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Strengthening the Security of Maritime Operations - CDE themed call launch presentations 24 Jan 2013
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Strengthening the Security of Maritime Operations - CDE themed call launch presentations 24 Jan 2013

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Centre for Defence Enterprise themed call for research proposals. This call closes on Monday 25 February 2013. See http://www.science.mod.uk/events/event_detail.aspx?eventid=198 for more information.

Centre for Defence Enterprise themed call for research proposals. This call closes on Monday 25 February 2013. See http://www.science.mod.uk/events/event_detail.aspx?eventid=198 for more information.

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  • Welcome and good morning.My name is Gavin Copeland and I am part of the MOD’s Centre for Defence Enterprise where I head up our work on engagement, communications and external relations.
  • As you can see we have a busy agenda for your today and I would ask that you keep your questions until, for technical questions, the session just before lunch and for more general questions – such as how to apply – for the final Q&A session. There will also be an opportunity to ask questions in networking over lunch and later this afternoon.
  • Innovation for Defence Why?Innovation means advantageWe want better, lighter, faster, simpler (and cheaper)We want to leverage the best innovation for the civilian sectorWe need to ensure research funds are spent in a way that can make the maximum difference
  • The Centre for Defence Enterprise was established nearly five years ago in recognition that most science and technology innovation takes place in non-defence markets and by small organisations and academia who traditionally have struggled to work with defence.CDE aims to present an open door for new science and technology providers to MOD and defence and security. For these organisations we exist as a first point of contact for anyone with a proof-of-concept research proposal for a disruptive technology, new process or innovation that has a potential defence and security application.We aim to provide a low overhead route to submitting innovative research proposals for short sharp proof of concept contracts that will prove the value of high-risk high benefit research. Typically CDE contracts are 6-9 months in duration and between 30 and 80 thousand pounds – although there are examples that fall outside both ends of the range.
  • So, CDE is an open-innovation capture tool. But that is a bit too simple a statement.The CDE role is very much focussed on supporting innovators who have the interest in exploring potential defence and security applications. Specifically we are looking to encourage new entrants into the Defence market.Why? Because innovation translates into military capability, hopefully an unique military capability that leads to military advantage for UK Armed Forces.More simply, we want a greater proportion of the brightest, most creative minds to be thinking about Defence and Security challenges.So, whilst other funding bodies may have more general science and technology development objectives our mission is very simple.CDE is here to ……..
  • …to enable development of cost-effective capability advantage…
  • For Defence and security.
  • About a year ago, our initial success led to a Ministerial announcement in the ‘National Security through Technology’ White Paper on the expansion of our role to cover both defence and security as well as increasing the size of our research call programme and providing more support to small organisations both during the contract and in finding opportunities for subsequent exploitation.
  • Like any potential market, ‘new entrants’ face barriers and the CDE team is focussed on the tools and means help overcome them.CDE has a history of engaging and funding SMEs. Some of our best work has been done ‘two men in a boat’ or rather ‘a man and a woman in a shed’, to be precise. And we frequently see highly innovative proposals come from individuals and very small companies.CDE is all about putting opportunity in the way of innovators, to contribute to UK military and security capabilities whilst gaining the opportunity to access the £150bn that MOD will be spending through its supply chain over the next 10 years. And access to CDE funding is potentially the first step on that road. So looking at this second major area of commitment made in the White Paper –to deepen our ability to support suppliers, particularly small organisations.We have a greater capability to run more events and calls, we have more of our very popular one-one surgeries (30 minutes – shape proposals – not technical) and we increasing our ability to support projects beyond the initial CDE stage, helping small businesses get into the wider defence and security supply chains.Unpacking some of the detail behind this help..
  • We try to take complex military requirements and turn them into plain English. This is a work in process, we don’t always get it right.But to tap into a new, non-defence innovation base we have to ensure that new entrants understand what we are saying. We shouldn’t expect them to learn a whole new language just to submit a proposal.
  • To ensure that CDE is accessible to all we make as much use of the internet as we can.We communicateour plans requirements and services through our website. And we have an online submission process that keeps the overhead as low as possible for new entrants and for MOD. The online process also allows us to move the process on at pace and keep the momentum up high.CDE’s web is based at www.science.mod.uk/enterprise and uses a secure online proposal and assessment portal. This allows simple proposal submission which highlights important aspects of an innovation but also allows rapid assessment by experts from across MOD.
  • This approach ensures that proposals and assessments are in a standardised and auditable manner that provides a low overhead approach to managing what would otherwise be a complex and disparate response from across suppliers that would consume significantly more resources.Our assessment methodology is onlineWe always try to give informative and actionable feedback.
  • CDE provides two principal routes for funding research proposals. We call them Themed calls and the Defence Open Call.Themed calls – such as this call today - were worth over £10M last year and are borne out of our existing research programme.The themed call programme is all about what may be thought of as the “known unknowns” and are specific technical challenges from the research programme along with a dedicated funding pot and a deadline against which to submit proposals. They are characterised by boundaries; a bounded set of challenges;a bounded budget that you can bid into;and a bounded response timeframe for you to submit your research proposals.
  • The Defence Open Call is there to enable us to investigate the ‘unknown unknowns’ – as Donald Rumsfeld once put it. A complex thing to do.It is an enduring research competition for our enduring challenges. You can submit a research proposal at any time.And what are these enduring challenges?
  • CDE aims to find innovative ideas to meetEnduring Military Technology ChallengesBetter, more robust, communicationsBetter observation and sensingBetter self-protectionMore efficient and versatile platformsALL FAMILIAR TO A ROMAN CENTURION AS TO THE MODERN SOLDIER IN AFGHANISTANChallenge to youBring us your innovation!Be bold, be creative and think differentlyCreate new & diverse communitiesConsider doing things differentlyHelp us to knock down barriers to exploitationWork with us to develop battle winning technology
  • The Defence Open Call represents less than 1% of our entire MOD S&T research programme, about £400M pa.It is therefore researved for the most exceptional ideas. That should set the context as to the kind of responses we are looking for into the open call process. It’s the things we just haven’t thought about;those things that really do come out of the left field. The open call does not seek iterative development; it does not seek to build on what we already know. It really is for those radical innovations that could fundamentally change the way we do business in defence and security.
