commission is working to create online calculators for growers.Funding for specialty crops, including nuts and nurseries in California, includes funding for research and marketing, Pegg of the California Farm Bureau said.The bill also "recognizes that there are risks in diseases being introduced into our livestock herds. "Funding will also likely include research labs, with UC Davis on the list.Help with marketing farm products overseas amounting to $200 million is also included, Pegg said."It's a huge bill for conservation," Pegg continued.Many landowners work through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program, which pays incentives for voluntary land practices.Food stamps were among the big issues with the bill's passage. The Senate and House went back and forth battling these numbers.In the end, $8 billion has been cut from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program over the next 10 years.Most of that savings comes from states that tie eligibility for food stamps to heating bill programs, the Associated Press reported. The cuts are estimated to reduce SNAP payments by $90 a month for about 850,000 households.The bill also prohibits the Agriculture Department from spending money on ads to recruit food stamp beneficiaries. Also out are illegal immigrants and college students.The full bill is nearly $1 trillion, with an estimated $16.6-$23 billion over 10 years vs. the 2008 Farm Bill.The bill also restores taxes paid to counties for government land.The bill passed the House 251-166. Both Northern SacramentoValley congressmen -- John Garamendi, D-Fairfield, and Doug LaMalfa, R-Richvale -- voted for the bill in the Hous Commodity prices move up MOHIUDDIN AAZIM Updated 2014-02-03 14:08:02 Prices of wheat rose further in January, keeping up months’ long trend, due to falling and mismanaged supplies. Consequently, wheat flour became costlier, pushing up prices of breads, buns and rusks. Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 10. Prices of wheat in international market declined gradually, from an average of $325 per tonne in October to $292 per tonne in December, but imports into Pakistan fell recently, aggravating the grain‘s shortage and fuelling its prices. Imports in December declined to 11,000 tonnes from 61000 tonnes in November. Importers say imports in January also remained low but exact stats are yet to pour in.In 2013, production of 24.3 million tonnes, down from about 25 million tonnes a year earlier, necessitated imports (377,000 tonnes were imported during July-December) .Wheat traders link the slowdown in imports in December to accelerated supplies of subsidised wheat from provincial food departments after these departments found that mismanagement was more to blame for short releases rather than shrinking stocks. Sindh Food department even took action against its officials.―But open market inventories are depleting on usual higher demand in winter and on unchecked smuggling,‖ a Karachibased trader told Dawn, citing it as a reason for price hike.Prices of Basmati rice also increased in January even though harvesting of the new crop that began in November kept the supplies strong. A recent SUPARCO report says no less than seven million tonnes of rice (both Basmati and coarse variety) has been produced this year. But recovery in Basmati exports from December and higher domestic demand are keeping the prices up, dealers say. In December 2013, exports of Basmati almost doubled to 45,000 tonnes from 23,000 tonnes in November— and even exceeded the December 2012 shipments of 38,000 tonnes.Besides, in continuation of the last year‘s trend ―packers of branded rice and chains of super stores pounced on the new year‘s Basmati grains immediately after their arrival in late November and December. That also sent prices up,‖ says another Karachi-based dealer.But some dealers say that prices of coarse rice varieties have showed no big rise in January, despite larger exports, for the market has enough carryover stocks and urban demand for nonBasmati grains remains subdued. Coarse rice exports also doubled to 308,000 tonnes in December 2013 from 154,000 tonnes in November, surpassing December 2012‘s exports of 292,000 tonnes. In January, prices of pulses also maintained an upward trend both because of insufficient local supplies and higher international prices on concerns of production in Canada, the largest producer of pulses. The biggest increase was seen in prices of Moong and Mash whereas Gram pulse recorded only a modest increase, and that too not on short supplies ―but in sympathy with overall inflationary trends,‖ says a local wholesaler.Huge gram harvest in the last cropping season reduced overall imports of pulses from 253,000 tonnes in July-December 2012 to 200,000 tonnes in July-December 2013.But traders say imports of Moong, Masoor, Mash and some other pulses (except gram) are now rising. Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 11. That explains an increase in imports to 35,000 tonnes in December 2013, from 21,000 tonnes, beating even December 2012‘s imports of less than 28,000 tonnes.Sugar prices remained flat in January as cane crushing continued throughout the country. Besides, international prices also kept falling on reports of larger outputs in some countries including Brazil and India.Sugar dealers say, however, that as Trading Corporation of Pakistan has got the government‘s approval to buy 75,000 tonnes sugar in February followed by 50,000 tonnes per month in coming months, a slight increase in prices could be seen next month. TCP purchased half a million tonnes of sugar in 2013 and under the new buying schedule it would end up buying another half a million tonnes or so, according to TCP sources. Industry sources say that some millers in Sindh and Punjab, in connivance with big dealers have already resorted to slower release of sugar stocks from mills to move the prices upwards in coming months. But a leading sugar miller in Sindh clarified that in recent weeks, frequent CNG rationing was the main reason behind delayed lifting of already purchased sugar stocks from mills.He said that declining trend in average international sugar prices (down 5.7 per cent and 7.5 per cent respectively in November and December ) along with higher estimated domestic output of the sweetener should keep local prices from rising. Pakistan is set to produce over five million tonnes of sugar this year, up from 4.7 million tonnes in the last year.Prices of tea inched up further in January keeping up the trend that set in with the eve of chilly weather. Officials of Pakistan Tea Association say prices of loose tea are climbing up not only in line with rising prices in Bangladesh and Sri Lanka but also due to an overall increase in the cost of domestic trade. Packers of branded tea had hiked prices back in November-December. —Mohiuddin Aazim Rice prices may gain a tad over next few weeks KARNAL, FEBRUARY 3: The rice market witnessed a steady trend with prices of aromatic and non-basmati rice varieties ruling unchanged on Monday.Amit Chandna, Proprietor of Hanuman Rice Trading Company, told Business Line that since the demand matched supply, prices were unchanged. The market is range-bound but within a positive territory.Traders expect the market to witness some changes and prices may improve marginally over the next few weeks, he said.In the physical market, Pusa-1121 (steam) sold at ₹9,200 -50, while Pusa-1121 (sela) quoted at ₹8,150 a quintalPure Basmati (Raw) quoted at ₹12,500. Duplicate basmati (steam) was sold at ₹7,000. . Pusa-1121 (second wand) was at ₹7,050, Tibar at ₹6,100 while Dubar at ₹5,000. In the non-basmati section, Sharbati (Steam) sold at ₹5,000 while Sharbati (Sela) was quoted at ₹4,800. Permal (raw) sold at ₹2,300, Permal (sela) at ₹2,350, PR (sela) sold at ₹2,900 while PR (Raw) was at -11 -11 ₹2,800. PR14 (steam) sold at ₹3,200. Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 12. Paddy Arrivals About 7,000 bags of different paddy varieties arrived at the Karnal Grain Market Terminal. About 5,000 bags of Pusa-1121 arrived and went for ₹4,250 while 2,000 bags of Sharbati went for ₹2,200 a quintal. (This article was published on February 3, 2014) Keywords: aromatic and non-basmati rice varieties, Hanuman Rice Trading Company, Nagpur Foodgrain Prices Open-Feb 03 Mon Feb 3, 2014 2:51pm IST 0 COMMENTS Nagpur, Feb 3 (Reuters) - Gram prices in Nagpur Agriculture Produce and Marketing Committee (APMC) reported strong on renewed demand from local millers amid tight supply from producing regions. Notable rise in Madhya Pradesh gram prices and reported demand from South-based millers also boosted prices, according to sources. * * * * FOODGRAINS & PULSES GRAM * Gram varieties ruled steady in open market on subdued demand from local traders amid ample supply in ready position. TUAR * Tuar fataka best and medium varieties suffered heavily in absence of buyers amid profit-taking selling by stockists at higher level. Increased overseas supply also pushed down prices. * In Akola, Tuar - 4,100-4,200, Tuar