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Updates and Other Information Updates and Other Information Document Transcript

  • THE CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY GAAP REPORTING MANUAL CHAPTER 14 – UPDATES AND OTHER INFORMATION OVERVIEW This section is made available for future updates, notes from workshops, further information and/or clarifications made to the GAAP conversion process. To date, the following topics have been included in this section: n New Accounting Pronouncements  GASB Statement No. 40, Deposit and Investment Risk Disclosures, an Amendment of GASB Statement 3  GASB Statement No. 42, Accounting and Financial Reporting for Impairment of Capital Assets and for Insurance Recoveries  GASB Statement No. 43, Financial Reporting for Postemployment Benefit Plans Other Than Pension Plans  GASB Statement No. 45, Accounting and Financial Reporting by Employers for Postemployment Benefits Other Than Pensions  GASB Statement no. 46, Net Assets Restricted by Enabling Legislation (an amendment of GASB Statement No. 34) n Access to Technical Accounting Literature and Resources Last revised May 10, 2005 14-1
  • The California State University GAAP Reporting Manual Effective June 2005 NEW ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS GASB Statement No. 40, Deposit and Investment Risk Disclosures, an Amendment of GASB Statement No. 3 Effective Date: For periods beginning after June 15, 2004 (for CSU, effective for fiscal year ending 2005) Summary The deposits and investments of state and local governments are exposed to risks that have the potential to result in losses. This Statement addresses common deposit and investment risks related to credit risk, concentration of credit risk, interest rate risk, and foreign currency risk. As an element of interest rate risk, this Statement requires certain disclosures of investments that have fair values that are highly sensitive to changes in interest rates. Deposit and investment policies related to the risks identified in this Statement also should be disclosed. The Board reconsidered the disclosures required by Statement No. 3, Deposits with Financial Institutions, Investments (including Repurchase Agreements), and Reverse Repurchase Agreements. Portions of that Statement are modified or eliminated. The custodial credit risk disclosures of Statement 3 are modified to limit required disclosures to: n Deposits that are not covered by depository insurance and are (a) uncollateralized, (b) collateralized with securities held by the pledging financial institution, or (c) collateralized with securities held by the pledging financial institution’s trust department or agent but not in the depositor-government’s name. n Investment securities that are uninsured, are not registered in the name of the government, and are held by either (a) the counterparty or (b) the counterparty’s trust department or agent but not in the government’s name. n Statement 3 disclosures generally referred to as category 1 and 2 deposits and investments are eliminated. However, this Statement does not change the required disclosure of authorized investments or the requirements for reporting certain repurchase agreements and reverse repurchase agreements, and it maintains, with modification, the level-of-detail disclosure requirements of Statement 3. The provisions of this Statement are effective for financial statements for periods beginning after June 15, 2004. Earlier application is encouraged. How the Changes in This Statement Improve Financial Reporting Deposit and investment resources often represent significant assets of governmental, proprietary, and fiduciary funds. These resources are necessary for the delivery of governmental services and programs, or to carry out fiduciary responsibilities. This Statement is designed to inform financial statement users about deposit and investment risks that could affect a government’s ability to provide services and meet its obligations as they become due. The Board believes that there are risks inherent in all deposits and investments, and it believes that the disclosures Last revised May 10, 2005 14-2
  • The California State University GAAP Reporting Manual Effective June 2005 required by this Statement provide users of governmental financial statements with information to assess common risks inherent in deposit and investment transactions. The Board adopted fair value accounting for most investments in Statement No. 31, Accounting and Financial Reporting for Certain Investments and for External Investment Pools. Fair value portrays the market’s estimate of the net future cash flows of investments, discounted to reflect both time value and risk. In order to understand the measurement of investments at fair value, the timing of cash flows (including investment time horizons) and investment risks need to be communicated. This Statement results from the Board’s formal reviews of its existing standards. These reviews —part of the Board’s strategic plan—are designed to evaluate the continuing usefulness of current requirements. The reduction of existing custodial credit risk disclosures follows from federal banking reforms adopted since the release of Statement 3. Last revised May 10, 2005 14-3