  • In the grand scheme of things both the themed calls and theopen call represent relatively small budgets.So funded packages of work are relatively small. Typically we will fund projects between around £60-100k. So we’re not looking for people to come to us with whole-system development; it’s about enabling technologies that could unlock the solution to a particular problem.
  • Emphasis Proof of Concept
  • An example. An innovative SME offered us a capability we didn’t know we wanted. Because we didn’t think it was possible. Let me give you two examples of work that CDE has funded under the open call Funded SME to produce…… No requirement
  • Another example. A serendipitous innovation brought about by a chance encounter between a MOD Scientist and an innovative academic researcher working on wool fibres. CDE provided the pathway to transfer some innovative technology from its originator, who understood virtually nothing about defence, into a compelling defence focused research proposal that was funded by the Defence Open CallNext example illustrates that focus University of Leeds Small samplePhase 2 contract has now been awardedKey: = Here’s the thing Provided compelling evidence to unlock the investment decision = deliverable
  • As well as the always open Defence Open Call, we have an ongoing programme of Themed Calls.You can see here the ones running through to end March and the forward programme to Autumn 2013 is already looking very busy and we will be able to share some of the details with you all very shortly.The best way to find out is via our email newsletter that you can sign up for on our website.
  • As you can see we have a busy agenda for your today and I would ask that you keep your questions until, for technical questions, the session just before lunch and for more general questions – such as how to apply – for the final Q&A session. There will also be an opportunity to ask questions in networking over lunch and later this afternoon.
  • These are not the only issues that would help conduct non-warfighting roles.But they are important issues for which it is not clear how to provide a solution.I am now going to address each of these challenges individually in the rest of this presentation.As an aside, the picture shows a representation of Counter-Piracy from a previous time. To a degree it illustrates that the RN has been involved in Maritime Security Operations for a considerable time, although the technologies have changed.
  • The Dhow to the right is a Pirate Dhow.The Dhow to the left is an Iranian Dhow that was attacked by Pirates and freed by the Royal Navy.It is not just large western container ships that are the subject to piracy. And not all Dhows are operated by Pirates.The worlds Oceans and Seas are very large, and contain a large amount of shipping, most of which is legitimate. Attempting to identify those craft that are involved in Piracy is not straight forward.
  • If the craft involved in illegal activity look the same as those that aren’t, then the only way to differentiate between them can be to take a closer look. i.e. conduct boarding operations. RHIB = Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat – Small grey craft to the right of the wooden Dhow.But boardings are not without risk.Boardings take a considerable amount of time.The RHIB needs to be launched, including boarding the crew.The RHIB needs to transit to the vessel to be investigated.The crew need to board the vessel, and conduct the required search.If nothing is found then the crew need to re-board their RHIB, return to the Ship and the RHIB recovered.All this means that only a relatively small number of vessels can be boarded.If all vessels can’t be boarded, then those that are boarded by necessity becomes random, or based on less evidence than might be hoped.Hence there is considerable potential for those vessels involved in illegal activities to go undetected.
  • These 3 proposals are not meant to be taken literally.But you may have technology that can achieve a similar effect.In the picture the RN RHIB is very close to the suspect vessel, which will aid some of the illustrations that I am about to show. But there would be a preference for the RHIB to stay at range if possible to it is clear that a boarding will be necessary. In fact, it would be better if the RN/RM crew could stay on the RN Ship in the background until it was clear that a boarding was necessary.May be an opportunity to employ an unmanned vehicle in the first instance. Mind Reading Device. (Is there another route to determine where the vessel is from, and where it is going to?) Perhaps a lie detector A Babel fish. (For those not aware of “The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Universe” this is a fish that provide translation from any language into your own language.) X-Ray Spectacles. (Is there are technology that enables one to look into the suspect vessel and determine what it is carrying? Perhaps specifically detection of weapons of explosives?)For this challenge we are looking for Technologies that “Improve determination of unlawful activity at sea”.These technologies might Highlight those vessels which are most suspicious Reduce the numbers of boardings that are necessary so that the most suspicious vessels can be concentrated on. Above all reduce the risk to the RN/RM crew conducting the boardings. Might be possible to deploy the technology via an unmanned vehicle.
  • But if Lethal Force is used in the context of a Maritime Security Operation, then probably the mission has failedExclusion ZoneMay or may not be a craft conducting an illegal activity.InterdictionMay or may not be a craft conducting an illegal activity. I am going to consider these two cases seperately in the following slides.
  • Exclusion ZoneIllustrated in Exemplar B in the call documentRecent years have seen an increased use of suicide bombs in the land environment, where there is the potential for this to transition into the Maritime. In these instances the threat is intentionally looking like a lawful vessel.Current capability is only to provide a lethal response. So one would need to be pretty sure of what the vessel is before being prepared to use themThe target may well be a civilian who is curious or who wants to sell something to the crew. The target may be amongst other craft which are expected.In this case there is obviously a willingness to employ a graduated response which transitions from no effect through to lethal effect. Firstly just providing a warning. Then a level of effect that would deter someone who is not involved in an illegal activity. If the vessel still keeps coming then it can pave the way to a lethal effect.Therefore the initial low level effects have to be deployable at range.They can be used to establish intent, and provide time for decision makingThe non-lethal effect might be directed towards the vessel or the crew.
  • A lot of synergy with Challenge 1, where Challenge 1 is about identifying who needs to be boarded / stopped. This part of Challenge 2 is about stopping the vessel, or slowing the vessel down.Note, this is not necessarily about stopping a craft that you know is conducting an illegal activity. This may be a legitimate vessel where the crew has not noticed the attempt to board. Or where for personal reasons they are deliberately attempting to avoid a boarding.If the vessel is damaged, then the RN ship becomes responsible for its safety and safe return to port. There might also be financial responsibility to correct any damage.It is recognised that this is not a simple challenge, which is part of the reason that it is being raised as part of a CDE call.
