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Tutorial 09 02_12
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Tutorial 09 02_12

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  • 1. Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologie dellInformazione ”A. Faedo” The NOSA-ITACA Integrated Software: Some Examples Author: Vincenzo Binante† email: vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.itLinks:• Mechanics of Materials and Structures Laboratory • Salome CAD/CAE Platform• Dipartimento di Costruzioni e Restauro (Unifi) • Nosa-Itaca• Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR) • Regione Toscana
  • 2. ContentsPart I:➢ Creating a geometry and mesh in the Salome CAD/CAE platform;➢ Creating an external python script, for which some variables must be assigned ( e.g., material property, thickness, loads, boundary conditions,...);➢ Generating a Nosa card ”.crd” from the python console of Salome GUI;➢ Launching the Nosa solver from the python console of Salome GUI;➢ Launching a Fortran user-program from the python console of Salome GUI; this program generates an output MED file from the ”.t19” result file.➢ Viewing the numerical results in Salome GUI; vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 2
  • 3. ContentsPart II:➢ Import a Nosa card ”.crd” into Salome GUI, where the mesh, node/element groups will be created;➢ Import an output file ”.t19” into Salome GUI to view the numerical results. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 3
  • 4. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface loadGeometry and Loads p = 100 Pa 1m 1.5 m 3m 4.5 m vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 4
  • 5. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface loadStarting up Salome:Open a terminal, then type the following command line: runSalome.The Salome GUI module will start.Step 1: Create two rectangles of sizes 4.5 x 3 m and 1.5 x 1 m From Salome GUI, select File → New to create a new study. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 5
  • 6. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load Activate the Geometry module by selecting Geometry from the SALOME pulldown menu: or by clicking on the icon vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 6
  • 7. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load Create the outer rectangle through menu New Entity → Primitives → Rectangle The Rectangle Construction dialogue box will open. Type ”pannello” in the Result Name field. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 7
  • 8. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load In the same dialogue box type 4.5 and 3 in the Height and Width fields, respectively. Then in the Orientation field options, select the plane on which the rectangle is to lie (the default options are OXY, OXY or OZX). Click Apply and Close to create the rectangle. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 8
  • 9. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load Note: If the rectangle is not to lie on one of the three main planes, select the right- hand icon (circled in red) to use either a pre-existing face as the plane or a pre- existing edge to define the unit outward normal to the plane. After clicking Apply and Close, the rectangle will be displayed in the OCC- viewer window. To change the display mode, right click on the rectangle, then in the pop-up menu select Display Mode → Shading vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 9
  • 10. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load In the same way, create the 2nd, 1.5 x 1 m rectangle and name it ”finestra”. Note: The foregoing procedure creates rectangles whose centers are coincident and located at the origin of the global system. The 2nd rectangle can be offset from the first as desired by making a translation through the menu sequence: Operations → Transformation → Translation. Step 2: Hollow out the panel by cutting Select Operations → Boolean → Cut. In the ”Cut Two Objects” dialogue that opens, accept the default (e.g., Cut_1) in the ”Result Name” field. Then, in the ”Main Object” field, select ”pannello” from the Object Browser or the OCC-viewer and in ”Tool Object” select ”finestra”. Click on Apply and Close to see the results. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 10
  • 11. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load To display only the object resulting from the cut operation, right click on Cut_1 from the Object Browser and select the ”Show Only” option from the pop-up menu. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 11
  • 12. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface loadOnce the hollow panels geometry has been created, we need to partition itinto several sub-components (such as edges, faces, and/or blocks), towhich the mesh creation algorithms and hypotheses will apply.First, we need to create 8 faces and 8 points by selecting New Entity →Basic → Point.By default, points are created by entering their coordinates. Here we insteaduse an alternate procedure: open the ”Point Construction” dialogue andselect the 2nd option: vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 12
  • 13. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface loadThis will create points by offsetting them one from the other. In the ”Pointwith reference” field, insert the left-bottom vertex of the finestra by selectingit in the OCC-viewer, then type in offset values Dx, Dy and Dz. The resultingcoordinates of the new points will be shown in the ”Result coordinates” field.Click on Apply and finally Apply and Close. The points to be created areshown in the figure below vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 13
  • 14. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface loadWe can now create 8 faces from the points defined: select New Entity →Blocks → Quadrangle Face and select the boundary vertices of a face. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 14
