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12th march,2014 daily rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
12th march,2014 daily rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
12th march,2014 daily rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
12th march,2014 daily rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
12th march,2014 daily rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
12th march,2014 daily rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
12th march,2014 daily rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
12th march,2014 daily rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
12th march,2014 daily rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
12th march,2014 daily rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
12th march,2014 daily rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
12th march,2014 daily rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
12th march,2014 daily rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
12th march,2014 daily rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
12th march,2014 daily rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
12th march,2014 daily rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
12th march,2014 daily rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
12th march,2014 daily rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
12th march,2014 daily rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
12th march,2014 daily rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
12th march,2014 daily rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
12th march,2014 daily rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine
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12th march,2014 daily rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine

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  • 1. Miriam: PH needs woman president in 2016 by Ira Pedrasa, ABS-CBNnews.com Posted at 03/11/2014 4:02 PM | Updated as of 03/11/2014 9:08 PM Blames men for corruption in Congress MANILA - To achieve higher standards of living, Filipino voters should pick a woman president in 2016, Senator Miriam Defensor Santiago said on Tuesday.In a speech at the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) in Los Baños, Laguna, Santiago – who lost her battle for the presidency in 1992 – said a woman president beginning 2016 will help ensure the United Nations Millennium Development Goals for gender equality will be reached.“We should have a female president in 2016. Research shows that when women are empowered as political leaders, countries often experience higher standards of living with positive developments in education, infrastructure, and health care,” she said.“We’ve had 13 male and only two female presidents so far. The Philippines has had a total of 15 presidents. To achieve equality between males and females, since we have had 13 males, the next 11 presidents should be female."The country has had two female presidents: Corazon Aquino (1986 to 1992) and Gloria Arroyo (2001 to 2010).Santiago ran against Mrs. Aquino's handpicked candidate, Fidel V. Ramos, in 1992. She lost but filed an electoral protest.She also urged voters to pick 6 female candidates for senator in 2016 to achieve gender equality in the upper house. Corruption “The greater majority in both chambers of Congress has always been men. Possibly, this is one reason why there is so much corruption in Congress,” she said.“Numerically, half of our high government officials should be women, and half should be men. And yet the division between the sexes is highly disproportionate in favor of men. In the Philippine Senate, in the 16th Congress, of 24 senators, only six of us are women,” she said.She said the Civil Service Commission has yet to reach its 50-50 target for representation of women and men in executive posts in government.She said the commission found in 2011 that women occupy only less than one-third of third-level positions in the government; more than one-third in government-owned and -controlled corporations; less than twenty percent in local government units; and more than one-third in the judiciary.Thus, the proportionate share is 1:2 in favor of men holding top posts in the government, she said.She also expressed concern over feminization in agriculture, or the increase of women in the agricultural sector.She said women in the sector are poorer, with their plot sizes smaller and production resources lower. Regional rice strategy set to boost production, livelihood of farmers
