2012 01 13_tsb schematic master plan 11x17

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  • 1. Town School for Boys2750 Jackson StreetModernization & Expansion Master PlanSchematic D iS h i Design S Supplement l01/13/2012Prepared for Town School for Boys 2750 Jac so Street 750 Jackson S ee San Francisco, CA 94115Prepared byApproved by Page 1 1/13/2012
  • 2. AcknowledgementsTown School 2011 – 2012 Board of Trustees Town School Faculty & StaffChairman Shelby Bonnie Headmaster Brewster Ely IVVice-Chairman Lynn PooleTreasurer Will bb W ll Robbins Senior Ad i i t ti Team S i Administrative T Pam Ab d th P AbendrothSecretary Victoria Prendergast Nick Cofod John A. Amster A Shelley Dorfler y Julie Ashley Nancy Doty Stephen J. Bachmann Lynn McKannay Roger Barnett Kathy N K h Nyrop Will Bartlett ’89 Rollie Miles Warner, Jr. Gretchen Berggruen Ronald B. Brown, Ph.D. Building & Grounds Committee David Schmaier Ann Penland Callan John Amster W. Brewster Ely IV ex officio Mark Kushner Jenna Feinberg Mark Miller Arina Fong Arina Fong Andrea Fuller Julie Ashley Parker Harris Roger Barnett Mark Kushner ’75 David Shimmon Christopher Lord Parker Harris Mark R Mill M k R. Miller Pen Callan Oran Muduroglu Nancy Doty ex officio R. David Schmaier Nadir Shaikh David Shimmon John Shuhda J h Sh hd Hon. Rebecca Westerfield (ret.) J Jim Zanze ‘81 Page 2 1/13/2012
  • 3. Table of ContentsChapter Contents Pages1 Project Overview/ I t d ti P j tO i / Introduction 4-8 Overview & Process Findings g Schematic Design Narrative2 Exterior Concepts p 9 – 18 Exterior Concepts Overview Perspectives Elevations3 Master Plan 19 - 244 Interior Concepts 25 - 31 Key Areas Classroom Concepts Cl C5 Project Phasing 326 Appendix pp A. Schedules B. Outline Specifications Page 3 1/13/2012
  • 4. Chapter 1. pProject Overview/ IntroductionOVERVIEWTown S h l for Boys i an independent K 8 school for boys located at 2750T School f B is i d d t K‐8 h l f b l t d tJackson St. in San Francisco. The school occupies a facility that has beenassembled from four separate structures built at different times; the earlieststructure d dates f from pre‐1958 with the l 1958 i h h latest addition b i the gymnasium ddi i being h iand cafeteria constructed in1971.Over the past dO h decade student enrollment h remained steady at d d ll has i d dapproximately 400, while teacher and staff population has increasedmaterially supporting the commitment to a richer classroom experience,enhanced program offerings and smaller class sizes. h d ff d ll lThe result is has been increased pressure on the existing facility to support theincrease in people and programs to the point where the school has explored anumber of options over the years to provide needed space relief. The currentfacility capabilities to support current, let alone enhanced curriculum offerings,necessitated focused study to achieve solutions. Page 4 1/13/2012
  • 5. Chapter 1. pProject Overview/ IntroductionPROCESSThe School’s Leadership and the Board of Trustee’s determined that a As a result of the assessments the physical Master Plan and specific l f h h h l l d ffocused, curricular programs-based Master Plan should be developed to project components have been able to be based upon underlyingenable short-term relief and guide long-term institutional advancement. g g curricular and institutional goals. These include:As part of this focused effort, MKThink was commissioned in April 2010 to • Developing a focus on project‐based learningundertake a comprehensive study comprised of several independent tracks. p y p p • Enabling a p g place for non‐traditional learners and personalities pThese tracks included academic program needs assessment, facility to thriveassessment, classroom utilization study, and an integrated planning and • Enhancing the participation of families in the schools e acquisition s a egy. W e wove oge esite acqu s o strategy. When woven together this work provides a s wo p ov des • Providing facilities that enable learning and encourage creative, g g gframework for identifying and ultimately realizing the facility needs and critical thinkingphysical environment solution options for Town School. • Incorporating green design principles with a focus on educational opportunities related to building performance and systems ‐ using the pp gp y gIn addition the following reports were made available to MKThink and building as a teaching tool.were reviewed in preparation of this work:• Jackson Street Facility Options Study, September 6, 2005. Pfau The School’s Leadership has translated these educational goals into theArchitecture following broad project goals for the Facilities Master Plan:• MEP Systems Due Diligence Study, May 15, 2007. Interface Engineering Study 15 2007• Structural Review Report, June 1, 2007. Murphy Burr Curry, Structural Project GoalsEngineers• Elevator System Assessment, June 30, 2006. Edgett Williams Consulting Assessment 30 2006 • Control Destiny at 2750 JacksonGroup • Plan for Opportunities Beyond Current• Case Study for Town School Facilities Remodeling. Date & author • Understand & Apply User Needs & Patternsunknown • Maximize Facility Opportunities• Town School for Boys – Drawing Review (Code), May 7, 2007. Rolf • Integrate Into Unified StrategyJensen & Associates, Inc.• Town School for Boys Building and Grounds Strategy and Plan – 3rdrevision. March 2008.•2750 Jackson Facility Opportunities Assessment (Preliminary). December,2009 Page 5 1/13/2012