  • 15. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface loadNext we create a shell from the 8 faces. Open New Entity → Build →Shell, and in the pop-up dialogue, type ”pannello_forato” in the ”Name” fieldand select the 8 faces in ”Objects”. Click on Apply and Close. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 15
  • 16. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface loadNow we define the sub-components of the pannello_forato object byselecting New Entity → Explode. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 16
  • 17. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface loadLikewise, we can explode the geometry of Cut_1. The difference betweenthe objects Cut_1 and pannello_forato depends on their sub-components.Therefore, different mesh types can be generated from their geometries . Aswill been seen later, only non-structured meshes can be obtained from thegeometry of Cut_1; a structured mesh will instead be generated from thegeometry of pannello_forato . Step 4: Create a mesh from the geometry of Cut_1 Activate the mesh module from the menu or by clicking the icon A VTK-viewer window will be created: to display the geometry of Cut_1, right click on it in the Object Browser, and select ”Show”. Select Mesh → Create Mesh and the ”Create Mesh” dialogue will open. In the ”Geometry” field, type Cut_1 by selecting it from the Object Browser and accept the default mesh name Mesh_1; then select tab 1D. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 17
  • 18. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 18
  • 19. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load Then in the ”Algorithm” field, select Wire discretisation and click on the button next to the ”Hypothesis” field and select Nb. Segments - a new dialog will open where we can define the ”global” number of sub-intervals into which which any edge can be split. Thus, in the ”Name” field, type ”algo1D_globale” and in ”Number of Segments” input 10. Accept the default option (i.e. uniform distribution) for ”Type of distribution”. Select OK to exit the dialog. Now, in the ”Create Mesh” dialogue, select the tab 2D and in the ”Algorithm” field select Quadrangle (Mapping) and type in Quadrangle Parameters into the ”Hypothesis” field - a new dialog will pop up, where we select ”algo2D_globale” as the ”Name” and ”Quadrangle Preference” in the ”Type” options. Click OK to exit the dialogue. Lastly, click on Apply and Close to exit the ”Create Mesh” dialogue. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 19
  • 20. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 20
  • 21. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load Now, in the Object Browser, expand the Mesh object, then Mesh_1, where the algorithms and hypotheses used to create the Cut_1 mesh can be retrieved . The icon by the Mesh_1 object indicates that the mesh has not yet been created. Thus, right click on Mesh_1 and in the pop-up menu select Compute. This is supposed to generate the mesh of Cut_1, but as can be seen from the message, ”Mesh computation failed”, in the pop-up dialog, the mesh could not be created. As the dialogue indicates, this is due to both the shape of Face_9 of Cut_1 and the algorithm chosen. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 21
  • 22. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 22
  • 23. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load Different algorithms and hypotheses must thus be chosen to create the mesh. To do this, in the Object Browser, expand Hypotheses, right click on algo2D_globale and select Unassign in the pop-up. Likewise, expand Algorithms, right click on Quadrangle_2D and select Unassign. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 23
  • 24. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load Now, right click on Mesh_1 and select Edit Mesh/Submesh - a new dialogue will open. Select the 2D tab and choose either Netgen 2D or Triangle (Mefisto) or Netgen 1D-2D as the algorithm. These are the only viable choices for the shape of Face_9. Click on Apply and Close to exit. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 24
  • 25. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load Depending on the algorithm used to create the mesh of Cut_1, we obtain three different triangular meshes, as shown in the picture belows:1D Algorithm: algo1D_globale 1D Algorithm: algo1D_globale2D Algorithm: Mefisto 2D Algorithm: Netgen 2D 2D Algorithm: Netgen 1D-2D vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 25
  • 26. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load To obtain a quadrangular structured mesh, we must take regular shapes into account, such as the geometry of pannello_forato. To do this, first delete the triangular meshes by right clicking on them and selecting Delete. Step 5: Create a mesh from the geometry of pannello_forato As before, select Mesh → Create Mesh. Then, in the Name field, type ”Global-Mesh” and selectthe pannello_forato object in ”Geometry” . Use the prevoiusly defined algorithms (algo1D_globale and algo2D_globale) and hypotheses for the mesh construction. Right click on Global-Mesh object, then select Compute. The pop-up dialog ”Mesh computation succeed” appears, showing the mesh details. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 26
  • 27. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 27
