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26th december,2013 daily global rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine

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Daily Rice Global Rice e-Newsletter shared by Riceplus Magazine …

Daily Rice Global Rice e-Newsletter shared by Riceplus Magazine
Riceplus Magazine shares daily International RICE News for global Rice Community. We publish daily two newsletters namely Global Rice News & ORYZA EXCLUSIVE News for readers .You can share any development news with us for Global readers.
Dear all guests/Commentators/Researchers/Experts ,You are humbly requested to share One/Two pages write up with Riceplus Magazine .
For more information visit (www.ricepluss.com + http://publishpk.net/index.php/riceplus).
Share /contribute your rice and agriculture related research write up with Riceplus Magazine to riceplus@irp.edu.pk , mujahid.riceplus@gmail.com
For Advertisement & Specs mujahid.riceplus@gmail.com

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  • 1. 26th December , 2013 Share developments in RICE and allied sectors, Promote the Concept of Knowledge Economy Dear Sir/Madam, YOUR IDEA has a great worth---JUST share it through RICE PLUS 10000+ stakeholders of rice industry read & apply various ideas and analysis written by the authors. Be the part of Rice plus authors Visit: www.ricepluss.com,www.publishpk.net mujahid.riceplus@gmail.com riceplus@irp.edu.pk Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 2. TOP Contents - Tailored for YOU Latest News Headlines…             $171b rice smuggling payoff in the Philippines unveiled Exports face possible contraction as 2013 winds up What concerns rice producers -- policy, prices and costs Rice Prices Bring Comparative Stability What concerns rice producers -- policy, prices and costs Higher prices seen in 2014 Rice millers hurt by political standoff TABLE-India Grain Prices-Delhi- Dec 26 Rice basmati rises on stockists buying Vietnamese rice most expensive in Asia? Nagpur Foodgrain Prices Open- December 26 Iraq issues tender to buy at least 30,000 tonnes of rice NEWS DETAILS: $171b rice smuggling payoff in the Philippines unveiled MANILA - A Goliath in rice smuggling has cornered the trade in this grain by plying Philippine Bureau of Customs (BOC) officials and rank-and-file employees with cash gifts that have amounted to 6 billion pesos (S$171.25 billion) over the last two years.A former BOC official, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said one of the main challenges facing the new management at the bureau was whether it would dismantle the network built by a certain "David Tan" who was designated as point man when rice-smuggling transactions were centralised two years ago. Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 3. "David Tan operates behind various brokerage firms. If you want to bring in rice without paying the right taxes, you have to go through him because the BOC officials deal only with him. The BOC officials do not entertain any other rice smuggler except Tan," said the source, who described the rice smuggler as "young and with deep connections in rice exporting countries in Asia, especially Vietnam.""They called these special operations or palusot because the rice shipments had no documents or import permit. After David Tan informs his connections where his shipments are arriving, the smuggling network goes into motion, from those who sign the papers to those who open the exit gates in the ports," the former official said.It was not clear whether "David Tan" was the same as "Mr. T" who, according to a new BOC official who talked to the Inquirer last week, was one of three big traders whose under-the-table deals with corrupt examiners, appraisers and other frontline personnel at the bureau were the cause of the agency's failure to meet its revenue collection goals. The new bureau official referred to the other two big traders as "Big Mama" and "Ma'am T."Old-timers in the BOC told the Inquirer on Monday that there was no reason to go after "Big Mama," "Ma'am T" and "Mr. T" because the papers of the three traders "appeared to be in order."The case is presumably the same with "David Tan."The former BOC official said the scheme involved at least two top bureau officials (who get 10,000 pesos to 20,000 pesos each per container), at least one major port official (5,000 pesos to 10,000 pesos per container) and more than a dozen desk employees whose signatures (1,000 pesos per container) were needed in the release papers of the smuggled rice.He estimated that Tan brought in an average of 1,000 TEU or 6-meter equivalent unit containers a week (a container can load 510 cavans of rice) or a weekly take of 37 million to 62 million pesos. In