  • 6. Chapter 1. pProject Overview/ IntroductionFINDINGSIn May 2010 a series of workshops were conducted to elicit perspective andfeedback from teachers and staff on the following topics:• The Sciences• Wellness, Food & Nutrition• Environment as a Teaching Tool g• The ArtsFrom these sess o s the following p og a o ese sessions e o ow g programmatic goa s we e es ab s ed. a c goals were established.COLLABORATION SPACE OPTIMIZATION• TSB Teachers by nature want to collaborate – facility should foster • “Found” space is low hanging fruitgrade or curriculum collaboration. • Creating or acquiring new space will always be more expensive than•SSupport collaboration with space teachers ‘own’ outside of the ll b i ih h ‘ ’ id f h other solutions th l ticlassroom • Outside space can be better utilized to support programs, downtime,• Adjacency is key to collaboration alternative learning and unstructured play • TSB f ilit can i facility incorporate t t teaching moments hi tENCOURAGE COMMUNAL SPACE USAGE WHERE POSSIBLE• Universal Classroom concept may be worth considering for certain SCHEDULING ENHANCEMENTSupper school but… • Optimizing existing space to support expanded programs will rely on• Roaming teacher model only works if everyone is roaming. It doesn’t re‐thinking how scheduling can free up space and utilize space effectively.work if a teacher must occupy another teacher s space teacher’s • Current schedule is a choice – it can be changed it if there is a will• Prototype shared space scenarios before full roll‐out • Consider alternative schedules: 6 day rotating / expanding double periods for certain classes and grades • Look at schedule blocks as a 4th dimension to spaceWELLNESS / HUMAN PERFORMANCE• Understand brain function needs and attention needs and support gyaccordingly TECHNOLOGY ENHANCEMENTS• Provide social & emotional support, especially for the outlier kid • Technologies can expand learning beyond the classroom• Unstructured downtime and unstructured play are important • Effective scheduling tools can better allow traditional and non‐traditional• Food & Nutrition awareness is important p learning spaces toachieve greater utilization g p g Page 6 1/13/2012
  • 7. Chapter 1. pProject Overview/ IntroductionDESIGN INTENT NARRATIVEThe Town School for Boys facility at 2750 Jackson Street will be modernized Specifically the improvements will include the following:and expanded to support the full academic program vision for 21st Centuryeducation. This vision informs the architectural design intent to transform the Expanded facilities to support the more broad Programmatic approach.building into an effective, exciting and appropriate tool for contemporary • 7,000 sf of new space will be added to the Core of the schoolteaching within a beautiful context. context through excavation and expansion to optimize the available building envelope.But, how can a building help serve as a teaching tool? By aligning the •10,000 sf of new space will be created below the Lower Field (andarchitectural attributes and features with the means of teaching and leaning. leaning north of the existing classrooms) classrooms).For Town School this means translating the academic vision and programs •The roof of the northeast corner will be raised to create a moreexpressed through the “9 points” and other related principles of Town’s 21st voluminous art room filled with natural light and inspired by aCentury learning program into an understanding of the types of activities and spectacular bay view. viewinteractions and requirements that support these more advanced modes ofeducation Re-organization to improve opportunities for interdisciplinary learning among related subjects subjects.The Master Plan envisions expansion and changes to support this •Renovations will enable Town to have a STEM center co-locating themodernization. The renovated campus will better support of collaboration, Science, Technology, Hands-on Experimentation and Math.project-based learning and l t l discovery among students. It will b tt j tb d l i d lateral di t d t ill better •The Library will be expanded and connected to the Literary Arts andsupport broad access to information, through extensive and rapidly evolving Language programs. A new 10,000 sf Multi-purpose center will betechnologies. It will better enable cross-disciplinary studies and better built to accommodate a full-court gym and be able to transform into aconnections t th educational opportunities beyond the school’s boundaries. ti to the d ti l t iti b d th h l’ b d i 450 seat theater theater.Ultimately the campus will achieve these goals within the fundamental mission •Music and Performing Arts will have larger and more flexible facilitiesof creating a love of learning and a celebration of boyhood. and be collocated with the new multi-purpose center. •The Upper S h l rooms will h •Th U School ill have b tt proximity and adjacencies better i it d dj i to improve informal connection. Page 7 1/13/2012
  • 8. Chapter 1. pProject Overview/ IntroductionDESIGN INTENT NARRATIVE (continued)Increased flexibility and access to technology: Change becomes a constant Improve ability to learn beyond the traditional classrooms through betteras Town School educators explore a range of methods and tools to engage connections to the City and the Natural Environment: The building may y g yand inspire Town boys. The building needs to recognize and respond to this support this core tenant of the Schools program through representational anddynamic. To do so the heavy elements of the architecture needs to ‘get out of practical methods. The architecture envelope will be more transparent andthe way’ to support education places that may be shaped and reshaped way softer offering g g greater visual connections between the exterior and interioreasily and economically. Thus many of the rooms and shared spaces will be environments. Daylight, captured views and general awareness of themodernized to provide for more flexibility in arrangements. Floor natural context will be a larger element of the interior spaces. Landscapeimpediments will be removed. Furniture will be upgraded. Ceiling heights removed upgraded e e e s will elements w be b oug into the bu d g highlighted by the ce a ‘Town- brought o e building g g ed e central owwill be increased where practical. The architectural surfaces (floors, walls and terrarium’. The roof top lab will provide an outdoor, protected opportunity toceilings) will carry increased and much more flexible technology infrastructure directly engage with environmental studies through hands-on experiences.pathways to support the flow