  • 28. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load Notes: 1. As shown in the previous figure, both 1D elements (Edge) and 2D ones (Face) have been created. This is done automatically by the Salome mesh generator. More specifically, for each geometry (both 2D and 3D) the mesh generator requires algorithms and hypothesis to be applied on each of the sub-components of the geometry. Thus, for 3D geometries, algorithms are required for edges, faces and blocks. The final result is a mesh made up of beam elements for all the edges, and shell elements for the faces of each solid element, and solid elements, even though we have a mesh with only solid elements. This is due to the ”descendent connectivity” that Salome applies to mesh elements by default (apart from the standard nodal connectivity), by which each solid element is defined by its edges (arete) and faces (maille). Clearly, this is also true for each shell element, defined by its edges. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 28
  • 29. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load 2.algo1D_globale has been applied for all edges bounding the faces of pannello_forato. This implies that each segment has been split into 10 sub-segments, regardless of its length. If we wish to obtain a uniform mesh, we need to define several 1D algorithms, depending on the geometry. From the Object Browser, expand the pannello_forato object, select all the edges (24), right click on them and type in ”Show Only” - the edges of the 8 faces of pannello_forato will be displayed in the VTK-viewer We now want to split the shorter edges into 5 sub-segments. To do this, select Mesh → Create Sub-mesh and a new dialogue will open. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 29
  • 30. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 30
  • 31. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load Accept the default ”Name”, then in the ”Mesh” field type ”Global-Mesh” and in ”Geometry”, select the short edge located at the bottom left in the VTK- viewer. Select the tab ”1D” and in ”Algorithm”, select ”Wire discretisation” and select ”Nb.Segments” from ”Hypotheses”. In the following dialogue, type in ”algo1D_locale” in the ”Name” and 5 in the ”Number of Segments” fields. Click on the OK button, then Apply. Repeat the same procedure for the other shorter edges and finally click on Apply and Close. Now, right click on ”Global-Mesh” and select Compute - the new mesh of pannello_forato will display, as shown in the following picture vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 31
  • 32. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 32
  • 33. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load As can be seen in the previous figure, the mesh is rather coarse. To refine it, expand the Hypotheses object in the Object Browser, then right click on algo1D_globale and select Edit Hypothesis in the pop-up and replace 10 with 20. Likewise, edit algo1D_locale by replacing 5 with 10. Now, right click on Global-Mesh then select Compute. The resulting finer mesh is shown in the figure below. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 33
  • 34. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load As mentioned in the foregoing, once the mesh has been generated, any additional elements not required for the analysis but created by the Salome mesh generator can be removed. In this example, beam elements can be eliminated, as none are present. To this end, select Modification → Remove → Elements. To select the edge elements, in the dialog that opens click on Set Filters and then, in the next dialogue, click on the ”Add” button (see figure in next slide). In the ”Criterion” field, select ”Geometry type”, then type ”Edge” into the ”Threshold value” and select ”Mesh” in the ”Source” field. Finally, click on Apply and Close. Now, the VTK-viewer will show all the edge elements highlighted and the ”Id Elements” of the ”Remove Elements” dialogue will list the identication numbers associated with these edge elements. Click on Apply and Close to remove the beam elements. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 34
  • 35. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 35
  • 36. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load In the Object Browser, right click on ”Global-Mesh” and select ”Advanced Mesh Infos” to retrieve information about the mesh. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 36
  • 37. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load The current mesh is made up of only quadrangular linear elements (4 nodes). If quadratic elements (8 nodes) are desired, select Modification → Convert to/from quadratic, then in the popup dialogue, select ”Global-Mesh” in the ”Mesh” field and check that the option ”Convert to quadratic” is selected. Click on Apply and Close. The total number of nodes will be 5640, as can be seen in the ”Advanced Mesh Infos” window. Step 6: Renumbering nodes/elements and Reorienting Once the useless elements have been removed, the next step is to renumber the nodes and elements. This is necessary because the Nosa solver does not admit discontinuities in the numbering (analysis will not converge). Thus, select Modification → Renumbering → Nodes, then type ”Global-Mesh” in the ”Mesh” field and click on Apply and Close. The elements must be renumbered in a similar fashion. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 37
  • 38. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load Regarding element connectivity, by default, Salome uses ”descendent connectivity”, by which each element is defined by nodes/aretes/mailles (see med documentation med-2.3.6). Moreover, element connectivity is usually clockwise (blue-coloured in the VTK-viewer), hence a check for any counter-clockwise connectivity must be performed. A first check can be made by observing the colour of the elements: elements with right connectivity are light-blue coloured. In any case, to view all the information regarding an element, right click on the VTK-viewer and select Mesh Element Infos. If an element exhibits improper connectivity, it must be re-oriented. To do this, select Modification → Orientation, then choose one of the available element selection criteria. In our case, select all the elements and click on Apply and Close to reorient the elements. As shown in the Vtk-viewer, the color ofcolourents change. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 38