  • The California State University GAAP Reporting Manual Effective June 2005 GASB Statement No. 42, Accounting and Financial Reporting for Impairment of Capital Assets and for Insurance Recoveries Effective Date: For periods beginning after December 15, 2004 (for CSU, effective for fiscal year ending 2006) Affects: Will amend GASB Statement 34, ¶19 and ¶21 Summary This Statement establishes accounting and financial reporting standards for impairment of capital assets. A capital asset is considered impaired when its service utility has declined significantly and unexpectedly. This Statement also clarifies and establishes accounting requirements for insurance recoveries. Governments are required to evaluate prominent events or changes in circumstances affecting capital assets to determine whether impairment of a capital asset has occurred. Such events or changes in circumstances that may be indicative of impairment include evidence of physical damage, enactment or approval of laws or regulations or other changes in environmental factors, technological changes or evidence of obsolescence, changes in the manner or duration of use of a capital asset, and construction stoppage. A capital asset generally should be considered impaired if both (a) the decline in service utility of the capital asset is large in magnitude and (b) the event or change in circumstance is outside the normal life cycle of the capital asset. Impaired capital assets that will no longer be used by the government should be reported at the lower of carrying value or fair value. Impairment losses on capital assets that will continue to be used by the government should be measured using the method that best reflects the diminished service utility of the capital asset. Impairment of capital assets with physical damage generally should be measured using a restoration cost approach, an approach that uses the estimated cost to restore the capital asset to identify the portion of the historical cost of the capital asset that should be written off. Impairment of capital assets that are affected by enactment or approval of laws or regulations or other changes in environmental factors or are subject to technological changes or obsolescence generally should be measured using a service units approach, an approach that compares the service units provided by the capital asset before and after the impairment event or change in circumstance. Impairment of capital assets that are subject to a change in manner or duration of use generally should be measured using a service units approach, as described above, or using deflated depreciated replacement cost, an approach that quantifies the cost of the service currently being provided by the capital asset and converts that cost to historical cost. Impairment losses should be reported in accordance with the guidance in paragraphs 41 through 46, 55, 56, 101, and 102 of Statement No. 34, Basic Financial Statements—and Management’s Discussion and Analysis—for State and Local Governments, and paragraphs 19 through 24 of Accounting Principles Board Opinion No. 30, Reporting the Results of Operations—Reporting the Effects of Disposal of a Segment of a Business, and Extraordinary, Unusual and Infrequently Occurring Events and Transactions. If not otherwise apparent from the face of the financial statements, the description, amount, and financial statement classification of impairment losses Last revised May 10, 2005 14-4
  • The California State University GAAP Reporting Manual Effective June 2005 should be disclosed in the notes to the financial statements. If evidence is available to demonstrate that the impairment will be temporary, the capital asset should not be written down. Impaired capital assets that are idle should be disclosed, regardless of whether the impairment is considered permanent or temporary. An insurance recovery associated with events or changes in circumstances resulting in impairment of a capital asset should be netted with the impairment loss. Restoration or replacement of the capital asset using the insurance recovery should be reported as a separate transaction. Insurance recoveries should be disclosed if not apparent from the face of the financial statements. Insurance recoveries for circumstances other than impairment of capital assets should be reported in the same manner. The provisions of this Statement are effective for fiscal periods beginning after December 15, 2004. Earlier application is encouraged. How the Changes in This Statement Improve Financial Reporting This Statement improves financial reporting because it requires governments to report the effects of capital asset impairments in their financial statements when they occur rather than as a part of the ongoing depreciation expense for the capital asset or upon disposal of the capital asset. Users of financial statements will better understand when impairments have occurred and what their financial impact is on the government. This Statement also enhances comparability of financial statements between governments by requiring all governments to account for insurance recoveries in the same manner. Last revised May 10, 2005 14-5