of digital information in support of wireless. wireless Larger and better community spaces including the addition of the multi multi- purpose facility and the improvements to the existing theater and cafeteria willDirectly engage the building as be part of the education program: By provide for increased opportunities to bring more and broader educationalproviding better access to information enhancing the narrative about its information, opportunities from beyond Town to the school community. communitydesign and operations and helping create a better context for Town to exploreits mission, 2750 Jackson St may become very effective teaching tool. Atleast four themes will be explored through the new architecture: Though the design remains under development, the schematic layout of the development Master Plan indicates these opportunities are physically feasible and in line •Discover and engage with the historical context with the budget targets for the project. The design team is very excited about •Reveal how buildings systems are made and function the ability to support the programmatic vision and make these intended •Demonstrate and support interaction with the natural environment and improvements reality. Over the next few months the concept will be refined to •Inspire and support community interaction. incorporate further input from the teachers, school leadership, neighbors, City officials and technical experts The intent is by June the design will be experts. June,The devices to achieve these themes will include spatial organization, use of confirmed and the first part of the plan will be implemented in the summer oftechnology, narrative and interactive displays, design details and material 2012. The pace of implementation will be determined by financial andchoices. h i practical considerations. Even with the inevitable obstacles that present considerations themselves during the project development, the strength of the program and the clarity of the design intent will enable consistency so that each stage complements and adds to the success of the learning environment environment. Page 8 1/13/2012
  • 9. Chapter 2. pExterior ConceptsEXTERIOR BUILDING CONCEPT OVERVIEW PART C EAST WING THIRD FLOOR & FENCE PART D WEST WING FENCE PART B1 PART B2 WEST WING PART A EAST WING (JACKSON STREET) CORE (JACKSON & SCOTT STREETS) EXISTING JACKSON STREET ELEVATION Page 9 1/13/2012
  • 10. Chapter 2. p Exterior Concepts PART A VIEW LOOKING WEST STEEL ANDSUNDIAL ON WALL BAY WOOD GREEN GLASS WINDOW SLATS WALL RAILING STOREFRONT FRITTED STONE STONE GLAZING GLASS LANDSCAPING PAVING STONE GABION WOOD BOARD FORMED CONCRETE A M N WALL BENCH KEYPLAN Page 10 1/13/2012
  • 11. Chapter 2. pExterior ConceptsPART AVIEW LOOKING WEST – FUTURE FABRIC LIGHT SHELVES KEYPLAN Page 11 1/13/2012
  • 12. Chapter 2. pExterior ConceptsPART AVIEW LOOKING EAST KEYPLAN SUNDIAL ON WALL BAY WOOD WINDOW SLATS STEEL AND STOREFRONT GREEN GLASS GLAZING WALL RAILING FRITTED STONE STONE GLASS LANDSCAPING PAVING STONE BOARD FORMED GABION WOOD CONCRETE WALL BENCH Page 12 1/13/2012
  • 13. Chapter 2. pExterior ConceptsPART AVIEW LOOKING EAST – FUTURE KEYPLAN FABRIC LIGHT SHELVES Page 13 1/13/2012
  • 14. Chapter 2. p Exterior Concepts JACKSON STREET ELEVATION KEYPLAN STONE SOUTH ELEVATION (JACKSON STREET) ( ) STEEL AND GABION STOREFRONT GREEN GLASS FRITTED STONE STONESUNDIAL ON WALL BAY WOOD WALL GLAZING WALL RAILING GLASS LANDSCAPING PAVING WINDOW SLATS WOOD BENCH NC BOARD FORMED CONCRETE O O M CONC Page 14 1/13/2012
  • 15. Chapter 2. pExterior ConceptsJACKSON STREET ELEVATION – FUTURE FABRIC LIGHT KEYPLAN SHELVES Page 15 1/13/2012
  • 16. Chapter 2. p Exterior Concepts SCOTT STREET ELEVATION KEYPLAN STEEL AND WOODSTOREFRONT FRITTED GLASS SLATSGLAZING GLASS RAILING Page 16 1/13/2012
  • 17. Chapter 2. pExterior ConceptsSCOTT STREET ELEVATION – FUTURE KEYPLAN FABRIC LIGHT SHELVES Page 17 1/13/2012
  • 18. Chapter 2. pExterior ConceptsWEST ELEVATION/SECTION THROUGH MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM & LOWER ATHLETIC FIELD KEYPLAN BOARD COR-TENBAY WOOD FORMED PLANTER W/WINDOW SLATS CONCRETE WOOD BENCH Page 18 1/13/2012
  • 19. 1 NEW BUILDING ENTRY 3 NEW ROOF GARDEN 7 EXISTING GYMChapter 3. p AND PAVEMENTMaster Plan 4 NEW COURTYARD 8 NEW LANDSCAPING AT STREET 2 NEW MULTIPURPOSE ROOM AND WEST WING 5 NEW STAIR AND ELEVATORMASTER PLAN BELOW LOWER ATHLETIC CORE AND SKYLIGHTOVERVIEW FIELD 6 NEW RAISED ROOF AND SKYLIGHTS 4 3 7 6 2 8 5 8 8 1 Page 19 1/13/2012
  • 20. Chapter 3. p 2750 JACKSON STREET MASTER PLAN COMPONENTSMaster Plan 1) INTERIOR MODERNIZATIONBASEMENT PLAN 2) NEW ACADEMIC CORE 3) NEW WEST WING 4) FAÇADE EXPANSION 5) SITE WORK Page 20 1/13/2012
  • 21. Chapter 3. p 2750 JACKSON STREET MASTER PLAN COMPONENTSMaster Plan 1) INTERIOR MODERNIZATION 2) NEW ACADEMIC COREFIRST FLOOR PLAN 3) NEW WEST WING 4) FAÇADE EXPANSION 5) SITE WORK Page 21 1/13/2012
  • 22. Chapter 3. p 2750 JACKSON STREET MASTER PLAN COMPONENTSMaster Plan 1) INTERIOR MODERNIZATION 2) NEW ACADEMIC CORESECOND FLOOR PLAN 3) NEW WEST WING 4) FAÇADE EXPANSION 5) SITE WORK Page 22 1/13/2012
  • 23. Chapter 3. p 2750 JACKSON STREET MASTER PLAN COMPONENTSMaster Plan 1) INTERIOR MODERNIZATION 2) NEW ACADEMIC CORETHIRD FLOOR PLAN 3) NEW WEST WING 4) FAÇADE EXPANSION 5) SITE WORK Page 23 1/13/2012
  • 24. Chapter 3. p 2750 JACKSON STREET MASTER PLAN COMPONENTSMaster Plan 1) INTERIOR MODERNIZATION 2) NEW ACADEMIC COREROOF PLAN 3) NEW WEST WING 4) FAÇADE EXPANSION 5) SITE WORK Page 24 1/13/2012
  • 25. Chapter 4. p Interior ConceptsMAIN LOBBY CEILINGWood Linear Ceiling WALLS ENLARGED FIRST FLOOR LOBBY PLANDisplay WallsFLOORLinoleum (color tbd) Rubber Base (color tbd) VIEW OF FIRST FLOOR LOBBY Page 25 1/13/2012
  • 26. Chapter 4. p Interior ConceptsLITERARY ARTS CENTER CEILING WALLSPainted drywall ceiling (color tbd) Plank acoustical panels Direct-Indiect Pendant Fixtures SECOND FLOOR LIBRARY PLAN WALLS FIRST FLOOR LIBRARY PLAN Carpet Tile (color tbd) Rubber Base (color tbd)FURNITURE Soft informal seating g VIEW OF FIRST FLOOR LIBRARY Page 26 1/13/2012