  • 39. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load Note: The procedures for renumbering elements and checking their connectivity are crucial to the success of a numerical analysis. Therefore, regardless of the checks made by the user, during generation of the Nosa card by the python modules, automatic checks are performed. If improper connectivity is detected, the program prompts the user to reorient the elements listed in the python console of Salome. Similar checks are conducted on node and element numbering. Step 7: Create Groups of nodes and elements Select Mesh → Create Group: to create a nodal group select ”Node” in the ”Element Type” field of the pop-up dialog, or ”Edge”, ”Face” or ”Volume” to create groups of 1D or 2D or 3D elements, respectively. It is also possible to create a group from the mesh and/or geometry by selecting the ”Standalone group” and/or ”Group on Geometry” types, respectively. Moreover, there are several filters for node/element selection. Once the nodes/elements have been selected, click on Apply and Close to create the group. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 39
  • 40. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 40
  • 41. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load Create nodal and element groups as shown in the picture below vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 41
  • 42. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load Step 8: Create a python file for assigning material property, loads,... Before proceeding, save the Salome study as Study1. Then, open the file InputStudy1.py with a text editor and assign the current study values to the variables defining the mesh data, element type, material property, thickness, boundary conditions, loads and so on. By so doing, for other studies and analyses, we can edit the values in same file and simply rename it as InputXXX.py (where XXX is the name of the current study). For the sake of convenience, most of the variables are defined according to the of the Nosa code syntax. A brief comment for each variable is provided in the file. In the current study, we aim to perform a static analysis using plane stress quadratic elements (8 nodes). The material is described by the masonry-like constitutive model. Clamped boundary conditions are applied to the bottom edge of the hollow panel and an inertial load and a surface load on the upper edge will be applied. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 42
  • 43. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load Thus, only the following variables in InputStudy1.py are to be edited :mdist = 2 nel = 1800 kmats = 1ntype = (2,) maxinc = 1 jmats = (1,)imaso = 1 miter =100 mvar = 11nmats = 1 nc = 3 npost = 1msete = 9 np = 5640 ndist_load = 2msetn = 3 nfixd = 1 idist = ((1,1),(32,2))mset = 5640 presc = ((0.,0.),) rdist = ((0.,-18000.,0.),(100.,0.))nelem = 1800 ifpre = ((1,2),) matno = (1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1)npoin = 5640 ngeom = 9 eltype_geom = (2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2)ncomgr = 9 nmaso = 9 maso = (1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1) vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 43
  • 44. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface loadprops = ((3e+9,.2,1800.,0.,0.,1e+20),)indvar = (1,2,4,11,12,14,17,31,32,34,37)nset_boundary = (incastro,)geom = ((.025,),(.025,),(.025,),(.025,),(.025,),(.025,),(.025,),(.025,),(.025))chvar = (exx,eyy,exy,sxx,syy,sxy,smises,einxx,einyy,einxy,ein_eqv)elset_maso =(all_elem,borexsup,borexinf,borinsup,borininf,borinsx,borindx,borexsx,borexdx)eset_load = (all_elem,borexsup)analysis_title = 2-D plane stress analysis of hollow panel with masonry-like materialAs already mentioned, each variable is briefly explained in the fileInputStudy1.py. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 44
  • 45. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface loadStep 9: Generate the Nosa card ”.crd” Once the problem variables have been assigned, the creation of the Nosa input file is straightforward: in the python console of Salome, type the following command line: execfile(”.../MainPreProcess.py”) specifying the full path of script files location (it is a good idea to keep all the python scripts and modules in the same directory). The script MainPreProcess.py calls several user python modules to manage the mesh and analysis data. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 45
  • 46. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load If no warning or error message is displayed, Study1.crd has been created ! vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 46
  • 47. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface loadNow, suppose that during Nosa card creation, the mesh contains someelements with clockwise connectivity. The display will show: element with wrong connectivity vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 47
  • 48. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface loadAs shown in the figure, some warnings display during creation of Study1.cr,and the user is prompted to reorient the elements listed in the pythonconsole.Note: the Salome element library contains several element types: triangularelements with 3 and 6 nodes, quadrangular elements with 4 and 8 nodesand polygonal elements with any number of nodes are available in the 2Dcase. In the 3D case, tetrahedral, hexahedral, prismatic, pyramidal andpolyhedral elements are supplied. Nevertheless, the polygonal andpolyhedral elements (useless in most structural analyses) supplied bySalome must, at least for the time being, be converted to quadrangular orhexahedral collapsed elements before the Nosa card is written. Thisconversion is done automatically by the user python modules duringexecution of MainPreProcess.py. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 48
