bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention
Competence-Oriented Framework for
Road Safety Education
ICDBT, 19th - 20th Aug...
bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention
The bfu: its areas of action and activities
20th August 2013-ICDBT HelsinkiCom...
bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention
Non-occupational accidents
among the Swiss population, 2009
3
90
315
610
0
100...
bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention
4
Road fatalities per 1 million inhabitants, 2010
111
107
102
88 86
76 74
68 6...
bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention
Development of serious personal injuries among car
drivers, by age group, per ...
bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention
Europe: Serious accidents among new drivers
(Fatalities: young drivers per 100...
bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention
7
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
0 3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30 33 36 39 42 45 48 51 54 5...
bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention
Road safety education in Switzerland
8
Pre-school:
nothingoffered
Kindergarten...
bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention
9
Analysis
 Road safety education in Switzerland
 is wide-ranging but fairly...
bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention
10
Braving the gap – but not in road safety education!
Competence-Oriented Fra...
bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention
The goal: continuity in road safety education
 A reality in France since 1997...
bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention
The way to go: a catalogue of competences
The catalogue of competences
 Permi...
bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention
Why competence-oriented?
 Competence-orientation is at the core of more recen...
bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention
Current status of work: 3 levels
14
Level 1:
Four competence sectors
Level 2:
...
bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention
Level 1: The four competence sectors
15
Behaviour
appropriate to the
situation...
bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention
Level 2: The twelve basic competences
16Competence-Oriented Framework for Road...
bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention
Level 3: Part-competences and it’s development (examples)
17
Basic competence ...
bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention
Further procedure
 Practitioners are calling for a 4th level: pool of impleme...
bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention
Thank you for your attention!
For further information: t.kramer@bfu.ch
19
bfu ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Kramer

207

Published on

Developing a Competence-oriented Orientation Framework as the First Step Towards Coordinated Traffic Education in Switzerland

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
207
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Kramer