  • 27. Chapter 4. p Interior ConceptsSTEM CEILING Exposed concrete deck and Acoustic panels glued to ceiling Direct-Indiect Pendant Fixtures Ceiling-mounted retractable mechanical systems power & water WALLS ENLARGED STEM LAB PLANFRP wainscot over painted drywall (colors tbd)FLOORPoured epoxy floor with integral base ( p y g (color tbd) ) VIEW OF STEM LAB Page 27 1/13/2012
  • 28. Chapter 4. p Interior ConceptsTYPICAL CLASSROOM CEILING SECTION @ TYPICAL CLASSROOM – PROPOSED OPTION B2 TYPICAL CLASSROOM – PROPOSED OPTION B2 REPLACE & RELOCATE EXISTING GLAZING ADD SUNSHADINGAcoustic panels glued to ceiling Direct-Indirect Pendant Fixtures WALLS/ GLAZING SECTION @ TYPICAL CLASSROOM – PROPOSED OPTION B1 TYPICAL CLASSROOM – PROPOSED OPTION B1 REPLACE EXISTING GLASS IN CURRENT LOCATION ADD FABRIC SUNSHADINGWall Wash Fixture Fabric SunshadingFLOOR Carpet Tile (color tbd) C T l ( l bd) Rubber Base (color tbd) R bb B ( l SECTION @ TYPICAL CLASSROOM – EXISTING TYPICAL CLASSROOM – EXISTING Page 28 1/13/2012
  • 29. Chapter 4. pInterior ConceptsTYPICAL CLASSROOM - EXISTING SECTION @ TYPICAL CLASSROOM – EXISTING TYPICAL CLASSROOM – EXISTING Page 29 1/13/2012
  • 30. Chapter 4. pInterior ConceptsTYPICAL CLASSROOM – PROPOSED B1 SECTION @ TYPICAL CLASSROOM – PROPOSED OPTION B1 TYPICAL CLASSROOM – PROPOSED OPTION B1 REPLACE EXISTING GLASS IN CURRENT LOCATION ADD FABRIC SUNSHADING Page 30 1/13/2012
  • 31. Chapter 4. pInterior ConceptsTYPICAL CLASSROOM – PROPOSED B2 SECTION @ TYPICAL CLASSROOM – PROPOSED OPTION B2 TYPICAL CLASSROOM – PROPOSED OPTION B2 REPLACE & RELOCATE EXISTING GLAZING ADD SUNSHADING Page 31 1/13/2012
  • 32. Chapter 5. p PREVIOUS PHASE Schematic Project PhasingEXISTING PHASE 1 PHASE 2 (PART 2A) PHASE 2 (PART 2B) PHASE 3 6/1/2012 – 8/30/2012 6/1/2013 – 8/30/2014 Within 6/1/2013-8/30/2014 Within 6-9 Yrs of Conditional Use Approval INTERIOR IMPROVEMENTS, ART ROOM CORE & EXCAVATION EXCAVATION BUILDOUT FAÇADE EXPANSION & SUNSHADING THEATER FOUNDATION, SEISMIC UPGRADES, SPRINKLER & HVAC UPGRADES IN-KIND WINDOW REPLACEMENT Page 32 1/13/2012
  • 33. Chapter 6. pAppendix APPENDIX A SCHEDULES Page 33 1/13/2012
  • 34. Chapter 6. pAppendix APPENDIX B SCHEMATIC OUTLINE SPECIFICATIONS Page 34 1/13/2012
  • 35. Town School for Boys Outline Specifications – Schematic Design Issued to FDI for Schematic Phase 1 Pricing 12-13-2011Prepared for:Town School for Boys2750 Jackson StreetSan Francisco, CA 94115Prepared by:Roundhouse One1500 Sansome StreetSan Francisco, CA 94111
  • 36. PROJECT DESCRIPTION  The new facility for Town School for Boys at 2750 Jackson Street is proposed as a “Building as a Teaching Tool.” Strategies to articulate the learning opportunities throughout the facility will include implementing cost effective, high impact solutions that will enable enriched curriculum and program opportunities for students, teachers, staff and families alike. This could include exposed & energy efficient building systems, recycled materials, optimizing daylighting, energy management systems & displays, and graphic signage. The project aims to achieve LEED Gold Certification.   The project proposes to increase the 54,540 sqft existing facility to approx 73,000 sqft, including approx 10,000 sqft of 30 feet deep excavation at the northwest corner of the site for a new Multi‐Purpose Room with a regulation sized basketball court and performance space. The construction is conceived to occur over 2 major construction phases, as described below, with temporary services and access to allow part of the student population to remain on site during Phase 2.   Construction Phases Phase 1 (Summer 2012)  Interior improvements at East Wing  Seismic improvements  Lower/ flatten foundation at existing Theater  Raise 3rd Floor Art Room Roof & add skylight  In‐kind replacement of storefront at Cafeteria (North Elevation)  Stub out to future cooling tower Phase 2 (~15 months starting summer 2013)  New Core (includes, Lobby, Library, Stairs, Elevator, Double Height south facing room, 3rd Floor PE  Spaces)  Excavation for Multi‐Purpose Room in West Wing  Temporary services to access East Wing  Sprinklers throughout building  Cooling Tower  Site Work  Rework perimeter heating in some of the south & east classrooms  Project PartsIn addition, there are 4 major project parts as follows:  Part 1:   Same as Phase 1  Part 2:   Core  Part 3A:   Cold Shell & Field  Part 3B:   Excavation Build‐out (Gym, catwalk, Control Room, Music Rooms)  Part 4:   Façade Expansion at East & West Wings along Jackson & Scott Streets  Temporary Services/Access for East Wing During Phase 2 2011_12_13_Schematic Outline Specifications for FDI Pricing.doc Page 2 of 15
  • 37. OUTLINE SPECIFICATIONS  Note: Strikethrough text indicates work not in scope (Phase 2)   1. SITE  a. Pavements‐ All designs are based on sub‐grades being of good quality.  i. Asphalt and Concrete Pavements    1. Asphalt  4” Plant mix base course with 1½” fine surface mix topping course over 6”  aggregate base.  2. Reinforced Concrete Pavement  7” to 8” Portland cement concrete slab reinforced with heavy mesh equivalent  to #4@12”over 6” aggregate base. Aggregate to match existing.  ii. Permeable Pavements  1. Concrete Unit Pavers  Uni Eco Stone 4” pavers over 2” min. No. 8 aggregate bedding course over 4”  min. #57 stone open graded base over 6” min. no. 2 stone subbase over  geotextile. Minimum gaps per manf. recs.  2. Crushed Granite  2” crushed granite over 2” min. No. 8 aggregate bedding course over 4” min.  #57 stone open graded base over 6” min. no. 2 stone subbase over geotextile  iii. Playsurface  1. 2”‐3” Recycled poured in place rubber playsurface – American Safety Surface &  Recreation or equal.     b. Barriers ‐ TBD    c. Fences, Gates and Railings  i. Fences  Match existing cyclone fence where applicable  ii. Gates  Match existing where applicable  iii. Railings (Exterior Stairs)  42” high guardrail made from 1 ½” dia. stainless t.s. posts w/ ¾” dia. horizontal rails  spaced 4” o.c. max. w/ a ½” x 3” s.s. barstock top rail.  iv. Railings (3rd Floor)  42” high perforated metal guardrail on 1 ½” dia. stainless t.s. posts w/ ½” x 3” s.s.  barstock top rail.  v. Railings (Balconies at Core)  42” high guardrail made from 1 ½”x1 ½” stainless t.s. posts w/ ¾” x 1 ½” x ipe horizontal  purlins spaced 4” o.c. max. over perforated metal panel (inside) w/ a ½” x 3” s.s.  barstock top rail.  vi. Wood Fence  36” high wood fence made from ¾” x 1 ½” horizontal battens of reclaimed ipe slats at 6”  o.c. over 1 ½” x vertical posts     d. Guards at Mechanical Equipment ‐ TBD  2011_12_13_Schematic Outline Specifications for FDI Pricing.doc Page 3 of 15