  • 49. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface loadStep 10: Submit the analysis To run the current analysis, it is not necessary to exit Salome session. The Nosa solver can be executed directly from Salome GUI by typing the following command lines into the python console: 1. from os import system 2. system(”./nosadyn Study1”) The analysis will run in batch mode and when it has completed the system command will return an integer number. The process and the status of each iteration at each load increment can be followed by observing the terminal running Salome (runSalome). vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 49
  • 50. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 50
  • 51. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load Note: It may be necessary to have the nosadyn executable in the same directory from which Salome is launched. Also, the current version of Nosa has been modified to be launched from Salome GUI. The relevant changes concern the subroutines mnosa.f, pstres.f and setdaf.f, the last of which is no longer required.Step 11: Create the output Med file Study1.med Once the analysis has completed, the output file Study1.med is obtained via the result file Study1.t19. To create the output file, execute the Fortran user-program postMed directly from the python console of Salome GUI via the command system(”./postMed Study1 1”) where the name of the file ”.t19” and the total numer of load increments must be specified. Once the med file has been created, the terminal will show the file status. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 51
  • 52. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 52
  • 53. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface loadStep 12: Import the file Stud1.med into Salome GUI Activate the Post-Pro module of Salome by clicking on the icon , then import Study1.med by selecting File → Import → MED file, or clicking on the icon . Once the file has been loaded, the Object Browser will contain a post-pro object, which can be expanded to retrieve Study1.med. Expanding Study1.med and ”orphanMesh” displays three subnodes: Families , Groups and Fields. Groups furnishes the node and element sets created by the mesh module, while Fields contains the output variables required by InputStudy1.py. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 53
  • 54. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 54
  • 55. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface loadStep 13: Viewing the results To view the deformed shape, right click on the displacement field ”U”, then select Deformed Shape and Scalar Map. In the pop-up dialogue, select the tab Scalar Bar, then in the ”Scalar Mode” field type the 2nd component of the displacement field. Click on OK. The VTK-viewer will display a plot of the mesh, together with the deformed shape. To view only the deformed shape, go to the Object Browser, expand the ”Presentations” object, right click on ScalarDef.Shape and select ”Show Only” from the pop-up menu. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 55
  • 56. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface load vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 56
  • 57. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface loadClick on the Point Selection icon, then in the VTK-viewer, click on a node -the values of the displacement field will be evaluated along with thecoordinates of this node. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 57
  • 58. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface loadIt is possible to view only the deformed shape without the scalar map: rightclick on the field ”U” and select the Deformed Shape option, as shown in thepicture below. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 58
  • 59. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface loadTo view the contour plot of the displacement field on the undeformed shape,right click on ”U” field and select the Scalar Map option. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 59
  • 60. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface loadNow, right click on the ”U” field in the Object Browser to select the Vectorsoption. Then, in the ”Vectors” tab of the resulting dialogue, enter 100 in the”Scale factor” field and select ”Magnitude colouring”. Finally, select the 2 ndcomponent of ”U” from the ”Scalar Bar” tab and click OK. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 60
  • 61. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface loadLikewise, right click on the ”RF” field in the Object Browser and select”Vectors” to show the reaction forces, as in the figure below. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 61
  • 62. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface loadNow, to display the normal stress along the y direction as defined at theelement centroid, as shown below, right click on the ”syy” field in the ObjectBrowser and select ”Scalar Map”. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 62
  • 63. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface loadThe values at each Gauss point of each element can be viewed by rightclicking on syy and selecting the option Gauss Points. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 63
  • 64. Example 1: 2D plane stress analysis of a squared hollowpanel made of masonry-like material subjected to its ownweight and a surface loadIn addition, clicking on the button Gauss point selection displays the value ata Gauss point vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 64
  • 65. Example 2: Analysis of a barrel vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight 2m = R 4m vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 65