dal - 6,200-6,400, Udid at 6,000-6,300, Udid Mogar (clean) - 7,000-6,200, Moong - 8,000-8,200, Moong Mogar (clean) 9,400-9,600, Gram - 2,600-2,700, Gram Super best bold - 3,600-3,800 for 100 kg. * Wheat, rice and other commodities remained steady in open market in thin trading activity, according to sources. Nagpur foodgrains APMC auction/open-market prices in rupees for 100 kg FOODGRAINS Gram Auction Gram Pink Auction Tuar Auction Moong Auction Udid Auction Masoor Auction Available prices Previous close 2,562-2,800 2,530-2,710 n.a. 2,100-2,600 n.a. 4,300-4,380 n.a. 4,400-4,600 n.a. 4,300-4,500 n.a. 2,600-2,800 Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 13. Gram Super Best Bold 3,900-4,100 3,900-4,100 Gram Super Best n.a. Gram Medium Best 3,600-3,800 3,600-3,800 Gram Dal Medium n.a. n.a. Gram Mill Quality 3,400-3,500 3,400-3,500 Desi gram Raw 3,100-3,200 3,100-3,200 Gram Filter Yellow n.a. n.a. Gram Kabuli 7,900-10,300 7,900-10,300 Gram Pink 7,700-8,100 7,700-8,100 Tuar Fataka Best 6,400-6,600 6,700-6,900 Tuar Fataka Medium 6,000-6,200 6,100-6,300 Tuar Dal Best Phod 5,700-5,900 5,700-5,900 Tuar Dal Medium phod 5,300-5,500 5,300-5,500 Tuar Gavarani 4,300-4,400 4,300-4,400 Tuar Karnataka 4,400-4,500 4,400-4,6500 Tuar Black 7,400-7,500 7,400-7,500 Masoor dal best 5,300-5,400 5,300-5,400 Masoor dal medium 5,000-5,200 5,000-5,200 Masoor n.a. n.a. Moong Mogar bold 9,500-9,900 9,500-9,900 Moong Mogar Medium best 8,800-9,200 8,800-9,200 Moong dal super best 8,600-8,800 8,600-8,800 Moong dal Chilka 8,100-8,500 8,100-8,500 Moong Mill quality n.a. n.a. Moong Chamki best 7,400-7,800 7,400-7,800 Udid Mogar Super best (100 INR/KG) 7,100-7,400 7,100-7,400 Udid Mogar Medium (100 INR/KG) 5,400-6,200 5,400-6,200 Udid Dal Black (100 INR/KG) 4,500-4,700 4,500-4,700 Batri dal (100 INR/KG) 3,850-4,650 3,800-4,600 Lakhodi dal (100 INR/kg) 3,000-3,100 3,000-3,100 Watana Dal (100 INR/KG) 3,250-3,350 3,250-3,350 Watana White (100 INR/KG) 3,200-3,300 3,100-3,200 Watana Green Best (100 INR/KG) 4,200-4,500 4,200-4,500 Wheat 308 (100 INR/KG) 1,800-1,900 1,800-1,900 Wheat Mill quality(100 INR/KG) 1,880-1,925 1,880-1,925 Wheat Filter (100 INR/KG) 1,750-1,950 1,750-1,950 Wheat Lokwan best (100 INR/KG) 2,100-2,550 2,100-2,550 Wheat Lokwan medium (100 INR/KG) 2,050-2,150 2,050-2,150 Lokwan Hath Binar (100 INR/KG) n.a. n.a. MP Sharbati Best (100 INR/KG) 3,100-3,600 3,100-3,600 Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 14. MP Sharbati Medium (100 INR/KG) 2,500-2,900 2,500-2,900 Wheat 147 (100 INR/KG) 1,600-1,700 1,600-1,750 Wheat Best (100 INR/KG) 1,700-1,800 1,650-1,750 Rice BPT (100 INR/KG) 2,900-3,200 2,900-3,200 Rice Parmal (100 INR/KG) 1,700-1,750 1,700-1,750 Rice Swarna Best (100 INR/KG) 2,500-2,600 2,500-2,600 Rice Swarna Medium (100 INR/KG) 2,200-2,350 2,200-2,350 Rice HMT (100 INR/KG) 4,000-4,300 4,000-4,300 Rice HMT Shriram (100 INR/KG) 4,700-4,900 4,700-4,900 Rice Basmati best (100 INR/KG) 11,000-13,500 11,000-13,500 Rice Basmati Medium (100 INR/KG) 6,300-7,600 6,300-7,600 Rice Chinnor (100 INR/KG) 5,500-5,800 5,500-5,800 Rice Chinnor Medium (100 INR/KG) 5,100-5,300 5,100-5,300 Jowar Gavarani (100 INR/KG) 1,400-1,600 1,400-1,600 Jowar CH-5 (100 INR/KG) 1,700-1,800 1,700-1,800 WEATHER (NAGPUR) Maximum temp. 30.0 degree Celsius (86.0 degree Fahrenheit), minimum temp. 12.4 degree Celsius (54.3 degree Fahrenheit) Humidity: Highest - n.a., lowest - n.a. Rainfall : nil FORECAST: Mainly clear sky. Maximum and Minimum temperature likely to be around 30 and 13 degree Celsius respectively. Note: n.a.--not available (For oils, transport costs are excluded from plant delivery prices, but included in market prices.) India's wheat, rice exports raise hackles at WTO Sidhartha, TNN Feb 3, 2014, 08.52AM IST Tags:Wheat|net worth|markets|Insurability NEW DELHI: The US, Canada and Pakistan have questioned India's export of wheat and rice, suggesting that subsidized grains have been shipped out providing gains to local traders.The queries at the World Trade Organization (WTO) come weeks after these countries reluctantly agreed to India's demand for renegotiating the agreement related to food subsidies that turned into a make-or-break issue at the Bali ministerial meeting in December.The government has denied the suggestions and said that India is complying with all international norms. "We are on the right track," said a top government official, dismissing the charges.On January 29, at a meeting of the WTO's committee on agriculture, the US and Canada asked India about reports that it exported two million