  • Non-Lethal Effectors Some caution. This has been looked at before with little success. Need a clear concept of how it would be employed. Need to ensure that it has sufficient range. It might well be appropriate to use an unmanned vehicle to help deliver the effect to the desired range.Barriers Need to ensure that it can be deployed easily. Need to ensure that it is effective.Warnings Need to ensure that it can be clearly understood. Again perhaps an unmanned vehicle has a role to playFor this challenge we are looking for Technologies that “Improve the response to hostile activity at sea”, where this is through a graduated response.As for the first challenge an unmanned vehicle might be part of the route to getting the required effect to the desired range.
  • 7.62mm GPMG and Mini Gun primary weapons for Force Protection in Maritime Security Operations.Deployed in a variety of positions around the ship.Ability to stow is very important in hot climates, as the ammunition degrades if left in the sun (Gets too hot).These easily portable weapons can be held inside the ship, and rapidly set up when required.In this presentation I am going to primarily focus on the training, as it as area we know needs improvement.Part of the reason for this is that operating Small Arms is not likely to be that person’s primary role. Hence the level of training is limited, and needs to fit around training for the primary role.In addition, although there is starting to be good land based training in small arms, there is not the same access on the. As a consequence the level of capability can degrade very quickly.Although this presentation is primarily focused on the training aspects, we are open to other suggestions on improving performance.
  • Guns are dangerous. Live Fire training can be arranged, but there are issues Land based training is easier to organise, but not fully representative Sea based training can be arranged, but organising an appropriate moving target can be difficult. (Master and Commander – Barrel in the sea) Ammunition is expensive, and you can use a lot of it in training. Non-live fire training is easier to arrange than Live fire training by just using a ship’s boat. But is it representative? Can you assess operator performanceHow do you measure operator performance? Current approach is to bring the craft ashore after each serial, but this can only give rough indications as you don’t necessarily know which period of the serial caused the hits. So long as the target doesn’t sink!
  • Hit Counters Real time measurements of hits (& misses) Might incorporate a miss distance indicatorAugmented Reality Simulation of live fire in non-live fire training Laser Beam?, Addition to viewer? Would want it to be as representative as possible.For this challenge we are looking for Technologies that “Improving small arms accuracyat sea”.
  • As you can see we have a busy agenda for your today and I would ask that you keep your questions until, for technical questions, the session just before lunch and for more general questions – such as how to apply – for the final Q&A session. There will also be an opportunity to ask questions in networking over lunch and later this afternoon.
  • As you can see we have a busy agenda for your today and I would ask that you keep your questions until, for technical questions, the session just before lunch and for more general questions – such as how to apply – for the final Q&A session. There will also be an opportunity to ask questions in networking over lunch and later this afternoon.
  • As you can see we have a busy agenda for your today and I would ask that you keep your questions until, for technical questions, the session just before lunch and for more general questions – such as how to apply – for the final Q&A session. There will also be an opportunity to ask questions in networking over lunch and later this afternoon.
  • Potential exploitation routes could include additional research to further develop or test the concept from MOD or other UK government departmentEach project will be invited to attend a stakeholder day, at Porton Down or Portsdown West, to present the outcomes and review exploitation routes
  • As you can see we have a busy agenda for your today and I would ask that you keep your questions until, for technical questions, the session just before lunch and for more general questions – such as how to apply – for the final Q&A session. There will also be an opportunity to ask questions in networking over lunch and later this afternoon.
  • Back to the ‘engagement’ tab now;> And there’s one source of information that is particularly useful, and that is the CDE Portal page.
  • Follow the link to the Portal page where you will find a particularly important document – the Quick Start Guide.What this actually is, is a step-by-step process to using the Portal. If you’ve not used the Portal before we would thoroughly recommend downloading a copy of this and having it to hand throughout the process.
  • Right, now moving on to the specific information that your proposal must contain, to put it into a strong position when competing with the others. These may seem like simple points but they are often missed.
  • The assessors of your proposal need to be able to envisage what is the proposed future capability benefit.It’s not about delivering that benefit immediately with a successful CDE project – this is only the first step.A reminder that CDE operates in the ‘proof of concept’ space but you need to start with the end in sight.We are about doing just enough work to inform a decision about the likely value of taking a concept to full development. Then maximising the opportunity to promote the outputs of that proof of concept phase to the widest range of possible exploitation paths.You need to indentify the major forseeable technological risk associated with developing your innovation, and then show us that you can overcome it.A successful CDE project will produce a compelling, evidence-based output that will persuade decision makers to unlock the investment to develop the technology into a future capability. So remember this at the very beginning when putting together your proposal.
  • 60 minutes.Two episodes of East Enders.That is all a CDE assessor has to form a view of your proposal and make a recommendation to the Decision conference.To assimilate and So, when you put your proposal together keep that in mind.
  • So, how might you conduct a basic health check on your proposal as you’re developing it?These checks apply to any CDE proposal whether it’s for a themed call or the Defence Open Call.
  • Make a claim we can consider and measure you against. A clear claim that the technology or innovation will contribute to a future hypothesised capability benefit.The claim must be compelling and attractive so that our interest is raised.If your proposal is for the Open call you have the opportunity to take some risk, starting with your claim.
  • It should describe how the technological development will contribute to the realisation of that capability benefit
  • Number 3 – your proposal must describe a logical programme of work to deliver the proposed technological development.
  • Number 4 - Your CDE proposal should describe the body of evidence that the programme of work will generate.What will be delivered?Going back to what I said before, the assessors need to see what will come out at the end of the project that will unlock any future capability development?
  • And finally number 5 – How that body of evidence you have generated will demonstrate tangible progress towards the realisation of the originally claimed future capability benefit.Again, it’s all about unlocking that investment decision.
  • So to remind you of those 5 points in the CDE proposal health check:
  • Now some essentials for submitting a proposal to this, and other, CDE themed calls.