  • 2. The Nation March 12, 2014 1:00 am Faced with growing threats to rice production, countries in Asia and the Pacific are engaging in a regional rice strategy, initiated by FAO last year at the request of member states, and further discussed during a side event at the organisation's 32nd regional conference for Asia and the Pacific, held from March 10 -14 , 2013. "Rice is life," said Hiroyuki Konuma, FAO assistant director-general and regional representative for Asia and the Pacific. "More than 90 per cent of all rice in the world is produced in this region and 90 per cent of rice is consumed in this region," Konuma pointed out. Rice dominates much of the region's landscape and is an important source of livelihood for 140 million rice-farming households, and for millions of rural poor who work on rice farms as additional hired labour. "Rice is part of the agricultural landscape, livelihoods, history and traditions," of the region, Konuma added. Rice is therefore a strategic commodity, closely connected with the overall economic growth and political stability of the region, dependent on an adequate, affordable and stable supply of this staple crop. With the world's population projected to exceed nine billion by 2050, FAO has warned that food production will need to increase by 60 per cent to meet the demands of a future hungry planet. In developing countries, that figure jumps to 77 per cent. According to the regional rice strategy, there is cause for concern about the feasibility of dramatically increasing rice production because of a lack of water and/or arable land in many countries of the region. Existing rice farms are also blamed for producing greenhouse gas emissions and degrading natural resources. Rice production is "threatened by a decline in rice biodiversity, a loss of rice heritage, global climate change and the changing composition of labour in rural areas," the strategy explains. There is, however, cause for cautious optimism. The regional rice strategy notes that several new opportunities exist. In the drive to end hunger, rice could play an important role in ensuring food
  • 3. security by reducing hunger, malnutrition and poverty. That's a strong incentive leading to developments in science and technology which are helping the sector "making it possible to increase rice productivity in a sustainable manner, add nutritive value to rice, reduce losses from drought and flood, reduce the environmental footprint of rice production and make the rice production system climate-smart." The strategy's vision for the rice sector is that of "food-secure, better-nourished and prosperous rice farmers and consumers in the Asia-Pacific region who benefit equitably from a vibrant, innovative and transformed rice sector that is more productive, efficient and environmentally sustainable by 2030." "The main objective of the strategy," according to Hiroyuki Konuma, FAO assistant director-general and regional representative for Asia and the Pacific, "is to provide evidence-based strategic guidelines and options for FAO member states in the region to help them develop and adjust their own national rice policy strategies in the light of broader regional and global trends as well as national priorities." Key objectives l Sustainably increase productivity and nutrition value of rice; l Enhance the rice value chain by improving food quality, diversity and food safety while reducing post- harvest losses; l Improve rice farming's capacity to mitigate and adapt to climate change and improve farmers' capacity to cope with risk; l Minimise the environmental footprint of rice production and enhance the ecosystems functions of rice landscapes, including the protection and promotion of rice heritage and culture; l Improve the efficiency, reliability and fairness of domestic and international rice markets for stabilizing rice price and supply, ensuring equitable access by the poor and promoting regional collaboration;
  • 4. l Enhance the well-being and livelihoods of smallholders, women and the new generation of rice producers by improving adjustments to long-term changes in demography, farm size and labour supply. The Regional Rice Strategy also calls for increased investment in research and development "to further technological innovations in all stages of the rice value chain for productivity and efficiency gains, better quality and nutritional value, greater resilience and environmental protection." It recognises that policy and institutional innovations are needed to promote rural income growth, the rapid spread of improved technologies, and to develop a robust food security system that is stable and accessible to all. Regional rice strategy set to boost production, livelihood of farmers The Nation March 12, 2014 1:00 am Faced with growing threats to rice production, countries in Asia and the Pacific are engaging in a regional rice strategy, initiated by FAO last year at the request of member states, and further discussed during a side event at the organisation's 32nd regional conference for Asia and the Pacific, held from March 10 -14 , 2013. "Rice is life," said Hiroyuki Konuma, FAO assistant director-general and regional representative for Asia and the Pacific. "More than 90 per cent of all rice in the world is produced in this region and 90 per cent of rice is consumed in this region," Konuma pointed out. Rice dominates much of the region's landscape and is an important source of livelihood for 140 million rice-farming households, and for millions of rural poor who work on rice farms as additional hired labour. "Rice is part of the agricultural landscape, livelihoods, history and traditions," of the region, Konuma added. Rice is therefore a strategic commodity, closely connected with the overall economic growth and political stability of the region, dependent on an adequate, affordable and stable supply of