  • 38.   e. Playstructures  i. $30,000 allowance for vertical climbing play structure    f. Site Structures  i. Retaining Walls and Curbs  1. Retaining walls and curbs are to be typically cast‐in‐place concrete. Besides the  wall thickness determined by design, walls and curbs are to have additional  reinforcement at fence posts with the following minimum thickness to reduce  number and width of cracks at the posts.   2. Walls and curbs supporting chain‐link fences are to have a minimum of 5”  concrete clear at fence sleeves each side, typically providing a width of 1’‐0” for  fences 10’‐0” high or less and 1’‐4” for fences over 10’‐0”.   3. Walls supporting iron fences 6‐0” or less are to have a minimum width of 1’‐0”.   Provide ¾” expansion joints every 40’‐0” maximum, with joints within 10 feet  of corners. Expansion joint layout is to be shown on the plans. Place expansion  joints a minimum of 2’‐3” away from the fence posts.   4. Provide drainage mat and weep holes (or perforated drainpipe connected to a  stone dry well at lot line condition) behind the wall to prevent saturation of the  backfill.   5. If retaining wall is a large element of the site, provide special formliners to  provide an architectural finish.   g. Site Furnishings  i. Benches  Landscape Forms Shadowline or equal.  ii. Bollard Lights  Landscape Forms Sentinel Mitre with Light or equal.  iii. Flagpoles  Reuse and relocate existing flagpole.  iv. Bicycle Racks  Inverted U style fabricated from 1.5" I.D. (1.9" O.D.) or 2.0" I.D. (2‐3/8" O.D.) ASTM A53  Schedule 40 Steel Pipe. Spaced per manf. recs.   h. Landscaping  i. Consideration is to be given to provide Low‐Impact Design landscaping to meet the  requirements of both San Francisco Stormwater Management and LEED Silver  requirements. This may include trees, shrubs, and plants that are low maintenance, low  water, and drought resistant. Plantings that reduce or eliminate the need for permanent  irrigation should be selected. Temporary irrigation, if necessary, should be limited to up  to one year after installation.   2. Building Envelope  a. Walls  i. Cement Plaster  Applied per ASTM C 926 and ASTM C 1063. Color and texture shall match existing where  applicable. If there is a new application not near existing cement plaster, then the finish  shall be a light dash.  2011_12_13_Schematic Outline Specifications for FDI Pricing.doc Page 4 of 15
  • 39. ii. Storefront System  1. Storefront  Kawneer Trifab VersaGlaze 451T front glazed w/ thermal break. Glazing shall be  fritted, double glazed, Low‐E, High Solar Gain w/ Agron or Krypton gas filler:U =  0.41‐0.55 / SHGC = 0.41‐0.60 / VT = 0.51‐0.60  2. Sundial  Stainless steel sundial and sunpath pattern to be attached to face of storefront  iii. Concrete “Structural” ‐ TBD  iv. Concrete “Architectural”  1. Formwork shall be random rough‐sawn boards a minimum of 4” wide and a  maximum of 8” wide. Boards shall be spaced to allow a slight bulge at the joints  that would be manually removed a number of integral and surface colors are to  be used, assume a minimum of 3  2. Aggregate to be re‐used from site excavation when possible  3. S.S.D. for concrete thickness and reinforcement  4. All joints shall be shown on the elevations, minimum one per floor vertically  and 1 per 20 feet horizontally.  5. At locations where the concrete is not exposed, as in the interior, the wall  assembly (from exterior to interior) shall consist of: concrete wall, vapor  barrier, 1” xps 6” mtl. stud, R 30 batt insulation, 5/8” type x gyp. bd.  6. Stainless Steel buttons embedded in concrete at 8’ o.c. vertically, 6’ o.c.  horizontally  v. Wood  4”‐8” wide reclaimed wood siding (Terra Mai teak or approved equal) over 1x P.T.  vertical battens over 2” rigid xps over GreenGuard Rain Drop building wrap over ¾”  plywood sheathing over 6X Mtl. Studs filled w/ R30 Batt insulation w/ 5/8” type X Gyp  bd. On the interior. High Temp Butyl Flashing used at all openings, vertical battens and  corners.  vi. Stone  1. Alternate 1  Variable size rough stone wall, all material to be reclaimed from excavation of  site when possible. Stones to be contained in wire cages (gabions) and stacked  2. Variable size rough stone wall, all material to be reclaimed from excavation of  site when possible. Stone wall to be stacked with deep set mortar to give the  appearance of dry stacked stone.  3. Alternate 2  Rusticated stone blocks, all material to be reclaimed from excavation of site  when possible. Stone wall to be stacked with deep set mortar to give the  appearance of dry stacked stone.   b. Windows  i. Aluminum  Traco NX 200 Series or approved equal  ii. Shading Devices  1. Fabritec PTFE Fabric Shade Panels similar to façade at Mesa Arts Center  2. Alternate‐ Kawneer InLighten light shelf or approved equal  c. Doors  2011_12_13_Schematic Outline Specifications for FDI Pricing.doc Page 5 of 15