tonnes of wheat because of surplus stock, sources familiar with the discussions said. Canada then Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 15. went on to ask if the floor price had been lowered to $260 a tonne from $300 a tonne proposed earlier, which was lower than the Canadian export price. Similarly, the US calculated the cost of wheat at the port at $310 a tonne and asked the government to supply data on the costs and the prices of the winning bid.During the meeting itself, India tried to dismiss the allegations saying that the exports were contracted at $279-289 a tonne, which is higher than the floor price. But discussions could not be undertaken further as the US sent its questions late and India will furnish the data over the next few weeks.Pakistan - which was part of the developing country alliance seeking easier regime for food subsidies before doing a U-turn - has raised questions over India's rice export figures and how basmati and non-basmati were graded.Although the developed countries led by the US had opposed "renegotiating" the agreement on agriculture settled nearly two decades ago, one of the major concerns was over grains procured at a high minimum support price slipping into international markets.In fact, India has explicitly assured that it restricted such practices but experts had warned that future exports would come under a cloud as the developed countries would raise the issue and go to the extent of seeking damages or restriction on shipments.India, which was virtually isolated at Bali, managed to get a deal under which the cost of building stocks for food security will not be counted against a country's domestic support limits.For India, the issue is especially critical as its procurement of staples may breach the prescribed cap in the coming years. What’s NEW in RICE research? PHILIPPINE RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE (PhilRice) Telefax: (044) 456-0113 loc. 511 or 512 Maligaya, Science City of Muñoz, 3119 Nueva Ecija E-mail: prri@email.philrice.gov.ph Stop smuggling through improved competitiveness Police powers and legal remedies are not the only ways to stop rice smuggling as Philippine Rice Research Institute (PhilRice), the country‘s lead in rice science and development, proposes a long-term solution. PhilRice economists, Dr. Flordeliza Bordey and Aileen Litonjua, said that eliminating the opportunity to smuggle can reduce, if not stop rice smuggling.They said that the prospect of raking-in high profits owing to large difference between the world and domestic price of rice drives the rampant smuggling in the country. Domestic price of rice had been higher as much as 75 percent than the world price since 2000. Although the gap closed in 2008, price differential widened again to 30 percent in 2012. ―The huge price difference can be attributed mainly to rice trade policies of the government and higher cost of producing rice in the Philippines relative to exporting countries. Rice smuggling is only a symptom of a worse disease – the inability to compete,‖ they pointed out.The country had applied quantitative restriction (QR) on rice as its international trade policy since 1995. QR involves a Minimum Access Volume, which is the amount of Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 16. rice that may be imported at 40 percent in-quota tariff or the tariff applied on imports within a quota. A higher tariff of 50 percent is imposed to imported rice beyond this quota. This policy was crafted to limit the inflow of cheap imported rice, thereby, protecting farmers and market players.However, studies show that ―smuggling tends to be more rampant in markets with high import duties and quantitative trade restrictions.‖ The country`s commitment to integrate with the ASEAN Economic Community by 2015 will eventually force the government to reduce these trade barriers. And with this, the price of domestic rice will be seen to adjust and follow the world market, and consequently minimize the incentive to smuggle. But doing so without enhancing the ability of farmers and other domestic market players to produce and market rice efficiently could only mean harm to the local rice industry,‖ the economists said.To be competitive, farmers must implement strategies to reduce the cost of producing rice such as mechanizing farm activities particularly harvesting and threshing. Adoption of high quality inbred and hybrid seeds, and PalayCheck - integrated crop management system, can also further increase the rice output per unit of