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Monterey Park Economic Strategic Planning Workshop 9 May 2009
 

Monterey Park Economic Strategic Planning Workshop 9 May 2009

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City of Monterey Park Joint Economic Strategy Presentation. The City Council/Redevelopment Agency Board, Planning Commission and Economic Development Advisory Board received a presentation on the ...

City of Monterey Park Joint Economic Strategy Presentation. The City Council/Redevelopment Agency Board, Planning Commission and Economic Development Advisory Board received a presentation on the initiation of an Economic Strategy by the Economic Development Department, Development Services and consultants.

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Monterey Park Economic Strategic Planning Workshop 9 May 2009 Monterey Park Economic Strategic Planning Workshop 9 May 2009 Presentation Transcript

  • City of Monterey Park
    May 9, 2009
    Joint Workshop
  • What Is Next?
    City Manager Introduction
  • Planning
    May 9, 2009
    Joint Workshop
    City of Monterey Park
  • Planning for Monterey Park’s Future
    “Pride in the Past, Faith in the Future”
  • 2001 General Plan Update: from the past to the future
    • Mixed Use Areas (Smart Growth Opportunities)
    • Industrial to Employment Technology along Monterey Pass Road/west of Long Beach Freeway
    • Industrial to Commercial (Market Place site)
    • Public Facilities to Open Space (South of Market Place)
  • The General Plan: paved the way for opportunities
    • Opened the doors to opportunities for business growth and new jobs
    • Identified housing needs
    • Created a new vision for Downtown
    • Created Goals and Policies for Implementing Tools
  • Goals: future guidance
    • Create a downtown that serves as a community focus, provides opportunities for economic development and accommodate commercial/ residential uses.
    • Establish the North Atlantic area as a focal point for retail and entertainment
    • Establish Monterey Pass Road as a prime location for new technology-oriented businesses
  • Policies: path to progress
    • Provide zoning incentives that encourages cohesive mixed-use development
    • Revise the Specific Plans or set aside the Plans in favor of new zoning regulations and design guidelines that will facilitate redevelopment efforts
    • Ensure that zoning regulations applicable to Monterey Pass Road corridor permit the range of uses necessary to achieve land use goals and prohibit uses that conflict with the goals.
  • City of Monterey Park Zoning Ordinance Update
    A more simplistic, user friendly and refined document
  • Zoning Ordinance
    • Translates the long term objectives and policies of the General Plan into everyday decisions.
    • Must be consistent with goals, objectives and policies of the General Plan (Government Code Sec. 65860,a).
    • Must be amended within a reasonable time so that it is consistent with the amended General Plan (Government Code Sec. 65860,c).
  • Reinvigorate Downtown: Strengthen the Pedestrian Linkages Plan
  • Promote Pedestrian Circulation: entry design features such as lined trees, lighting and clear visibility
  • Industrial to Employment Technology: update zoning classification
  • Promote Commercial Success: streamline development process, provide flexibility
  • Diversity: Update land use classifications to address community growth
  • Image: development design guidelines that focus on identity/parkway accents
  • Downtown area: larger sidewalks, decorative crosswalks, reduce traffic volumes
  • Reason to Repeal Specific Plans
    • North Atlantic, Mid-Atlantic, Garvey/Garfield and South Garfield
    • Adopted in 1980’s
    • Inconsistent with 2001 General Plan
    • Development standards already incorporated into the Zoning Ordinance and Pedestrian Linkages Plan
  • Sign Ordinance: maximizing business identity
    • Create uniformity, proportionality and cohesion
    • Create harmony and design compatibility
    • Establish Master Sign Programs for all new shopping centers
    • Consistent application for wall and window signs
  • Window Signs
  • Sign Graphics
  • City of Monterey Park
    May 9, 2009
    Joint Workshop
  • Building & Safety
    May 9, 2009
    Joint Workshop
    City of Monterey Park
  • Monterey Park
    GreenBuilding Program
    An opportunity and obligation to rethink our community and economic development
  • What is GreenBuildingorSustainableDevelopment?
    • Efficient use of resources
    • Minimized impact on environment
    • Healthy indoor air quality