  • 66. Example 2: Analysis of a barrel vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight Step 1: Create the geoemtry of the barrel vault From New Entity → Basic → Point create 4 points by entering their coordinates. x y z Point 1 2 0 0 Point 2 2 4 0 Point 3 0 0 0 Point 4 0 4 0 vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 66
  • 67. Example 2: Analysis of a barrel vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight Now select New Entity → Basic → Line and create 2 lines by selecting the previously defined points: one line will be the axis of rotation of the barrel vault, the other will be the generatrix. To create the surface of revolution select New Entity → Generation → Revolution - a pop-up dialogue will open. In the”Object” and ”Axis” fields, select the generatrix and the other line (via the OCC-viewer). In the ”Angle” field, enter 180 and click on the ”Reverse” box if the orientation is clockwise, otherwise do not. Click on Apply and Close. From the Object Browser, right click on the last object, select ”Show Only” and rename it to ”volta”. Now select New Entity → Explode to obtain the free edges of the volta object. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 67
  • 68. Example 2: Analysis of a barrel vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight Step 2: Create the mesh of the barrel vault Select Mesh → Create Mesh and type ”Global-Mesh” and ”volta” into the ”Name” and ”Geometry” fields, respectively. Select the tab ”1D” and choose ”Wire discretisation” as the algorithm, and ”Nb. Segments” as the hypothesis. In the ”Hypothesis Construction” dialogue type in ”algo1D_globale” as the name, and enter 80 as the number of sub-segments into which all free edges of volta must be split. Select the tab ”2D” and choose ”Quadrangle (Mapping)” as the algorithm and ”Quadrangle Parameters” as the hypothesis. In the next dialogue imput ”algo2D_globale” in the ”Name” field and select the ”Quadrangle Preference” option. Right click on the Global-Mesh from the Object Browser and select Compute. Then remove all the beam elements (not needed for the current analysis), and renumber the nodes and elements. Lastly, check the element connectivity. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 68
  • 69. Example 2: Analysis of a barrel vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight Once these operations have been performed, the mesh of the barrel vault should be depicted as in the following figure. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 69
  • 70. Example 2: Analysis of a barrel vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight Now, create node and element sets following to the procedures described in the previous example. The results are shown in the figure below: vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 70
  • 71. Example 2: Analysis of a barrel vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight Step 3: Edit the InputStudy1.py file Edit the file ”InputStudy1.py”, as below, to modify some variables to the values for the current analysis, then rename this file to InputStudy2.py.mdist = 1 nel = 6400 kmats = 1ntype = (10,) maxinc = 1 jmats = (1,)imaso = 1 miter =100 mvar = 38nmats = 1 nc = 3 npost = 1msete = 5 np = 6561 ndist_load = 1msetn = 5 nfixd = 4 idist = ((1,1),)mset = 6561 mshel = 5 rdist = ((0.,0.,-18000.),)nelem = 6400 matno = (1,1,1,1,1)npoin = 6561 ngeom = 5 eltype_geom = (10,10,10,10,10)ncomgr = 5 nmaso = 5 maso = (1,1,1,1,1) vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 71
  • 72. Example 2: Analysis of a barrel vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weightprops = ((3e+9,.2,1800.,0.,0.,1e+20),)indvar = (1011,1012,1014,1015,1016,1021,1022,1024,1025,1026,3011,3012,3014,3015,3016,3021,3022,3024,3025,3026,5011,5012,5014,5015,5016,5021,5022,5024,5025,5026,51,52,53,54,55,56,57,58)nset_boundary = (bordo_-x,bordo_+x,arco_+y,arco_-y)geom = ((.2,),(.2,),(.2,),(.2,),(.2,))chvar = (s11_bot,s22_bot,s12_bot,s23_bot,s13_bot,ie11_bot,ie22_bot,ie12_bot,ie23_bot,ie13_bot,s11_med,s22_med,s12_med,s23_med,s13_med,ie11_med,ie22_med,ie12_med,ie23_med,ie13_med,s11_top,s22_top,s12_top,s23_top,s13_top,ie11_top,ie22_top,ie12_top,ie23_top,ie13_top,N11,N22,N12,Q23,Q13,M11,M22,M12)elset_maso = (all_elem,bordo_sx,bordo_dx,arc_fron,arc_rear)eset_load = (all_elem,)analysis_title = 2-D analysis of a barrel vault with masonry-like materialifpre = ((1,2,3,4,5,6),(1,2,3,4,5,6),(1,2),(1,2))presc = ((0.,0.,0.,0.,0.,0.),(0.,0.,0.,0.,0.,0.),(0.,0.),(0.,0.)) vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 72
  • 73. Example 2: Analysis of a barrel vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight Step 4: Run the analysis In the python console of Salome GUI, type the following command lines: ● from os import system ● system(”./nosadyn Study2”) Step 5: Create the Study2.med output file In the python console of Salome GUI type the following command line: ● system(”./postMed Study2 1”) vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 73
  • 74. Example 2: Analysis of a barrel vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight Step 6: Import Study2.med into Salome GUI and view the results The following figures show the deformed shape of the barrel vault and the stress and strain fields at the Gauss points vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 74
  • 75. Example 2: Analysis of a barrel vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 75
  • 76. Example 2: Analysis of a barrel vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 76
  • 77. Example 2: Analysis of a barrel vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 77
  • 78. Example 2: Analysis of a barrel vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 78
  • 79. Example 2: Analysis of a barrel vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 79