input and reduce production cost per unit.Meanwhile, Dr. Eufemio T. Rasco, Jr., PhilRice executive director, encouraged farmers to diversify their crops and try alternative ways to cut production cost. To improve productivity, farmers need to diversify farming activities like engaging in non-rice income-generating activities that use resources from the rice environment. This includes production of mungbean, corn, mushroom, vermicast, ducks, and fish. In addition, farmers can use non-fossil fuel based inputs like vermicast, Azolla, mungbean, crop rotation and bioethanol to further reduce farm production cost. If rice income of farmers will decline as a result of free trade, they should be helped to find alternative income sources,‖ he stressed. What‘s NEW in RICE research? PHILIPPINE RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE (PhilRice) Telefax: (044) 456-0113 loc. 511 or 512 Maligaya, Science City of Muñoz, 3119 Nueva Ecija E-mail: prri@email.philrice.gov.ph Farmers warned on fake PhilRice seeds The Philippine Rice Research Institute (PhilRice) cautioned farmers to be more careful in buying seeds after the agency had found a rampant unauthorized use of its sacks in Nueva Ecija and Isabela. When transacting with seed dealers, PhilRice advised farmers to contact the Farmers` Text Center at 0920-9111398 to verify prices, rice varieties being sold, and quality of the seeds. Investigations by a Fact Finding Committee showed that hybrid rice seeds claimed to be from PhilRice were mixed with other varieties and sold at PhP6,000 per 20 kg. PhilRice-produced hybrid rice seeds cost only PhP195 a kilo.―We sell registered seeds to growers and they in turn produce certified seeds, which are widely sold to farmers. It could be that sacks with PhilRice ‗brand‘ and certification tags are bogus. Rest assured that we are after entities who claim that they are selling PhilRice-produced seeds, although these are not really PhilRice-produced and may not even be PhilRice varieties,‖ Dr. Eufemio T. Rasco Jr, PhilRice executive director, said. Recently, the country`s lead agency in rice research and development found that Javan Agri Trading Company used PhilRice sacks in distributing Mestiso 24, a hybrid rice variety to a cooperative in Cabiao, Nueva Ecija. Analysis of the sample seeds Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 17. showed that seeds were actually PSB Rc240, an inbred variety. The cooperative members said that they were encouraged to buy the seeds despite of the high price because they were delivered ―right in their doorsteps‖; reducing their travelling cost.―We have asked the authorities to investigate on this. For the meantime, our farmers can contact our Text Center or check PhilRice-produced available seeds in http://www.philrice.gov.ph/index.php?page=products&page2=seeds,‖ Rasco said.To ensure purity and cleanliness, Rasco said that PhilRice-produced seeds undergo a month-analysis conducted by National Seed Quality Control Services, a division under the Bureau of Plant Industry that oversees seed and planting material production, processing, storage, and distribution. ―We assure our farmers that our seeds have a minimum germination rate of 85 percent. High quality seeds can contribute to a 5-10 percent increase in grain yield, so this is why, we maintain our standards on seeds,‖ Rasco said. Other than agriculture establishments and seed centers, farmers can also buy seeds at PhilRice stations in Science City of Muñoz, Nueva Ecija; Batac, Ilocos Norte; San Mateo, Isabela; Los Baños, Laguna; Murcia, Negros Occidental; RTRomualdez, Agusan del Norte; Midsayap, North Cotabato; and Ligao City, Albay. What’s NEW in RICE research? PHILIPPINE RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE (PhilRice) Telefax: (044) 456-0113 loc. 511 or 512 Maligaya, Science City of Muñoz, 3119 Nueva Ecija E-mail: prri@email.philrice.gov.ph Execs back less rice wastage Local executives in the country are prioritizing measures that will reduce rice wastage as commitment in sustaining the National Year of Rice 2013, which will be launched this year as the Be RICEponsible campaign. During last year‘s Vice Mayors‘ League of the Philippines meeting, around 130 towns and cities pledged to support policies that would promote responsible rice consumption for the country to be rice-self-sufficient and for the Filipinos to have better health. Hazel Antonio, director of the National Year of Rice 2013 campaign, said that dialogues with the food service industry and discussions at the local legislature are now being conducted to implement the default serving and availability of half rice to prevent wastage. Already, food establishments in some provinces including La Union, were required to include half cup of rice in their menu.