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Search Operators
 

Search Operators

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    Search Operators Search Operators Document Transcript

    • By Munpreet Marbay Search Operators Report
    • By Munpreet Marbay Content Introduction……………………………………………Page 3 Examples of Search operators…………………….Page 4,5 Summary………………………………………………Page 6 Conclusion…………………………………………….Page 6 Bibliography………………………………………….Page7
    • By Munpreet Marbay Introduction This report will cover the various search techniques that can benefit the user when researching different topics. There are 5 main techniques that can optimise research; this report will include various examples. Search operators are used to narrow down specific terms or even broaden the term to make researching easier.
    • By Munpreet Marbay Examples of Search Operators 1) Quotation marks: (“____”) Quotation marks are used to search words as a specific phrase, so when researching the phrase within the quotation marks will be searched together rather than separate. Examples: “Boris Johnson”, “Galaxy Chocolate”, “Brown Bags” 2) Wild Card Search (*) When researching we may forget part of the phrases or words, so using the Wild Card symbol allows you to research relevant content online if you have forgotten parts of the phrase or letter when spelling. Examples: “Azerba*”: Azerbaijan, “Wh*”: When, Where, who 3) Excluding Words (-) When researching, we could find information we do not need, so a good technique of researching is using the minus symbol to exclude any words you don’t want to search. Examples: “Hotels –UK”, “Women’s Shoes –Yellow”, “Mini Cooper –Blue”
    • By Munpreet Marbay 4) Defining a Term (:) When trying to define a word, it is quicker to use the define symbol instead of writing out a sentence. When using search engines such as Google, Google will have their own definition. Examples: “Define:blog”, “Define:Irony”, “Define:Dibersity” 5) Required Words (+) When searching, we may get unwanted information, to save time and look for the related content you need the required word symbol makes searching quick, as it searched the required word within the search engine. Examples: “Horse+farm”, “Hotels +USA”, “Coffe+Costa”
    • By Munpreet Marbay Summary Search operators are an efficient technique when researching a particular topic as it allows you to gather the relevant information rather than scrolling through Unrelated information. “Wild Card” search operator helps users to gather relevant content if they have forgotten the specific term or spelling. “Quotation Marks” tells the search engine to search the phrase together rather than the separate. “Excluding Words”, helps the user to search certain content without having a specific word when researching. “Defining a word”, this technique allows the user to search a definition quickly without having to type the sentence within Google. “Required Words” this helps the user to gather specific information using the key words. Conclusion Having used the search operators for the first time, I found using them a bit tedious, as I have never needed to use them when researching a particular topic, also to benefit from using the search operators, you would have to learn them. However they are useful when researching certain topics and also make researching more accurate, so gathering the correct information is simple.
    • By Munpreet Marbay Bibliography http://jwebnet.net/advancedgooglesearch.html https://support.google.com/vault/answer/2474474?hl=en http://www.googleguide.com/advanced_operators_reference.html http://www.open.ac.uk/infoskills-researchers/search-techniques.htm
    • By Munpreet Marbay