Background
• Driving is an important factor in maintaining health
and quality of life in older adults.
• Self-regulation (...
Aim
To design and use a theoretically based
intervention to positively influence self-
regulation planning intentions and
...
Theoretical Basis
• Theory of Planned Behaviour (Ajzen, 1991).
• Established health psychology model used to
predict inten...
Research Questions
• To determine the effects of the intervention
on:
–Direct measures of TPB constructs
–Indirect measure...
Methods
• Randomised controlled trial.
• Drivers stratified by age into three groups –
young (17-25 years), middle-years (...
Participants
• N = 81, 53 women & 28 men.
• Aged : 18 to 83 years.
Mean = 46.40 years, S.D. = 20.58 years.
• Experience : ...
Materials
• Pre and post-intervention questionnaire
packet – demographics, SRI, TPB.
• ‘DriveSafe’ handypack.
• Interventi...
Intervention Components
Persuasive
messages Goal setting
Action
planning
Coping
planning
Behavioural
Contract
Results
• Direct Constructs
– Explained 34% of variance in intention.
– Increase in affective attitude.
• Indirect Constru...
Conclusions
• Extended TPB intervention successful in
facilitating change in self-reported, SR behaviour
– offers promise ...
Limitations
• Attrition.
• Gender balance (Higher female take up rate).
• Self-report measures.
• Cannot attribute results...
References
• Abraham and Michie (2008) A taxonomy of behavior change techniques used in
interventions. Health Psychology, ...
Acknowledgements
• This study was funded by DriveSafe-Stay
Safe, a Birmingham based road safety
charity and the Economic a...
Gwyther
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Gwyther

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Testing an intervention encouraging self-regulation in drivers across the lifespan

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Gwyther

  1. 1. Background • Driving is an important factor in maintaining health and quality of life in older adults. • Self-regulation (SR) is being promoted as a safe method of maintaining independent mobility in older drivers. • SR often thought of as driving avoidance (e.g. not driving in the dark) BUT it also incorporates planning (e.g. route mapping). • Could an intervention be designed to promote SR planning behaviours in drivers across the lifespan?
  2. 2. Aim To design and use a theoretically based intervention to positively influence self- regulation planning intentions and behaviours.
  3. 3. Theoretical Basis • Theory of Planned Behaviour (Ajzen, 1991). • Established health psychology model used to predict intention and behaviour.
  4. 4. Research Questions • To determine the effects of the intervention on: –Direct measures of TPB constructs –Indirect measures of TPB constructs –Self-reported planning behaviours –Goal achievement
  5. 5. Methods • Randomised controlled trial. • Drivers stratified by age into three groups – young (17-25 years), middle-years (26-64 years) and old (65 years +). • Participants randomly allocated to group intervention or control condition.
  6. 6. Participants • N = 81, 53 women & 28 men. • Aged : 18 to 83 years. Mean = 46.40 years, S.D. = 20.58 years. • Experience : 3 months to 66 years. Mean = 26.26 years, S.D. = 19.03 years.
  7. 7. Materials • Pre and post-intervention questionnaire packet – demographics, SRI, TPB. • ‘DriveSafe’ handypack. • Intervention worksheet • Additional set of questions relating to goal achievement for intervention group.
  8. 8. Intervention Components Persuasive messages Goal setting Action planning Coping planning Behavioural Contract
  9. 9. Results • Direct Constructs – Explained 34% of variance in intention. – Increase in affective attitude. • Indirect Constructs – Explained 11% of variance in intention. – Reduction in normative beliefs. • Self-reported Planning Behaviour – Increased. • Goal achievement – Over 90% achieved first and second goals
  10. 10. Conclusions • Extended TPB intervention successful in facilitating change in self-reported, SR behaviour – offers promise as a tool to assist drivers in achieving their mobility goals. • Intervention positively affects affective attitude. Care should be taken to ensure that changing affective attitude does not increase risk potential.
  11. 11. Limitations • Attrition. • Gender balance (Higher female take up rate). • Self-report measures. • Cannot attribute results to either TPB or goal setting tasks. • Short timescale.
  12. 12. References • Abraham and Michie (2008) A taxonomy of behavior change techniques used in interventions. Health Psychology, 27, 379-387. • Ajzen, I (1991) The theory of planned behaviour. Orgainizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes 50(2), 179-211. • Ajzen (2002a)Constructing a TPB questionnaire: conceptual and methodological considerations. Retrieved 15 May, 2012, from http://socgeo.ruhosting.nl/html/files/spatbeh/tpb.measurement.pdf • Gollwitzer (1993) Goal achievement: The role of intentions. European Review of Social Psychology, 4, 141-185. • Gollwitzer and Sheeran (2006) Implementation Intentions and Goal Achievement: A Meta-analysis of Effects and Processes. In P. Z. Mark (Ed.), Advances in Experimental Social Psychology (Vol. Volume 38, pp. 69-119): Academic Press. • Sniehotta, Schwarzer, Scholz and Schulz (2005) Action planning and coping planning for long-term lifestyle change: Theory and assessment. European Journal of Social Psychology, 35(4), 565-576. • Sniehotta (2009) Towards a theory of intentional behaviour change: Plans, planning, and self-regulation. British Journal of Health Psychology, 14, 261-273.
  13. 13. Acknowledgements • This study was funded by DriveSafe-Stay Safe, a Birmingham based road safety charity and the Economic and Social Research Council, award number ES/G003777/1. • We are grateful to the drivers who participated in this study.

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