SOCIAL PSYCOLOGYBYNOHA SABRY
DEFINITIONSocial psychology is the scientific study of how people’sthoughts, feelings and behavior are influenced by the a...
Roles and Rulesorms = Social constrainsules about how we supposed to act , enforced by threat ofpunishment if we violate t...
RolesTypes of Norms :• Enriched by low•Unspoken cultural understanding•Tiny unspoken people learn unconsciously
Social Rolesome regulated by norms about how people social rules : p0sitions that are regulated by norms about how people ...
The Obediance study
Attitudesttitudes are defined as learned, global evaluations of a person, object,place, or issue that influence thought an...
The origins of Attitudettitudes have strong correlations between likes and dislikes and thegenetic backgroundnborn Errors ...
persuasion                      Corecive persuasionFriendly persuasion
Individuals in Groupsonformityroupthink
Conformitytest line   A B C
Conformityveryone conform:dentification of group membershe group has knowledge more than his
Sides of conformity
Group Thinkhe tendency to think alike and suppress dissentroup think = extreme conformityroup think occurs when a group ne...
Persuasionersuasion is an active method of influence that `ttempt to guidepeople toward adoption of an attitude ,idea ,or ...
Persuasionercussion attempts to relay on the mass media frequently result infailure. This is because people ‘s behavior ar...
SOCIAL COGNITIONhis is a growing area of social psychology ,that studies how peopleperceiveabout and remember information ...
GROUP PSYCHOLOGY               Noha Sabry Prof. Psychiatry – Faculty of Medicie-Cairo                  Univestry
Group Identityocial Identitythnic Identitythnocentrism Stereotypes
Intragroup and intergroup Behavioractors Influencing Behavior in Groupsroup Sizeature and focus in group
Nature and Focus of Groupask and oriented groupentient group
Leadershipypes of leadershipccording to nature, focus and needs of the group there are twotypes:ocial –emotional leaderask...
Group Conflict and Prejudicehe origins of Prejudiceefining and measuring Prejudicenconscious Prejudices
Group decision makingolarizationroup think
Group cohesivenessnter group behaviour
PREJUDICESources of Prejudice-- Reducing Prejudice
The Individual and Society          ( BASIC SOCIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS )ulturealuesormsnomie  - Acute anomie - Chronic anomie
Socializationrimary socialization
Deviant Behaviour and Social Controleviant behaviourtigma
Social psychology
Social psychology
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Social psychology

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  • Social psychology is the scientific study of how people's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by the actual, imagined, or implied presence of others.[1] By this definition, scientific refers to the empirical method of investigation. The terms thoughts , feelings , and behaviors include all of the psychological variables that are measurable in a human being. The statement that others may be imagined or implied suggests that we are prone to social influence even when no other people are present, such as when watching television, or following internalized cultural norms. Social psychologists typically explain human behavior as a result of the interaction of mental states and immediate social situations. In Kurt Lewin's conceptual formula, behavior can be viewed as a function of the person in the environment, B = f ( P , E ).[2] In general, social psychologists have a preference for laboratory based, empirical findings. Social psychology theories tend to be specific and focused, rather than global and general.
  • he topic of persuasion has received a great deal of attention in recent years. Persuasion is an active method of influence that attempts to guide people toward the adoption of an attitude, idea, or behavior by rational or emotive means. Persuasion relies on "appeals" rather than strong pressure or coercion. Numerous variables have been found to influence the persuasion process, and these are normally presented in five major categories: who said what to whom and how . The Communicator, including credibility, expertise, trustworthiness, and attractiveness. The Message, including varying degrees of reason, emotion (such as fear), one-sided or two sided arguments, and other types of informational content. The Audience, including a variety of demographics, personality traits, and preferences. The Channel, including the printed word, radio, television, the internet, or face-to-face interactions. The Context, including the environment, group dynamics, pre-amble to the message Dual-process theories of persuasion (such as the elaboration likelihood model) maintain that the persuasive process is mediated by two separate routes. Persuasion can be accomplished by either superficial aspects of the communication or the internal logic and evidence of the message. Whether someone is persuaded by a popular celebrity or factual arguments is largely determined by the ability and motivation of the audience. Persuasion attempts that rely on the mass media frequently result in failure. This is because people's attitudes and behaviors are often established habits that tend to be resistant to change. Communication campaigns are most likely to succeed when they use entertaining characters and messages, tailor the message to fit the audience, and repeat messages across relevant media channels. [ citation needed ] An example of a highly effective mass media campaign is the Got Milk campaign. [ edit]
  • ersuasion is an active method of influence that attempts to guide people toward the adoption of an attitude, idea, or behavior by rational or emotive means. Persuasion relies on "appeals" rather than strong pressure or coercion. Numerous variables have been found to influence the persuasion process, and these are normally presented in five major categories: who said what to whom and how . he Communicator, including credibility, expertise, trustworthiness, and attractiveness. The Message, including varying degrees of reason, emotion (such as fear), one-sided or two sided arguments, and other types of informational content. The Audience, including a variety of demographics, personality traits, and preferences. The Channel, including the printed word, radio, television, the internet, or face-to-face interactions. The Context, including the environment, group dynamics, pre-amble to the message