this staple crop. With the world's population projected to exceed nine billion by 2050, FAO has warned that food production will need to increase by 60 per cent to meet the demands of a future hungry planet. In developing countries, that figure jumps to 77 per cent. According to the regional rice strategy, there is cause for concern about the feasibility of dramatically increasing rice production because of a lack of water and/or arable land in many countries of the region. Existing rice farms are also blamed for producing greenhouse gas emissions and degrading natural resources. Rice production is "threatened by a decline in rice biodiversity, a loss of rice heritage, global climate change and the changing composition of labour in rural areas," the strategy explains. There is, however, cause for cautious optimism. The regional rice strategy notes that several new opportunities exist. In the drive to end hunger, rice could play an important role in ensuring food security by reducing hunger, malnutrition and poverty. That's a strong incentive leading to developments in science and technology which are helping the sector "making it possible to increase rice productivity in a sustainable manner, add nutritive value to rice, reduce losses from drought and flood, reduce the environmental footprint of rice production and make the rice production
  • 5. system climate-smart." The strategy's vision for the rice sector is that of "food-secure, better-nourished and prosperous rice farmers and consumers in the Asia-Pacific region who benefit equitably from a vibrant, innovative and transformed rice sector that is more productive, efficient and environmentally sustainable by 2030." "The main objective of the strategy," according to Hiroyuki Konuma, FAO assistant director-general and regional representative for Asia and the Pacific, "is to provide evidence-based strategic guidelines and options for FAO member states in the region to help them develop and adjust their own national rice policy strategies in the light of broader regional and global trends as well as national priorities." Key objectives l Sustainably increase productivity and nutrition value of rice; l Enhance the rice value chain by improving food quality, diversity and food safety while reducing post-harvest losses; l Improve rice farming's capacity to mitigate and adapt to climate change and improve farmers' capacity to cope with risk; l Minimise the environmental footprint of rice production and enhance the ecosystems functions of rice landscapes, including the protection and promotion of rice heritage and culture; l Improve the efficiency, reliability and fairness of domestic and international rice markets for stabilizing rice price and supply, ensuring equitable access by the poor and promoting regional collaboration; l Enhance the well-being and livelihoods of smallholders, women and the new generation of rice producers by improving adjustments to long-term changes in demography, farm size and labour supply. The Regional Rice Strategy also calls for increased investment in research and development "to further technological innovations in all stages of the rice value chain for productivity and efficiency gains, better quality and nutritional value, greater resilience and environmental protection." It recognises that policy and institutional innovations are needed to promote rural income growth, the rapid spread of improved technologies, and to develop a robust food security system that is stable and accessible to all. Global glut, falling demand: double whammy for Vietnam rice exports Wednesday, March 12, 2014 16:13
  • 6. Workers load rice into containers slated for export Vietnam is likely find rice exports difficult this year due to the increasing global supply as Thailand seeks ways to liquidate its huge inventory and lower demand as some importing countries increase their own production, Trinh Van Tien of the Institute of Policy and Strategy for Agriculture and Rural Development tells Vietweek. Vietnam has seen rice exports fall in recent months due to volatility in the global market. What is your forecast for 2014? Trinh Van Tien: In the short term, the world rice market is seeing an oversupply. Some countries which used to depend on rice imports are increasing their production of the grain to ensure food security. The Philippines, Indonesia, and Malaysia used to import large quantities of rice, but have now reduced imports since they have increased production. Meanwhile, the global supply has increased. Thailand had a large rice inventory as a program to buy rice from farmers to keep export prices high by the Thai government since 2011 has failed. Thailand’s inventory now is estimated at some 15 million tons. To raise money to pay farmers who sold rice to the government, Thailand will have to cut its export prices to increase sales, dragging down prices in the world market and affecting [all] rice exporters including Vietnam. The increase in the supply is also attributed to rising production and exports by India. Its rice exports were even higher than Vietnam’s in 2013. India offers very competitive prices for low-quality rice, bringing down the average price on the world market. The average price fell to around US$400 per ton late last year, from over $550 a year earlier. If there are no factors like severe natural disasters affecting rice production, the rice market will see prices fall due to the oversupply, and importers will have more choices. ''Africa is a promising market with large demand, but its finance is limited, so Vietnam