  • 40. i. Storefront  Kawneer 350 standard entrance or equal  ii. Steel  1. Doors: 14 gage galvanized face sheets – painted  2. Frames: 12 gage galvanized steel, reinforced – painted  3. No vision panels shall be provided for doors to mechanical and/or storage  spaces.  d. Roofs  i. Flat Roof at Roof Garden  1. For new construction, roofs are typically designed for storm water retention.  The roof is to be pitched to drain for positive roof drainage, typically 2”. For a  typical square or rectangular roof configuration, positive drainage can be  achieved by sloping the structural steel.  2. For other roof configurations, the desired slope can be achieved by sloping the  concrete. Construct crickets behind equipment using structural repair mortar.  3. Fluid applied protected membrane roofing system shall include:  a. Membrane ‐ rubberized asphalt, fully adhered to deck, minimum  thickness 215 mils,including fabric reinforcing sheet.  b. Separation/Protection sheet ‐ Reinforced rubberized asphalt,  minimum thickness 40 mils.  c. Drainage Mat  d. Insulation ‐ Extruded polystyrene. R=20, consistent with prototypical  energy modeling.  e. Filter fabric.  f. Precast pavers, 2” thick minimum to provide wind uplift resistance, of  reflectance required to meet LEED Heat‐Island Affect point.  g. Concrete deck shall be tested for moisture content prior to membrane  installation, to ensure proper adhesion.  ii. Playsurface Flat Roof (Upper Athletic Field)  1. Rubberized playsurface to match existing playsurface  2. Drainboard  3. Dexotex  iii. Equipment Screens  Industrial Louvers Model 450 XPI factory painted  iv. Skylights  1. Sun Optics pre‐engineered self supporting skylight with integral louvers on 3’‐ 6” concrete curb   e. Miscellaneous  i. Downspouts  3” dia. painted, galv.  ii. Trellises  Painted, galvanized t.s. frame with 1x4 ipe purlins.   iii. Flashing  Painted galvanized sheet metal  iv. Access ladder  v. Exterior Metal Stairs  2011_12_13_Schematic Outline Specifications for FDI Pricing.doc Page 6 of 15
  • 41. vi. Exterior Building Signage   3. Building Interiors  a. Finishes  i. Floors  1. Sealed Concrete‐ ground smooth and sealed with GS Concrete Guard  2. Poured Epoxy‐ Everlast epoxy flooring or approved equal  3. VCT‐ 1’x1’ Armstrong Excelon or approved equal $4/SF installed  4. Linoleum‐ 1’x1’ Armstrong Marmorette with Naturcoat or approved equal  $6/SF installed  5. Ceramic Tile‐ American Olean Infusion slip resistant porcelain tile or approved  equal. At shower rooms, tiles are backed using the Schluter KERDI system of  waterproofing.  6. Carpet Tile‐ InerfaceFLOR quickship pallettes or approved equal  7. Stone (Lobby)  Honed stone (species and size tbd)   8. Wood   a. Multi‐Purpose Room ‐ Connor GreenPlay flooring or approved equal  b. Stage (Multi‐Purpose Room & Theater)  Harlequin Activity with Hardwood surface or approved equal  c. Dance Studio Flooring  Harlequin Activity with Hardwood surface or approved equal    ii. Base  1. Rubber‐ Armstrong 4” rubber base or approved equal  2. Wood‐ 4” painted wood base or approved equal  3. Tile‐ American Olean porcelain tile or approved equal  4. Integral Poured Epoxy‐ Everlast epoxy flooring or approved equal    iii. Walls  1. Painted Gyp. Bd.‐ Smooth Eggshell Finish   a. light colored paint: 1 primer coat + 1 top coat w/ eggshell finish  b. dark colored paint: 1 primer coat + 2 top coats w/ eggshell finish  c. high use areas (ex: cafeteria): 1 primer coat + 2 top coats w/ semigloss  finish  2. Tile  American Olean Infusion porcelain tile or approved equal. At shower rooms,  tiles are backed using the Schluter KERDI system of waterproofing.  3. FRP (Labs 258 & 261)  7’‐0” FRP wainscot  4. Acoustic Panels (Music Room)  JCW Reflecta 60 STC wall panel or approved equal    iv. Ceilings  1. ACT‐1  Armstrong School Zone Fine Fissured w/ 2x2 lay‐in frame  2. ACT‐2  Armstrong Optima Vector Plank  2011_12_13_Schematic Outline Specifications for FDI Pricing.doc Page 7 of 15
  • 42. 3. Open ceiling  Armstrong #746 Fine Fissured 1x1 panel glued to underside of ceiling 60%  ceiling coverage minimum  4. Gypsum Board  ½” gyp. bd. under ¾” hat channels spaced 2’‐0” o.c. under 21/2” x 20GA cross  beams either connected directly to the ceiling or hung similar to an ACT ceiling  system.   5. Wood  Armstrong WoodWorks Linear Ceiling or approved equal  6. Special Acoustic 1 (Multi‐Purpose Room)  JCW Gym Panel or approved equal to infill all area at ceiling between structure  7. Special Acoustic 2 (Music Classrooms)  JCW fabric wrapped 75mm Techmel panel    b. Partition Construction  i. Typical Classroom  1 layer 5/8” type x gyp. bd. / 3 5/8” x 20GA mtl. studs spaced 16” o.c. / acoustic batt  insulation / 1 layer 5/8” type x gyp. bd. To be built w/ slip tracks and bracing, S.S.D.  ii. Typical Sound Isolation  1 layer 5/8” type x gyp. bd. resilient channels spaced 2’‐0” o.c. / 3 5/8” x 20GA mtl. studs  spaced 8” o.c. staggered every 16” o.c./ acoustic batt insulation / 2 layers 5/8” type x  gyp. bd. To be built w/ slip tracks and bracing, S.S.D.  iii. Chase  5/8” type x gyp. bd. / 3 5/8” x 20GA mtl. stud spaced 16” o.c. / acoustic batt insulation /  required air space, varies / 3 5/8” x 20GA mtl. stud spaced 16” o.c.  / 5/8” type x gyp. bd.  To be built w/ slip tracks and bracing, S.S.D.  iv. Shaft  1” gypsum liner panels / USG Shaftwall C‐H stud (size varies depending on requirements,  assume 4”) / R12 batt insulation / 2 layers 5/8” type x gyp. bd. (assume 2 hour rated) To  be built w/ slip tracks and bracing, S.S.D.  v. Fire Rated  All walls will at least meet minimum requirements set forth in GA Fire Resistance  Manual GA‐600‐2009   c. Interior Doors, Frames, & Hardware  i. Typical Classroom  1. Doors shall be constructed of structural composite lumber core, 1‐3/4” thick 5‐ ply construction. A vision panel shall be provided w/ a minimum of 7 s.f. Doors  and frames to meet all required fire rating.  2. Frames shall be 12 gage galvanized steel, reinforced – painted.  3. Hardware shall consist but are not limited to the following items:  a. LCN 4041 Door Closer or approved equal  b. Sargent TZONE (11 Line) cylinder lockset , classroom (F84) or approved  equal  c. Minimum 3 Hager AB920 hinges  d. Hager 327F or 327W floor or wall stop and holder  e. Hager 756S Astragal  f. 10” s.s. door kick  2011_12_13_Schematic Outline Specifications for FDI Pricing.doc Page 8 of 15