  • he topic of persuasion has received a great deal of attention in recent years. Persuasion is an active method of influence that attempts to guide people toward the adoption of an attitude, idea, or behavior by rational or emotive means. Persuasion relies on "appeals" rather than strong pressure or coercion. Numerous variables have been found to influence the persuasion process, and these are normally presented in five major categories: who said what to whom and how . The Communicator, including credibility, expertise, trustworthiness, and attractiveness. The Message, including varying degrees of reason, emotion (such as fear), one-sided or two sided arguments, and other types of informational content. The Audience, including a variety of demographics, personality traits, and preferences. The Channel, including the printed word, radio, television, the internet, or face-to-face interactions. The Context, including the environment, group dynamics, pre-amble to the message Dual-process theories of persuasion (such as the elaboration likelihood model) maintain that the persuasive process is mediated by two separate routes. Persuasion can be accomplished by either superficial aspects of the communication or the internal logic and evidence of the message. Whether someone is persuaded by a popular celebrity or factual arguments is largely determined by the ability and motivation of the audience. Persuasion attempts that rely on the mass media frequently result in failure. This is because people's attitudes and behaviors are often established habits that tend to be resistant to change. Communication campaigns are most likely to succeed when they use entertaining characters and messages, tailor the message to fit the audience, and repeat messages across relevant media channels. [ citation needed ] An example of a highly effective mass media campaign is the Got Milk campaign. [ edit]
  • ocial cognition is a growing area of social psychology that studies how people perceive, think about, and remember information about others. Much of the research rests on the assertion that people think about people differently from non-social targets.[11] This assertion is widely supported by the existence of social cognitive deficits exhibited by people with Williams syndrome and autism.[12] Person perception is the study of how people form impressio
  • Social psychology

    1. 1. SOCIAL PSYCOLOGYBYNOHA SABRY
    2. 2. DEFINITIONSocial psychology is the scientific study of how people’sthoughts, feelings and behavior are influenced by the actual ,imagined ,or implied presence of othersSocial psychology study how social roles ,attitudes ,relationships ,and groups influence people to do things theywould not necessarily do on their own- to act bravely,compassionately , aggresively or even savagelyocial psychologists typically explain human behavior as a resultof the interaction of mental states and immediate social
    3. 3. Roles and Rulesorms = Social constrainsules about how we supposed to act , enforced by threat ofpunishment if we violate them or promised of reward if we followthem .orms are the conventions of everyday life that makes of everyday lifethat makes interactions with otherpeople predictive and orderlyver culture has it is own norms for just everthing in human experience
    4. 4. RolesTypes of Norms :• Enriched by low•Unspoken cultural understanding•Tiny unspoken people learn unconsciously
    5. 5. Social Rolesome regulated by norms about how people social rules : p0sitions that are regulated by norms about how people in thosepositions should behaveender Rolesccupational rolesamily roles
    6. 6. The Obediance study
    7. 7. Attitudesttitudes are defined as learned, global evaluations of a person, object,place, or issue that influence thought and action.ut more simply, attitudes are basic expressions of approval ordisapproval, favorability or unfavorability, or as Bem put it, likes anddislikes.xamples would include liking chocolate ice cream, being againstabortion, or endorsing the values of a particular political party.
    8. 8. The origins of Attitudettitudes have strong correlations between likes and dislikes and thegenetic backgroundnborn Errors of social and cognitive skillsemperament and personality traits such as openness to experienceeligious affiliation
    9. 9. persuasion Corecive persuasionFriendly persuasion
    10. 10. Individuals in Groupsonformityroupthink
    11. 11. Conformitytest line A B C
    12. 12. Conformityveryone conform:dentification of group membershe group has knowledge more than his
    13. 13. Sides of conformity
    14. 14. Group Thinkhe tendency to think alike and suppress dissentroup think = extreme conformityroup think occurs when a group needs for total agreement “IrvingJanis ,1982-1989”ymptoms of group think include the following:
    15. 15. Persuasionersuasion is an active method of influence that `ttempt to guidepeople toward adoption of an attitude ,idea ,or behavior by rationalor emotive means.ersuasion relies on appeals rather than strong pressure or coercionariables that influence persuasion process WHO said WHAT to WHOM and HOW- THE COMMUNICATOR-THE MESSAGE
    16. 16. Persuasionercussion attempts to relay on the mass media frequently result infailure. This is because people ‘s behavior are often establishedhabits that tend to be resistance to change .Communication campaign are most likely to succeed when they useentertaining characters and messages, tailor messages acrossrelevant media channels
    17. 17. SOCIAL COGNITIONhis is a growing area of social psychology ,that studies how peopleperceiveabout and remember information about others.eople think about people differently from non- social targetsilliaams ‘syndrome and altruismltruism and Dissent
    18. 18. GROUP PSYCHOLOGY Noha Sabry Prof. Psychiatry – Faculty of Medicie-Cairo Univestry
    19. 19. Group Identityocial Identitythnic Identitythnocentrism Stereotypes
    20. 20. Intragroup and intergroup Behavioractors Influencing Behavior in Groupsroup Sizeature and focus in group
    21. 21. Nature and Focus of Groupask and oriented groupentient group
    22. 22. Leadershipypes of leadershipccording to nature, focus and needs of the group there are twotypes:ocial –emotional leaderask leaderccording to the style or way of leading we may have:• Democratic leader• Autocratic (authoritarian) leader• Laissez –fair leader• Appointed leaders
    23. 23. Group Conflict and Prejudicehe origins of Prejudiceefining and measuring Prejudicenconscious Prejudices
    24. 24. Group decision makingolarizationroup think
    25. 25. Group cohesivenessnter group behaviour
    26. 26. PREJUDICESources of Prejudice-- Reducing Prejudice
    27. 27. The Individual and Society ( BASIC SOCIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS )ulturealuesormsnomie - Acute anomie - Chronic anomie
    28. 28. Socializationrimary socialization
    29. 29. Deviant Behaviour and Social Controleviant behaviourtigma
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