Community capacity proposal gomojo for WORLD CHANGE FROM DTLV
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  • Despite the central importance of HTC, globally fewer than 40 percent of PLHIV know they are positive. Increasing knowledge of stats, especially among PLHIV, is a critical focus of PEPFAR-funded HTC programs referrals from HTC to clinical and community services, as well as referrals to HIV prevention, treatment and care services. Knowledge of HIV status fundamental to the prevention, treatment and care of HIV. It is the gateway to a range of core interventions including VMMC, PMTCT, HIV care and treatment, blood safety and TB screening and services. PEPFAR will also work to expand the use of rapid HIV test kits and new models of service in order to enable more widespread use of testing outside of health facilities and promote more effective linkages of people testing positive to HIV care and treatment services. The strength of linkages between HTC points of diagnosis and other HIV services (both clinic- and community-based) will fundamentally impact the effectiveness of any HTC programming. HIV testing and counseling (HTC), condoms and other evidence-based and appropriately targeted prevention interventions are also all key components of achieving an AIDS-free generation. Since its inception, PEPFAR has provided nearly 190 million HIV testing and counseling encounters and this number continues to grow. In 2012 alone, PEPFAR directly supported HTC for more than 46.5 million people. Moving forward, PEPFAR will support countries in expanding their capacity to continue this work while increasing a focus on reaching individuals living with HIV and linking them to services. © David Snyder/CDC Foundation

Community capacity proposal gomojo for WORLD CHANGE FROM DTLV Community capacity proposal gomojo for WORLD CHANGE FROM DTLV Presentation Transcript

  • President Obama committed to developing July 2011 A CALL TO ALL FOR ACTION from the President of the United States asking all LEADERS announced that HIV/AIDS the United States HIV/AIDS is increasing at PANADEMIC rates of infections What Motivates Our Values This is a global fight, and it’s one that America must continue to lead…Looking back at the history of HIV/AI DS, you’ll see that no other country has done more than this country, and that’s testament to our leadership as a country. But we can’t be complacent.”
  • THE GLOBAL STRATEGY TO AN #AIDSFREEGENERATION
  • A NATIONAL HIV/AIDS STRAGEGY FOR THE UNITED STATES PEPFAR-THE UNITED STATES PRESIDENTS EMERGENCY AIDS RELIEF EXECUTIVE SUMMARY When one of our fellow citizens becomes infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) every nine-and-a-half minutes, the epidemic affects all Americans. It has been nearly thirty years since the first cases of HIV garnered the world‟s attention. Without treatment, the virus slowly debilitates a person‟s immune system until they succumb to illness. The epidemic has claimed the lives of nearly 600,000 Americans and affects many more.¹ Our Nation is at a crossroads. We have the knowledge and tools needed to slow the spread of HIV infection and improve the health of people living with HIV. Despite this potential, however, the public‟s sense of urgency associated with combating the epidemic appears to be declining. In 1995, 44 percent of the general public indicated that HIV/AIDS was the most urgent health problem facing the Nation, compared to only 6 percent in March 2009.² While HIV transmission rates have been reduced substantially over time and people with HIV are living longer and more productive lives, approximately 56,000 people become infected each year and more Americans are living with HIV than ever before.³,⁴ Unless we take bold actions, we face a new era of rising infections, greater challenges in serving people living with HIV, and higher health care costs.⁵ To accomplish these goals, we must undertake a more coordinated national response to the HIV epidemic. The Strategy is intended to be a concise plan that will identify a set of priorities and strategic action steps tied to measurable outcomes. Accompanying the Strategy is a Federal Implementation Plan that outlines the specific steps to be taken by various Federal agencies to support the high-level priorities outlined in the Strategy. This is an ambitious plan that will challenge us to meet all of the goals that we set. The job, however, does not fall to the Federal Government alone, nor should it. Success will require the commitment of all parts of society, including State, tribal and local governments, businesses, faith communities, philanthropy, the scientific and medical communities, educational institutions, people living with HIV, and others. The vision for the National HIV/AIDS Strategy is simple: 1. reducing the number of people who become infected with HIV, 2. increasing access to care and optimizing health outcomes for people living with HIV 3. reducing HIV-related health disparities. 1. CDC. HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report. 2007; 19: 7. Available http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/reports/2007report/pdf/20 07SurveillanceReport.pdf 2. Kaiser Family Foundation. 2009 Survey of Americans on HIV/AIDS: Summary of Findings on the Domestic Epidemic. April 2009. 3. CDC. Estimates of new HIV infections in the United States. August 2008. Available athttp://www.kff.org/kaiserpolls/upload/7889.pdf 4. CDC. HIV Prevalence Estimates—United States, 2006. MMWR 2008;57(39):1073-76. 5. If the HIV transmission rate remained constant at 5.0 persons infected each year per 100 people living with HIV, within a decade, the number of new infections would increase to more than 75,000 per year and the number of people living with HIV would grow to more than 1,500,000 (JAIDS, in press).
