presented “ Social Ecology and Urban Agriculture:   Growing Scientific Thinking in High School”  Community as Intellectual...
What is Urban Agriculture? <ul><li>Growing fruits and vegetables in and around urban areas for consumption by local popula...
What are benefits of an urban agriculture to the community? <ul><li>Preserves environment-decreases pollution & increases ...
What are benefits of an urban agriculture program to high school students? <ul><li>Students are connected with culture and...
What are the outcomes of integrating urban agriculture in math & science? <ul><li>Students understand the interdisciplinar...
How can we start planning an urban agriculture program for high school students? <ul><li>Meet with teachers, parents, comm...
What are some considerations in developing an urban agriculture curriculum? <ul><li>What content will be covered? </li></u...
What are the best teaching methods & strategies? <ul><li>Action research </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative learning </li></u...
What types of assessments can we use? <ul><li>Authentic assessments allow students to create shared knowledge.  </li></ul>...
How do we keep high school students involved?  <ul><li>Provide authentic, culturally relevant learning opportunities </li>...
What have urban farmers from Dr. Pedro Albizu Campos High School been doing? <ul><li>Summer program </li></ul><ul><li>Hydr...
Contributors <ul><li>Carlos DeJesús – Science Teacher, Dr. Pedro Albizu Campos High School.  [email_address]   </li></ul><...
Curriculum Notes Content Skills Assessments
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

CIS Symposium 2008

302

Published on

“Social Ecology and Urban Agriculture: Growing Scientific Thinking in High School”

Community as Intellectual Space: Aesthetics as Resistance: The Act of Community Building

4th Annual Symposium June 13-15, 2008

Published in: Technology, Real Estate
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
302
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • CIS Symposium 2008

    1. 1. presented “ Social Ecology and Urban Agriculture: Growing Scientific Thinking in High School” Community as Intellectual Space: Aesthetics as Resistance: The Act of Community Building 4th Annual Symposium June 13-15, 2008
    2. 2. What is Urban Agriculture? <ul><li>Growing fruits and vegetables in and around urban areas for consumption by local populations </li></ul><ul><li>UA is democratic because all members of the community have equal access to food </li></ul><ul><li>UA is participatory because it is community-based and food choices are controlled by local residents </li></ul><ul><li>Through UA we learn about the social ecology of a community, or the relationship between human society, all living plants and animals, and the environment </li></ul>
    3. 3. What are benefits of an urban agriculture to the community? <ul><li>Preserves environment-decreases pollution & increases biodiversity </li></ul><ul><li>Improves health & well being of community members </li></ul><ul><li>Increases economic sustainability of the community </li></ul><ul><li>Is aesthetically pleasing </li></ul><ul><li>Increases community building </li></ul><ul><li>Reinforces cultural connections with food & the land </li></ul>
    4. 4. What are benefits of an urban agriculture program to high school students? <ul><li>Students are connected with culture and community </li></ul><ul><li>Students build multi-generational relationships, sharing reciprocal knowledge with family and other community members </li></ul><ul><li>Students are actively involved in community building & understand the relationship between human-kind and the natural world </li></ul><ul><li>Students gain a sense of social empowerment </li></ul>
    5. 5. What are the outcomes of integrating urban agriculture in math & science? <ul><li>Students understand the interdisciplinary nature of the sciences </li></ul><ul><li>Students understand the process of inquiry </li></ul><ul><li>Students understand that communities interact, co-exist, and are inter-dependent </li></ul><ul><li>Students learn how to use math & science to explore & solve real world problems </li></ul><ul><li>Students gain skills of community inquiry,critical thought, and life-long learning </li></ul><ul><li>Students gain skills they will use in school & in the workplace </li></ul>
    6. 6. How can we start planning an urban agriculture program for high school students? <ul><li>Meet with teachers, parents, community leaders to determine level of interest & involvement and create a shared vision </li></ul><ul><li>Raise awareness in the school and community about the benefits of UA </li></ul><ul><li>Start a curriculum development team </li></ul><ul><li>Articulate how the program will fit into the school curriculum and meet standards </li></ul><ul><li>Develop a budget </li></ul><ul><li>Engage students in the planning process </li></ul>
    7. 7. What are some considerations in developing an urban agriculture curriculum? <ul><li>What content will be covered? </li></ul><ul><li>How will the program be integrated? </li></ul><ul><li>What skills will students learn? </li></ul><ul><li>How will students be assessed? </li></ul><ul><li>How will the program be linked to state standards? </li></ul>
    8. 8. What are the best teaching methods & strategies? <ul><li>Action research </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative learning </li></ul><ul><li>Inquiry-based learning </li></ul><ul><li>Problem-based learning </li></ul><ul><li>Student-centered learning </li></ul>
    9. 9. What types of assessments can we use? <ul><li>Authentic assessments allow students to create shared knowledge. </li></ul><ul><li>Some examples include: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Creating a blog </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Developing an architectural rendering </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Collaborating on a proposal </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Planning a community event </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Producing a documentary </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Publishing a podcast </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Writing a news article </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Compiling a portfolio </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Writing competency statements </li></ul></ul></ul>
    10. 10. How do we keep high school students involved? <ul><li>Provide authentic, culturally relevant learning opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>Connect learning with community building </li></ul><ul><li>Give students skills they can use </li></ul><ul><li>Match student interests with their work </li></ul><ul><li>Provide appropriate and meaningful assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Provide after school and summer jobs in urban agriculture and high school credit </li></ul>
    11. 11. What have urban farmers from Dr. Pedro Albizu Campos High School been doing? <ul><li>Summer program </li></ul><ul><li>Hydroponics </li></ul><ul><li>Rooftop gardening </li></ul><ul><li>Germinating seeds in the classroom </li></ul><ul><li>Community gardens </li></ul><ul><li>Planters, greenhouse </li></ul>
    12. 12. Contributors <ul><li>Carlos DeJesús – Science Teacher, Dr. Pedro Albizu Campos High School. [email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Juan Rodríguez – Math Teacher, Dr. Pedro Albizu Campos High School. [email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Matthew Rodríguez – Assistant Director, Dr. Pedro Albizu Campos High School. [email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Raymond Rodríguez – Math Teacher, Dr. Pedro Albizu Campos High School. [email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Students of Dr. Pedro Albizu Campos High School </li></ul><ul><li>Michelle Torrise – Graduate Assistant, University of Illinois Graduate School of Library and Information Science, Community Informatics Initiative. [email_address] </li></ul>
    13. 13. Curriculum Notes Content Skills Assessments
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×