  • 43. g. Hager saddle threshold per floor transition requirements ii. Typical Office  1. Doors shall be constructed of structural composite lumber core, 1‐3/4” thick 5‐ ply construction. Doors and frames to meet all required fire rating.  2. Frames shall be 12 gage galvanized steel, reinforced – painted.  3. Hardware shall consist but are not limited to the following items:  a. LCN 4041 Door Closer or approved equal  b. Sargent TZONE (11 Line) cylinder lockset , office (F81) or approved  equal  c. Minimum 3 Hager AB920 hinges  d. Hager 327F or 327W floor or wall stop and holder  e. Hager 756S Astragal  f. 10” s.s. door kick  g. Hager saddle threshold per floor transition requirements iii. Typical Storage and Utility  1. Doors shall be constructed of structural composite lumber core, 1‐3/4” thick 5‐ ply construction. Doors and frames to meet all required fire rating.  2. Frames shall be 12 gage galvanized steel, reinforced – painted.  3. Hardware shall consist but are not limited to the following items:  a. LCN 4041 Door Closer or approved equal  b. Sargent TZONE (11 Line) cylinder lockset , storage (F86) or approved  equal   c. Minimum 3 Hager AB920 hinges each door  d. 2 Hager 327F or 327W floor or wall stop and holder  e. 10” s.s. door kick  f. Hager saddle threshold per floor transition requirements  g. Hager 756S Astragal  h. louvers as required, S.M.D. iv. Typical Corridor (double door)  1. Doors shall be constructed of structural composite lumber core, 1‐3/4” thick 5‐ ply construction. Doors and frames to meet all required fire rating.  2. Frames shall be 12 gage galvanized steel, reinforced – painted.  3. Hardware shall consist but are not limited to the following items:  a. 2 LCN 4041 door closers or approved equal  b. 2 Hager 4500 Series panic bars  c. Minimum 3 Hager AB920 hinges  d. Sargent 1560 Magnetic door holder w/ fail safe mechanism tied to fire  alarm  e. 2 10” s.s. door kicks  f. Hager saddle threshold per floor transition requirements  g. Fire Door Coordinator v. Typical Public (double door)  1. Doors shall be constructed of structural composite lumber core, 1‐3/4” thick 5‐ ply construction. Doors and frames to meet all required fire rating.  2. Frames shall be 12 gage galvanized steel, reinforced – painted.  3. Hardware shall consist but are not limited to the following items:  a. 2 LCN 4041 door closers or approved equal  b. 2 Hager 4500 Series panic bars  2011_12_13_Schematic Outline Specifications for FDI Pricing.doc Page 9 of 15
  • 44. c. Minimum 3 Hager AB920 hinges each door  d. 2 Hager 327F or 327W floor or wall stop and holder  e. 2 10” s.s. door kicks  f. Hager saddle threshold per floor transition requirements  g. Fire Door Coordinator  vi. Acoustical Doors (Between Theater & Cafeteria)  1. Acoustical Surfaces, Inc. – Studio 3D Noise S.T.O.P. Soundproof Interior Doors   (STC 56)  vii. Sliding Partition Door  1. Alternate 1  a. Doors shall be constructed of structural composite lumber core, 1‐ 3/4” thick 5‐ply construction.   b. track shall be Niko #27.000 w/ wall support brackets  c. door hangers shall be Niko R92 triple wheel hanger  d. White board surfacing shall be fixed to it where applicable.  2. Alternate 2  a. Skyfold Classic NR Sliding Walls  viii. Garage Door  1. Alternate 1  Skyfold Mirage Glass Garage Door    2. Alternate 2  2‐1/8” Aluminum frame glass garage door with tempered glass lites   d. Interior Windows  i. Steel Windows ‐ Fixed  Windows to be painted hollow metal to match door frames w/ ¼” glazing. Tempered  and fire glazing where required.  ii. Steel Windows ‐ Sliding  Windows to be painted hollow metal to match door frames w/ ¼” glazing. Tempered  and fire glazing where required.  iii. Interior Light Shelf (Art Room)  1. Aluminum ‐ ASTM B 211 and or 209, alloys 3003and 6063‐T5 or 6063‐T6 for   extrusions.  2. Fasteners ‐ All fasteners to be non‐corrosive and compatible with the above   aluminum and or stainless steel materials. All necessary fasteners to be   supplied by the manufacturer.  3. Extruded 2 ½” deep extruded aluminum channel frame with mitered corners.  Center support tube to be 2 ½” X 2 ½” extruded tube.  4. Minimum .080” thick top and bottom aluminum sheet fastened to the extruded  aluminum channel frame.  e. Casework  i. Construction   1. All casework construction shall conform with section 14 of the Woodwork  Institute Manual of Millwork  2. All cabinet doors shall be Type I flush  3. All cabinet doors shall have stainless steel wire pulls  2011_12_13_Schematic Outline Specifications for FDI Pricing.doc Page 10 of 15
  • 45. 4. All cabinets shall be economy grade, except at laboratory spaces where  finished will be laboratory grade.  5. All casework construction details shall follow Style ‘A’ frameless  ii. Finishes  1. All cabinet frames to be clear sealed wood or approved equal  2. All cabinet drawer and door faces to be Formica Standard Laminates or  approved equal  3. All countertops to be Formica Standard Laminates or approved equal  4. All laboratory countertops to be Formica Chemtop 2 Laminates or approved  equal    f. Furniture – TBD    g. Retractable Seating  Hussey or Jezet retractable seating system or equal    h. Interior Handrails  1 ½” dia. s.s. handrail and handrail extension    i. Miscellaneous   i. Signage  1. Accessible room signage, donor signage  2. “Building as a Teaching Tool” Signage (Graphic educational signage)  ii. Window Treatment  1. Mecho shades (Art Room only)    j. Equipment   i. Typical Classroom  1. Ceiling mouned projector  2. Ceramic whiteboard, 7’H typical  3. Other Equipment TBD  ii. Reading Room ‐ TBD  iii. Library ‐ TBD  iv. Office ‐ TBD  v. Music Room ‐ TBD  vi. Laboratory   1. Ice maker  2. Refrigerator  3. Other Equipment TBD  vii. Art Room   1. All cabinet doors shall be Type I flush  2. Reuse (2) Existing Art Room kilns  3. Compact Storage, Montel Quadramobile system or approved equal  viii. Public Areas  1. Energy monitoring system display  ix. Gym  1. Scoreboard   2011_12_13_Schematic Outline Specifications for FDI Pricing.doc Page 11 of 15