  • WELCOME GOMOJO is here today in response to the July 2011 CALL TO ACTION for ALL LEADERS to join the fight against HIV/AIDS and for an AIDS FREE GENERATION. The President asked for us all to focus on the hardest hit demographics with a grossly disproportioned rate of infection in particular young Black Americans and Faith Based Organizations. Following the directions of the President Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Blueprint to an AIDSFREEGENERATION as an ongoing process of pursuing a course of high impact prevention: increasing our focus on building the capacity of our community and disseminating the United States Federal Governments appropriates recommended strategieswith positive interventions and strategies and increasing our distance learning, growth and endless NEW opportunities in DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS.. GOMOJO is please to present A YEAR IN REVIEW highlighting A MINISCULE of our continuing possibilities with passion being a main effort. It provides a glimpse into the INSPIRING and ongoing work of our Las Vegas community and building of the capacity of the nations HIV workforce As difficult as it is to choose among the many accomplishments and uncovered opportunities in 2012, I choose to highlight the following  Developing a Community Resource and Central Connection site to coordinate events and opportunities to the Downtown Las Vegas, the Downtown Project and United States Federal Government funded and Private Based Community and Health Based Organizations.  Restructured GOMOJO to better align with the priorities of the State of Nevada, City of Las Vegas, Downtown Project, Team Zappos  Developing with the Gender Justice of Nevada team to address Gender Violence and Advocate for equal rights and justice.  ,Developed GOMOJO into not only a Male Condom Holder but also a Female Condom holder.  Collected and organized nearly 500 business cards collected Please read on to learn more about these and other successes and opportunities for all of us to utilize. My progress would NOT have been possible without th Josh at The Center, Jane and Holly with Gender Justice, Tony and Team Zappos, Delivering Happiness, Tech Cocktail, Big Ern, my three kids support and humbleness to go for broke, and the public health and safety professionals, staff, and volunteers. Further, to build the nations HIV prevention and THE GREATEST CITY IN THE WORLD TO LIVE, LEARN, WORK AND PLAY workforce requires the strength of our ongoing collaborative efforts with our GOMOJO Capacity Building Assistance, Prevention Training Centers, the Downtown Project, VegasTech, Street Level Business, and other partners and stakeholder's. I kindly thank you for your commitment to working together as ONE TEAM and to HIV/STI/Unwanted Pregnancy and Gender Violence prevention.
  • MISSION STATEMENT To HARNESS OUR GLOBAL power as ONE TEAM in DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS through disseminating , marketing , supporting and MOBILIZING OUR WOW VALUES , PURPOSES, PASSIONS , MEMORIES , DESIRES and GOALS FOR PROFIT with a multi-pronged HIGHER PURPOSE of creating g an AIDSFREEGENERATION. GOMOJO will empower our community members with the information, resources and tools needed to achieve their goals by increasing knowledge , skills, technology, infrastructure and stats, facts and good times necessary to implement and sustain science-based , culturally appropriate HIV, STIs and unwanted pregnancy prevention and intervention strategies.
  • How Does Nevada rank? According to Henry J. Keiser Family Foundation Health Statistics (2007), Nevada ranked 26th in the nation for the number of new AIDS cases; the annual AIDS case rate for males was higher than the national AIDS case rate (25.6 vs. 22.9); ranking males 10th in the nation for AIDS cases in Nevada. Additionally, Nevada ranked 29th in the nation among HIV Infection Cases Reported among States with Confidential Name-Based Reporting, 2007 (1=High, 51=Low).
  • RATE OF HIV INFECTION BY SEX-2011
  • RATE OF HIV INFECTION BY AGE GROUP
  • RATE OF INFECTION BY RACE-2011
  • RATE OF HIV/AIDS INFECTION BY RACE
  • HISTORY OF HIV/AIDS IN NEVADA 0 20 40 60 80 55-64 45-54 35-44 25-34 13-24 >13 % OF INCREASE OF PERSONS IN NV LIVING WITH HIV/AIDS 2004-2008 % OF INCREASE OF PERSONS IN NV LIVING WITH…
  • NEVADA WORKING TOGETHER SURVEY FOCUS GROUP
  • BEHAVIORS CONNECTIONS TO HIV
  • VUNERABLE POPULATIONS
  • WEBSITES USED TO SEARCH FOR PARTNERS
  • KEY INFORMANT SURVEY DATA FROM
  • Participants in the MSM focus groups (N=96) also completed an anonymous quantitative survey that assessed demographics, sexual and drug risk behaviors, and HIV testing history. Because little is known about use of the internet and HIV risk among MSM in Nevada, sexual behavior questions were asked separately for partners met online and those met offline. In addition, patterns of internet use (number of hours spent online per week and websites most commonly used) and attitudes about online HIV prevention were assessed. RESULTS Sexual Behaviors and Use of the Internet Half the participants reported using the internet to meet sex partners during the past six months and 60% met partners offline (bars, clubs, friends, or organizations)
  • • Over half (58%) of participants believed that internet sites used to meet sex partners do not have enough • HIV/STD information and 56% said that they would use a website for MSM who are only interested in having safe sex. NUMBER OF PARTNERS ONLINE VS OFFLINE
  • However, consistent condom use was much less frequent when MSM had sex with online partners compared to offline partners: receptive anal sex (53% vs. 74%), insertive anal sex (54.5% vs. 69%), and oral sex (3% vs. 25.5%). (Figure 79). Over one fifth of MSM who used the internet to meet sex partners the past six months said they spend 10 hours or more searching for partners online each week Overall, there were not large differences between in the number of partners that participants reported meeting online compared to offline during the past six months (Figure 79).
  • DESCRIPTION AND JUSTIFICATION OF PRIORITY POPULATIONS Special emphasis should be placed on minority populations, with a special emphasis on African-American And Latino/a groups, who are disproportionately affected by HIV. HIV+ Due to increase in treatment options for individuals infected with HIV, people have been living longer, healthier lives with HIV and AIDS. There are approximately 7,940 people living with HIV/AIDS in Nevada in 2008, over half (52 percent) of the cases are AIDS cases. MSM In Nevada in 2008, 71 percent of the newly diagnosed HIV infections had a primary risk of MSM. Over the past five years (2005-2008), the number of newly diagnosed cases reporting MSM as primary risk factor has increased 33 percent. Although Whites accounted for the greatest proportion of new cases among MSM, Nevada is experiencing significant increases among new MSM cases for both Blacks and Hispanics. Additionally, over half (60 percent) of the persons identified living with HIV and AIDS in Nevada reported MSM as the primary risk of transmission. The high prevalence of HIV among gay and bisexual men means MSM are at elevated risk for being exposed to the infection during each sexual encounter. Therefore, MSM was determined to be the top priority population for the Nevada State HIV Prevention plan due to the rates of HIV infection among this population. Key focus areas within this population would include: 1. MSM who seek out sexual partners via the internet, including chats rooms and classified postings (ie: craigslist.org, gay.com, manhunt.net, etc) 2. Partners of MSM, including female sex partners of non-identifying MSM 3. MSM engaging in high-risk sexual activity under the influence of Alcohol and/or drugs.