  • 7. may face difficulties in getting payments" Despite the situation, the Vietnam Food Association (VFA) has set a rice export target of 7 million tons, higher than the 6.7 million tons exported last year. Do you think Vietnam can achieve the target? The export volume is not the most important issue for Vietnam now – to whom we can ship our rice and at what price is. China recently refused to import rice from Thailand due to the political instability in the latter. Some people think that it is an opportunity for Vietnam. With lower transport costs, Vietnamese rice has greater advantages compared to other countries. China may increase purchase of Vietnamese rice via unofficial channels across the border. However, it is very dangerous for Vietnam. It is difficult to monitor this export model. The Ministry of Industry and Trade cannot find out the exact volume of exports under this model. Small traders, when they see large profits, could increase rice purchases from farmers for export under the model. This could cause difficulties for other traders in buying rice to fulfill export contracts they have signed. So it could destroy Vietnam’s official export system. Vietnam does not expect much from importers who buy rice on credit under government contracts. Africa is a promising market with large demand, but its finance is limited, so Vietnam may face difficulties in getting payments. In addition, Africa mainly imports low-quality rice and Vietnam cannot compete with India, Pakistan, and Myanmar due to their lower prices. Asian countries like the Philippines and Indonesia, which used to import Vietnamese rice, have reduced demand due to their increasing production of the grain. Vietnam’s rice exports in the coming time will depend on the operation of the VFA since there will not be many more importers. Our traditional customers like the Philippines and Indonesia are studying the market to decide the best time and source for importing rice. The association’s operations should be improved to help importers. The government often asks traders to buy rice from farmers and keep in stock and wait for higher prices before exporting. Should we do the same thing in the upcoming crop? We could do it years ago when exporters did not have big inventories. Traders did not face difficulties in selling the rice they stocked. But the inventory is too large now. Besides Thailand, India also has large rice stocks. If our traders also buy rice for stockpiling, the global rice inventory, which is already big, will increase further, causing a risk of losses for traders. Some traders made losses when export prices fell last year, and so they have been unable to buy rice and stockpile this year. The government can buy rice from farmers to stockpile, but it is very difficult because of the limited funds. For farmers, selling their rice is expected to be difficult in the coming time. What should they do to avoid risks? Our traders operate in an unscientific manner. The prices they offer for some varieties of good rice, which farmers are encouraged to grow for exports, are not much higher than those which have high output but low quality and require smaller investment. So farmers do not grow the kind of varieties that authorities
  • 8. encourage them to. Traders buy all kinds of rice from farmers, even low-quality ones, when they have large export orders. So it is difficult to answer the question about what farmers should do now. According to the VFA, farmers should stop growing the spring-summer rice crop since it often rains during harvest time, affecting the quality. The rice from the crop cannot be exported. What do you think about it? In theory, farmers should do it since we have an ample rice supply for domestic consumption. However, authorities have not yet found out what farmers can do to replace the rice crop to earn an income. So the idea is impractical. Like us on Facebook and scroll down to share your comment Bao Van Thanh Nien News (The story can be found in the March 7 issue of our print edition, Nagpur Foodgrain Prices Open- Mar 12 Mon Mar 12, 2012 2:58pm IST 0 COMMENTS Gram and tuar prices in Nagpur Agriculture Produce and Marketing Committee (APMC) reported higher on increased festival season demand from local millers amid weak supply from producing regions. Upward trend on NCDEX, notable rise in Madhya Pradesh pulses and reported demand from South-based millers also helped to push up prices, according to sources. * * * * FOODGRAINS & PULSES GRAM * Gram varieties firmed up in open market on good buying support from local traders amid tight supply from millers. Fresh rise on NCDEX also boosted sentiment.