  • 80. Example 2: Analysis of a barrel vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 80
  • 81. Example 2: Analysis of a barrel vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 81
  • 82. Example 2: Analysis of a barrel vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 82
  • 83. Example 2: Analysis of a barrel vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 83
  • 84. Example 3: Analysis of a groin vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight 6m 3m R= 2 m 6m vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 84
  • 85. Example 3: Analysis of a groin vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight Step 1: Create the geometry of the groin vault Select New Entity → Basic → Point and create 8 points by entering the coordinates shown below. X Y Z Point 1 2 0 0 Point 2 2 6 0 Point 3 0 0 0 Point 4 0 6 0 Point 5 3 5 0 Point 6 -3 5 0 Point 7 3 3 0 Point 8 -3 3 vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 0 85
  • 86. Example 3: Analysis of a groin vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight Select New Entity → Blocks → Quadrangle Face and create 2 rectangles by entering their vertices. Face 1 Point 1,...,Point 4 Face 2 Point 5,...,Point 8 Via New Entity → Generation → Revolution create 2 half-cylinders by rotating the faces defined in the previous step around two lines: Object to be rotated Axis of rotation Angle Revolution 1 Face 1 pt3-pt4 180 Revolution 2 Face 2 pt7-pt8 180 vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 86
  • 87. Example 3: Analysis of a groin vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight Open Operations → Boolean → Cut to create the intersections of the half-cylinders. Object to be cut Cutting object Cut 1 Revolution 1 Revolution 2 Cut 2 Revolution 2 Revolution 1 Hide all objects but Cut_1 and Cut_2 in the Object Browser,. Select New Entity → Explode to obtain the faces constituting Cut_1 and Cut_2. Hide all in the Object Browser, then expand the Cut_1 and Cut_2 objects, and select the faces making up the groin vault and display them in the OCC-viewer. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 87
  • 88. Example 3: Analysis of a groin vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight Select Operations → Boolean → Fuse to create the unions (fuse) of two objects. Object 1 Object 2 Fuse 1 Face 4 Face 14 Fuse 2 Fuse 1 Face 7 Fuse 3 Fuse 2 Face 17 Hide all objects except Fuse 3 in the Object Browser: the resulting object is shown in the figure below (with the differently-coloured faces). vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 88
  • 89. Example 3: Analysis of a groin vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight Now, we must split the Fuse 3 object into 4 parts (for meshing), so we create two planes from three points, via New Entity → Basic → Plane. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 89
  • 90. Example 3: Analysis of a groin vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight Now, selecting Operations → Partition create two partitions of the Fuse 3 object by means of two planes, as shown below. Object 1 Object 2 Partition 1 Fuse 3 Plane 1 Partiton 2 Partition 1 Plane 2 vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 90
  • 91. Example 3: Analysis of a groin vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight Rename the Partition 2 object to volta_crociera. Finally, select New Entity → Explode to obtain the edges and faces constituting the volta_crociera object. The figure below displays the faces of the volta_crociera object in different colours. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 91
  • 92. Example 3: Analysis of a groin vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight Step 2: Create the mesh of the groin vault Once the mesh module has been activated, display all the edges of the volta_crociera object in the VTK-viewer. Select Mesh → Create Mesh and input ”Global-Mesh” as the name and select volta_crociera for the geometry . Select the ”1D” tab and use ”Wire discretisation” as the algorithm and ”Nb- Segments” as the hypothesis. In the next dialogue, enter ”algo1D_globale” as the name and ”40” as the number of sub-segments into which to divide all the edges . Now select the ”2D”tab and use ”Quadrangle (Mapping)” as the algorithm and ”Quadrangle Parameters” as the hypothesis. In the next dialogue, enter the name ”algo2D_globale” and select type ”Quadrangle Preference”. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 92
  • 93. Example 3: Analysis of a groin vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight Now, open Mesh → Create Sub-mesh and enter ”Global-Mesh” for the mesh and for the geometry select one of the edges which should be split according to an algorithm other than ”algo1D_globale”. Select the ”1D” tab and use ”Wire discretisation” as the algorithm and ”Nb- Segments” as the hypothesis. In the next dialogue, enter ”algo1D_locale” as the name and ”25” as the number of sub-segments into which the edge is to be split. Repeat the procedure for all edges with partitions different from ”algo1D_globale”. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 93
  • 94. Example 3: Analysis of a groin vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight The blue-coloured edges must be split according to the ”algo1D_locale” algorithm, the others according to ”algo1D_globale”. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 94
  • 95. Example 3: Analysis of a groin vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight In the Object Browser, right click on ”Global-Mesh”, then select Compute. Remove all beam elements (uneeded for the current analysis) by selecting Modification → Remove → Elements and using the available filters to select the edge elements. Then renumber nodes and elements by selecting Modification → Renumbering → Nodes/Elements. The following figure shows the mesh of the groin vault. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 95