  • CDC‟s HIV Prevention Community Planning Guidance there are three goals in community planning:  The community planning process supports a broad-based community participation in HIV prevention planning.  Community planning identifies priority HIV prevention needs in each jurisdiction.  Community planning ensures that HIV prevention resources target priority populations and interventions set forth in the comprehensive HIV prevention plan.
  • OBJECTIVES Mobilize condom subsidized commodities to poor and vulnerable populations frequently not reached by private sector supply chains. Distribute free public sector male and female condoms primarily to populations lacking disposable income and/or those at elevated risk of HIV transmission or acquisition. AIDSFREEGE NERATION=H APPINESS WOW Support & Service Evolve POSITIVE CHANGE Redefine “Weirdness” Building LIFE long Friends better than Family Seek Adventure , Learning and Applying Pursue AND EMPOWER Growth, Lear ning DO More WITH Less and GIVE More FOR Less Humble
  • STRATEGIES 1. Increase the availability and reach of media campaigns 2. Increase the availability of online interventions 3. Increase the number and availability of interventions that address substance use 4. Expand the availability of free and low cost HIV testing 5. Increase condom availability and appeal 6. Increase the number and availability of youth-specific interventions
  • INCREASE THE AVAILABILITY AND REACH OF MEDIA CAMPAIGNS T H E N E E D • Community member frustration over lack of media attention on HIV/AIDS • Current media campaigns only target the GLBTQI community and reinforce the stigma that associates HIV as a “gay disease” • Pharmaceutical companies heavily promote HIV as a manageable chronic disease • Sexuality and condom use still portrayed as negative, dirty, and unhealthy. T H E G A P S • No current media campaigns targeting injection drug users • Campaigns targeting specific minority communities and HIV+ populations need to be expanded • No current radio campaigns and limited television marketing • No current campaigns that feature celebrities, athletes, and politicians getting tested for HIV • No current campaigns that demonstrate that while HIV can be treated effectively, living with HIV is not easy and drugs have many side effects. Print (Q Vegas, LV Weekly), Online (twitter, facebook), Promo Materials South MSM, Y/YA Narrowcast Campaign: Print South MSM, Y/YA
  • INCREASE THE AVAILABILITY AND REACH OF MEDIA CAMPAIGNS • Expand media campaigns to portray safe sex in a healthy, fun, sexy way • Reinforce safer sex messaging on a variety of media outlets to reach diverse populations, including those with a focus on Latinos/as and African- Americans • Encourage discussion of condoms in movies and television shows • Develop campaigns that feature celebrities, athletes, and politicians getting tested for HIV • Flash statistics of the number of people who are unaware of their HIV infection to reinforce testing messages • Create advertisements that demonstrate that while HIV can be treated effectively, living with HIV is not easy and drugs have many side effects • Include prevention messages in restrooms of bars/clubs, airports, and casinos • Include information about HIV/AIDS prevention at gas stations, grocery stores, and bus stops • Develop more HIV prevention materials in Spanish.
  • INCREASE THE AVAILABILITY OF ONLINE INTERVENTIONS T H E N E E D • Increase in the availability and use of internet sites and phone applications that people use for the purpose of seeking sexual partners (ie: gay.com, adam4adam, craigslis t, grindr, etc.) • Increase in the availability and use of social networking and dating sites that people use for the purpose of seeking sexual partners (ie: facebook, myspace, match.com , etc.) • Advances in technology allow people easier access to meet sexual partners in a private and efficient manner T H E G A P S • Limited staffing for active peer education • Limited staffing for disease investigation • No coordinated statewide internet interventions/marketing campaigns • No active online intervention on craigslist • Lack of interventions reaching out to MSM population in non- MSM online venues • Limited educational outreach on online sites, such as chat room educational sessions
  • INCREASE THE AVAILABILITY OF ONLINE INTERVENTIONS THE RECOMMENDED STRATEGIES Increased online HIV prevention interventions may be the most efficient way to reach sexually active MSM, particularly those who do not self-identify as gay or bisexual, as well as younger populations. • Require users of dating or sexual networking websites to click on a pop-up that acknowledges the importance of using condoms • Display local links for HIV testing and services on the first page of websites • Have peer educators create profiles and respond to ads with information about where to obtain free condoms and/or free testing • Have peer educators set up an educational profile on social networking sites and „friend‟ others • Create social networking profiles (myspace, facebook, twitter) that send information about HIV prevention• Have public health professionals host live chats where individuals can ask questions about HIV and other STDs • Display HIV risk reduction pop-ups that will catch the attention of target populations (ie: using attractive models and positive promotion of safer sex) • Randomly display innovative and diverse condom advertisements • Include a standard place for HIV status disclosure on all sites • Development of a sex-positive branding strategy that promotes safer sex and harm reduction approaches
  • INCREASE THE NUMBER AND AVAILABILITY OF YOUTH-SPECIFIC INTERVENTIONS T H E N E E D • Community frustration with the quality and content of sexual health education that is delivered in schools • Urgent need to develop sexual health programs that involve parents and include the roles of home and community • Youth have become de-sensitized to HIV prevention messages • Youth see HIV as a chronic manageable disease • Youth are more concerned with pregnancy prevention than HIV/STD prevention T H E G A P S • Limited resources and programming that target youth and young adults • Lack of coordination and collaboration with sexual health education programming in school districts • Lack of parent/child intervention programs • Lack of peer sexual health education programs for youth • Limited support groups for HIV+ youth and youth adults