  • 9. TUAR * Tuar fataka best and medium varieties moved down in open market in absence of buyers amid healthy supply from millers. Increased overseas arrival also pushed down prices. * In Akola, Tuar - 3,300-3,400, Tuar dal - 5,000-5,200, Udid at 2,900-3,000, Udid Mogar (clean) - 4,200-4,300, Moong - 3,800-4,000, Moong Mogar (clean) 5,100-5,300, Gram - 3,450-3,550, Gram Super best bold - 4,400-4,600 for 100 kg. * Wheat, rice and other commodities prices remained steady in open market in thin trading activity, according to sources. Nagpur foodgrains APMC auction/open-market prices in rupees for 100 kg FOODGRAINS Available prices Previous close Gram Auction 2,935-3,240 2,900-3,190 Gram Pink Auction n.a. 2,100-2,600 Tuar Auction 2,730-3,280 2,700-3,170 Moong Auction n.a. 3,500-3,600 Udid Auction n.a. 3,450-3,500 Masoor Auction n.a. 2,300-2,400 Gram Super Best Bold 4,500-4,700 4,400-4,600 Gram Super Best n.a. Gram Medium Best 4,000-4,200 3,900-4,100
  • 10. Gram Dal Medium n.a. n.a. Gram Mill Quality 3,900-4,100 3,800-4,000 Deshi gram Raw 3,700-3,800 3,600-3,700 Gram Filter Yellow n.a. n.a. Gram Kabuli 7,000-8,600 6,900-8,500 Gram Pink 4,400-5,300 4,300-5,200 Tuar Fataka Best 5,500-5,700 5,600-5,800 Tuar Fataka Medium 5,200-5,400 5,300-5,500 Tuar Dal Best Phod 4,650-5,150 4,650-5,150 Tuar Dal Medium phod 4,350-4,600 4,350-4,600 Tuar Gavarani 3,200-3,300 3,200-3,300 Tuar Karnataka 3,350-3,450 3,350-3,450 Tuar Black 6,000-6,100 6,000-6,100 Masoor dal best 3,450-3,650 3,450-3,650 Masoor dal medium 3,300-3,475 3,300-3,475 Masoor n.a. n.a. Moong Mogar bold 6,200-6,400 6,200-6,400 Moong Mogar Medium best 5,700-6,000 5,700-6,000 Moong Mogar Super fine n.a. n.a. Moong Dal Chilka best 4,900-5,100 4,900-5,100 Moong dal Medium 4,400-4,600 4,400-4,600 Moong Mill quality n.a. n.a. Moong Chamki best 4,800-5,500 4,800-5,500 Udid Mogar Super best (100 INR/KG) 5,300-5,500 5,300-5,500 Udid Mogar Medium (100 INR/KG) 4,600-4,800 4,600-4,800
  • 11. Udid Dal Black (100 INR/KG) 3,800-4,400 3,800-4,400 Batri dal (100 INR/KG) 2,550-2,675 2,550-2,675 Lakhodi dal (100 INR/kg) 2,375-2,400 2,375-2,400 Watana Dal (100 INR/KG) 2,575-2,625 2,575-2,625 Watana White (Naylon) (100 INR/KG) 2,500-2,600 2,500-2,600 Watana White (100 INR/KG) 2,550-2,750 2,550-2,750 Watana Green Best (100 INR/KG) 2,850-3,250 2,850-3,250 Watana Green Medium (100 INR/KG) 2,650-2,900 2,650-2,900 Wheat 308 (100 INR/KG) 1,250-1,350 1,250-1,350 Wheat Mill quality (100 INR/KG) 1,250-1,300 1,250-1,300 Wheat Filter (100 INR/KG) 1,750-1,850 1,750-1,850 Wheat Lokwan best (100 INR/KG) 1,350-1,625 1,350-1,625 Wheat Lokwan medium (100 INR/KG) 1,300-1,475 1,300-1,475 Lokwan Hath Binar (100 INR/KG) n.a. n.a. MP Sharbati Best (100 INR/KG) 2,000-2,300 2,000-2,300 MP Sharbati Medium (100 INR/KG) 1,900-2,000 1,900-2,000 Wheat 147 (100 INR/KG) 1,300-1,400 1,300-1,400 Wheat Best (100 INR/KG) n.a. n.a. Rice BPT (100 INR/KG) 2,050-2,200 2,050-2,200 Rice Parmal (100 INR/KG) 1,400-1,450 1,400-1,450 Rice Swarna Best (100 INR/KG) 1,650-1,750 1,650-1,750 Rice Swarna Medium (100 INR/KG) 1,400-1,500 1,400-1,500 Rice HMT (100 INR/KG) 2,200-2,650 2,200-2,650 Rice HMT Shriram (100 INR/KG) 2,600-3,200 2,600-3,200 Rice Basmati best (100 INR/KG) 6,000-10,000 6,000-10,000
  • 12. Rice Basmati Medium (100 INR/KG) 3,800-4,500 3,800-4,500 Rice Chinnor (100 INR/KG) 3,200-3,250 3,200-3,250 Rice Chinnor Medium (100 INR/KG) 2,800-3,000 2,800-3,000 Jowar Gavarani (100 INR/KG) 1,100-1,400 1,100-1,400 Jowar CH-5 (100 INR/KG) 1,500-1,700 1,500-1,700 WEATHER (NAGPUR) Maximum temp. 35.0 degree Celsius (95.0 degree Fahrenheit), minimum temp. 21.1 degree Celsius (69.9 degree Fahrenheit) Humidity: Highest - 40 per cent, lowest - 14 per cent. FORECAST: Mainly clear sky. Maximum and Minimum temperature likely to be around 36 and 22 degree Celsius respectively. Note: n.a.--not available (For oils, transport costs are excluded from plant delivery prices, but included in market prices.) Thailand Bank Cuts Rate In a Bid to Help Growth Central Bank Sees More 'Downside Risks to Growth' Following Months of Protests and Inconclusive Election  Email  Print
  • 13.  Save↓ More  Facebook  Twitter  LinkedIn  smaller  Larger By WARANGKANA CHOMCHUEN CONNECT Updated March 12, 2014 6:58 p.m. ET BANGKOK—Thailand's central bank cut its benchmark interest rate to the lowest level in more than three years on Wednesday in a bid to support growth as the country's political crisis has taken a toll on the economy. In a 4-to-3 vote, the Bank of Thailand's monetary-policy committee cut its overnight rate to 2% from 2.25%. The last time it was at 2% was in early January 2011. The bank also said the economy was unlikely to grow by even 3% this year, down from a forecast of 4% as recently as November, as the political standoff weighs on consumption and investment. "The committee judges that downside risks to growth have risen in light of the prolonged political situation," central bank Assistant Gov. Paiboon Kittisrikangwan said. A ruling Wednesday by the Constitutional Court added yet another blow to the country's economic prospects. The court struck down a government proposal to borrow some $62 billion for infrastructure projects. The seven-year spending plan, which included the development of high-speed trains, was expected to be this year's main growth driver, and was intended to enhance Thailand's long-term competitiveness. The court said the borrowing, which would have been about a fifth of the country's gross domestic product, breached laws related to budget and fiscal discipline.