Snap:A general view of newly planted rice seedlings is seen at a rice field in Gloria, Oriental Mindoro in central Philippines November 28, 2013. A Goliath in rice smuggling has cornered the trade in this grain by plying officials and rank-and-file employees with cash gifts that have amounted to 6 billion pesos (US$135 billion) over the last two years Exports face possible contraction as 2013 winds up Published: 26 Dec 2013 :Newspaper section: Business Exports fell for a third consecutive month in November, putting more pressure on the sector that accounts for about 60% of the country's economy.The Commerce Ministry reported yesterday exports dropped 4.08% yearon-year in November to US$18.757 billion, following a 0.67% decline in October and 7.09% drop in September.Imports totalled $19.314 billion last month, down 8.60% year-on-year.For the first 11 months, Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 4. exports slipped 0.49% year-on-year to $210.09 billion. However, imports for the period edged up 1.22% to $231.99 billion, a trade deficit of $21.90 billion.Srirat Rastapana, permanent secretary for the Commerce Ministry, blamed November's export contraction on a weaker than expected global economic recovery and a high base last year.Benjarong Suwankiri, a first vice-president of TMB Analytics, TMB Bank's research unit, said the performance in November was disappointing, reflecting weakened global demand. "Based on the lower than expected export contraction in November and an expected drop in December, it is highly likely Thai exports will end this year with a mild contraction of 0.5% in 2013," he said.Shipments of key industrial products, which made up 63.8% of total exports, dropped 5.2% in November to $11.96 billion, comprising mainly television sets, automobiles, and construction materials.Agro-industrial goods also dipped 2.5% last month to $3.037 billion, comprising mostly rice, frozen seafood, fruit and vegetables."We still hope exports will remain positive this year," she said. "If they contract, it would be the first time since 2009 when Thai shipments fell 14.26%."Thai exports grew 28.13% in 2010, 13.96% in 2011 and 2.99% in 2012.Mrs Srirat said shipments for 2013 could grow by 0.6% if they fetch $19 billion in December, a sharp decline from the 12%-13% target originally set by the Commerce Ministry.The ministry cut its export growth target several times this year, first to 7%-8%, then 3%-4% and finally 1% in November.Mrs Srirat was confident Thailand could see export growth in 2014. What concerns rice producers -- policy, prices and costs Dec. 26, 2013Elton Robinson | Delta Farm Press Once again, U.S. rice producers are facing an upcoming season rife with uncertainty over commodity prices, input costs, water availability and the farm bill. Here are the thoughts of a few rice producers attending the USA Rice Outlook Conference held in St. Louis, Mo., recently. Check Rough Rice Futures Prices Allen McLain, Jr., who farms about 1,500 acres of rice, soybeans and crawfish with his father, Allen McLain, Sr., in Abbeville, La., is concerned that an anticipated increase in U.S. rice acres in 2014 could push supplies higher and prices lower. U.S. farmers planted just under 2.5 million acres in rice in 2013. ―There are always uncertainties, too, and you never know what they are,‖ McLain said.McLain and his father had a very good year producing rice in 2013, he said. ―We had one of the better years that we’ve seen in a long time. It started off very tough, but it worked out in the end.‖ A ratoon crop was also very effective, according to McLain. A good year for growing rice Shannon Harrington produces rice and soybeans and operates a cow-calf operation in a partnership with his brother Blaine, in Iowa, La. The Harringtons also had a banner yield year in 2013. ―The previous year, we had one of the worst,‖ Harrington said. ―We had a variety that had been performing well in the past, and we had a Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 5. bad outbreak of blast that hit every acre we had, about 2,000 acres. This year, it bounced back, and we had one of our best crops ever.‖A new farm bill is the biggest issue facing rice producers, Harrington noted. ―We know that there are going to be cuts in funding. Simply eliminating direct payments is going to have a direct impact on us.‖The timetable is even more important than whatever is in a final bill, Harrington said. ―They’re working on other things to take the place of direct payments, but there is the uncertainty of not knowing what’s going to happen. Here we are, needing to be planning for next year’s crop. But we don’t have anything etched in stone as far as government support is concerned. Last January, we got an extension of the previous farm bill, and we operated under that for a year. Now we’re coming up to another deadline.