  • Government furnished X – And by that we mean information or equipment provided by us.Don’t rely on the provision of any of this.For the proof-of-concept space that CDE operates in, we would always recommend you find alternative means of executing your projects or testing your innovations.You should use public data sets, for example in this call, – many of which you can find on the internet.
  • For CDE phase one projects, we would advise you to avoid reliance on any sort of human or animal testing, which would require going through the strict MOD ethics clearance procedures. This takes time, so for a short, sharp initial CDE project it may not be viable.It may be that you can partition your programme of work into a first stage that doesn’t require ethical clearance, so that the team could assess the output after this stage before going further into the work.Any advice on this aspect, please do ask the team today before submitting your proposals.
  • A reminder – All CDE competitions are at the Unclassified level. Everything within your proposal must be unclassified.Ask yourself – would it pass the train test? In other words, if you left the proposal document on a train, would it compromise UK national security interests? If in doubt, leave it out!
  • The deadline for today’s themed call is Tuesday 19 February 2013 at 1700 hrs sharp.Do not leave it until the last minute to submit your proposal on the Portal.Give yourself plenty of time to review your proposal.If you leave it until the last minute you run the risk of missing the deadline as the server will have frozen under the amount of people submitting at the same time.Please do it the day before, a couple of days before or even the week before the deadline.You will save yourself a lot of stress.
  • A reminder again of that deadline.Also another really important point – you will find this information in the call document published online – you must put the appropriate line in your proposal title to identify that it is for this themed call. For this one you must put ‘Maritime Security Operations + challenge 1, 2 or 3’ as a prefix in the title.If you miss this deadline you will be significantly lowering your chances of success. The Defence Open Call is not a likely back-up option. For the reasons you heard earlier this morning, the Open Call is much harder to be successful in, due to the higher threshold for innovation.
  • Specifically for this themed call today, if you have any technical questions, please go directly to the team that you’ve met here today. You can contact them using this email address.However,Capacity to answer these queries is limited in terms of volume and scope. Queries should be limited to a few simple questions or if provided with a short (few paragraphs) description of your proposal, the technical team will provide, without commitment or prejudice, broad yes/no answers. This query facility is not to be used for extensive technical discussions, detailed review of proposals or supporting the iterative development of ideas. Whilst all reasonable efforts will be made to answer queries, CDE and Dstl reserve the right to impose management controls when higher than average volumes of queries or resource demands restrict fair access to all potential proposal submitters.
  • Call document and presentations online.Webinar.Network.Q&A.
  • Welcome and good morning.My name is Gavin Copeland and I am part of the MOD’s Centre for Defence Enterprise where I head up our work on engagement, communications and external relations.

Strengthening the Security of Maritime Operations - CDE themed call launch presentations 24 Jan 2013 Strengthening the Security of Maritime Operations - CDE themed call launch presentations 24 Jan 2013 Presentation Transcript

  • Agenda10:00 Introduction to CDE10:25 Maritime security problems & challenges11:00 Technical Q&A11:10 BREAK Previous CDE activity case study on11:40 maritime security12:00 Perspective from horizon scanning12:20 Technical challenges summary12:40 CDE proposal guidance + general Q&A13:00 LUNCH14:00 One-to-one meetings
  • Centre for Defence Enterprise Strengthening the Security of Maritime Operations Centre for Defence Enterprise Crown Copyright www.science.mod.uk/enterprise cde@dstl.gov.uk (c) 2013 Dstl UNCLASSIFIED / FOR PUBLIC RELEASE
  • Centre for Defence Enterprise Supporting Innovators Centre for Defence Enterprise Crown Copyright www.science.mod.uk/enterprise cde@dstl.gov.uk (c) 2013 Dstl UNCLASSIFIED / FOR PUBLIC RELEASE
  • Innovation = Advantage Centre for Defence Enterprise Crown Copyright www.science.mod.uk/enterprise cde@dstl.gov.uk (c) 2013 Dstl © Crown Copyright© Crown Copyright MOD 2011 UNCLASSIFIED / FOR PUBLIC RELEASE
  • Prove the value of novel, high- risk, high-potential-benefit research Centre for Defence Enterprise Crown Copyright www.science.mod.uk/enterprise cde@dstl.gov.uk (c) 2013 Dstl© Crown Copyright MOD 2011 UNCLASSIFIED / FOR PUBLIC RELEASE
  • The aim of CDE Centre for Defence Enterprise Crown Copyright www.science.mod.uk/enterprise cde@dstl.gov.uk (c) 2013 Dstl© Crown Copyright MOD 2011 UNCLASSIFIED / FOR PUBLIC RELEASE
  • To enable development of cost- effective capability advantage Centre for Defence Enterprise Crown Copyright www.science.mod.uk/enterprise cde@dstl.gov.uk (c) 2013 Dstl© Crown Copyright MOD 2011 UNCLASSIFIED / FOR PUBLIC RELEASE
  • for Defence and Security Centre for Defence EnterpriseCrown Copyright www.science.mod.uk/enterprise cde@dstl.gov.uk(c) 2013 Dstl UNCLASSIFIED / FOR PUBLIC RELEASE
  • “National Security Through Technology” White Paper ‘Building on the CDE success in providing efficient access to innovation, we will broaden its remit to cover both the defence and security domains. As part of this, we will seek ways to provide moresupport to small- and medium-sized enterprises inthe development of routes to market for potential products and to enhance communication mechanisms between CDE and our suppliers’ Centre for Defence Enterprise Crown Copyright www.science.mod.uk/enterprise cde@dstl.gov.uk (c) 2013 Dstl UNCLASSIFIED / FOR PUBLIC RELEASE
  • Support to SMEs Centre for Defence EnterpriseCrown Copyright www.science.mod.uk/enterprise cde@dstl.gov.uk(c) 2013 Dstl UNCLASSIFIED / FOR PUBLIC RELEASE