    Green Building is a way of building that strives for three goals over the life cycle of a project:
  • GreenBuilding Criteria
    • Site Selection & Planning
    • Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy
    • Water Efficiency
    • Material Efficiency & Reuse/Recycle
    • Indoor Air Quality
    • Pollution Reduction
    • Waste Reduction
    • Innovation in Design & Technology
  • Green Building RatingSystems
    Nationwide
    • LEED(Leadership on Energy and Environmental Design)
    • Green Globes
    • National Green Building Standard
    California
    • BIG(Build It Green)
    • CGB(California Green Builder)
  • CaliforniaGreenLegislations
    • AB 32(2006)—set a carbon reduction target similar to the Kyoto Protocol by 2020
    • AB 35 (2007, vetoed)—would require EPA to adopt green building standards for State buildings by 7/1/2009
    • AB 888 (2007, vetoed)—would require commercial buildings50,000 sq. ft. or larger to achieve LEED Gold Certification
    • AB 1058 (2007, vetoed)—would require HCD to adopt green building guidelines for residential buildings by 7/1/2009
    • SB 375 (2008)— intend to help achieve AB 32 through anti-sprawl land use policy and regional transportation planning
    Sources of Carbon Emission
    Electricity used in Buildings
    Materials used in Construction
  • CaliforniaGreenLegislations
    • AB 32(2006)—set a carbon reduction target similar to the Kyoto Protocol by 2020
    • AB 35 (2007, vetoed)—would require EPA to adopt green building standards for State buildings by 7/1/2009
    • AB 888 (2007, vetoed)—would require commercial buildings50,000 sq. ft. or larger to achieve LEED Gold Certification
    • AB 1058 (2007, vetoed)—would require HCD to adopt green building guidelines for residential buildings by 7/1/2009
    • SB 375 (2008)— intend to help achieve AB 32 through anti-sprawl land use policy and regional transportation planning
  • CaliforniaGreenLegislations
    • AB 32(2006)—set a carbon reduction target similar to the Kyoto Protocol by 2020
    • AB 35 (2007, vetoed)—would require EPA to adopt green building standards for State buildings by 7/1/2009
    • AB 888 (2007, vetoed)—would require commercial buildings50,000 sq. ft. or larger to achieve LEED Gold Certification
    • AB 1058 (2007, vetoed)—would require HCD to adopt green building guidelines for residential buildings by 7/1/2009
    • SB 375 (2008)— intend to help achieve AB 32 through anti-sprawl land use policy and regional transportation planning
    • AB 35 (2007, vetoed)—would require EPA to adopt green building standards for State buildings
    • AB 888 (2007, vetoed)—would require certain commercial buildings to achieve LEED Gold Certification
    • AB 1058 (2007, vetoed)—would require HCD to adopt green building guidelines for residential buildings
  • CaliforniaGreenBuildingCode
    • Adopted July 2008
    • Effective August 1, 2009, on a voluntary basis
    • Mandatory after January 1, 2011
  • Why aMonterey ParkGreenBuildingProgram
    • Set forth local procedural policies for enforcing the California Green Building Code
    • Provide local guidelines to make the code user-friendly
    • Provide information resources to assist compliance
    • Provide incentivesandmarketing edge for green projects
    • Facilitate land use planning
  • Timelinefor the Monterey ParkGreenBuilding Program
  • California CurrentGreenLegislations
    • AB 210– to allow local amendments to Green Building Code
    • AB 212– to require all residential buildings to be zero net energy buildings by 2020
    • AB 290– to set aside portion of low-mod housing block grant for energy efficient or green housing
    • SB 7– to allow net energy surplus credits over a 12 months period
    • SB 1672– to propose a $2.25 billion bond related to renewable energy
    • And more…
  • Implications of EmergingTrendsinGreenBuilding
    • Growing consensus on how to measure and define green buildings
    • More green building legislationsto come
    • Grant funding increasingly tied to Green features
    • Green housing becoming a norm
    • Green Building eventually no longer optional
    • Proximity to transit and pedestrian-oriented district = Cost Saving in development
  • Implications of EmergingTrendsinGreenBuilding
    • Growing consensus on how to measure and define green buildings
    • More green building legislations to come
    • Funding increasingly tied to Green features
    • Green housing becoming a norm
    • Green Building eventually no longer optional
    • Proximity to transit and pedestrian-oriented district = Cost Saving in development
  • City of Monterey Park
    May 9, 2009
    Joint Workshop