  • The California State University GAAP Reporting Manual Effective June 2005 GASB Statement No. 43, Financial Reporting for Postemployment Benefit Plans Other Than Pension Plans Effective Date: The requirements of this Statement for other postemployment benefits (OPEB) plan reporting are effective one year prior to the effective date of Statement 45 for the employer (single-employer plan) or for the largest participating employer in the plan (multiple-employer plan). The requirements of this Statement are effective in three phases based on a government's total annual revenues in the first fiscal year ending after June 15, 1999: 1. Plans in which the sole or largest employer is a phase 1 government—with annual revenues of $100 million or more—are required to implement this Statement in financial statements for periods beginning after December 15, 2005. 2. Plans in which the sole or largest employer is a phase 2 government—with total annual revenues of $10 million or more but less than $100 million—are required to implement this Statement in financial statements for periods beginning after December 15, 2006. 3. Plans in which the sole or largest employer is a phase 3 government—with total annual revenues of less than $10 million—are required to implement this Statement in financial statements for periods beginning after December 15, 2007. If comparative financial statements are presented, restatement of prior-period financial statements is required. Affects: Will supersede GASBS 25, fn3; GASBS 26; and GASBS 27, fn18 Will amend NCGAI 6, ¶5; GASBS 14, ¶81; GASBS 25, ¶4, 26, ¶42, ¶44, fn5, and fn16; GASBS 27, ¶2; GASBS 31, ¶4; GASBS 34, ¶106–¶109, ¶140, ¶141, fn43, and fn44 Summary In addition to pensions, many state and local governmental employers provide OPEB as part of the total compensation offered to attract and retain the services of qualified employees. OPEB includes postemployment healthcare, as well as other forms of postemployment benefits (for example, life insurance) when provided separately from a pension plan. What This Statement Does This Statement establishes uniform financial reporting standards for OPEB plans and supersedes the interim guidance included in Statement No. 26, Financial Reporting for Postemployment Healthcare Plans Administered by Defined Benefit Pension Plans. The approach followed in this Statement generally is consistent with the approach adopted in Statement No. 25, Financial Reporting for Defined Benefit Pension Plans and Note Disclosures for Defined Contribution Plans, with modifications to reflect differences between pension plans and OPEB plans. The standards in this Statement apply for OPEB trust funds included in the financial reports of plan sponsors or employers, as well as for the stand-alone financial reports of OPEB plans or the public employee retirement systems, or other third parties, that administer them. This Statement Last revised May 10, 2005 14-6
  • The California State University GAAP Reporting Manual Effective June 2005 also provides requirements for reporting of OPEB funds by administrators of multiple-employer OPEB plans, when the fund used to accumulate assets and pay benefits or premiums when due is not a trust fund. Statement No. 45, Accounting and Financial Reporting by Employers for Postemployment Benefits Other Than Pensions, addresses standards for the measurement, recognition, and display of employers’ OPEB expense/expenditures and related liabilities (assets); note disclosures; and, if applicable, required supplementary information (RSI). The measurement and disclosure requirements of the two Statements are related, and disclosure requirements are coordinated to avoid duplication when an OPEB plan is included as a trust or agency fund in an employer’s financial report. In addition, reduced disclosures are acceptable for OPEB trust or agency funds when a stand-alone plan financial report is publicly available and contains all required information. Summary of Standards OPEB Plans That Are Administered as Trusts (or Equivalent Arrangements) Financial Reporting Framework The financial reporting framework for defined benefit OPEB plans that are administered as trusts or equivalent arrangements includes two financial statements and two multiyear schedules that are required to be presented as RSI immediately following the notes to the financial statements. The financial statements focus on reporting current financial information about plan net assets held in trust for OPEB and financial activities related to the administration of the trust. The statement of plan net assets provides information about the fair value and composition of plan assets, plan liabilities, and plan net assets held in trust for OPEB. The statement of changes in plan net assets provides information about the year-to-year changes in plan net assets, including additions from employer, member, and other contributions and net investment income and deductions for benefits and refunds paid, or due and payable, and plan administrative expenses. Required notes to the financial statements include a brief plan description, a summary of significant accounting policies, and information about contributions and legally required reserves. In addition, OPEB plans are required to disclose information about the current funded status of the plan as of the most recent actuarial valuation date, and actuarial methods and assumptions used in the valuation. THE REQUIRED SCHEDULES (RSI) PROVIDE ACTUARIALLY DETERMINED HISTORICAL TREND INFORMATION FROM A LONG-TERM PERSPECTIVE, FOR A MINIMUM OF THREE VALUATIONS , ABOUT (A) THE FUNDED STATUS OF THE PLAN AND THE PROGRESS BEING MADE IN ACCUMULATING SUFFICIENT ASSETS TO PAY BENEFITS WHEN DUE AND (B ) EMPLOYER CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PLAN . THE SCHEDULE OF FUNDING PROGRESS REPORTS THE ACTUARIAL VALUE OF ASSETS , THE ACTUARIAL ACCRUED LIABILITY, AND THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE TWO OVER TIME. THE SCHEDULE OF EMPLOYER CONTRIBUTIONS REPORTS THE ANNUAL REQUIRED CONTRIBUTIONS OF THE EMPLOYER (S ) (ARC) AND THE Last revised May 10, 2005 14-7