―The goal of default serving and availability of half-cup rice is not to limit the rice consumption of Filipinos, but rather to give consumers more freedom to order what they can only eat,‖ Antonio said. Based on a 2008 data of the Food and Nutrition Research Institute, every Filipino wastes around 9g of uncooked rice or 2tbsp of cooked rice daily. The wastage is equivalent to 13 percent of our rice imports in 2010 and can be valued at PhP6.2B, enough to feed 2.6M Filipinos for a year.―We cannot solve the issue on rice wastage by forcing people to eat beyond what they can. The solution is to provide them with smaller serving options and by serving half-cup as default especially during Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 18. conferences or meetings where plated meals are served,‖ Antonio explained.―In the end, this will not only reduce wastage in rice but also on money as people will not be forced to pay for something that they do not want to eat,‖ Antonio concluded.Sen. Ferdinand "Bongbong" Marcos Jr. has also recently filed Senate Bill 1863, or the "AntiRice Wastage Act of 2013‖ while Butil Rep. Agapito Guanlao and Batangas Rep. Mark Llandro Mendoza filed a similar bill at the House of Representatives.Senator Loren Legarda also expressed her support to the half cup policy during her privilege speech at the senate on rice, biodiversity, and climate change on December 18, 2013. Apart from half cup of rice, also being encouraged by DA-PhilRice is the serving of healthier rice such as brown rice and rice mixed with other staples such as corn and camote to promote better health. ### What’s NEW in RICE research? PHILIPPINE RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE (PhilRice) Telefax: (044) 456-0113 loc. 511 or 512 Maligaya, Science City of Muñoz, 3119 Nueva Ecija E-mail: prri@email.philrice.gov.ph Agri sector lacks investment Economists based at Philippine Rice Research Institute (PhilRice) found in their studies that low investment in research and development (R&D) slows down agricultural productivity.In a volume of the 12-monograph series in Productivity Growth in Philippine Agriculture authored by Flordeliza Bordey and Sergio Francisco of PhilRice Socioeconomics Division, they stated that the country‘s ability to feed an increasing population or total factor productivity is declining. Reports from the budget division of the Department of Agriculture showed that R&D had a 0.08 percent-share of public spending compared to infrastructures, regulatory services, and production support in 2001. This less than a percent-share declined to half in 2002 and 2003. It increased to 0.06 percent in 2004 and 0.05 percent in 2005.Published late last year, the book showed that the country has low public investment in R&D compared with Indonesia, Malaysia, India, and China.In 2002, Indonesia spent USD 177M; USD 424, Malaysia; USD 1,355M, India; USD 2,574 M, China; while the Philippines only spent USD 141M.―The conclusions from the studies imply that the decline in productivity growth is caused by the inability of the country to allocate its resources efficiently, and to policies that intervened in the process of resource allocation,‖ the authors said.With their findings, they concluded that R&D investments in agriculture in general have not received priority attention from the government.―The continued under investment would have a negative implication on productivity. This needs to be addressed to realize the high benefits from agricultural R&D,‖ the authors said. In the case of rice, the economists found that among public investments in R&D, extension, production subsidy and irrigation, only R&D generated cost savings or was able to spend less money than the expected cost. Despite spending less, R&D activities had improved agricultural productivity through researches and technologies.The monograph series was supported by the Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture, the Bureau of Agricultural Research, and PhilRice. Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 19. What’s NEW in RICE research? PHILIPPINE RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE (PhilRice) Telefax: (044) 456-0113 loc. 511 or 512 Maligaya, Science City of Muñoz, 3119 Nueva Ecija E-mail: prri@email.philrice.gov.ph PhilRice intensifies technology adaptation The Philippine Rice Research Institute (PhilRice) fast tracks the adaptation of farming technologies with its seven branches across the country implementing a more developmental approach. During the institute`s recent 59th Board of Trustees meeting, the highest policy-making body agreed that the branch stations will broaden its development focus to address other farming needs in the community.Until last year, PhilRice stations have specialized research activities. The station in Batac, Ilocos Norte is known as center for dry land agriculture research and development; San Mateo, Isabela, hybrid rice; Los Baños, Laguna, grain quality; Murcia, Negros Occidental, organic agriculture; RTRomualdez, Agusan del Norte, nutrient management; Midsayap, North Cotabato, integrated pest management; and Ligao City, Albay, R &D for climate change adaptation.―We are redefining the roles of our branch stations. They will serve as nucleus for technology testing and demonstration,‖ Dr. Eufemio T. Rasco Jr, PhilRice executive director said. Rasco said that additional farming components will be tested and demonstrated in the stations including services on financing and custom machinery, marketing, and processing services for products derived from the community. These components, he said, aim to enhance productivity, profitability, sustainability, resource-use efficiency, valueadding, and mechanization. "The outcome from the demonstration sites will be easily and immediately deployed to the surrounding communities. This creates a ripple effect as these communities will then become additional nuclei for technology dissemination to farther communities. Schools and state universities near the stations are also potential catalysts in the formation of other nuclei,‖ Rasco said.―We have seen the impact of this model here at Central Experiment Station where seed centers multiplied rapidly with the help of PhilRice. Aside from seeds, we are eyeing the integration of other technologies like vermicomposting, mushroom production and processing, bioethanol production, and livestock production,‖ he added. What’s NEW in RICE research? PHILIPPINE RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE (PhilRice) Telefax: (044) 456-0113 loc. 511 or 512 Maligaya, Science City of Muñoz, 3119 Nueva Ecija E-mail: prri@email.philrice.gov.ph Good community agri needed to help farmers Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 20. Empowering the farmers and increasing their income amidst threats of climate change is possible through community shared agriculture (CSA) or bringing together the farmers and consumers. CSA, a concept being advocated in the country by the Good Food Community (GFC), assures smallholder farmers of a stable demand while giving the urban dwellers, especially in Metro Manila, easy access to ―the healthiest, besttasting harvest.‖ Charlene C. Tan, GFC president, said during her recent talk at Philippine Rice Research Institute (PhilRice), that the system has encouraged farmers to produce more and better quality vegetables and the consumers to experience ―happier, healthier, more fulfilling way of living.‖Farmers subscribed to their program get funding from consumers, who in turn, receive a weekly basket of fresh, seasonal, organic produce from a designated drop-off point for 12 weeks. They also receive information on the month`s harvest and tips on how to prepare the vegetables, which are packed and priced at PhP250-P400 a week. ―Through CSA, farmers in our communities, including Tarlac, are assured of demand despite market and environmental risks,‖ Tan said. As among the world`s top 10 most vulnerable countries to climate change, the country is threatened with inadequate food supply and resilience in farming communities, Tan said, is grown by investment in people and partnerships. .―We need a new system based on integrity and solidarity. Through CSA, farmers and consumers develop a deeper and more meaningful relationship. Consumers subscribed to us get to meet the farmers producing their food and experience how they are produced,‖ Tan stressed.Meanwhile, PhilRice executive director Eufemio T. Rasco had committed to support CSA through the institute`s Intensified Rice-Based Agri-Bio Systems program, which aims to develop a sustainable, ecological efficient, and socially acceptable systems that will generate PhP1 million annual income in a hectare. Agri expert urges PHL to continue rice-sufficiency program Category: Agri-Commodities 02 Feb 2014 :Written by Alladin S. Diega / Correspondent AN agricultural development specialist has called on Asian nations not to abandon rice-sufficiency policy and urged them to revolutionize their farm sectors, as well.Sjarifudin Baharsjah made the statement during the awarding ceremony of the 2013 Dioscoro L. Umali Award in Agricultural Development where he was the recipient, held at Makati City recently.Baharsjah, 80, a former Indonesia agriculture minister, was recognized for his efforts to promote food security in Indonesia through policies and measures, particularly the agribusiness approach, effectively increasing productivity of rice farms and uplifting the welfare of Indonesian farmers.In a speech, Baharsjah said: ―Indonesia became self-sufficient in rice in 1984 after decades of importing the grain largely through the application of the Green Revolution technology. ‖Although the rice varieties Indonesia used to raise output came from the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), these were further improved through the work of the Indonesia Agency for Agricultural Research and Technology (IAARD), according to Baharsjah.Indonesia depends largely on Java to produce rice, accounting for 60 percent of the national rice production, and to encourage more farmers to plant these varieties, the national government has launched extension services and the provision of subsidies, including fertilizers, and Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 21. credit to farmers.―When the country decided to adopt an export-driven growth policy, the agriculture sector was confident that it could support the policy, in part, not only because of its rubber, crude palm oil and cacao exports playing a significant role, but also because it was confident in its ability to produce enough rice to create the low-cost condition, which would make the country‘s exports of industrial products competitive in the world market,‖ the agriculture research awardee said.According to Baharsjah, Indonesia had 238 million people to feed in 2010, and the population growth rate is 1.5 percent yearly.Baharsjah also said that the per capita rice consumption per year of his country is higher than that of the Philippines at 139 kilos, while the hectarage for irrigated rice fields (sawah) in Java is now down to 3.3 million hectares, with the annual decrease of farms estimated at 50,000 hectares annually. Moreover, he noted that Indonesia‘s rice production has stagnated at 5 metric tons (MT) per hectare, which is still higher than the average of 3.9 MT per hectare in the Philippines.Rice self-sufficiency has proven to be an effective tool to improve the economy of a developing economy, however, the goals have to be met to avert dire consequences, the awardee warned.―A serious impact of the agricultural policy which insisted on maintaining self-sufficiency in spite of failures to actually achieve the goals, coupled with the opening of the domestic market to foreign produce was the rise in poverty and unemployment in rural areas, a rural agriculture economic involution, even within a seemingly healthy national economy,‖ Baharsjah noted.The Philippines‘s Department of Agriculture has declared 98 percent in food self-sufficiency program for 2013, citing the series of strong tropical typhoons that visited the country last year as the reason for the shortage. ―As most of the country‘s population lives in the rural areas, and unless the agriculture economic involution of the rural areas is not properly addressed, it may become an ever enlarging balloon of poverty which endangers the national economy,‖ Baharsjah added.Referring to his own country primarily, Baharsjah stressed that current ―agricultural policy‖ which mainly consists of setting targets to reach self-sufficiency in rice, corn, sugar, soybean and meat, may lead simply to a repetition of serious policy failures which would lead to an agricultural catastrophe.A new agricultural policy, based on the actual availability of natural resources and the best possible agricultural practices has to be formulated which would lead future development of our agriculture to achieve long-term goals, namely, the ability to produce enough food for our people, to raise income and welfare of our farmers, and to contribute significantly to national development, Baharsjah concluded. For Advertising SPECS & RATES Contact: Advertising Department Mujahid Ali mujahid.riceplus@gmail.com +92 321 369 2874 Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874

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