  • THE RECOMMENDED STRATEGIES • Develop sexual health education programs for parents and increase parent involvement in sexual health interventions. • Advocate for consistent and comprehensive sexual health education programs throughout all school districts in Nevada. • Include a discussion of homosexuality in sexual health programs • Address the stigma associated with discussion of sexuality, birth control and HIV/STD testing • Create programs were HIV-positive youth share their experience with other youth • Create a “tip sheet” on how to bring up condoms with a partner distributed at youth-focused events • Provide opportunities for youth to role-play condom negotiation • Create peer education and mentorship programs for young MSM, as well as heterosexual youth INCREASE THE NUMBER AND AVAILABILITY OF YOUTH-SPECIFIC INTERVENTIONS
  • EXPAND THE AVAILABILITY OF FREE AND LOW COST HIV TESTING T H E N E E D • Community members are engaging in risky sexual and/or needle sharing behavior; yet, these people are not getting tested for HIV due to barriers in cost and availability • Minority communities, although disproportionately at risk for HIV, report less availability of free or low cost HIV testing options in their communities • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend routine screening of HIV in health care settings for all adults • There is community stigma around HIV testing; HIV testing has not yet been “normalized” T H E G A P S • No rapid testing in the field | North • Limited diversity in HIV testing providers | South • No online HIV test result options • Limited education to providers about routine HIV testing • Lack of testing incentives for high risk populations • Limited free off-site testing outreach to minority and heterosexual communities THE CURRENT RESOURCES Free and low cost HIV testing is available at on- site and limited off-site locations statewide targeting MSM, Y/YA, and IDU. HOPES Rapid and Oral Standard Free on-site testing Free limited off-site testing North Washoe County Health District Rapid, Oral Standard, and Blood Standard Low cost on-site testing Free limited off-site testing North Planned Parenthood Rapid and Blood Standard Low cost on-site testing Statewide Northern Nevada Outreach Team Oral Standard Free limited off-site testing North Southern Nevada Health District Rapid, Oral Standard, and Blood Standard Low cost on-site testing Free limited off-site testing South
  • EXPAND THE AVAILABILITY OF FREE AND LOW COST HIV TESTING THE RECOMMENDED STRATEGIES • Offer more rapid testing to increase the number of people who receive their test results • Offer more oral testing options to increase the number of people who are willing to test • Test where straight-identifying people hang out (e.g., “straight” bars, clubs, and concerts) to reach MSM who are not “out” and high-risk heterosexuals • Encourage testing at fraternities, sororities, and the dorms • Offer testing in more “mainstream” locations (farmers markets, grocery stores, schools) • Encourage providers to make HIV testing a routine part of medical exams • Increase street-based HIV testing to reach sex workers and their partners • Encourage testing with one‟s partner • Give incentives for testing (discounted admission to shows, free drinks, vouchers for STD screening and/or birth control) • Offer testing at special events and/or host new community events for targeted populations at risk (i.e., block parties, Cinco de Mayo, and community barbecues) • Expanding testing and outreach in the jails and in collaboration with probation and parole services
  • INCREASE CONDOM AVAILABILITY AND APPEAL T H E N E E D • Community members stated lack of accessible, free condom distribution locations • Community stigma surrounding the purchase and/or use of condoms result in less frequent use • Few bars and clubs offer free condoms • Free condoms that are available lack appeal The Current Resources: Free, yet limited, condom availability in the Reno and Las Vegas areas at MSM and Y/YA targeted sites. T H E G A P S • Lack of funding and resources for widespread condom availability • Limited locations for free condom distribution sites • Limited hours of operations for many free condom distribution sites • Lack of funding and resources for “appealing” condoms
  • INCREASE CONDOM AVAILABILITY AND APPEAL THE RECOMMENDED STRATEGIES: • Widely distribute condoms in both gay and non-gay establishments, including mainstream locations such as barber shops, bus stops, movie theaters, dorms, bars, and clubs • Advertise and provide a wider variety of condoms (range of flavors, colors, sizes) • Couple condom distribution with campaigns that promote condom use as sexy and desirable • Advertise locations of free/reduced-cost condoms • Have nightclub bouncers hand out condoms as people enter the establishment • Install condom machines at bars, clubs, and gyms • Distribute condoms at locations frequented by youth such as skate parks, schools, Boys & Girls Club • Actively hand out condoms in places of high-risk activity
  • INCREASE THE NUMBER AND AVAILABILITY OF INTERVENTIONS THAT ADDRESS SUBSTANCE USE T H E N E E D • Substance use is a growing issue in all communities throughout Nevada • Used syringes are being found on streets and in parks throughout Nevada • Community members stated that they engaged in the “most risky” sexual behavior while under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs • Syringe access (needle exchange) is illegal in the state of Nevada T H E G A P S • No statewide needle exchange program • Lack of substance use interventions in Spanish • Lack of online substance use interventions • Lack of coordination between substance abuse agencies and HIV prevention efforts THE CURRENT RESOURCES Street Smart North Y/YA FACT South Y/YA SAPTA Testing Sites South IDU Street Outreach (bleach kits, disbursement and education) North IDU
  • INCREASE THE NUMBER AND AVAILABILITY OF INTERVENTIONS THAT ADDRESS SUBSTANCE USE THE RECOMMENDED STRATEGIES • Implement a statewide needle exchange program • Develop campaigns that highlight substance use as a risk factor for HIV • Develop more substance use educational materials in Spanish • Promote online substance abuse prevention efforts Increase the availability of substance abuse treatment for diverse populations • Decrease the stigma surrounding addiction
  • 89030 89101 89102 89106 89109 89115 89119 Objectives CDC-INFO •1-800-CDC-INFO (232-4636) •cdcinfo@cdc.gov •Get answers to questions and locate HIV testing sites. CDC HIV Web Site •www.cdc.gov/hiv CDC National HIV Testing Resources •http://hivtest.cdc.gov •Text your ZIP code to KNOW IT or 566948. Locate an HIV testing site near you. CDC National Prevention Information Network (NPIN) •1-800-458-5231 •www.cdcnpin.org •Technical assistance and resources. AIDSinfo •1-800-448-0440 •www.aidsinfo.nih.gov •Treatment and clinical trials. AIDS.gov •www.aids.gov •Comprehensive government problems you have identified.