‖ Ag news delivered daily to your inbox: Subscribe to Delta Farm Press Daily.Lorenzo Pope, a producer and researcher in Glenn, Calif., says expenses are a critical issue for rice producers, mostly for weed control. The farm bill is also a concern, sort of. ―In California, a new farm bill is probably not going to help us much. There will be a safety net, but if you use the safety net, you’re in trouble already. We’ll have to be careful without any government subsidies. Just basic rice may not work anymore.‖Water availability is also getting tighter in California. ―How much water security you have depends on what water district you’re in,‖ Pope said. ―Those south of the Sacramento are looking at big water cuts. We’re also very dependent on the rain to fill the reservoirs. Once we have sufficient water in the spring, we can plant with the confidence that we can harvest.‖Rice holding its own in farm bill debate.John Owen, Louisiana rice producer and chairman, USA Rice Producers’ Group, told attendees of the conference that despite small U.S. rice acres, the rice industry is holding its own in the farm bill debate.―Nothing worth anything comes cheaply. But in this farm bill debate, have we not as an industry fought the good fight? And have we not fought above our weight class? We have stood and faced some really powerful people inside and outside the farm community, on and off Capitol Hill and we in the rice industry are still standing. ―We’re not asking for special treatment. We’re asking for a place at the table, for respect for what we do, some understanding of the risks we face and a set of reasonable tools to help us manage those risks. We’re not asking to be guaranteed a profit, only that we have enough support to keep us viable when markets turn down, or when Mother Nature reminds us who’s really in charge.Ag news delivered daily to your inbox: Subscribe to Delta Farm Press Daily. ―We should not apologize for pursuing policy that is not only in agriculture’s best interests, but in America’s best interests.‖Owen noted that both the House and Senate bills ―are in conference committee hands, and work toward completion is grinding forward, and I would emphasize grinding.‖Owen believes a farm bill will emerge from the conference committee this month, ―and it will be approved by Congress, hopefully in January. Our detractors are not going away, but as farmers, our purpose is as great as it’s ever been.‖ Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 6. Rice Prices Bring Comparative Stability Lee Sang Yong | 2013-12-26 21:16 Market prices in North Korea continue to respond well to the execution of Jang Song Taek, Daily NK has learned.According to inside sources, on December 20th good quality rice was trading at 4000 won/kg in Pyongyang, 4900 won/kg in Sinuiju and 4600 won/kg in Hyesan. These prices are 1100, 500 and 1200 won lower respectively than they were in mid November.Several factors may be playing a role. Early in 2013, a portion of wartime rice reserves was released. In addition to this, the distribution of food by the state has been more reliable than normal for much of this year. There was also a good harvest of potatoes, corn and rice, which has brought down market prices. Finally, the state did not implement market controls in the wake of the execution of Jang Song Taek, which has played a part in facilitating the circulation of goods. One source from Hyesan in Yangkang Province informed Daily NK on the 26th, ―Markets were only restricted briefly during the mourning period for the General [Kim Jong Il], and trading has returned to normal now. Restrictions were anticipated following news of the sudden execution of the aunt’s husband [Jang Song Taek], but that didn't happen.‖―Large amounts of rice and vegetables were given in payment to workers in mining areas of North Hamkyung Province,‖ the source also went on. ―These products then circulated to other provinces like Yangkang. The Upper [the authorities] also gave out rations of corn and rice, which means that there is quite a lot of rice in the market.‖A source from Pyongyang also reported, ―The rice price started gradually dropping in midNovember. It was at 4800 won at the start of December but by the middle of the month it had fallen all the way to 4000 won. This has traditionally been a time when rice prices fall as products siphoned off during the threshing period begin to appear in the markets. However, a drop of around 1000 won in a month is highly unusual.‖―Thanks to the continual distribution of rations and these payment-in-kind wages for some enterprises, an increasing number of people are looking to buy side dishes rather than rice,‖ the source explained. ―Now many grain traders have left the market and are harder to find.