  • The California State University GAAP Reporting Manual Effective June 2005 PERCENTAGE OF ARC RECOGNIZED BY THE PLAN AS CONTRIBUTIONS . THE REQUIRED SCHEDULES ARE ACCOMPANIED BY NOTES REGARDING FACTORS THAT SIGNIFICANTLY AFFECT THE IDENTIFICATION OF TRENDS IN THE AMOUNTS REPORTED . Measurement (the Parameters) Plans are required to measure all actuarially determined information included in their financial reports in accordance with certain parameters. The parameters include requirements for the frequency and timing of actuarial valuations as well as for the actuarial methods and assumptions that are acceptable for financial reporting. If the methods and assumptions used in determining a plan’s funding requirements meet the parameters, the same methods and assumptions are required for financial reporting by both a plan and its participating employer(s). However, if a plan’s method of financing does not meet the parameters (for example, the plan is financed on a pay-as-you-go basis), the parameters apply, nevertheless, for financial reporting purposes. For financial reporting purposes, an actuarial valuation is required at least biennially for OPEB plans with a total membership (including employees in active service, terminated employees who have accumulated benefits but are not yet receiving them, and retired employees and beneficiaries currently receiving benefits) of 200 or more, and at least triennially for plans with a total membership of fewer than 200. The projection of benefits should include all benefits covered by the current substantive plan (the plan as understood by the employer and plan members) at the time of each valuation and should take into consideration the pattern of sharing of benefit costs between the employer and plan members to that point, as well as certain legal or contractual caps on benefits to be provided. The parameters require that the selection of actuarial assumptions, including the healthcare cost trend rate for postemployment healthcare plans, be guided by applicable actuarial standards. Alternative Measurement Method OPEB plans with a total membership of fewer than one hundred have the option to apply a simplified alternative measurement method instead of obtaining actuarial valuations. This alternative method includes the same broad measurement steps as an actuarial valuation (projecting future cash outlays for benefits, discounting projected benefits to present value, and allocating the present value of projected benefits to periods using an actuarial cost method). However, it permits simplification of certain assumptions to make the method potentially usable by nonspecialists. OPEB Plans That Are Not Administered as Trusts or Equivalent Arrangements Multiple-employer defined benefit OPEB plans that are not administered as trusts or equivalent arrangements should be reported as agency funds. Any assets accumulated in excess of liabilities to pay premiums or benefits, or for investment or administrative expenses, should be offset by liabilities to participating employers. Required notes to the financial statements include a brief plan description, a summary of significant accounting policies, and information about contributions. Last revised May 10, 2005 14-8
  • The California State University GAAP Reporting Manual Effective June 2005 Defined Contribution Plans Defined contribution plans that provide OPEB are required to follow the requirements for financial reporting by fiduciary funds generally, and by component units that are fiduciary in nature, set forth in Statement 34 and the disclosure requirements set forth in paragraph 41 of Statement 25. Last revised May 10, 2005 14-9
  • The California State University GAAP Reporting Manual Effective June 2005 GASB Statement No. 45, Accounting and Financial Reporting for Postemployment Benefits Other Than Pensions Effective Date: The requirements of this Statement are effective in three phases based on a government's total annual revenues in the first fiscal year ending after June 15, 1999: • Governments that were phase 1 governments for the purpose of implementation of Statement 34—those with annual revenues of $100 million or more—are required to implement this Statement in financial statements for periods beginning after December 15, 2006. • Governments that were phase 2 governments for the purpose of implementation of Statement 34—those with total annual revenues of $10 million or more but less than $100 million—are required to implement this Statement in financial statements for periods beginning after December 15, 2007. • Governments that were phase 3 governments for the purpose of implementation of Statement 34—those with total annual revenues of less than $10 million—are required to implement this Statement in financial statements for periods beginning after December 15, 2008. Earlier application of this Statement is encouraged. All component units should implement the requirements of this Statement no later than the same year as their primary government. Affects: Will supersede GASBS 12; GASBS 27, ¶24 Will