  • THE CURRENT RESOURCES Free and low cost HIV testing is available at on-site and limited off-site locations statewide targeting MSM, Y/YA, and IDU. HOPES Rapid and Oral Standard Free on-site testing Free limited off-site testing North Washoe County Health District Rapid, Oral Standard, and Blood Standard Low cost on-site testing Free limited off-site testing North Planned Parenthood Rapid and Blood Standard Low cost on-site testing Statewide Northern Nevada Outreach Team Oral Standard Free limited off-site testing North Southern Nevada Health District Rapid, Oral Standard, and Blood Standard Low cost on-site testing Free limited off-site testing South Target Population Intervention Type Men who have Sex with Men (MSM)* *includes partners and internet Many Men Many Voices D-Up: Defend Yourself Mpowerment Promise Project Explore HIV Positive* *includes partners Changes Project Holistic Health Recovery Willow Healthy Relationship Partnership for Health Clear Injection Drug Users MIP: Modelo de Intervención Psicomedica Safety Counts Shield Real Men Are Safe: REMAS Street Smart North Y/YA FACT South Y/YA SAPTA Testing Sites South IDU Street Outreach (bleach kits, disbursement and education) North IDU Youth/Young Adults* * includes MSM and Heterosexual Sihle: Sisters Informing, Healing, Living, and Empowering Focus on Youth Be Proud, Be Responsible Street Smart Draw the Line, Respect the Line Together Learning Choices RESOURCES
  • PROJECT SUMMARY Support countries in articulating a strategy for condom programming that addresses key supply and demand issues related to increasing condom use, assessing the relevant target populations that need to be reached with condom programming and delineating how different market actors(e.g., public, social marketing and private sectors) can contribute to provision of condoms for these target populations.
  • Address structural, social and economic barriers to effective HIV prevention, including GBV, stigma and discrimination and gender inequality, with a focus on advocacy, policy and evidence based interventions.
  • Employ evidence-based strategies to create demand for, and utilization of, male and female condoms, such as ensuring that high-quality condoms are available, that offered condoms correspond to consumer preferences, and that a variety of price points for different distribution channels are used.
  • ONLINE PREVENTION TACTICS Increased online HIV prevention interventions may be the most efficient way to reach sexually active MSM, particularly those who do not self-identify as gay or bisexual, as well as younger populations.
  • YOUTH1. Target and tailor programming for sexually active and most-at-risk youth based on pattern of behavior and their needs. 2. Provide necessary information and skills building to help youth prepare to make their eventual transition to sexual activity safer and healthier, including delay of sexual debut. 3. Work with parents and guardians to help improve communication to youth about their values and expectations regarding adolescent behavior, as well as stressing the importance of monitoring and supervision of their adolescents. 4. Engage influential adults within the community to create an enabling environment conducive to the adoption of safer sex behaviors among youth. 5. Expand access to community-level prevention programs, including peer outreach, and curriculum-based programs for out-of-school youth. 6. Provide or refer sexually active youth to confidential youth HTC, and ensure linkages to care for HIV positive youth. 7. Encourage sexually-active youth to learn their HIV status, practice safer sex and reduce their number of sexual partners. Provide sexually active young people with risk reduction information and skills building, including access to male and female condoms and information on correct and consistent condom use. 8. Prioritize interventions targeting evidence-based prevention, care and treatment for adolescents living with HIV/AIDS in the following areas: •a) Measurement •b) Prevention •c) Treatment: •d) Advocacy 9. Provide comprehensive packages of interventions for highly vulnerable youth and young member of key populations tailored to be accessible and acceptable to younger people. 10. Where feasible, support structural interventions to reduce young people’s exposure to risk and increase protection. 11. Strengthen and expand gender- sensitive programs to respond to the unique needs of male and female youth, including addressing harmful gender norms that foster the spread of HIV. 12. Evaluate the impact of PEPFAR-funded youth programs to build a stronger evidence base for these interventions.
  • OBJECTIVES State specific, measurable project objectives. Explain how the project objectives address the problems you have identified.
  • 0 2000 4000 6000 8000 10000 12000 1 YR 2 YR 3 YR 4 YR 5 YR DTLV COMMUNITY DTLV COMMUNITY The most community focused and greatest city in the world to live, learn, work and play 2011 • RESEARCH AND OBSERVING • PRODUCT TESTING AND DEVELOPMENT • GATHERING STATS AND FACTS • REFLECTION OF PERSONAL EXPERIENCES • TALKING TO FAMILY AND FRIENDS • EYES, EARS AND THOUGHTS OPEN AND FOCUSED ON COMMUNITY OUTREACH AND STATISTICS • RESEARCH NEED AND IMPACT POTENTIALS • APPLIED WOW VALUES AND WWW.ZAPPOS.COM AS INTERNET AND COMAPANY BUSSINESS AND VALUE MODEL • CAME UP WITH IDEAS TO CARRY 1,000S OF SMALL ESSENTIALS FOR ENDLESS TARGET MARKETS • AND WAYS TO HIDE BEHIND PURPOSE 2012 • SOULTION TO EVOLVING THE USE OF FEMALE CONDOMS 2013
  • THE SPIRIT PROJECT PEPFAR THE SPIRIT PROJECT Support the deployment of suitable technology for measurement of viral load, both through tiered laboratory networks and „point-of-care‟ tests as they become available. This technology is particularly important in helping people on ART and their care provider monitor how their treatment is working and assist them in achieving an “undetectable” level or virus in their bodies.  JOHNLYNN  DR.ZDOGG  AFAN  THECENTER  VMPOWER  TEEN HUNTRIDE  VICTIMS OF CRIME/WITNESS/ADVOCACY  TRIALS AND OUTCOMES  FUNDING
  • Are we taking Action Based on our Shared Values? 8. Promote the female condom as an essential part of an overall condom strategy, with programs that account for each country‟s broader condom market and that consider the unique attributes and benefits of the female condom for various populations. #GOMOJO #GODTLV UNITED STATES FEDERAL GOVERNMENT GOMOJO has responded to the PEPFAR required strategy will continue to support a multi-pronged approach to combating new HIV infections, working with partner governments and civil society to address the sources of new infections and create enabling environments for HIV prevention.
