Plagiarism
English 9
What is Plagiarism?
• "Plagiarism means using another's work without
giving credit. Whenever you quote or base your
ideas ...
Types of Plagiarism
Source: “What is Plagiarism?” Plagiarism.org. Web. 29 April 2010.
<http://www.plagiarism.org>
Indicators
• An indicator provides a reliable way of measuring
achievement and monitoring performance.
• Indicators for me...
Citing Sources as an
Indicator of Your Grade
87.4 107.7 160.6
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
160
180
Avg. Grade for Not Citing
...
What We Found
61
22
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
Plagiarized Did Not Plagiarize
Series1
Series2
Source: 2009-2010 Semester II En...
Academic Dishonesty Policy
from WHS Handbook
• Academic dishonesty, cheating, and plagiarism are serious
matters that chal...
Grading Key
• WC = Works Cited
• DS = Double Spaced
• IN = Indent
• ALPHA = Alpha Order
• MLA = MLA Format
• OR = Componen...
Definitions of Types of
Plagiarism
1. "The Ghost Writer.” The writer turns in another's work, word-for-word, as his or her...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Plagiarism Data Driven Instruction

2,149 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,149
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Plagiarism Data Driven Instruction

  1. 1. Plagiarism English 9
  2. 2. What is Plagiarism? • "Plagiarism means using another's work without giving credit. Whenever you quote or base your ideas on another person's work, you must document the source you used. Even when you do not quote directly from another work, if reading that source contributed to the ideas presented in your paper, you must give the authors proper credit.” Source: “Citing Sources.” University of California Berkeley Library. Web. 28 April 2010. < http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/instruct/guides/citations.html#Plagiarism>.
  3. 3. Types of Plagiarism Source: “What is Plagiarism?” Plagiarism.org. Web. 29 April 2010. <http://www.plagiarism.org>
  4. 4. Indicators • An indicator provides a reliable way of measuring achievement and monitoring performance. • Indicators for measuring achievement on this assignment are: • Have I provided original thoughts and ideas? • Are all my sources cited properly?
  5. 5. Citing Sources as an Indicator of Your Grade 87.4 107.7 160.6 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 Avg. Grade for Not Citing Sources Avg. Grade for Works Cited but No In-Text Avg. Grade for Works Cited and In-Text Citation Source: 2009-2010 Semester II English 9 Students. Grades. Shakespeare Research Project. Compiled by M. Torrise and J. Mahmoud. 28 April 2010. Possible Points 190
  6. 6. What We Found 61 22 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Plagiarized Did Not Plagiarize Series1 Series2 Source: 2009-2010 Semester II English 9 Students. Grades. Shakespeare Research Project. Compiled by M. Torrise and J. Mahmoud. 28 April 2010. Total Number of Assignments Graded: 83
  7. 7. Academic Dishonesty Policy from WHS Handbook • Academic dishonesty, cheating, and plagiarism are serious matters that challenge each student’s goal of being responsible. Examples: • Copying computer internet materials or software without proper documentation or in violation of copyright law. • Summarizing material without acknowledging the source. • Representing the work of someone else as one’s own work • Obtaining or accepting a copy of a test or answers to a test. • Copying another student’s homework or test answers; or providing work or answers to another student. • Students who engage in such dishonesty may be penalized by receiving a grade of “0” for the assignment. Repeated offenses could result in a grade of “F” for the course.
  8. 8. Grading Key • WC = Works Cited • DS = Double Spaced • IN = Indent • ALPHA = Alpha Order • MLA = MLA Format • OR = Components in Correct Order • PC = Punctuation • IT = In Text Citation • PL = Plagiarism • CP = Cut and Paste • WS = Word Smith
  9. 9. Definitions of Types of Plagiarism 1. "The Ghost Writer.” The writer turns in another's work, word-for-word, as his or her own. 2. "The Photocopy.” The writer copies significant portions of text straight from a single source, without alteration. 3. "The Potluck Paper. “ The writer tries to disguise plagiarism by copying from several different sources, tweaking the sentences to make them fit together while retaining most of the original phrasing. 4. "The Poor Disguise.” Although the writer has retained the essential content of the source, he or she has altered the paper's appearance slightly by changing key words and phrases. 5. "The Labor of Laziness.“ The writer takes the time to paraphrase most of the paper from other sources and make it all fit together, instead of spending the same effort on original work. 6. "The Self-Stealer.” The writer "borrows" generously from his or her previous work, violating policies concerning the expectation of originality adopted by most academic institutions. Source: “What is Plagiarism?” Plagiarism.org. Web. 29 April 2010. <http://www.plagiarism.org>

×