  • Communicating requirements Centre for Defence Enterprise Crown Copyright www.science.mod.uk/enterprise cde@dstl.gov.uk (c) 2013 Dstl UNCLASSIFIED / FOR PUBLIC RELEASE
  • Online submission
  • Assessment
  • CDE advantages• Accessible• Rapid assessment• Benevolent IP arrangements• 100% funding• Easy contracting• Quick paying Centre for Defence Enterprise Crown Copyright www.science.mod.uk/enterprise cde@dstl.gov.uk (c) 2013 Dstl UNCLASSIFIED / FOR PUBLIC RELEASE
  • Proposals received4099
  • Proposals funded17%
  • Contracts awarded£35M
  • Two routes to funding
  • Defence Open Call
  • Enduring challenges Centre for Defence Enterprise Crown Copyright www.science.mod.uk/enterprise cde@dstl.gov.uk (c) 2013 Dstl © Crown Copyright© Crown Copyright MOD 2011 UNCLASSIFIED / FOR PUBLIC RELEASE
  • Seeking the exceptional
  • Enabling technologies
  • High risk – high benefit Centre for Defence EnterpriseCrown Copyright www.science.mod.uk/enterprise cde@dstl.gov.uk(c) Crown Copyright Dstl 2011 2013 Dstl UNCLASSIFIED / FOR PUBLIC RELEASE
  • CDE funds proof Centre for Defence EnterpriseCrown Copyright www.science.mod.uk/enterprise cde@dstl.gov.uk(c) 2013 Dstl UNCLASSIFIED / FOR PUBLIC RELEASE
  • Micro generators
  • Novel fibres for CBR protection
  • CDE Marketplace
  • CDE Marketplace
  • Centre for Defence Enterprise 01235 438445 cde@dstl.gov.uk www.science.mod.uk/enterprise Centre for Defence Enterprise Crown Copyright www.science.mod.uk/enterprise cde@dstl.gov.uk (c) 2013 Dstl UNCLASSIFIED / FOR PUBLIC RELEASE
  • CDE themed callsStrengthening maritime security Call launch Today Summary Webinar 5 FebSignal processing for low SWaP Webinar 5 Feb 2013Smart nano-scale materials/structures Call launch 21 Feb 2013Countering terrorist networks Call launch 19 Mar 2013Register and further details at www.science.mod.uk under ‘Events and Calls’ Centre for Defence Enterprise Crown Copyright www.science.mod.uk/enterprise cde@dstl.gov.uk (c) 2013 Dstl UNCLASSIFIED / FOR PUBLIC RELEASE
  • Agenda10:00 Introduction to CDE10:25 Maritime security problems & challenges11:00 Technical Q&A11:10 BREAK Previous CDE activity case study on11:40 maritime security12:00 Perspective from horizon scanning12:20 Technical challenges summary12:40 CDE proposal guidance + general Q&A13:00 LUNCH14:00 One-to-one meetings
  • Strengthening the Security ofMaritime OperationsProblems & Challenges
  • The UK is an island nation• 9 out of 10 items bought or made by the UK arrives or leaves by sea.• 1.5 Million tonnes of maritime freight is dealt with every day at UK seaports.• ≈800,000 cubic metres of liquefied natural gas is delivered at Milford Haven each week. – Bespoke gas tankers pass through 4 of the 10 “Choke Points” on the world’s oceans: Straits of Hormuz, Bab-el-Mendeb, Suez, Gibraltar• Substantial Royal Navy presence is stationed East of Suez, and elsewhere to keep the sea lanes open. Sourced from RnNwebsite Dstl is part of the © Dstl 2013 For Public Release Ministry of Defence
  • Maritime Security (& Constabulary) Operations• During peace time RN vessels conduct a wide variety of operations including defence (short of war) and security (including Constabulary) – RN vessels are rarely utilised for the primary purpose for which they are procured – namely warfighting. – RN vessels are not designed to undertake their most frequent roles. Dstl is part of the © Dstl 2013 For Public Release Ministry of Defence
  • Scope of this call• Three challenges have been identified which would significantly aid the Royal Navy in the conduct of maritime security operations: 1. Improving determination of unlawful activity at sea 2. Improving the response to hostile activity at sea 3. Improving small arms accuracy at sea. Sourced from Wikipedia Dstl is part of the © Dstl 2013 For Public Release Ministry of Defence
  • Challenge 1Improving determination of unlawful activity at sea Dstl is part of the © Dstl 2013 For Public Release Ministry of Defence
  • What is the problem?• RN vessels are tasked with interdicting vessels that are involved in illegal activities – such as piracy, transportation of weapons or terrorist activities.• But vessels employed in illegal activities can look exactly the same as those employed in legal activities Commercial Dhow Pirate Dhow Dstl is part of the © Dstl 2013 For Public Release Ministry of Defence
  • Current approach & issues• Currently RN crew are required to board suspicious looking craft and conduct a search for illegal cargo, or evidence of illegal activities – boarding is usually achieved using the ship’s RHIB• Boarding a vessel at sea carries risk: – the target crew may be armed – there is often a language barrier – there is the potential for mis- understandings• In short, boarding can be dangerous!• Plus, current approach is time consuming Dstl is part of the © Dstl 2013 For Public Release Ministry of Defence
  • I have come from the What might help! local fishing village I can’t under- stand what you• A mind-reading device are saying (or a lie detector)• A Babel Fish• X-ray spectacles• Note, these are intended to be suggestions to stimulate ideas rather than be realistic MOD requirements!• Technologies are needed that can lead to: • highlighting those targets of greatest interest • reducing the numbers of boardings necessary • reducing the risk to RN/RM crew Dstl is part of the © Dstl 2013 For Public Release Ministry of Defence
  • Challenge 2Improving the response to hostile activity at sea Dstl is part of the© Dstl 2013 For Public Release Ministry of Defence
  • What is the problem?• All RN crew have the right to use lethal effectors in self-defence• In Maritime Security Operations use of lethal effectors is an act of last resort• Aspiration for a graduated and proportional response, because: – the targets are not military – they look civilian and legal – they probably are civilian and legal• Two distinctive cases: – Exclusion Zone keeping small craft away from an RN ship, or an area of interest – Interdiction ensuring small & large craft have slowed down, or come to a complete stop so that a boarding can take place Dstl is part of the © Dstl 2013 For Public Release Ministry of Defence