  • KEY BENEFITS AIDSFREEGENERATION A Complete Source for Community Utilize Our Resources Help Youth Use Advantages for Good Harness Our Global Power Value Diversity-Our world is becoming smaller and smaller, especially in a global community like Las Vegas. Technology, economic conditions and mobility require we work within a diverse playing field. While on my journey I took special precautions to keep my mouth shut and observe, identify and analyze problem situations, conflict resolution, active listening and gathering coping mechanisms for change.
  • PROJECT TIMETABLE Description Start Date to Completion Date Phase 1 RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS JULY 2011-FOREVER Phase 2 WALK THE PATH OF HARDEST HIT DEMOGRAPHICS NOVEMBER 2011-PRESENT Phase 3 INTRODUCE AND PROPOSE TO DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS COMMUNITY NOW TO LAST WEEK, MONTH, YEAR
  • KEY RESOURCES UNITED STATES FEDERAL GOVERNEMENT ALL FUNDED HEALTH AND COMMUNITY BASED ORGANIZATIONS MEDIA PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTOR Utilizing our GLOBAL POWER is key
  • EVALUATION Discuss how and when the project will be evaluated.  Community Participation  Explain how you will act on the results of your assessments and project evaluation. Increase the momentum and go harder, faster, longer until AIDSFREEGENERATION
  • AUGUST 2, 2013 DEAR PREVENTION PARTNER: August 2, 2013 Dear Prevention Partner: Today, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced the competitive availability of fiscal year (FY) 2014 funds to implement funding opportunity announcement (FOA), PS14-1403: Capacity Building Assistance for High-Impact Prevention. This program will support multiple awards to implement capacity building programs that meet or exceed FOA requirements and performance targets. The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement is to strengthen the capacity of the HIV prevention workforce to optimally plan, implement, and sustain high-impact HIV prevention interventions and strategies within health departments, community-based organizations, and healthcare organizations across the United States and its territories. Total fiscal year funding will be approximately $26 million, culminating in a total 5- year project period funding of approximately $130 million. Applications are due October 2, 2013, and the project period is from April 1, 2014 to March 31, 2019. Toward meeting the vision and goals of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS), CDC‟s high-impact prevention (HIP) approach is based on scientifically-proven, cost- effective, and scalable interventions directed to populations who need it most. Consolidating capacity building assistance (CBA) programs previously funded under FOAs PS09-906 and PS11-1103, this FOA will support a single program that reflects CDC‟s current and future efforts to provide high quality CBA services to reduce HIV infections and related morbidity, mortality, and health disparities across the United States and its territories. This program will support a national Capacity Building Assistance (CBA) Provider Network (CPN) under three core funding categories to serve the following organizations: A. Health Departments, B: Community-based Organizations, and C: Healthcare Organizations. In addition, funding Category D: CPN Resource Center will provide overarching network coordination and support for awardees funded under Categories A, B, and C. The new funding opportunity embodies CDC‟s commitment to High-Impact Prevention and represents an exciting new direction in strengthening the capacity of the HIV prevention workforce. We encourage you to widely distribute this announcement within your own networks. Additional information about this new FOA is available at http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/policies/funding/announcements/PS14-1403/index.html. Sincerely, /Rashad Burgess/ Rashad Burgess, M.A. Chief, Capacity Building Branch Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention /Janet C. Cleveland/ Janet C. Cleveland, M.S. Deputy Director, Prevention Programs Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention
  • 1. COMPETENT STAFF 2. CBA DELIVERY 3. CBA SERVICES 4. CULTURAL COMPETENCE 5. MARKETING 6. CBA PROVIDER NETWORK (CPN) PARTICIPATION 7. REPORTING Community- based Organizations Healthcare Organizations Health Departments CBA PROVIDER NETWORK 1. HIV Testing 2. Prevention with HIV- Positive Persons 3. Prevention with High-Risk HIV Negative Persons 4. Condom Distribution 5. Organizational Development & Management 6. Policy 1. HIV Testing 2. Prevention with HIV- Positive Persons 3. Prevention with High-Risk HIV Negative Persons 4. Condom Distribution 5. Organizational Development & Management 6. Policy 1. HIV Testing 2. Prevention with HIV- Positive Persons 3. Prevention with High-Risk HIV Negative Persons 4. Condom Distribution 5. Organizational Development & Management 6. Policy 1. Marketing CPN 2. Supplemental Development of CPN Products 3. CPN Coordination & Meeting Support
  • 1. Competent Staff 2. CBA Delivery 3. CBA Services 4. Cultural Competence 5. Marketing 6. CBA Provider Network (cpn) Participation 7. Reporting 1. HIV Testing 2. Prevention with HIV-Positive Persons 3. Prevention with High-Risk HIV Negative Persons 4. Condom Distribution 5. Organizational Development & Management 6. Policy Marketing CPN Supplemental Development of CPN Products CPN Coordination & Meeting Support •HEALTH DEPARTMENTS •HEALTH PROVIDERS •COMMUNITY-BASED ORGANIZATIONS
  • AN ARMY CRAWL THROUGH OUR SYSTEM
  • Road Map for Shared Responsibility The goal of creating an AIDS-free generation is a shared responsibility with partner countries in a convening role. Neither the U.S. nor any other single entity can accomplish this goal alone. Rather, it requires a country to demonstrate political will and effective coordination of multiple partners that are providing financing and carrying out interventions both inside and outside of the health sector, and most importantly, meaningfully involve those living with and affected by HIV in all aspects of the response.