  • 96. Example 3: Analysis of a groin vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 96
  • 97. Example 3: Analysis of a groin vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight Now, create the node and element sets via Mesh → Create Group. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 97
  • 98. Example 3: Analysis of a groin vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 98
  • 99. Example 3: Analysis of a groin vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight Step 3: Edit the InputStudy2.py file Edit the file ”InputStudy2.py” to modify some variables to the values for the current analysis, then rename this file to InputStudy3.py mdist = 1 nel = 8000 kmats = 1 ntype = (10,) maxinc = 1 jmats = (1,) imaso = 1 miter =100 mvar = 38 nmats = 1 nc = 3 npost = 1 msete = 9 np = 8261 ndist_load = 1 msetn = 9 nfixd = 5 idist = ((1,1),) mset = 8261 mshel = 5 rdist = ((0.,0.,-18000.),) nelem = 8000 matno = (1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1) npoin = 8261 ngeom = 9 eltype_geom = (10,10,10,10,10,10,10,10,10) ncomgr = 9 nmaso = 9 maso = (1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1) vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 99
  • 100. Example 3: Analysis of a groin vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weightprops = ((3e+9,.2,1800.,0.,0.,1e+20),)indvar = (1011,1012,1014,1015,1016,1021,1022,1024,1025,1026,3011,3012,3014,3015,3016,3021,3022,3024,3025,3026,5011,5012,5014,5015,5016,5021,5022,5024,5025,5026,51,52,53,54,55,56,57,58)nset_boundary = (base,arco_-x,arco_+x,arco_-y,arco_+y)geom = ((.2,),(.2,),(.2,),(.2,),(.2,),(.2,),(.2,),(.2,),(.2,))chvar = (s11_bot,s22_bot,s12_bot,s23_bot,s13_bot,ie11_bot,ie22_bot,ie12_bot,ie23_bot,ie13_bot,s11_med,s22_med,s12_med,s23_med,s13_med,ie11_med,ie22_med,ie12_med,ie23_med,ie13_med,s11_top,s22_top,s12_top,s23_top,s13_top,ie11_top,ie22_top,ie12_top,ie23_top,ie13_top,N11,N22,N12,Q23,Q13,M11,M22,M12)elset_maso = (all_elem,face1,face2,face3,face4,face5,face6,face7,face8)eset_load = (all_elem,)analysis_title = 2-D analysis of a groin vault with masonry-like materialifpre = ((1,2,3,4,5,6),(1,2),(1,2),(1,2),(1,2))presc = ((0.,0.,0.,0.,0.,0.),(0.,0.),(0.,0.),(0.,0.),(0.,0.)) vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 100
  • 101. Example 3: Analysis of a groin vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight Step 4: Run the analysis In the python console of Salome GUI type the following command lines: ● from os import system ● system(”./nosadyn Study3”) Step 5: Create the Study3.med output file In the python console of Salome GUI type the following command: ● system(”./postMed Study3 1”) vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 101
  • 102. Example 3: Analysis of a groin vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight Step 6: Import Study3.med into Salome GUI and view the results The following figures show the deformed shape of the groin vault and the stress and strain fields at the Gauss points vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 102
  • 103. Example 3: Analysis of a groin vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 103
  • 104. Example 3: Analysis of a groin vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 104
  • 105. Example 3: Analysis of a groin vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 105
  • 106. Example 3: Analysis of a groin vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 106
  • 107. Example 3: Analysis of a groin vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 107
  • 108. Example 3: Analysis of a groin vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 108
  • 109. Example 3: Analysis of a groin vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 109
  • 110. Example 3: Analysis of a groin vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 110
  • 111. Example 3: Analysis of a groin vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 111
  • 112. Example 3: Analysis of a groin vault made of masonry-likematerial subjected to its own weight The last figure shows the displacement field by selecting the option Cut Planes from those available. Note: The previous figures show results which may not seem symmetrical, depending on the node positions in the connectivity of any element (the first node in the connectivity may not be located at the bottom-left, even though the orientation is counterclockwise). In reality, this is not the case, though it represents a problem common to many software applications (e.g., MSC Mentat). Example 3 completes the first part of this tutorial. We now continue on to Part 2. vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 112
  • 113. Example 4: Importing a Nosa card *.crd into Salome GUI Importing a Nosa input file (”*.crd”) requires a python module named MeshImport.py, which reads the mesh data of the Nosa card and applies the python commands in Salome to rebuild the fem . Start a new session of Salome and type the following command lines into Salome GUI python console: ● import MeshImport ● MeshImport.importNosa(../filename.crd) where, the full path to filename.crd must to be specified. It is advisable to have the python module in the same directory where Salome GUI is executed. The following example show the results of importing the three Nosa cards murosud3.crd, ciappei.crd and rognosa.crd vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 113
  • 114. Example 4: Importing a Nosa card *.crd into Salome GUI vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 114
  • 115. Example 4: Importing a Nosa card *.crd into Salome GUI vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 115
  • 116. Example 4: Importing a Nosa card *.crd into Salome GUI vincenzo.binante@isti.cnr.it 116

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