‖ Meanwhile, the US Dollar exchange rate in Pyongyang, Sinuiju and Hyesan climbed by 300, 110 and 120 won respectively in the period since mid November, reaching 8400, 8260 and 8300 won respectively.On this, the Pyongyang source commented, ―Generally the exchange rate runs parallel to the rice price and the two rise and fall together. But recently this has not been the case, as the number of people wanting to save their newly increased wages in US Dollars is growing." Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 7. What concerns rice producers -- policy, prices and costs Dec. 26, 2013Elton Robinson | Delta Farm Press Rice producers at the USA Rice Outlook Conference in St. Louis talk about the year they had in 2013, and looked forward to the challenges of the new year.Most of their concerns centered about the resolution of the farm bill debate so they can begin the planning process.Once again, U.S. rice producers are facing an upcoming season rife with uncertainty over commodity prices, input costs, water availability and the farm bill. Here are the thoughts of a few rice producers attending the USA Rice Outlook Conference held in St. Louis, Mo., recently.Allen McLain, Jr., who farms about 1,500 acres of rice, soybeans and crawfish with his father, Allen McLain, Sr., in Abbeville, La., is concerned that an anticipated increase in U.S. rice acres in 2014 could push supplies higher and prices lower. U.S. farmers planted just under 2.5 million acres in rice in 2013. ―There are always uncertainties, too, and you never know what they are,‖ McLain said.McLain and his father had a very good year producing rice in 2013, he said. ―We had one of the better years that we’ve seen in a long time. It started off very tough, but it worked out in the end.‖ A ratoon crop was also very effective, according to McLain. A good year for growing rice Shannon Harrington produces rice and soybeans and operates a cow-calf operation in a partnership with his brother Blaine, in Iowa, La. The Harringtons also had a banner yield year in 2013. ―The previous year, we had one of the worst,‖ Harrington said. ―We had a variety that had been performing well in the past, and we had a bad outbreak of blast that hit every acre we had, about 2,000 acres. This year, it bounced back, and we had one of our best crops ever.A new farm bill is the biggest issue facing rice producers, Harrington noted. ―We know that there are going to be cuts in funding. Simply eliminating direct payments is going to have a direct impact on us.‖The timetable is even more important than whatever is in a final bill, Harrington said. ―They’re working on other things to take the place of direct payments, but there is the uncertainty of not knowing what’s going to happen. Here we are, needing to be planning for next year’s crop. But we don’t have anything etched in stone as far as government support is concerned. Last January, we got an extension of the previous farm bill, and we operated under that for a year. Now we’re coming up to another deadline.‖ Lorenzo Pope, a producer and researcher in Glenn, Calif., says expenses are a critical issue for rice producers, mostly for weed control. The farm bill is also a concern, sort of. ―In California, a new farm bill is probably not going to help us much. There will be a safety net, but if you use the safety net, you’re in trouble already. We’ll have to be careful without any government subsidies. Just basic rice may not work anymore.‖Water availability is also getting tighter in California. ―How much water security you have depends on what water district you’re in,‖ Pope said. ―Those south Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 8. of the Sacramento are looking at big water cuts. We’re also very dependent on the rain to fill the reservoirs. Once we have sufficient water in the spring, we can plant with the confidence that we can harvest.‖ Rice holding its own in farm bill debate John Owen, Louisiana rice producer and chairman, USA Rice Producers’ Group, told attendees of the conference that despite small U.S. rice acres, the rice industry is holding its own in the farm bill debate.―Nothing worth anything comes cheaply. But in this farm bill debate, have we not as an industry fought the good fight? And have we not fought above our weight class? We have stood and faced some really powerful people inside and outside the farm community, on and off Capitol Hill and we in the rice industry are still standing.