  • Road Map for Driving Results with Science 2. Support implementation research. 3. Evaluate the efficacy of optimized combination prevention. 4. Support innovative research to develop new technologies AND METHODS TO MOBILIZE SAFE SEX for prevention 5. Develop evidence-based approaches to reaching people early enough in their disease progression to help maintain a strong immune system, stave off opportunistic infections, particularly TB, and reduce new HIV infections. 6. Support the deployment of suitable technology for measurement of viral load, both through tiered laboratory networks and „point-of- care‟ tests as they become available. COLLABORATE GOVERNMENT RESORUCES WITH SPIRIT PROJECT 7. Utilize OUR AMAZING RESOURCES Downtown Las Vegas TO HELP OUR COMMUNITY/COUNTRY/WORLD in adopting breakthrough new technologies with proven impact, such as new, PHROPHLYATIC CARRYING DEVICE FOR MALE AND FEMAL CONDOMS
  • Driving Results with SCIENCE The implementation science agenda examines methods that:  GOMOJO M  MALE AND FEMALE  SAFESEX KEYCHAIN CONTAINER S  THIS WAS 2012 WHEN SCORE WAS IN THE BUILDING NEXT TO IT…WHAT IF WE
  • Driving Results with Science 2. Support implementatio n research: a) On decentralization strategies to help reach and retain more people in care (and put people more in charge of their care), such as community-based testing and treatment strategies b) On interventions that can help address gaps in the continuum of care— plugging the holes in the leaky cascade—including ways to increase testing, improve linkage to care for people testing positive, and reduce attrition by helping people remain in care. c) Test interventions, including innovative technologies and other strategies to reduce the burden on patients, the cost of the package of care and the requirements of the health system to deliver.
  • Road Map for Driving Results with Science
  • Road Map for Saving Lives Through its continued support for scale-up of combination prevention and treatment interventions in high- burden countries, PEPFAR will help countries •Reduce new HIV infections and CONDOMS, ABSTAIN •Decrease AIDS-related mortality GET TESTED GET TREATED GET AIDSFREE while simultaneously increasing the capacity of OUR COMMUNITY, COUNTRY AND WORLD to sustain and support these efforts over time and reduce sexually related incidences. COOL CONTATAINERS TO SAFELY CARRY, EASILY ACCESS AND USE CONDOM SENSE This support will, in turn, move more countries past the programmatic tipping point in OUR HIV epidemics—the point at which the annual increase in new patients on ART exceeds annual new HIV infections— and put US on the path toward achieving an AIDS- free generation. THIS IS THE STRATEGY I USED FOR DOWNTOWN LAS VEGAS AND GOMOJO
  • 1. Partner with community in a joint move toward community- led, managed, and implemented responses. 2. Increase support for civil WOW society as a partner in the global AIDS response. 3. Expand collaboration with multilateral and bilateral partners. 4. Increase private sector mobilization toward an AIDS- free generation. Road Map for Shared Responsibility
  • Driving Results with Science 5. Develop evidence-based approaches to reaching people early enough in their disease progression to help maintain a strong immune system, stave off opportunistic infections, particularly TB, and reduce new HIV infections. COMPELLI NG STORIES ENDLESS BIG THINKING PROBABIL ITIES WAYS TO CARRY AND REMEMBER GOALS AND VALUES TO STICK BY CONNECTION TO COMMUNITY RESOURCES READINES S AND ACHIEVE MENT PLACES TO GO THINGS TO DO AND GOALS TO ACCOMPLI SH STAY READY AND BE READY PURPOSE+PASSIO N=PROFITS HAPPINESS
  • GOMOJO Driving Results with Science  4. Support innovative research to develop new technologies for prevention
  • DRIVING RESULTS WITH SCIENCE  THE CENTER  GENDER JUSTICE OF NV  FEDERAL ADVOCAY CERTIFICATION FOR EQUAL RIGHTS AND JUSTICE FOR ALL FOR 1 FOR ALL 4 ONE  VMPOWERMENT  HIV/AIDS PROGRAM  FREE TESTING  SUPPORT  HELP  MEDICAL TREATMENT REFERALS  SHARE STORIES  STATE OF NEVADA  HUMAN & HEALTH SERVICES  GOMOJO  PEPFAR  CDC/NPIN  HHS/AIDS.GOV  WHITEHOUSE.GOV/NHAS
  • YOUTH • 1. Target and tailor programming for sexually active and most-at-risk youth based on pattern of behavior and their needs. • 2. Provide necessary information and skills building to help youth prepare to make their eventual transition to sexual activity safer and healthier, including delay of sexual debut. • 3. Work with parents and guardians to help improve communication to youth about their values and expectations regarding adolescent behavior, as well as stressing the importance of monitoring and supervision of their adolescents. • 4. Engage influential adults within the community to create an enabling environment conducive to the adoption of safer sex behaviors among youth. • 5. Expand access to community-level prevention programs, including peer outreach, and curriculum-based programs for out-of-school youth. • 6. Provide or refer sexually active youth to confidential youth HTC, and ensure linkages to care for HIV positive youth. • 7. Encourage sexually-active youth to learn their HIV status, • practice safer sex and reduce their number of sexual partners. • Provide sexually active young people with risk reduction information and skills building, • including access to male and female condoms and information on correct and consistent condom use. • 8. Prioritize interventions targeting evidence-based prevention, care and treatment for adolescents living with HIV/AIDS in the following areas: – a) Measurement: Work with the UN and partner governments to better track the numbers of adolescents living with HIV (ALHIV) and the coverage of critical HIV services for these populations. – b) Prevention: Work with global experts to identify the most effective interventions for preventing new HIV infections in vulnerable adolescent populations and support partner governments to bring them to scale. – c) Treatment: Work with partner governments and implementing partners to scale programs that increase access to treatment for ALHIV, and help those currently in pediatric care to effectively transition to adult care. – d) Advocacy: Work with UNICEF and other global partners to raise awareness of the needs of ALHIV and vulnerable adolescents, and – Build commitments to bringing effective programs and interventions to scale. • 9. Provide comprehensive packages of interventions for highly vulnerable youth and young member of key populations tailored to be accessible and acceptable to younger people. • 10. Where feasible, support structural interventions to reduce young people’s exposure to risk and increase protection. • 11. Strengthen and expand gender-sensitive programs to respond to the unique needs of male and female youth, including addressing harmful gender norms that foster the spread of HIV. • 12. Evaluate the impact of PEPFAR-funded youth programs to build a stronger evidence base for these interventions.