  • Exclusion zone• Keeping unknown craft away from the ship – level of response varying according to distance from the ship – enable establishment of intent – provide time for decision making Area Denial Non-Lethal Force Robust Warning Dstl is part of the © Dstl 2013 For Public Release Ministry of Defence
  • Interdiction• Need to stop or slow down a craft so that it can be boarded or investigated• Effect is required to be non-lethal and non-destructive• But, effect should be graduated and proportional in response to the suspect craft and their crew – Priority is non-damaging response – If the craft is damaged you are responsible for its safe return to port Dstl is part of the © Dstl 2013 For Public Release Ministry of Defence
  • What might help!• Repellent force fields (or other non-lethal effectors)• A weather-control device Green – must be OK• Pinpointed warnings to approach• Note, these are intended to be suggestions to stimulate ideas rather than be realistic MOD requirements!• Technologies are needed that can lead to: • stopping the craft • stopping the craft from getting too close • providing a clear warning • increasing time for decision making Dstl is part of the © Dstl 2013 For Public Release Ministry of Defence
  • Challenge 3 Improving small arms accuracy at sea Dstl is part of the© Dstl 2013 For Public Release Ministry of Defence
  • Mk44 7.62mm Mini-Gun What is the problem?• Primary weapon for Force Protection in Maritime Security Operations are small arms – manually operated – cheap and easy to stow away L7A2 7.62mm GPMG• How can we increase their performance? – ensure small arms operators are well trained and competent – make the weapons easier to fire accurately – increase the lethal effect Dstl is part of the © Dstl 2013 For Public Release Ministry of Defence
  • Issues with training• Guns are dangerous!• Live fire training can be arranged but is not straight forward• Non-live fire is easier to arrange but is not always representative • For training to be useful you need to measure performance • Current approach, hits can only be counted when the craft is brought ashore Dstl is part of the © Dstl 2013 For Public Release Ministry of Defence
  • What might help!• An automatic hit counter• Augmented reality• Remote targeting system• Technologies are needed that can lead to: • prioritising training when and where it is needed • improving marksmanship • increasing the safety of RN/RM crew Dstl is part of the © Dstl 2013 For Public Release Ministry of Defence
  • Proposals are invited that can demonstrate a proof-of-concept to meet one or more of the challenges Dstl is part of the© Dstl 2013 For Public Release Ministry of Defence
  • Agenda10:00 Introduction to CDE10:25 Maritime security problems & challenges11:00 Technical Q&A11:10 BREAK Previous CDE activity case study on11:40 maritime security12:00 Perspective from horizon scanning12:20 Technical challenges summary12:40 CDE proposal guidance + general Q&A13:00 LUNCH14:00 One-to-one meetings
  • Agenda10:00 Introduction to CDE10:25 Maritime security problems & challenges11:00 Technical Q&A11:10 BREAK Previous CDE activity case study on11:40 maritime security12:00 Perspective from horizon scanning12:20 Technical challenges summary12:40 CDE proposal guidance + general Q&A13:00 LUNCH14:00 One-to-one meetings
  • A perspective from horizon scanning© Crown Copyright 2013. Published with the permission of the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory on behalf of the Controller of HMSO. Dstl publication reference: DSTL/PUB69923.
  • Techniques for information access• In searching, we describe what is (likely to be) interesting before we retrieve it.• In scanning, we realise what’s interesting after we’ve retrieved it. Dstl is part of the UNCLASSIFIED Ministry of Defence © Crown Copyright Dstl 2013
  • A RADAR analogy time Dstl is part of the UNCLASSIFIED Ministry of Defence© Crown Copyright Dstl 2013
  • Searching for excitementLook for developments described as, eg…  revolutionary  ground-breaking  unprecedented  paves the way  world’s first  closer to reality  first time  orders of magnitude  …  paradigm  previously impossible Dstl is part of the UNCLASSIFIED Ministry of Defence © Crown Copyright Dstl 2013
  • MARITIME SECURITY Surveillance, dete Psychological ction and (determining tracking intent) Distraction, mis- Sensing Robotics Sensors information, illusion Aerial Psychology Biometrics Biometrics vehicles Marking or tagging Preventing individuals and access vessels Materials Robotics NLW Robotics Physical Modelling Materials barriers Defence Training Automatic Improved Cost Weapons control learning efficiency Escape Dstl is part of the UNCLASSIFIED Ministry of Defence© Crown Copyright Dstl 2013
  • Novel propulsion ContraPel • a propeller system that works above the waterline • said to carry out “...all the functions of both propellers and water-jets with none of the drawbacks of either” (credit: Hk kng, Wikipedia)CycloGyro• vertical takeoff and landing• nearly unrestricted manoeuvrability• no rotating items outside the airframe• small outside dimension• very low noise level compared with helicopters• potentially low fuel consumption in gliding flight• ability to reverse thrust for landing on moving platforms (credit: Seg9585, Wikipedia) (adapted from http://d-dalus.com/en/home.html) Please note: the appearance of this technology in no way constitutes an Dstl is part of the UNCLASSIFIED endorsement by Dstl or MOD. The original Ministry of Defence © Crown Copyright Dstl 2013 authors’ claims for the efficacy of their developments are taken at face value.
  • Technology for marking/tracking• In 2009, RFID micro-transponders were glued to live ants in order to study their behaviour (Bristol University).• Hitachi produce an RFID chip that is just 0.05mm2• But range is limited by antenna size... (credit: Lightwarrior2, WikiPedia) • ...University of Illinois and US company ChamTech Operations have each developed nanoparticle mixes that can be sprayed on to vertical objects to act as antennae. • The approach extended the readable range of an RFID tag from 1.5 to 200m Please note: the appearance of this technology in no way constitutes an Dstl is part of the UNCLASSIFIED endorsement by Dstl or MOD. The original Ministry of Defence © Crown Copyright Dstl 2013 authors’ claims for the efficacy of their developments are taken at face value.