―We’re not asking for special treatment. We’re asking for a place at the table, for respect for what we do, some understanding of the risks we face and a set of reasonable tools to help us manage those risks. We’re not asking to be guaranteed a profit, only that we have enough support to keep us viable when markets turn down, or when Mother Nature reminds us who’s really in charge. ―We should not apologize for pursuing policy that is not only in agriculture’s best interests, but in America’s best interests.‖Owen noted that both the House and Senate bills ―are in conference committee hands, and work toward completion is grinding forward, and I would emphasize grinding.‖Owen believes a farm bill will emerge from the conference committee this month, ―and it will be approved by Congress, hopefully in January. Our detractors are not going away, but as farmers, our purpose is as great as it’s ever been.‖ Higher prices seen in 2014 By Cai U. Ordinario, BusinessMirror Posted at 12/26/2013 8:21 AM | Updated as of 12/26/2013 8:21 AM MANILA, Philippines - The destruction wreaked by super typhoon Yolanda (international code name Haiyan) on sectors like agriculture will push commodity prices higher for Filipino consumers in 2014, according to a local economist.But University of Asia and the Pacific Associate Prof. Victor Abola was quick to add that food prices, particularly that of rice, are not likely to increase as there is a rice surplus in countries such as Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia and India that can provide rice supply to the Philippines through importation.Abola told reporters inflation could settle at around 4 percent next year and while this is within the 3-percent to 5-percent target set by the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP), it is higher than this year’s average of a little over 3 percent. The impact of Yolanda on both inflation and economic growth, Abola said, could last for the duration of the entire first semester or from January to June next year. Abola maintained his forecast that growth will still be Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 9. within the 7-percent range next year.The initial effect [will be] in the first quarter [because there was a] destruction of productive capacity mostly in the agriculture [sector],‖ Abola said.But he said the oversupply of rice in Thailand, Vietnam and Cambodia is making rice prices cheap in the international market.Abola said this was brought about by the reaction of farmers after the 2008 rice price crisis where farmers were encouraged to plant more because of the high price of the commodity.―Even in the case of [Typhoon] Ondoy, my analysis was [there will be high inflation in] six months and [this] will dissipate in six months. So we are looking at two quarters essentially, in the fourth quarter this year and in the first quarter of next year,‖ Abola said. Earlier, Socioeconomic Planning Secretary Arsenio M. Balisacan said the total damage and loss from Yolanda has been initially estimated at P571.1 billion. This, he said, includes physical assets, reductions in production, sales and income, as well as the value of increased operating costs resulting from the disaster.The Reconstruction Assistance on Yolanda plan said the typhoon caused some P33.98 billion in damages and losses to infrastructure; agriculture, P62.11 billion; industry and services, P116 billion; and education, P23.9 billion.Data also showed the damage to health is worth P5.57 billion; housing, P325.24 billion; and local government, P4.3 billion. The plan also said about 90 percent of the total damages and losses have fallen on the private sector with the remaining 10 percent on the public sector. Millers clamp down on rice release to hold prices OUR CORRESPONDENT India's rice exports to Iran and Nigeria to remain strong. KARNAL, DEC. 26: The rice market is likely to rule without much change on account of steady demand and ample stocks in the coming days, said trade experts.With trading being lukewarm in the market, prices of almost all the varieties except Sharbati (steam) remained unchanged .Amit Chandna, Proprietor of Hanuman Rice Trading Company, told Business Line that domestic demand has failed to pick up and hence, rice millers are releasing limited stocks in the market to keep prices stable.Trading has been lacklustre since mid-December, he said.According to trade experts, the market is likely to rule around current levels over the next few days and may witness some alteration in the first week of January. In the physical market, Pusa-1121 (steam) sold at Rs 8,400-8,500, while Pusa-1121 (sela) quoted at Rs 7,500 a quintal. Pure Basmati (Raw) quoted at Rs 12,500. Duplicate basmati (steam) sold at Rs 7,300. Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 10. Sharbati (Steam) dropped by Rs 200 and sold at Rs 4,800 while Sharbati (Sela) was quoted at Rs 4,500. Permal (raw) sold at Rs 2,300, Permal (sela) at Rs 2,350, PR-11 (sela) sold at Rs 3,100 while PR-11 (Raw) was at Rs 2,950. PR14 (steam) sold at Rs 3,200. Paddy arrivals Around 20,000 bags of Pusa-1121 arrived and sold at Rs 3,850-4,000, 5,000 bags of Sharbati arrived and sold at Rs 2,100-2,320, while around 5,000 bags of Suagndha-999 went for Rs 2,600-75 a quintal. (This article was published on December 26, 2013) Keywords: rice futures, rice prices Post Comment Rice millers hurt by political standoff Paddy supply comes to a halt Ahmed Humayun Kabir Topu, Pabna Rice producers in Pabna are apprehensive over the political stalemate that has affected distribution and left about 15,000 workers sitting idle. Most rice mills in the district remain closed as there is virtually no paddy collection or sales for a lack of transportation. The government's aman procurement drives began on December 1, with targets to procure 10,866 tonnes by February 28, said Md Moyen Uddin, district controller of food. The drive may miss targets due to the lingering political turmoil, he added. ―Since December 1, we have procured just 1,234 tonnes of rice. At this rate, we are not sure if we can meet the target.‖ A mere 491 rice mills made agreements with the government to supply 7,458 tonnes of rice; other millers in the district are reluctant to make a promise as production costs have increased due to the continuous blockades, Main Uddin said.According to officials at the district food office, 849 rice mills used to produce 52,000 tonnes of rice in every 15-day cycle, but production stopped last month for the political impasse. ―Rice traders could not receive paddy from the northern and southern districts due to the blockades for a month. Due to a lack of paddy, most rice mills remained shut that hampered production,‖ said Md Idris Ali Bishwas, president of the district rice mill owners association.A few rice mills in Ishwardi upazila continued production with low amounts of paddy that increased production costs. ―Previously, I used to bring 200 to 250 bags of paddy a day to produce approximate 100 bags of rice. But in the last two weeks, I had to keep my mill shut for a lack of paddy,‖ said Md Sadek Ali Bishwas, a rice mill owner.Transporters are now charging about Tk 25,000 for a truck carrying rice to Dhaka, up from Tk 12,000-14,000, which is also increasing prices, he added. Published: 12:00 am Friday, December 27, 2013 Last modified: 4:13 am Friday, December 27, 2013 Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 11. TABLE-India Grain Prices-Delhi- Dec 26 Rates by Asian News International, New Delhi Tel: 011 2619 1464 Indicative Grains Previous opening close (in rupees per 100 kg unless stated) ---------------------------------------------------------Wheat Desi 1,725-2,525 1,725-2,525. Wheat Dara 1,800-2,000 1,760-1,960. Atta Chakki (per 10 Kg) Roller Mill (per bag) Rice Basmati(Common) I.R.-8 Gram Peas Green 1,900-2,000. 1,850-1,950 Rice Basmati(Lal Quila) Rice Sela 1,900-2,000. 1,900-2,000 Rice Basmati(Sri Lal Mahal) Rice Permal 215-240. 1,920-2,025 Maida (per bag) Sooji (per bag) 215-240 1,850-1,950. 12,000 11,500 11,500. 7,500-7,900 2,450-2,600 3,325-3,600 2,350-2,500 3,300-3,600 3,450-3,750 12,000. 7,400-7,800. 2,450-2,600. 3,350-3,550. 2,350-2,500. 3,300-3,600. 3,500-3,800. Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 12. Peas White Bajra Jowar white 2,600-2,700 1,350-1,600 1,800-2,050 2,600-2,700. 1,350-1,600. 1,950-2,250. Maize 1,500-1,800 1,500-1,800. Barley 1,500-1,550 1,500-1,550. Guwar 3,300-3,900 3,300-3,900. Source: Delhi grain market traders. Rice basmati rises on stockists buying Press Trust of India | New Delhi December 26, 2013 Last Updated at 15:16 IST Prices of rice basmati rose by Rs 200 per quintal at the wholesale grains market today on stockists buying against slowdown in arrivals from producing regions. However, other grains ruled steady in scattered deals. Traders said stockists buying following rising demand against restricted arrivals from producing belts mainly pushed up rice basmati prices. In the national capital, rice basmati common and Pusa-1121 variety rose by Rs 200 each to Rs 8,600-8,800 and Rs 7,950-8,450 per quintal, respectively. The following were today's quotations per quintal: Wheat MP (deshi) 2,070-2,270, Wheat dara (for mills) 1,660-1,665, Chakki atta (delivery) 1,665-1,670 Atta Rajdhani (10 kg) 220, Shakti bhog (10 kg) 220, Roller flour mill 920-930 (50 kg), Maida 970-990 (50 kg) and Sooji 1,010-1,030 (50kg). Basmati rice (Lal Quila) 10,400, Shri Lal Mahal 10,000, Super Basmati Rice, 9,500, Basmati common new 8,600-8,800, Rice Pusa-(1121) new 7,950-8,450, Permal raw 2,100-2,200, Permal wand 2,275-2,300, Sela 2,950-2,975 and Rice IR-8- 1,875-1,900, Bajra 1,320-1,325, Jowar yellow 1,400-1,450, white 2,300-2,500, Maize 1,405-1,410, Barley 1,400-1,410, Rajasthan 1,080-1,090. Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 13. Vietnamese rice most expensive in Asia? HA NOI (VNS)— The November Market Review by global rice market news provider Oryza has shown that that the price of Vietnamese rice remains the most expensive across Asia.According to data released last Friday, Vietnamese five percent broken rice was sold for US$410-420 per tonne, down $20 per tonne from two weeks ago, but higher by $10 per tonne from one month ago.The price of Thai rice (of the same variety), in comparison, declined $15 per tonne to $380 per tonne from two weeks ago. The price was also lower by $25 per tonne from one month ago. Compared with the same period last year, the Vietnamese rice price is higher by $5 per tonne, while the price of Thai rice fell $170 per tonne during the same period.Do Van Hao, an expert at the Institute of Policy and Strategy for Agriculture and Rural Development, told Biz Hub that in recent times, there have been a few instances when the export price of Vietnamese rice surpassed that of Thai rice. He pointed out that it was not the first time that the Vietnamese rice price had climbed higher than the Thai rice price because such a phenomenon had occurred in the past, although for very short durations."There are some reasons that have pushed the price of Viet Nam's rice higher than the price of Thai rice recently. First, Viet Nam won a contract to export 500,000 tonnes of rice to the Philippines on November 25. The lowest price under this contract was $462.25 per tonne, while Thai rice fetched a price of $475 per tonne. That has stimulated demand for Vietnamese rice and raised export prices," he said.Second, Thailand has permitted its rice granaries to export rice stored from earlier harvests. Currently, its granaries store tens of millions of tonnes of rice and the increasing exports have led to falling prices, he noted.Third, the exchange rate between the Thai baht and the US dollar has seen an increasing trend, which has lowered the price of rice in the local currency," he added.Echoing the same sentiment, agricultural expert Vo Tong Xuan noted that while Viet Nam is exporting its latest rice harvest, Thailand is selling rice from its granaries, leading to price disparities."Enterprises exporting rice to China and Africa have lowered their reserves. Now, in the middle of December, we cannot purchase rice from farmers because the third crop was harvested in November. Lower supply is one of the reasons that have pushed the price higher," he added."I think the current price is suitable because Thailand is not lowering the price of its high-quality rice. Right now, Cambodia is harvesting a new crop and a portion of that will be exported to Viet Nam," he said.Hao shrugged off worries about importing rice from overseas while the price is high, noting that price disparities are currently not too wide. He also pointed out that the variety of rice exported is different from that consumed in Viet Nam.Hao added that "Thai rice could, however, be imported for domestic consumption if its price is much lower than that of Vietnamese rice.""Recently, Viet Nam has imported large quantities of rice from Thailand, and if Thai rice is cheap and of good quality, the level of imports could increase," he said.According to the Viet Nam Food Association (VFA), between January 2013 and December 19, the quantity of rice exports reached 6.325 million tonnes, which had a free-on-board (FOB) value of $2.735 billion and a Cost, Insurance and Freight (CIF) value of $2.848 billion.Between December 1 and December 19, the quantity of rice exported was 183,897 tonnes, Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 14. which had an FOB value of $86.569 million and a CIF value of $91.969 million.Speaking to the Vneconomy newspaper, general secretary Huynh Minh Hue said the total quantity of rice exports for 2013 is estimated at around 6.6 million of tonnes, lower than expected. The VFA had set a goal of exporting 7.5 million tonnes of rice at the beginning of 2013. — VNS In Snap: Rice is packed for export at Gao Viet Company. The price of Vietnamese rice remains the most expensive across Asia, according to a market review. — VNA/VNS Photo Thanh Vu Nagpur Foodgrain Prices Open- December 26 Thu Dec 26, 2013 7:05pm IST Nagpur, Dec 26 (Reuters) - Gram prices in Nagpur Agriculture Produce and Marketing Committee (APMC) reported down on lack of demand from local millers amid poor quality arrival. Easy condition on NCDEX, fresh fall in Madhya Pradesh gram prices and increased supply from producingregions also pushed down prices, according to sources. * * * * FOODGRAINS & PULSES GRAM * Desi gram raw recovered in open market on good demand from