  • Redevelopment Agency
    May 9, 2009
    Joint Workshop
    City of Monterey Park
  • Agency
    Optimization
    of
    Financial Resources
  • Merger of the Atlantic/Garvey and “Merged Project” Areas
    • Merge the Atlantic/Garvey Redevelopment Project Area and the “Merged Project” Area into a single redevelopment project area.
    • The newly Consolidated Merged Project Redevelopment Plan documents to be covered under one redevelopment plan.
  • Legal Rationale
    • “Mergers of project areas are desirable as a matter of public policy if they result in substantial benefit to the public and if they contribute to the revitalization of blighted areas through the increased economic vitality of those areas and through increased and improved housing opportunities in or near such areas,” California Redevelopment Law 33485
  • Policy Rationale
    • “Merged Project” Area has both the majority of still existing blight and the greatest potential for new redevelopment projects.
    • The “Merged Area” is running out of Tax Increment funds faster than the Atlantic/Garvey.
    • Being able to use the Atlantic/Garvey funds throughout a single project area would enhance the overall financial capacity of the Redevelopment Agency.
  • 44
    Utilization
    The ability to use Tax Increment
    Funds in all areas under the
    Redevelopment Project Area
    Plan will allow:
    • Funding of infrastructure for new developments.
    • Funding for upgrade or replacement of existing infrastructure within the redevelopment area.
    • Funding of Green Building Technology in the redevelopment area and for City-wide residential rehabilitation.
    44
  • Additional Amendments
    The Agency may also consider additional amendments to enhance the financial vitality of the Consolidated Redevelopment Project Area.
    • Tax Increment & Bond Debt Limit Amendment
    • Add Capital Projects to the Redevelopment Plans
    • Ten-Year Extension of Project Area
  • Legislative Findings
    • Significant blight remains within one of the project areas.
    • True, demonstrated by recent study conducted by Agency Consultants
    • Blight cannot be eliminated without merging the project areas
    • True existing “Merged Project” area has diminishing financial capacity
  • 47
    Amendment toAdd Territory
    The potential exists of adding territory extending along South Garfield Avenue and Pomona Boulevard into the Redevelopment Project Area.
    • The area is a “Gateway” into the City
    • The area has a need for commercial rehabilitation and economic assistance
    6
  • 48
    48
  • Required Procedures
    Conduct financial review of each area to be merged
    Prepare necessary documents
    • Preliminary report
    • Amendment plan
    • Blight report (includes amended implementation plan)
    • Report to city council
    • Environmental document
  • Required Procedures :
    Transmit documents to appropriate bodies
    • Agency/City Council
    • Taxing agencies
    • State HCD and Department of Finance
    • Planning commission
    Notice Public Hearing
    • Mailed notice 30 days prior to hearing
    • Published notice 3 times for 3 successive weeks)
  • Budget/Cost Items
    • Cost - $150,000 and $350,000
    • For all amendments and related costs.
    • Based on amendment types and size of the project areas.
    • Redevelopment consultant
    • Environmental consultant
    • Agency special legal counsel
    • Citizen participation
    • Required mailing and publishing cost
    • Internal staff time.
  • Processing Time All Major Amendments
    • Twelve to eighteen months
  • City of Monterey Park
    May 9, 2009
    Joint Workshop
  • Economic Development
    May 9, 2009
    Joint Workshop
    City of Monterey Park
  • Economic Strategic Plan / Brand Development Process
    STREAM 2
    STREAM 4
    STREAM 3
    STREAM 1
    Brand Development
    Urban Design
    Economic &
    Demographic Analysis
    Primary Research
    Economic and Brand Strategic Plan
    Implementation Actions/Priorities
  • Preliminary Economic Goals for Discussion
    • Increase the Economic Competitiveness of Monterey Park
    • Maximize Public Revenues
    • Develop a Wide Array of Retail Opportunities
    • Create Destination Retail/Entertainment Opportunities
    • Diversify the City’s Economic Jobs and Wages
    • Provide a Good Jobs/Housing Mix
    • Support the Existing Businesses
    • Create Attractive Pedestrian Environments
    • Develop and Promote a Strong Brand Identity and Image for Monterey Park
    • Provide Good Economic Data and Indicators for Decision Makers
  • City of Monterey Park
    Thank you for attending.