  • Determining intent• US Navy said to be testing a UAV helicopter with a new 3D sensor package to identify pirate vessels ‘hiding’ among (credit: Thomas Kretzer, DronePedia) other shipping.• But could a simpler Pilot View - video UAV also play a role? transmitters to stream images to a PC or smart – Pilot View and/or phone – Microphone and Tx – Speech-to-speech translation Microphone and FM Tx Range: up to 500 metres – Remote biometrics Output : >60mW – On-chip imaging RADAR,... Please note: the appearance of this technology in no way constitutes an Dstl is part of the UNCLASSIFIED endorsement by Dstl or MOD. The original Ministry of Defence © Crown Copyright Dstl 2013 authors’ claims for the efficacy of their developments are taken at face value.
  • • Bullet Flight App Training (credit: – Inputs hardware profile and weather data Editor182, – provides highly detailed fire control solutions WikiPedia) out to 3000m – $29.99 • US Advanced Distributive Learning Initiative (ADL) • Augmented/mixed reality – US/ONR uses multiple sensors to determine a trainees viewpoint, while virtual equipment and effects are inserted into the real-world view through glasses, goggles or a visor. – AR-based training uses real physical(credit: Antonio Zugaldia, (credit: Giovanni Vincenti,WikiPedia) devices so the trainee develops WikiPedia) sensorimotor skills. Please note: the appearance of this technology in no way constitutes an Dstl is part of the UNCLASSIFIED endorsement by Dstl or MOD. The original Ministry of Defence © Crown Copyright Dstl 2013 authors’ claims for the efficacy of their developments are taken at face value.
  • Technologies for illusion • As a wild card, what are the long-term possibilities for stand-off techniques that are capable of creating illusion, deception and disorientation in a potential attacker? – Optical. A number of technical developments project images into free space. Some require a scattering medium such as fine water mist or smoke to provide the ‘screen’, others attempt to operate without. – ‘Direct retinal writing’, is already incorporated into some advanced head (credit: WikiMedia.org) up displays. – Acoustic. Low-frequency beams can be achieved using non-linear parametric transmission (e.g. ‘Audio Spotlight’). – Pressure. Touchable holograms have been demonstrated along with effects created by high pressure vortices.(credit: OpenVoxel.org) – Projected augmented reality? Please note: the appearance of this technology in no way constitutes an Dstl is part of the UNCLASSIFIED endorsement by Dstl or MOD. The original Ministry of Defence © Crown Copyright Dstl 2013 authors’ claims for the efficacy of their developments are taken at face value.
  • So what?!• We hope that this short description of just a few emerging technologies hints at the very wide range of approaches that might be taken towards improving maritime safety.• In some situations, existing methods are struggling to deliver the required performance.• Truly innovative ideas are welcomed within this CDE process. Dstl is part of the UNCLASSIFIED Ministry of Defence © Crown Copyright Dstl 2013
  • Agenda10:00 Introduction to CDE10:25 Maritime security problems & challenges11:00 Technical Q&A11:10 BREAK Previous CDE activity case study on11:40 maritime security12:00 Perspective from horizon scanning12:20 Technical challenges summary12:40 CDE proposal guidance + general Q&A13:00 LUNCH14:00 One-to-one meetings
  • Strengthening the Security ofMaritime OperationsExamples, demonstrations andwhat we are looking for in a winningproposal
  • What are we looking for?• We do want to fund – De-risking of critical technologies or components – System or sub-system testing in a simplified scenario – System or sub-system testing in a maritime environment – Adaptation of a mature technology to a maritime environment or a new role• We do NOT want to fund – Generation of a paper study – Development of a computer simulation – Solutions that are likely to be unaffordable – Work that is not challenging Dstl is part of the © Dstl 2013 For Public Release Ministry of Defence
  • Challenge 1 – Improving determination of unlawful activity at sea• We want proposals for breakthroughs in the way that unlawful activity can be detected• This could include detecting weapons and illegal cargo that may be concealed• We do want – Proposals that can be deployed at range from the RN ship – Proposals that can be deployed from or away from the ship – Exploitation of technologies from other areas• We do not want – Proposals that cause unintentional harm to the crew of the suspect craft – Proposals that cause unintentional damage the suspect craft Dstl is part of the © Dstl 2013 For Public Release Ministry of Defence
  • Challenge 1 – Improving determination of unlawful activity at sea• Solutions to this challenge would mean – the RN could target its interdictions more discriminatively – lower risk to the safety of the ship’s crew – lower risk to the safety of the crew of the suspect craft Dstl is part of the © Dstl 2013 For Public Release Ministry of Defence
  • Challenge 2 – Improving the response to hostile activity at sea • Case 1: Exclusion Zone. • Case 2: Interdiction.• We want proposals for new technology that can provide a graduated response to a suspect craft and their crew• We do want – Proposals that can be deployed at range from the RN ship – Proposals that can be deployed from or away from the ship – Exploitation of technologies from other areas• We do not want – Proposals that cause disproportional harm to the crew of the suspect craft – Proposals that cause disproportional damage to the suspect craft Dstl is part of the © Dstl 2013 For Public Release Ministry of Defence
  • Challenge 2 – Improving the response to hostile activity at sea• Case 1: Exclusion Zone.• Case 2: Interdiction.• Solutions to this challenge would mean – the RN could keep a suspect craft at an effective exclusion range from the ship – suspect craft could be handled appropriately – lower risk to the safety of the ship and crew and other craft Dstl is part of the © Dstl 2013 For Public Release Ministry of Defence