amend NCGAI 6, ¶5; GASBS 10, ¶2; GASBS 16, fn6 and fn7; GASBS 27, ¶6, ¶7, and ¶39; and GASBI 6, ¶7 Summary In addition to pensions, many state and local governmental employers provide other postemployment benefits (OPEB) as part of the total compensation offered to attract and retain the services of qualified employees. OPEB includes postemployment healthcare, as well as other forms of postemployment benefits (for example, life insurance) when provided separately from a pension plan. This Statement establishes standards for the measurement, recognition, and display of OPEB expense/expenditures and related liabilities (assets), note disclosures, and, if applicable, required supplementary information (RSI) in the financial reports of state and local governmental employers. The approach followed in this Statement generally is consistent with the approach adopted in Statement No. 27, Accounting for Pensions by State and Local Governmental Employers, with modifications to reflect differences between pension benefits and OPEB. Statement No. 43, Financial Reporting for Postemployment Benefit Plans Other Than Pension Plans, addresses Last revised May 10, 2005 14-10
  • The California State University GAAP Reporting Manual Effective June 2005 financial statement and disclosure requirements for reporting by administrators or trustees of OPEB plan assets or by employers or sponsors that include OPEB plan assets as trust or agency funds in their financial reports. How This Statement Improves Financial Reporting Postemployment benefits (OPEB as well as pensions) are part of an exchange of salaries and benefits for employee services rendered. Of the total benefits offered by employers to attract and retain qualified employees, some benefits, including salaries and active-employee healthcare, are taken while the employees are in active service, whereas other benefits, including postemployment healthcare and other OPEB, are taken after the employees’ services have ended. Nevertheless, both types of benefits constitute compensation for employee services. From an accrual accounting perspective, the cost of OPEB, like the cost of pension benefits, generally should be associated with the periods in which the exchange occurs, rather than with the periods (often many years later) when benefits are paid or provided. However, in current practice, most OPEB plans are financed on a pay-as-you-go basis, and financial statements generally do not report the financial effects of OPEB until the promised benefits are paid. As a result, current financial reporting generally fails to: • Recognize the cost of benefits in periods when the related services are received by the employer • Provide information about the actuarial accrued liabilities for promised benefits associated with past services and whether and to what extent those benefits have been funded • Provide information useful in assessing potential demands on the employer’s future cash flows. This Statement improves the relevance and usefulness of financial reporting by (a)requiring systematic, accrual-basis measurement and recognition of OPEB cost (expense) over a period that approximates employees’ years of service and (b)providing information about actuarial accrued liabilities associated with OPEB and whether and to what extent progress is being made in funding the plan. Summary of Standards Measurement (the Parameters) Employers that participate in single-employer or agent multiple-employer defined benefit OPEB plans (sole and agent employers) are required to measure and disclose an amount for annual OPEB cost on the accrual basis of accounting. Annual OPEB cost is equal to the employer’s annual required contribution to the plan (ARC), with certain adjustments if the employer has a net OPEB obligation for past under- or overcontributions. Last revised May 10, 2005 14-11
  • The California State University GAAP Reporting Manual Effective June 2005 The ARC is defined as the employer’s required contributions for the year, calculated in accordance with certain parameters, and includes (a) the normal cost for the year and (b) a component for amortization of the total unfunded actuarial accrued liabilities (or funding excess) of the plan over a period not to exceed thirty years. The parameters include requirements for the frequency and timing of actuarial valuations as well as for the actuarial methods and assumptions that are acceptable for financial reporting. If the methods and assumptions used in determining a plan’s funding requirements meet the parameters, the same methods and assumptions are required for financial reporting by both a plan and its participating employer(s). However, if a plan’s method of financing does not meet the parameters (for example, the plan is financed on a pay-as-you-go basis), the parameters nevertheless apply for financial reporting purposes. For financial reporting purposes, an actuarial valuation is required at least biennially for OPEB plans with a total membership (including employees in active service, terminated employees who have accumulated benefits but are not yet receiving them, and retired employees and beneficiaries currently receiving benefits) of 200 or more, or at least triennially for plans with a total membership of fewer than 200. The projection of benefits should include all benefits covered by the current substantive plan (the plan as understood by the