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Running an Effective Meeting
Running an Effective Meeting
Running an Effective Meeting
Running an Effective Meeting
Running an Effective Meeting
Running an Effective Meeting
Running an Effective Meeting
Running an Effective Meeting
Running an Effective Meeting
Running an Effective Meeting
Running an Effective Meeting
Running an Effective Meeting
Running an Effective Meeting
Running an Effective Meeting
Running an Effective Meeting
Running an Effective Meeting
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Running an Effective Meeting

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Jason Fossum and Kayley Schoonmaker

Jason Fossum and Kayley Schoonmaker

Published in: Education, Technology
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  • Seeing as we deleted the “Overview” slide, let’s state briefly here what we are going to be talking about.
  • I added “break a tie – in most cases” at the bottom of this slide. Does this make sense? I know that most bylaws state that the chair can break a tie, but I have seen occasions where the bylaws do not allow it.
  • I added “Know your bylaws!” at the bottom of this slide. I think it is very important. Do you think this is a good place to touch on this?
  • I will talk briefly about my experience here as the Chair of the Northeast and ICC student senate.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Running an Effective Meeting By Jason Fossum
    • 2. Basic principles to remember Robert’s Rules of Order were created to help groups run effective meetings. The rules were designed to:  Protect the right of the minority to express its opinion.  Allow the majority to ultimately rule.  Allow groups to process business as needed in a fair and orderly manner.  Be applied only as strictly as needed.
    • 3. Meetings are effective when…. Debate and discussions occurs in an orderly and respectful manner. Business is dealt with in a fair and open process. The minority opinion on issues have had their say. Your agenda is dealt with efficiently.
    • 4. Keys to being an effective chair You as the chair play an important role in the effectiveness of your meetings. As the chair, you have a few key responsibilities and rights which will help you be effective. They are: To provide an unbiased application of the rules To ensure controlled debate Provide adherence to the agenda To know how to deal with motions To apply the rules only as strictly as needed
    • 5. Unbiased application of the rules What does it mean to be unbiased? Not entering into debate Not unduly influencing discussion Protecting every opinion, even if you disagree. Not allowing personalities to interfere in business. What can you do as chair? Provide information helpful to the discussion (but don’t enter into debate while doing it). Answer questions that are raised. Break a tie – in most cases.
    • 6. Ensuring controlled debate As the chair, it’s up to you to be sure that debate on issues remains focused and under control. In general, that means:  Stopping the “run away trains.”  Enforcing speaker limitations when necessary.  Focus on hearing both sides.  Understanding how rules apply in situations of importance.
    • 7. Ensuring controlled debate Robert’s Rules of Order limits the right of any member to speak on a given issue twice in one day. Robert’s Rules has motions that can be made that limit debate. For example:  Previous Question Robert’s Rules requires that all speakers stay focused on the business at hand and chairs can rule debate out of order.
    • 8. Knowing the rules It’s important that you have a general understanding of Robert’s Rules. It is NOT necessary that you know everything. Don’t be afraid to buy a book and have it with you! Understanding how to deal with motions will make or break your meeting. Know your bylaws!
    • 9. Dealing with motions Main motions: should address your item of business and seek to deal with it in some way. Amendments: will seek to change the main motion in some manner. Understanding the most efficient way to deal with these will make your meetings run amazing!
    • 10. Dealing with motions Using the logical precedence of motions will help you work through your business. You must deal with all amendments before dealing with the main motion.
    • 11. Dealing with motions There are four categories of motions in Robert’s Rules: Main motion Subsidiary motion: are used to change how a main motion is handled or debated (amendment is most common of this category). Incidental motion: purpose is to allow for questioning of procedure (point of order is most common). Privileged motion: are used to bring other business, usually unrelated to the main motion before the body (lay on the table is a common motion in this category).
    • 12. Commonly used motions Lay on the Table: allows for temporary set aside of your main motion. Postponement: allows for longer term set aside of debate on the main motion. Previous Question: allows for the immediate end to debate on the main motion and forces a vote. Division: allows for clarification on the result of a voice vote. Reconsider: allows for further debate on an issue that has already been acted upon.
    • 13. Application of the rules Robert’s Rules requires that the rules only be applied as strictly as necessary to complete your business. What does this mean?
    • 14. Application of rules If you don’t need to enforce a rule, don’t. Only limit people to speaking twice if they’re excessive and obviously trying to slow down the business. Don’t use unnecessary motions. Allow people some latitude until they take advantage of you. A friendly reminder is always a good first step.
    • 15. Questions?
    • 16. Mock Meeting… Let’s see it in action!

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