  1. 1. bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention Competence-Oriented Framework for Road Safety Education ICDBT, 19th - 20th August 2013, Helsinki Thomas Kramer, MSc in Psychology t.kramer@bfu.ch – www.bfu.ch 20th August 2013-ICDBT HelsinkiCompetence-Oriented Framework for Road Safety Education 1
  2. 2. bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention The bfu: its areas of action and activities 20th August 2013-ICDBT HelsinkiCompetence-Oriented Framework for Road Safety Education 2 Road traffic Sports Home and leisure –Research - Communication - Advisory services – Training –Network of safety delegates
  3. 3. bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention Non-occupational accidents among the Swiss population, 2009 3 90 315 610 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 Road traffic Sports Home and leisure People injured (in thousands) 319 137 1547 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 Road traffic Sports Home and leisure Fatalities Material costs (CHF in billions) 4935 1838 4774 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 Road traffic Sports Home and leisure bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention Competence-Oriented Framework for Road Safety Education 20th August 2013-ICDBT Helsinki
  4. 4. bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention 4 Road fatalities per 1 million inhabitants, 2010 111 107 102 88 86 76 74 68 67 66 65 64 64 64 61 54 51 47 46 46 45 45 43 42 32 31 28 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 GR USA PL P NZ CZ H I SLO A CDN NIRL L F AUS E FIN IRL ISR DK J D N CH NL GB S Competence-Oriented Framework for Road Safety Education 20th August 2013-ICDBT Helsinki
  5. 5. bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention Development of serious personal injuries among car drivers, by age group, per 100,000 inhabitants 5 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 18-24 25-44 45-64 65+ Competence-Oriented Framework for Road Safety Education 20th August 2013-ICDBT Helsinki
  6. 6. bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention Europe: Serious accidents among new drivers (Fatalities: young drivers per 100,000, IRTAD) 6 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 AT 18-20 FR 18-20 DE 18-20 SE 18-20 CH 18-20 Competence-Oriented Framework for Road Safety Education 20th August 2013-ICDBT Helsinki
  7. 7. bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention 7 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 0 3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30 33 36 39 42 45 48 51 54 57 60 63 66 69 72 75 78 81 84 87 90+ Car Motorcycle Moped Bicycle Pedestrian Competence-Oriented Framework for Road Safety Education 20th August 2013-ICDBT Helsinki Seriously injured people and fatalities per 100,000 inhabitants by age and mode of transport, Ø 2001-2011
  8. 8. bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention Road safety education in Switzerland 8 Pre-school: nothingoffered Kindergarten/primarylevel: comprehensive,goodoffer Lowersecondarylevel: selectiveoffers Uppersecondarylevel: individualoffers Drivinginstruction:little compulsorytraining Voluntaryfurthertraining: littleused LACK OF STRUCTURE, LITTLE CONTINUITY Competence-Oriented Framework for Road Safety Education 20th August 2013-ICDBT Helsinki
  9. 9. bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention 9 Analysis  Road safety education in Switzerland  is wide-ranging but fairly uncoordinated  has gaps (geographical coverage, content, target groups)  has little structure and little coherence in terms of content  Driving instruction  must therefore start from practically zero  cannot make up for deficits due to a lack of quantity and quality  Road safety can be optimised  by coordinating road safety education  by harmonising and developing content (and methods) Competence-Oriented Framework for Road Safety Education 20th August 2013-ICDBT Helsinki
  10. 10. bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention 10 Braving the gap – but not in road safety education! Competence-Oriented Framework for Road Safety Education 20th August 2013-ICDBT Helsinki
  11. 11. bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention The goal: continuity in road safety education  A reality in France since 1997  Niedersachsen, Germany: Mobility Curriculum since 2001  Victoria, Australia: Road Safety Education Action Plan 2012-2013  Ireland: Road Safety Strategy 2007-2012 11Competence-Oriented Framework for Road Safety Education 20th August 2013-ICDBT Helsinki
  12. 12. bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention The way to go: a catalogue of competences The catalogue of competences  Permits the coordination of content in road safety education  Permits the recognition (and the closure) of gaps  Promotes a spiral-shaped structuring of competences  Is a tool for those in charge of road-safety programmes  Can be used as a reference when editing content or redesigning programmes 12Competence-Oriented Framework for Road Safety Education 20th August 2013-ICDBT Helsinki
  13. 13. bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention Why competence-oriented?  Competence-orientation is at the core of more recent curricula  Competences comprise  Knowledge and proficiency  Abilities/know-how  Attitude and opinion  Competences are aimed at their applicability in various situations  Competence definitions are well-suited to being specified in educational activities/teaching materials 13Competence-Oriented Framework for Road Safety Education 20th August 2013-ICDBT Helsinki
  14. 14. bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention Current status of work: 3 levels 14 Level 1: Four competence sectors Level 2: Twelve basic competences Level 3: ~ 20 part-competences with competence development Competence-Oriented Framework for Road Safety Education 20th August 2013-ICDBT Helsinki
  15. 15. bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention Level 1: The four competence sectors 15 Behaviour appropriate to the situation Handling and using modes of transport Responsibility and the environment Rules and regulations Competence-Oriented Framework for Road Safety Education 20th August 2013-ICDBT Helsinki
  16. 16. bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention Level 2: The twelve basic competences 16Competence-Oriented Framework for Road Safety Education 20th August 2013-ICDBT Helsinki
  17. 17. bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention Level 3: Part-competences and it’s development (examples) 17 Basic competence 4.2: Recognising the limitations of personal driving ability and acting responsibly Part-competence 4.2.1 Be aware of the factors that influence driving ability and take note of them. Can recount what one can already do as a young child in the street and what one cannot do. Is aware that being distracted by games and conversations can affect perception and reactions in traffic. Can describe the effects of different types of distractions and develops alternative actions. Is aware of the effects of addictive substances on behaviour in traffic and develops alternative activities. Is aware of the effect of being overtired and of group-dynamic processes in traffic behaviour and develops alternative personal strategies. Is aware of the danger of overestimating their own abilities and underestimating accident risks. Basic competence 3.1: Ensuring safety and avoiding accidents by anticipating eventsPart-competence 3.1.1 Can adjust own traffic behaviour to own prerequisites. Adapts personal behaviour (as a pedestrian, cyclist and user of a device comparable to a vehicle) in adjacent traffic areas to personal skills and preconditions. Adjusts personal behaviour (as a pedestrian, a user of devices comparable to vehicles and as a cyclist) in the extended traffic area to meet personal abilities and preconditions. Adapts personal behaviour in the extended traffic area to personal abilities and preconditions. Adapts personal behaviour in the entire traffic area to personal abilities and preconditions. Basic competence 3.1: Ensuring safety and avoiding accidents by anticipating events Basic competence 2.1: Familiarity with a vehicle and a practical mastery of its use Part-competence 2.1.1 Can operate the vehicle. Can move around increasingly safely on foot and on devices comparable to vehicles. Can keep their balance on a bicycle, brake safely and ride through a protected area by bicycle and on devices comparable to vehicles. Is familiar with the most important features of bicycles and devices comparable to vehicles and can move safely with them in traffic. Is familiar with the most important features of the modes of transport used and can use them safely in traffic. Is familiar with the required functions and elements of the mode of transport used and can use them safely in different situations. Basic competence 1.2: Ability to explain the meaning of rules and the effects of violating rules Part-competence 1.2.1 Can see the meaning of road-traffic rules. In simple situations, is able to explain the connection between traffic rules and safety. Based on simple situations on the way to school, can explain the contribution of rules to safety in traffic. Based on simple situations in the extended traffic area, can explain how rules contribute towards safety in road traffic. Based on complex situations in the extended traffic area, is able to explain the contribution made by rules to road safety. Based on complex situations in the extended traffic area, can explain the contribution made by rules to road safety, can give reasons for the need for road traffic rules and refer these to his or her own behaviour. Competence-Oriented Framework for Road Safety Education 20th August 2013-ICDBT Helsinki 0-3 4-8 9-12 13-15 16-20 >20
  18. 18. bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention Further procedure  Practitioners are calling for a 4th level: pool of implementation examples?  Discussion of the rough draft with practitioners in autumn  Broad-based review in winter 2013/2014  Development of a web-based tool for dissemination  Conclusion of the work and distribution of the tool: summer 2014 18Competence-Oriented Framework for Road Safety Education 20th August 2013-ICDBT Helsinki
  19. 19. bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention Thank you for your attention! For further information: t.kramer@bfu.ch 19 bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention Competence-Oriented Framework for Road Safety Education 20th August 2013-ICDBT Helsinki
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×