employer and plan members) at the time of each valuation and should take into consideration the pattern of sharing of benefit costs between the employer and plan members to that point, as well as certain legal or contractual caps on benefits to be provided. The parameters require that the selection of actuarial assumptions, including the healthcare cost trend rate for postemployment healthcare plans, be guided by applicable actuarial standards. Alternative Measurement Method A sole employer in a plan with fewer than one hundred total plan members (including employees in active service, terminated employees who have accumulated benefits but are not yet receiving them, and retirees and beneficiaries currently receiving benefits) has the option to apply a simplified alternative measurement method instead of obtaining actuarial valuations. The option also is available to an agent employer with fewer than one hundred plan members, in circumstances in which the employer’s use of the alternative measurement method would not conflict with a requirement that the agent multiple-employer plan obtain an actuarial valuation for plan reporting purposes. Those circumstances are: • The plan issues a financial report prepared in conformity with the requirements of Statement 43 but is not required to obtain an actuarial valuation because (a) the plan has fewer than one hundred total plan members (all employers) and is eligible to use the alternative measurement method, or (b) the plan is not administered as a qualifying trust, or equivalent arrangement, for which Statement 43 requires the presentation of actuarial information. • The plan does not issue a financial report prepared in conformity with the requirements of Statement 43. Last revised May 10, 2005 14-12
  • The California State University GAAP Reporting Manual Effective June 2005 This alternative method includes the same broad measurement steps as an actuarial valuation (projecting future cash outlays for benefits, discounting projected benefits to present value, and allocating the present value of benefits to periods using an actuarial cost method). However, it permits simplification of certain assumptions to make the method potentially usable by nonspecialists. Net OPEB Obligation—Measurement An employer’s net OPEB obligation is defined as the cumulative difference between annual OPEB cost and the employer’s contributions to a plan, including the OPEB liability or asset at transition, if any. (Because retroactive application of the measurement requirements of this Statement is not required, for most employers the OPEB liability at the beginning of the transition year will be zero.) An employer with a net OPEB obligation is required to measure annual OPEB cost equal to (a) the ARC, (b) one year’s interest on the net OPEB obligation, and (c) an adjustment to the ARC to offset the effect of actuarial amortization of past under- or overcontributions. Financial Statement Recognition and Disclosure Sole and agent employers should recognize OPEB expense in an amount equal to annual OPEB cost in government-wide financial statements and in the financial statements of proprietary funds and fiduciary funds from which OPEB contributions are made. OPEB expenditures should be recognized on a modified accrual basis in governmental fund financial statements. Net OPEB obligations, if any, including amounts associated with under- or overcontributions from governmental funds, should be displayed as liabilities (or assets) in government-wide financial statements. Similarly, net OPEB obligations associated with proprietary or fiduciary funds from which contributions are made should be displayed as liabilities (or assets) in the financial statements of those funds. Employers are required to disclose descriptive information about each defined benefit OPEB plan in which they participate, including the funding policy followed. In addition, sole and agent employers are required to disclose information about contributions made in comparison to annual OPEB cost, changes in the net OPEB obligation, the funded status of each plan as of the most recent actuarial valuation date, and the nature of the actuarial valuation process and significant methods and assumptions used. Sole and agent employers also are required to present as RSI a schedule of funding progress for the most recent valuation and the two preceding valuations, accompanied by notes regarding factors that significantly affect the identification of trends in the amounts reported. Cost-Sharing Employers Employers participating in cost-sharing multiple-employer plans that are administered as trusts, or equivalent arrangements, in which (a) employer contributions to the plan are irrevocable, (b) plan assets are dedicated to providing benefits to retirees and their beneficiaries in accordance with the terms of the plan, and (c) plan assets are legally protected from creditors of the employers or plan administrator, should report as cost-sharing employers. Employers Last revised May 10, 2005 14-13