  • Challenge 3 – Improving small arms accuracy at sea • Case 1: Training Aids • Case 2: Weapon Aids• We want proposals for new tools that enable operators to improve accuracy at sea• This could include training aids or methods of providing feedback on marksmanship accuracy• We do want – Proposals that can be employed at sea – Proposals that enhance live fire and non-live training – Exploitation of technologies from other areas• We do not want – Proposals that would replace the current small arms – Proposals that provide computer based training only Dstl is part of the © Dstl 2013 For Public Release Ministry of Defence
  • Challenge 3 – Improving small arms accuracy at sea• Case 1: Training Aids.• Case 2: Weapon Aids.• Solutions to this challenge would mean – the RN would have feedback on how well the small arms operators were able to engage the boat threat – skilled performance and accuracy would be improved Dstl is part of the © Dstl 2013 For Public Release Ministry of Defence
  • Proposals are invited that can demonstrate a proof-of-concept to meet one or more of the challenges Dstl is part of the© Dstl 2013 For Public Release Ministry of Defence
  • Call for proposals• Proposals are invited from all parts of industry and academia• Proposals should focus on proof-of-concept• No cap on value of proposals but expect to fund proposals that offer innovation in both the solution and the programme of work• The proposed programme of work should affordably demonstrate, or sufficiently prove, de-risking of your solution Dstl is part of the © Dstl 2013 For Public Release Ministry of Defence
  • Support• MOD Technical Partner will be assigned to each project to provide Subject Matter Expertise Interface with the defence and security community GFX to support development and demonstration activity• GFX could include Provision of target craft Access to small arms and mounts Assistance in the running of trials on land and at sea• GFX should be appropriate and clearly stated in the proposal together with an option if it is not available Dstl is part of the © Dstl 2013 For Public Release Ministry of Defence
  • Outputs• Seeking proposals that:• Offer The Royal Navy the greatest advantage in Maritime Security Operations• Offer You the opportunity to develop an understanding of the maritime problem, and new skills and knowledge that can be re-used inside and outside maritime• Solutions could cross the military and civilian divide and could have application to non-military security operations in UK waters• Exploitation of successful proposals will be actively supported Dstl is part of the © Dstl 2013 For Public Release Ministry of Defence
  • Agenda10:00 Introduction to CDE10:25 Maritime security problems & challenges11:00 Technical Q&A11:10 BREAK Previous CDE activity case study on11:40 maritime security12:00 Perspective from horizon scanning12:20 Technical challenges summary12:40 CDE proposal guidance + general Q&A13:00 LUNCH14:00 One-to-one meetings
  • Centre for Defence EnterpriseSubmitting a Successful Proposal Centre for Defence Enterprise www.science.mod.uk/enterprise cde@dstl.gov.uk UNCLASSIFIED / FOR PUBLIC RELEASE Crown Copyright (c) 2012
  • Maximising your chances
  • Know what is available Centre for Defence Enterprise www.science.mod.uk/enterprise cde@dstl.gov.uk Dstl is part of the Ministry of Defence UNCLASSIFIED / For Public Release Crown Copyright Dstl 2012
  • Know what is available Centre for Defence Enterprise www.science.mod.uk/enterprise cde@dstl.gov.uk Dstl is part of the Ministry of Defence UNCLASSIFIED / For Public Release Crown Copyright Dstl 2012
  • Know what is availableRead availableinformationIncluding CDEmanualsEspecially Quick StartGuide Centre for Defence Enterprise www.science.mod.uk/enterprise cde@dstl.gov.uk Dstl is part of the Ministry of Defence UNCLASSIFIED / For Public Release Crown Copyright Dstl 2012
  • Developing a CDE proposal Centre for Defence Enterprise www.science.mod.uk/enterprise cde@dstl.gov.uk Dstl is part of the Ministry of Defence UNCLASSIFIED / For Public Release Crown Copyright Dstl 2012
  • Value from technologyInnovative Futureconcept capability PoC Incremental development Dstl is part of the Ministry of Defence
  • Assessmentmins
  • Proposal health check Centre for Defence Enterprisewww.science.mod.uk/enterprise cde@dstl.gov.uk UNCLASSIFIED / FOR PUBLIC RELEASE Crown Copyright (c) 2012
  • Claim of future benefit
  • Contribution to future benefit
  • Logical programme of work
  • Generation of evidence
  • Demonstration of progress
  • Health checkBased on a claim of future benefitContribution to realisation of future benefitLogical programme of workEvidential outcomesDemonstration of progress towards goal Centre for Defence Enterprise www.science.mod.uk/enterprise cde@dstl.gov.uk UNCLASSIFIED / FOR PUBLIC RELEASE Crown Copyright (c) 2012
  • The essentials
  • Government furnished X Centre for Defence Enterprise www.science.mod.uk/enterprise cde@dstl.gov.uk Dstl is part of the Ministry of Defence UNCLASSIFIED / For Public Release Crown Copyright Dstl 2012
  • Ethics
  • Unclassified
  • Early birds
  • Deadline Call closes: 17:00 hrs onMonday 25 February 2013 Centre for Defence Enterprise www.science.mod.uk/enterprise cde@dstl.gov.uk Dstl is part of the Ministry of Defence UNCLASSIFIED / For Public Release Crown Copyright Dstl 2012
  • Call process queriesCentre for Defence Enterprise 01235 438445 cde@dstl.gov.uk www.science.mod.uk/enterprise Centre for Defence Enterprise www.science.mod.uk/enterprise cde@dstl.gov.uk UNCLASSIFIED / FOR PUBLIC RELEASE Crown Copyright (c) 2012
  • Call technical queriesdstlmaritimeinnovation@dstl.gov.uk Centre for Defence Enterprise www.science.mod.uk/enterprise cde@dstl.gov.uk Dstl is part of the Ministry of Defence UNCLASSIFIED / For Public Release Crown Copyright Dstl 2012
  • Further information www.science.mod.uk Events and Calls > Current calls for proposals >Strengthening the Security of Maritime OperationsWebinar – Tuesday 5 February 2013 14:30-15:30 Details on the call webpage Email craig.cook@aadktn.co.uk to join Centre for Defence Enterprise www.science.mod.uk/enterprise cde@dstl.gov.uk Dstl is part of the Ministry of Defence UNCLASSIFIED / For Public Release Crown Copyright Dstl 2012