  • 14. "It's a shame that we miss a chance to develop something that could have put us in the forefront in linking [the region]…and be the center of regional investment," Prime MinisterYingluck Shinawatra told reporters after the decision. The Stock Exchange of Thailand was down about half a percentage point after the rate decision and the court's ruling. Ms. Yingluck has led a caretaker government, with limited spending powers, since she dissolved parliament in December to help calm street protests that began a month earlier. Snap elections held on Feb. 2 ended inconclusively because of an opposition boycott and attempts by antigovernment protesters to disrupt voting. The protests seeking to oust Ms. Yingluck are still going on but have declined in size in recent weeks and are no longer tying up traffic in the capital. Nevertheless, uncertainty over when a new government will be formed, amid the already weak growth, has rattled investors and strained Southeast Asia's second-largest economy, after Indonesia. The previous government's declaration of a state of emergency on Jan. 21 to curb protests also hurt tourism, which grew at a record pace last year. 698 million baht contributed so far to funds for assisting rice growers Published on March 12, 2014 by TFP · No Comments BANGKOK, 12 March 2014 (NNT) †” The Bank for Agriculture and Agricultural Cooperatives (BAAC) reveals that 698 million baht has been contributed so far to the funds it established to assist rice growers who are still waiting for payment owed to them under the rice pledging scheme. l According to staff at the BAAC headquarters, 18 million baht has been donated into the 1st type of fund, which is a fund for direct donation to help the rice growers; 510 million baht has been contributed to the 2nd type of fund, which does not earn any interest for the depositor, and 169 million baht has been deposited into the 3rd type of fund, which yields 0.63% interest per year. Uttaradit governor Chat Kittinopphadon on Tuesday presided over the launch of such a fund by the BAAC branch in Uttaradit province. 13 million baht was contributed to the fund by heads of local state agencies, rice mill owners and members of the public to mark the occasion. ( Namo Vananupong) Can Tho exports 193,000 tonnes of rice 11/03/2014 | 20:50:08
  • 15. The Mekong Delta city of Can Tho recently sold 14,000 tonnes of rice abroad, bringing its total export of the grain so far this year to 193,000 tonnes, up 5.7 percent over the same period last year and earning of 99.5 million USD. The increase is attributed to efforts by the city’s rice exporting businesses in seeking new markets in Asia and Africa . They have also signed contracts to sell 70,000 tonnes of the food to mainland China and Hong Kong . Municipal authorities take rice as a key foreign currency earner which generates jobs and ensures a steady income for farmers. In addition to applying the large-scale paddy field model across an area of 20,000 hectares during the 2013-2014 winter-spring crop, they will encourage businesses to sign purchasing contracts with farmers, ensuring sufficient rice for export. The city’s businesses are aiming to ship 1 million tonnes of rice abroad in 2014, up 140,000 tonnes from last year, for over 516 million USD. In 2013, they raked in nearly 500 million USD from rice export, accounting for 30 percent of the city’s total export value.-VNA Minnesota board: More study needed on sulfates By AMY FORLITI, Associated Press | March 12, 2014 | Updated: March 12, 2014 7:56pm  Comments 0  E-mail  Print 0 0
  • 16.  Photo By Jim Mone/AP FILE - In this Aug. 30, 2006 file photo, Joe Hoagland, left, pushes a canoe through a wild rice bed in White Earth, Minn., as 14-year-old Chris Salazar learns how to harvest the rice by knocking the grain off the stalks with two sticks. The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency said Wednesday, March 12, 2014 that more data analysis must be done to determine whether it will recommend changes to the state's water quality standards to protect wild rice from sulfates. MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency said Wednesday that more data analysis must be done to determine whether it will recommend changes to the state's water quality standards to protect wild rice from sulfates. A preliminary analysis of a two-year study on the issue makes no recommendations for changes to the standard for sulfate discharges at this time but says site-specific standards might be needed for some waters. The analysis also suggests the current standard is within a range suitable for protecting wild rice. "We're learning it's more complicated than it is simple," said MPCA Commissioner John Linc Stine. "So we have more work to do on that before we can settle on a recommendation or ... recommendations that we know would be more comprehensive and protective." He said the analysis released Wednesday only begins to look at the complexity of the subject and is not a final answer on water quality standards. Minnesota limits sulfate discharges from mines and other sources into waters that produce wild rice to 10 milligrams per liter, based on research from