  • The California State University GAAP Reporting Manual Effective June 2005 participating in multiple-employer plans that do not meet those criteria instead are required to apply the requirements of this Statement that are applicable to agent employers. Cost-sharing employers are required to recognize OPEB expense/expenditures for their contractually required contributions to the plan on the accrual or modified accrual basis, as applicable. Required disclosures include identification of the way that the contractually required contribution rate is determined (for example, by statute or contract or on an actuarially determined basis). Employers participating in a cost-sharing plan are required to present as RSI schedules of funding progress and employer contributions for the plan as a whole if a plan financial report, prepared in accordance with Statement 43, is not issued and made publicly available and the plan is not included in the financial report of a public employee retirement system or another entity. Other Guidance Employers that participate in defined contribution OPEB plans are required to recognize OPEB expense/expenditures for their required contributions to the plan and a liability for unpaid required contributions on the accrual or modified accrual basis, as applicable. This Statement also includes guidance for employers that finance OPEB as insured benefits (as defined by this Statement) and for special funding situations. Last revised May 10, 2005 14-14
  • The California State University GAAP Reporting Manual Effective June 2005 GASB Statement No. 46, Net Assets Restricted by Enabling Legislation (an amendment of GASB Statement No. 34) Effective Date: For periods beginning after June 15, 2005 (for CSU, effective for fiscal year ending 2006) Affects: Will amend GASBS 34, paragraph 34 Summary GASB Statement No. 34, Basic Financial Statements—and Management’s Discussion and Analysis—for State and Local Governments, requires that limitations on the use of net assets imposed by enabling legislation be reported as restricted net assets. In the process of applying this provision, some governments have had difficulty interpreting the requirement that those restrictions be “legally enforceable.” The confusion over this phrase has resulted in a diversity of practice that has diminished comparability. This Statement clarifies that a legally enforceable enabling legislation restriction is one that a party external to a government—such as citizens, public interest groups, or the judiciary—can compel a government to honor. The Statement states that the legal enforceability of an enabling legislation restriction should be reevaluated if any of the resources raised by the enabling legislation are used for a purpose not specified by the enabling legislation or if a government has other cause for reconsideration. Although the determination that a particular restriction is not legally enforceable may cause a government to review the enforceability of other restrictions, it should not necessarily lead a government to the same conclusion for all enabling legislation restrictions. THIS STATEMENT ALSO SPECIFIES THE ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL REPORTING REQUIREMENTS IF NEW ENABLING LEGISLATION REPLACES EXISTING ENABLING LEGISLATION OR IF LEGAL ENFORCEABILITY IS REEVALUATED. FINALLY, STATEMENT REQUIRES THIS GOVERNMENTS TO DISCLOSE THE PORTION OF TOTAL NET ASSETS THAT IS RESTRICTED BY ENABLING LEGISLATION . THE REQUIREMENTS OF THIS STATEMENT ARE EFFECTIVE FOR FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR PERIODS BEGINNING AFTER JUNE 15, 2005. How the Changes in This Statement Improve Financial Reporting The clarifications in this Statement should improve the understandability and comparability of net asset information by making the assessment of legal enforceability more uniform across governments. For example, it should minimize the chances that a government will make an across-the-board determination that none or all of its enabling legislation restrictions are legally enforceable without considering each restriction individually. The additional accounting and financial reporting guidance should help governments determine how to respond to changes in the circumstances surrounding an enabling legislation restriction. The disclosure of the amount of net assets restricted by enabling legislation will allow users to distinguish qualifying restrictions on resource use imposed through a government’s own actions from other types of net asset restrictions. Unless otherwise specified, pronouncements of the GASB apply to financial reports of all state and local governmental entities, including general purpose governments; public benefit corporations and authorities; public employee retirement systems; and public utilities, hospitals Last revised May 10, 2005 14-15
  • The California State University GAAP Reporting Manual Effective June 2005 and other healthcare providers, and colleges and universities. Paragraph 2 discusses the applicability of this Statement. Last revised May 10, 2005 14-16
  • The California State University GAAP Reporting Manual Effective June 2005 ACCESS TO TECHNICAL ACCOUNTING LITERATURE AND RESOURCES In preparing GAAP financial statements, it is essential that campus preparers have access to technical accounting literature and resources. Additionally, at a minimum, campus personnel should possess copies of GASB Statements 34, 35, 37, and 38. It is also recommended to have copies of GASB Statements 39, 40, and 42. Campus personnel should utilize these resources to provide guidance on accounting and reporting in accordance with GAAP. These resources can be found on the GASB website link below. http://www.gasb.org/pub/index.html Last revised May 10, 2005 14-17