  • PEPFAR programs are led by OGAC at the State Department and implemented by various U.S. agencies and departments, including the following: 1) Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention (CDC): CDC‟s Global AIDS Program (GAP) operates in 38 countries and four regional programs. CDC HIV/AIDS programs assist ministries of health and local implementing organizations to implement HIV/AIDS prevention programs, analyze program impact and cost effectiveness, and build the capacity of public workforce, as well as public health information, laboratory, and management systems. 2) National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH supports HIV/AIDS research and training in approximately 100 countries. This research focuses on tools to prevent HIV transmission, such as vaccines and microbicides; strategies to prevent mother-to- child transmission; and approaches to treating HIV and its associated opportunistic infections and co-infections in resource poor settings. 3) U.S. Agency for International Development: USAID supports HIV/AIDS programs in nearly 100 countries. These programs focus on providing treatment, care, and support to people infected with HIV/AIDS; strengthening primary health care systems; providing training, technical assistance, and commodities that reduce HIV transmission; educating high-risk behaviors; and supporting international partnerships. 4) Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA): HRSA provides education and training HIV/AIDS programs in more than 25 countries that increase rapid roll-out of ART, support health system strengthening and improvements in human resources for health, and facilitate innovative approaches to health data collection and evaluation. 5) U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA): FDA ensures the availability of safe and effective AIDS treatment. Since 2004, FDA has supported an accelerated review process for ARTs, including generic drugs and fixed dose combination drugs (FDCs)—multiple antiretroviral drugs combined into a single pill—for PEPFAR programs. As of 2011, 136 ART formulations had been approved or tentatively approved by FDA. 6) Department of Labor (DOL): DOL implements HIV/AIDS programs in over 23 countries that facilitate the development of comprehensive workplace-based HIV prevention and education programs; assist governments, employers, and trade unions to develop and disseminate workplace policy countering stigma 7) U.S. Response to the Global Threat of HIV/AIDS: Basic Facts Congressional Research Service 8 and discrimination; and support collaboration between government, business, and labor in countering HIV/AIDS. 8) Peace Corps: Peace Corps volunteers support community-based HIV/AIDS care and prevention efforts over 66 countries. A number of Peace Corps volunteer projects related to HIV/AIDS received direct PEPFAR funding, while other Peace Corps posts benefited from activities organized by the headquarters using central PEPFAR funding. 9) U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC): DOC creates and disseminates sector specific strategies to inform HIV trade advisory committees on how the private sector can help combat HIV/AIDS. 10) The U.S. Census Bureau also contributes to PEPFAR by assisting with data management and analysis, estimating infections averted, and supporting mapping of country-level activities
  • Congressional Research  U.S. Response to the Global Threat of HIV/AIDS: Basic Facts Congressional Research Service 8 and discrimination; and support collaboration between government, business, and labor in countering HIV/AIDS.  The U.S. Census Bureau also contributes to PEPFAR by assisting with data management and analysis, estimating infections averted, and supporting mapping of country-level activities
  • Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention (CDC)  CDC‟s Global AIDS Program (GAP) operates in 38 countries and four regional programs. CDC HIV/AIDS programs assist ministries of health and local implementing organizations to implement HIV/AIDS prevention programs, analyze program impact and cost effectiveness, and build the capacity of public workforce, as well as public health information, laboratory, and management systems
  • U.S. Agency for International Development: USAID  USAID supports HIV/AIDS programs in nearly 100 countries.  These programs focus on providing treatment, care, and support to people infected with HIV/AIDS;  Strengthening  primary health care systems;  providing training,  technical assistance,  and commodities that reduce HIV transmission; educating high-risk behaviors; and supporting international partnerships.
  • Department of Defense (DOD):  DOD operates HIV/AIDS programs in 73 countries.  DOD‟s primary role under PEPFAR is to support military-to-military HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment, and care efforts; assist in the development of military-specific HIV/AIDS policies; and provide HIV/AIDS counseling, testing, and care for military families. DOD also provides HIV prevention scientific and technical assistance to non-military PEPFAR programs.  The DOD HIV/AIDS Prevention Program (DHAPP) manages DOD‟s HIV/AIDS programs for foreign militaries and oversees the use of PEPFAR funds by DOD
  • National Institutes of Health (NIH)  NIH supports HIV/AIDS research and training in approximately 100 countries. This research focuses on tools to prevent HIV transmission, such as vaccines and microbicides; strategies to prevent mother-to-child transmission; and approaches to treating HIV and its associated opportunistic infections and co-infections in resource poor settings.
  • Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)  HRSA provides education and training HIV/AIDS programs in more than 25 countries that increase rapid roll-out of ART  Support health system strengthening  Improvements in human resources for health, and facilitate innovative approaches to health data collection and evaluation.
  • QUESTIONS? Ability to Delegate Strong Communication Skills Confidence Commitment Keeping a Positive Attitude Creativity Intuition Ability to Inspire Having a Sense of Humor