local traders amid poor crop reports in this season. TUAR * Tuar gavarani and tuar Karnataka reported higher in open market on renewed demand from local traders amid weak supply from producing regions. * Udid varieties firmed up in open market on good buying support from local traders amid weak supply from producing belts. * In Akola, Tuar - 4,300-4,450, Tuar dal - 6,700-6,700, Udid at 4,800-5,100, Udid Mogar (clean) - 5,700-6,000, Moong - 7,000-7,300, Moong Mogar (clean) 7,900-8,100, Gram - 2,800-3,000, Gram Super best bold - 4,000-4,200 for 100 kg. * Wheat, rice and other commodities remained steady in open market in thin trading activity, according to sources. Nagpur foodgrains APMC auction/open-market prices in rupees for 100 kg Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 15. FOODGRAINS Available prices Previous close Gram Auction 2,500-2,650 2,570-2,770 Gram Pink Auction n.a. 2,100-2,600 Tuar Auction n.a. 3,800-4,050 Moong Auction n.a. 4,400-4,600 Udid Auction n.a. 4,300-4,500 Masoor Auction n.a. 2,600-2,800 Gram Super Best Bold 3,800-4,200 3,800-4,200 Gram Super Best n.a. Gram Medium Best 3,600-3,800 3,600-3,800 Gram Dal Medium n.a. n.a. Gram Mill Quality 3,200-3,400 3,200-3,400 Desi gram Raw 2,750-2,850 2,700-2,800 Gram Filter Yellow n.a. n.a. Gram Kabuli 7,800-10,200 7,800-10,200 Gram Pink 7,700-8,100 7,700-8,100 Tuar Fataka Best 6,600-6,800 6,600-6,800 Tuar Fataka Medium 6,100-6,300 6,100-6,300 Tuar Dal Best Phod 5,900-6,100 5,900-6,100 Tuar Dal Medium phod 5,500-5,700 5,500-5,700 Tuar Gavarani 4,250-4,350 4,200-4,300 Tuar Karnataka 4,450-4,550 4,400-4,500 Tuar Black 7,000-7,100 7,000-7,100 Masoor dal best 5,300-5,400 5,300-5,400 Masoor dal medium 5,000-5,100 5,000-5,100 Masoor n.a. n.a. Moong Mogar bold 8,400-8,600 8,400-8,600 Moong Mogar Medium best 7,800-8,000 7,800-8,000 Moong dal super best 7,200-7,600 7,200-7,600 Moong dal Chilka 6,800-7,000 6,700-6,900 Moong Mill quality n.a. n.a. Moong Chamki best 6,000-6,800 6,000-6,800 Udid Mogar Super best (100 INR/KG) 6,500-7,000 6,500-6,800 Udid Mogar Medium (100 INR/KG) 5,800-6,100 5,800-6,000 Udid Dal Black (100 INR/KG) 4,700-5,000 4,600-4,800 Batri dal (100 INR/KG) 3,800-4,000 3,800-4,000 Lakhodi dal (100 INR/kg) 3,000-3,100 3,000-3,100 Watana Dal (100 INR/KG) 3,200-3,300 3,200-3,300 Watana White (100 INR/KG) 3,100-3,200 3,100-3,200 Watana Green Best (100 INR/KG) 4,550-4,900 4,550-4,900 Wheat 308 (100 INR/KG) 1,750-1,850 1,750-1,850 Wheat Mill quality(100 INR/KG) 1,700-1,750 1,700-1,750 Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874
  • 16. Wheat Filter (100 INR/KG) 1,700-1,900 1,700-1,900 Wheat Lokwan best (100 INR/KG) 2,000-2,500 2,000-2,500 Wheat Lokwan medium (100 INR/KG) 1,950-2,100 1,950-2,100 Lokwan Hath Binar (100 INR/KG) n.a. n.a. MP Sharbati Best (100 INR/KG) 3,200-3,600 3,200-3,600 MP Sharbati Medium (100 INR/KG) 2,700-2,900 2,700-2,900 Wheat 147 (100 INR/KG) 1,550-1,650 1,550-1,650 Wheat Best (100 INR/KG) 1,600-1,700 1,600-1,700 Rice BPT (100 INR/KG) 3,300-3,500 3,300-3,500 Rice Parmal (100 INR/KG) 1,900-1,950 1,900-1,950 Rice Swarna Best (100 INR/KG) 2,550-2,700 2,550-2,700 Rice Swarna Medium (100 INR/KG) 2,300-2,450 2,300-2,450 Rice HMT (100 INR/KG) 4,300-4,500 4,300-4,500 Rice HMT Shriram (100 INR/KG) 4,800-5,200 4,800-5,200 Rice Basmati best (100 INR/KG) 11,000-13,500 11,000-13,500 Rice Basmati Medium (100 INR/KG) 6,300-7,600 6,300-7,600 Rice Chinnor (100 INR/KG) 5,500-5,900 5,500-5,900 Rice Chinnor Medium (100 INR/KG) 5,100-5,400 5,100-5,400 Jowar Gavarani (100 INR/KG) 1,450-1,600 1,450-1,600 Jowar CH-5 (100 INR/KG) 1,750-1,850 1,750-1,850 WEATHER (NAGPUR) Maximum temp. 28.9 degree Celsius (84.0 degree Fahrenheit), minimum temp. 13.0 degree Celsius (54.4 degree Fahrenheit) Humidity: Highest - n.a., lowest - n.a. Rainfall : nil FORECAST: Mainly clear sky. Maximum and Minimum temperature likely to be around 29 and 13 degree Celsius respectively. Note: n.a.--not available:(For oils, transport costs are excluded from plant delivery prices, but included in market prices.) Iraq issues tender to buy at least 30,000 tonnes of rice Reuters Middle East – 22 hours ago(Reuters) - Iraq issued a tender to buy at least 30,000 tonnes of rice, with long-grain supplies which can be sourced from the United States, Uruguay, Thailand and Argentina, a trade ministry statement said on Thursday.The closing date for the tender is Jan. 13, and offers must be valid until Jan. 17.In its previous rice tender which closed on Dec. 8, Iraq rejected all offers and made no purchase due to high prices asked by traders, a trade ministry source said. (Reporting by Ahmed Rasheed; Editing by Louise Ireland). Daily Rice E-Newsletter by Rice Plus Magazine www.ricepluss.com News and R&D Section mujajhid.riceplus@gmail.com Cell # 92 321 369 2874