the 1940s suggesting that higher levels can stunt development of the plants. Supporters of iron and copper-nickel mining have argued the standard is obsolete, and the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce has said its own analysis concludes a standard is unnecessary. But the state's American Indian bands fear any weakening could imperil a food source they consider sacred and central to their cultural identity. The theory behind the study, conducted by scientists at the University of Minnesota and the University of Minnesota-Duluth, is that higher concentrations of sulfates can harm wild rice plants when they're converted into sulfides in the sediments where the plants grow. The MPCA's analysis found that the amount of sulfide in the sediment is affected by the amount of sulfate in the water as well as the amount of iron in the sediment.
  • 17. A higher amount of iron in the sediment mitigates sulfide concentrations, so in those areas, a higher level of sulfate in the water might not result in too much sulfide, the analysis found. On the flip side, areas with very low iron levels might require lower sulfate standards. Because of that, the analysis said, site-specific standards might be needed for some waters. The MPCA will continue to examine whether the type of water body — lakes, streams or rice paddies — affect wild rice's susceptibility to sulfide. Stine said the MPCA is working on developing recommendations based on sound science and good policy. He said the agency continues to analyze the data and refine its findings as needed. A scientific review will take place this year and there will be an opportunity for all stakeholders and members of the public to comment before final recommendations are made. Stine said recommendations could be put forth late this year or early next year, at the earliest. PDRC protesters stall rice auction  Published: 12 Mar 2014 at 14.59  Online news: Anti-government protesters and farmers on Wednesday morning forced the Commerce Ministry to postpone its planned auction of 240,000 tonnes of stockpiled rice on the Agricultural Futures Exchange of Thailand. Tinnakorn Ornpathum, a co-leader of the People’s Democratic Reform Committee (PDRC), led a large group of supporters from Lumpini Park to the Commerce Ministry in a show of support for farmers camping out at the government department demanding payment for grains pledged under the state rice scheme. Mr Tinnakorn urged officials to stop working and leave the ministry while farmers from Buri Ram province burned two straw men representing caretaker Commerce Minister Niwatthamrong Bunsongphaisan and caretaker Finance Minister Kittiratt Na-Ranong. The protesters said these two ministers were directly responsible for failures in the rice-pledging scheme. The ministry's Internal Trade Department had planned to auction stockpiles on Wednesday. Protesters later cut electricity to the ministry, prompting Somchart Sroythong, director-general of the Internal Trade Department, to announce that the auction would be postponed until March 26. The government says it has sold 278,962 tonnes of rice through the Agricultural Futures Exchange of Thailand since last October, raising three billion baht in revenue.
  • 18. PM seeks 45-day delay on rice charges Lawyers for caretaker Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra on Wednesday asked the National Anti-Corruption Commission (NACC) for another 45 days to study rice-pledging graft charges against the premier, who is due to testify before the agency this Friday.  Published: 12/03/2014 at 04:25 PM  Newspaper section: breakingnews Lawyer Norawit Lalaeng said Ms Yingluck's legal team had only managed to copy documents relating to the investigation at the NACC office in Nonthaburi on Tuesday, leaving them just two days to mount a defence. Mr Norawit also claimed the 49-page report does not contain full details of allegations against Ms Yingluck, relating to rice corruption at all levels of government, the distortion of rice market mechanisms or irregularities in rice storage expenses. He said he believed the anti-graft agency's full report contained more than 49 pages, since the allegations involved the entire rice-pledging programme. However, he said he was told by the NACC that it would only provide the 49-page dossier for him to examine. Ms Yingluck, who is also chairwoman of the National Rice Policy Committee, has been charged with dereliction of duty for failing to address allegations of corruption in the government’s rice- pledging scheme. Ms Yingluck was originally scheduled to meet the NACC on Feb 27 to answer the charge, but the date was pushed back to Friday, March 14 when she failed to appear at the meeting in person. About the author Thai credit rating survives rice scheme  Published: 12 Mar 2014 at 17.49  Online news: The rice-pledging scheme on its own will not have a significant impact on the sovereign credit quality of Thailand, according to a report published today by Standard & Poor's Ratings Services. Standard & Poor's does not expect to lower the BBB+ sovereign rating of Thailand because of the cost of the rice-subsidy scheme, the report said.