  • 46. 4. Building Services  a. Plumbing  i. Kitchen Indirect Waste Piping  ii. Acid Waste System – pH Neutralization  iii. Piping Materials  iv. Water Services for Domestic, Sprinkler and Standpipe Systems  v. Water Heaters  vi. Backflow Prevention Device – Double Check Valve (DCV) and Reduced  vii. Pressure Zone (RPZ)  viii. Wall Hydrant Requirements for Window Washing and General Maintenance  ix. Gas Service and Meter Piping  x. Gas Valves/Master Gas Control Valve  xi. Hose Bibs  xii. Floor Drains (Science Labs)  xiii. Plumbing Fixtures  1. Restroom Urinals‐ American Standard Flush Free Waterless Urinal Medium  2. Restroom Toilets‐ American Standard Madera ADA 1.28 GPF with Selectronic  Dual Flush Valve  3. Restroom Sinks‐ American Standard Comrade Wall‐Mount Sink  4. Restroom Faucets‐ American Standard Pillar Tap Metering Faucet  5. Shower Systems‐ American Standard FloWise Commercial Shower System 1.5  GPM  6. Laboratory Sinks‐ Elkay DRKAD2522554 Lustertone 18‐gauge classroom sink  with double ledge.  7. Laboratory & Art Room Faucets‐ Chicago Faucets 895‐317ABCP ADA gooseneck  spout  8. Art Room Sinks – Stainless Steel Trough Sink  9. Floor Sinks at Janitor Clostets‐ Elkay EFS3321C with back and side Panels as  reqd.  10. Janitor Faucets‐ Elkay LK940AT08T4S Wall mount Faucet  11. Interior water coolers‐ EHWM17C two level s.s. drinking fountain  12. Exterior drinking fountains‐ Halsey Taylor Endura 4705FR wall mounted ADA  drinking fountain  13. Roof Garden Sinks ‐ Elkay DRKAD2522554 Lustertone 18‐gauge classroom sink  with double ledge.  14. Retractable ceiling mounted hoses in Labs 258 & 261  xiv. Storm Water Management – System TBD  xv. Grease Interceptors and Oil Separators  xvi. Conveyance of Sanitary Waste from Plumbing Fixtures Located in Basement or Cellar  Floors  b. Mechanical  i. General Overview of Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning Systems  ii. HVAC Unit Centralization and Coordination  iii. Ductwork and Shafts  iv. Non‐Assembly Spaces (Classrooms, Offices, etc.)  v. Public Assembly Spaces  vi. Considerations for Kindergarten, 1st and 2nd Grade Classrooms  vii. Convectors and Enclosures  2011_12_13_Schematic Outline Specifications for FDI Pricing.doc Page 12 of 15
  • 47. viii. Corridor Ductwork  ix. Wardrobe/Locker Ventilation  x. Heating and Cooling Design Parameters (Load Calculations)  xi. Smoke Control and Post‐Fire Smoke Purge Systems  xii. Air Conditioning Existing School Buildings  xiii. Unit Ventilators (Existing School Buildings Only)  xiv. Arrangement and Sizing of Equipment  xv. Fuel Oil/Diesel Oil Storage Tanks: Capacity and Room/Vault Ventilation  xvi. Cleaning and Inspection of Boilers and Chimneys  xvii. Fuel Burning Equipment  xviii. Gas Leak Detection and Alarm Systems  xix. Venting of Oil and Gas Fired Steam and Hot Water Boilers and Emergency  xx. Generators  xxi. Boiler Burner Safety Considerations for Non‐Condensing Boilers  xxii. Building Management System / Direct Digital Control BMS/DDC and DDC Only Systems  xxiii. Kitchen Ventilation  xxiv. Kitchen Storeroom HVAC Requirements  xxv. Acoustical Standards  xxvi. Plenum Returns  xxvii. HVAC Design Requirements for Special Spaces  xxviii. LEEDv3 2009 for Schools, ASHRAE 90.1‐07 Appendix G  xxix. Refrigeration Leak Detection and Ventilation System  xxx. Verification of Air System Design  xxxi. Ducts Requiring Dedicated Shafts  xxxii. Vent Hoods (Art Room & Laboratories) c. Fire Protection  i. Sprinkler Design  ii. Fire Standpipe Design  iii. Sprinkler Floor Control Valve Assembly Location d. Elevators  i. Finishes ‐ TBD  ii. Size –Otis 2000 lb Holed Hydraulic, 5’‐8”w x 4’‐3”d x 8’‐0”h  iii. Speed  iv. Number of Stops – 7 e. Lifts  i. Finishes ‐ TBD  ii. Size – 4’‐6”w x 3’‐4”d  iii. Speed  iv. Number of Stops – 2  v. Travel Distance – 3’‐5” f. Electrical & Communication Services  i. POWER DISTRIBUTION  ii. Electric Service  iii. Receptacles  iv. Retractable ceiling mounted power cords in Labs 258 & 261  v. LIGHTING SYSTEMS  1. Interior Lighting  a. Recessed CFL Cans  2011_12_13_Schematic Outline Specifications for FDI Pricing.doc Page 13 of 15
  • 48. b. Linear Fluorescent Pendants‐ Peerless Cerra 10 or equal w/ standard  electronic ballast, light sensors min. 1 each room.  c. Wall Washers‐ Peerless Tulip Lightline Direct or equal  d. 2x2 Recessed ACT  e. Sconces  2. Stage and Platform Lighting for Primary band Intermediate Schools  a. truss system  3. Emergency Lighting  4. Exit Signs  Recessed edge‐lit exit signage  5. Exterior/Site/Security Lighting  a. Bollards  b. Stair Lights  6. Interior Athletic Fields/Sports Lighting  a. High Bays  g. Low Voltage Systems  i. Fire Detection and Alarm System  ii. Main Telecommunications Room and Intermediate Telecommunication’s Closet  iii. Telephone System  iv. Data Cabling Network  v. Intercommunication Systems  vi. Television Cabling System  vii. Clock System  viii. Intrusion Alarm System  ix. Carbon Monoxide Detection and Alarm Systems  x. daylight/power/temperature monitoring system   5. Temporary Services  Provide temporary services & access to the East Wing for part of the student population during Phase 2.  a. Stairs  1‐Hr Fire Rated emergency stairs from Roof to grade at Jackson Street  b. Elevators  Temporary Elevator from Roof to Grade at Jackson Street  c. Bathrooms  Portable Restroom, Johnny On The Spot Pearl Series II or equal   d. Lighting  Emergency Egress Lighting in Temporary Stair Enclosure  e. Egress Protection (North Exit Court to Scott Street)  Plywood barrier at egress path from Stair Tower at North Exit Court    6. Room Matrix (see attached)  a. Rooms  i. Finishes  1. Floor  2. Base  3. Wall  4. Ceiling  5. Notes  2011_12_13_Schematic Outline Specifications for FDI Pricing.doc Page 14 of 15
  • 49. ii. Cabinetry  1. Base Cabinets  2. Upper Cabinets  3. Full Height Cabinets iii. Furniture  1. Tables  2. Chairs  3. Miscellaneous iv. Mechanical  1. Controls  2. Registers  3. Notes v. Electrical  1. Controls  2. Receptacles  3. Lighting  4. Notes vi. Plumbing  1. Fixtures vii. Low Voltage Systems  1. Fire Detection and Alarm  2. Telecommunications  3. Data  4. TV Cabling  5. Clock  6.  MEP Monitoring Systems  2011_12_13_Schematic Outline Specifications for FDI Pricing.doc Page 15 of 15