  • 19. "Thailand's fiscal and debt metrics can accommodate the likely losses from the rice-pledging scheme, and will remain comfortably in the ranges commensurate with the current rating," said Standard & Poor's credit analyst Agost Benard. In its base-case scenario, the rating agency projected that general government fiscal deficits will average 0.7% of GDP in 2013-2016, while general government debt as a percentage of GDP will rise by an average of 3% annually over the period. As a result, Standard & Poor's estimates that net general government debt will reach a still-moderate 25% of GDP. The ratings service said the rice-subsidy scheme in its original form exposed the government to large losses from buying the country's rice crop at a guaranteed price. The current version however, caps losses by limiting the amount of support per farming household, it said. Implementation of the scheme has also stalled due to the country's ongoing political stalemate, the report said, adding that the future course of the scheme will depend on resolution of the current political impasse and the makeup of the next government. FDA shuts firm at centre of Listeria outbreak By Joe Whitworth+ 12-Mar-2014
  • 20. Roos Foods has recalled a variety of products Related tags: Whole-genome sequencing, Roos Foods, Listeria, FDA, CDC, Cheese, Sour cream, Outbreak Related topics: Legislation, Testing The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has suspended the registration of Roos Foods, which is at the centre of a Listeria outbreak linked to the death of one person, after an inspection uncovered insanitary conditions. RELATED NEWS: One dead and seven hospitalized in Listeria outbreak Controlling Listeria in RTE meat and poultry products CDC identifies people most at risk from listeria Listeria suspected source of two separate outbreaks FDA found the roof leaking so that water was raining down into the cheese processing room, including onto equipment and storage tanks and standing water on the floor in the cheese curd processing room in proximity to the cheese vats and in storage rooms.
  • 21. The suspension was ordered after an investigation with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and state and local partners linked a multi-state outbreak of listeriosis to cheeses contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes and manufactured by the company. Residues after cleaning FDA inspected the company’s facility from February 18 – March 4 and also found food residues found on equipment after cleaning and openings to milk storage tanks and transfer piping were not capped to prevent contaminants entering or compromising food contact surfaces. The suspension order will be lifted when the FDA determines that food manufactured, processed, packed, or held no longer has a reasonable probability of causing serious adverse health consequences or death. Eight people sickened The CDC reported eight people have been infected with the outbreak strain of Listeria monocytogenes from two states: California (1), Maryland (7). Dates that illness was diagnosed range from August 1, to November 27, 2013 and seven of the eight ill persons were hospitalized. Roos Food product recall Five of the illnesses were related to a pregnancy; two of these were diagnosed in two mother– newborn pairs, and one in only the newborn. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of Listeria monocytogenes strains isolated from Roos Foods cheese products has been performed by the FDA and Virginia’s Division of Consolidated Laboratory Services.
  • 22. They were found to be highly related to the Listeria strains isolated from patients, adding further confidence that cheese products produced by Roos Foods were a likely source. Roos Foods has voluntarily recalled all lots, sizes and types of cheese under the Amigo, Anita, Mexicana, and Santa Rose de Lima brands. The firm also recalled all product sizes and containers of Santa Rosa de Lima Crema Salvadorena Cultured Sour Cream, Santa Rosa de Lima Mantequilla de Bolsa Tradicion Centroamericana, Crema Pura Mexicana Cultured Sour Cream, La Chapina Crema Guatemalteca Guatemalan Style Cream, and Amigo Brand Crema Centroamericana Cultured Sour Cream. Products were distributed through retail stores in Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Virginia and the District of Columbia. Copyright - Unless otherwise stated all contents of this web site are © 2014 - William Reed Business Media SAS - All Rights Reserved - Full details for the use of materials on this site can be found in the Terms & Conditions

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