Gifted students
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A summary of what is giftedness and profiles of some subgroups of gifted learners.

A summary of what is giftedness and profiles of some subgroups of gifted learners.

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  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
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  • Hi Taylor, sorry I've been overseas for a couple of weeks. I have loads of stuff on the social and emotion needs of gifted students. Some time back I presented to the Gifted Support Network on that very subject. Friend me on Facebook (Martin Jellinek in Melbourne, Australia) and I will share my Google Drive folder with you, that contains a lot more stuff, I am not using Slideshare that much any more.
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  • Thanks Martin, currently I am looking at the social and emotional needs of gifted students, the underachiever , curriculum differentiation and acceleration. Quite indepth, there is so much reading out there. This was not a core unit in my combined visual arts and teaching degree but it really should of been, its so valuable.
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  • I'm so glad that you found it useful. No I didn't study at SCU, I studied Gifted Ed at Melbourne Uni and now I lecture there. Let me know if there are any other resources you need.
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  • Oh I wish I had seen this powerpoint before i did my last assingment on the Gifted an taleneted! DId you study at SCU this is exactly what I was looking for! So informing thank you really enjoyed the graphics!
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Gifted students Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Gifted Students
  • 2. Aren’t all children gifted?
    • The first step is to desensitise the issue.
    • Labelling a child as gifted does not instil them with more worth than another child.
    • Identifying a child as gifted is identifying a need that must be addressed.
    • Gifted students learn differently to to their peers and will suffer if these needs are not met.
    Oakland, T 2005, ‘Assessment of Gifted Students for Identification Purposes: New Techniques for a New Millennium’, Learning and individual differences , vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 327-36
  • 3. What is giftedness?
    • Gagné cautions that it is important to differentiate between giftedness and talent.
    • Gifts are the “natural abilities” that can only become talents provided the right intrapersonal characteristics, environmental influences and luck!
    Gross M, et al. 2004, Gifted and Talented Education: Professional development package for teachers , Department of Education, Science and Training, Sydney, NSW
  • 4. The Gagné Model of Giftedness and Talent
  • 5. Characteristics of gifted students
    • Cognitive
    • Social / Emotional
  • 6. Cognitive characteristics of gifted students
    • Fast pace of learning (dislike slow)
    • Extremely well developed memory
    • Preference for independent work
    • Require deeper exploration of topic
    • Ask reflective, probing questions
    • Reason at a level beyond their years
    Gross M, Sleap B & Pretorius M, 1999, ‘Characteristics of gifted students’ in Gifted Students in Secondary Schools , GERRIC, Sydney, NSW
  • 7. Characteristics of gifted students
    • Cognitive
    • Social / Emotional
  • 8. Affective characteristics of gifted students
    • Experience intense emotions
    • Exhibit perfectionist tendencies
    • Highly developed sense of justice
    • Empathy – unusually high or absent
    • Very mature sense of humour
    • Prefer company of older students
    Gross M, Sleap B & Pretorius M, 1999, ‘Characteristics of gifted students’ in Gifted Students in Secondary Schools , GERRIC, Sydney, NSW
  • 9. Not all gifted students are the same Type I – The Successful Type II – The Divergently Gifted Type III – The Underground Type IV – The Dropouts Type V – The Double-labelled Type VI – The Autonomous Learner Betts GT & Neihart M 1988, ‘Profiles of the Gifted and Talented’, The Gifted Child Quarterly , vol. 32, no. 2, pp.248-253
  • 10. Type I – The Successful
    • Account for approx. 90% of gifted students in school programs
    • Learned to work within the system
    • Behavioural problems rare as eager for approval
    • Become competent but uncreative adults that rarely achieve their full potential
    Betts GT & Neihart M 1988, ‘Profiles of the Gifted and Talented’, The Gifted Child Quarterly , vol. 32, no. 2, pp.248-253
  • 11. Type II – The Divergently Gifted
    • Rarely identified and placed in program
    • Very creative but obstinate / tactless / sarcastic
    • Question authority, challenge teachers
    • Social problems – potential dropouts
    Betts GT & Neihart M 1988, ‘Profiles of the Gifted and Talented’, The Gifted Child Quarterly , vol. 32, no. 2, pp.248-253
  • 12. Type III – The Underground
    • Mostly girls craving social inclusion
    • Will attempt to hide their gifts
    • More resistant the more they are pushed
    Betts GT & Neihart M 1988, ‘Profiles of the Gifted and Talented’, The Gifted Child Quarterly , vol. 32, no. 2, pp.248-253
  • 13. Type IV – The Dropouts
    • Angry with parents and teachers for being failed by the system
    • Angry with themselves for being unable to work within the system
    • Rejected / depressed / withdrawn / aggressive
    Betts GT & Neihart M 1988, ‘Profiles of the Gifted and Talented’, The Gifted Child Quarterly , vol. 32, no. 2, pp.248-253
  • 14. Type V – The Double-labelled
    • Academic gifts coupled with physical or social/emotional disability
    • Most common counterpart is Asperger’s syndrome
    • Talents often masked – sometimes to the extent that they end up in remedial programs
    Betts GT & Neihart M 1988, ‘Profiles of the Gifted and Talented’, The Gifted Child Quarterly , vol. 32, no. 2, pp.248-253
  • 15. Type VI – The Autonomous Learner
    • Independent and self-directed
    • They don’t work for the system but make it work for them
    • Create their own opportunities
    • Positive and successful
    • Often in leadership roles
    Betts GT & Neihart M 1988, ‘Profiles of the Gifted and Talented’, The Gifted Child Quarterly , vol. 32, no. 2, pp.248-253
  • 16. The Identification Process
    • Parent nomination
    • Teacher nomination
    • Student work
    Standardised achievement tests Standardised test of giftedness Dynamic testing teacher- created assessments Above-/Off-level testing Program Placement Adjustment of curriculum Continual monitoring Oakland, T 2005, ‘A 21st-Century model for identifying for gifted and talented programs in light of conditions: an emphasis on race and ethnicity’, Gifted Child Today , vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 56-58
  • 17. Issues
    • Identification is often very difficult in disadvantaged or culturally diverse populations
    • Failure to identify can result in anger, frustration, alienation, etc
    • Badly managed programs can also serve to alienate gifted students
    Hansen, JB & Johnston Toso, S 2007, ‘Gifted Dropouts: personality, family, social and school factors’, Gifted Child Today, vol. 30, no. 4, pp.30-41
  • 18. Implications for learning
    • There are 3 main ways in which the curriculum should be differentiated
    • 1 – Process modifications
    • 2 – Product modifications
    • 3 – Learning environment
    Vaille, W & Geake, J 2003, ‘Pedagogy and Curriculum’ in W Vaille & J Geake (eds), The Gifted Enigma; a collection of articles , Hawker Brownlow Education, Cheltenham, VIC
  • 19. Process Modifications
    • Learning tasks should be abstract, complex, varied
    • Learning tasks should involve issues of organisation, study of people, methods of inquiry.
    Vaille, W & Geake, J 2003, ‘Pedagogy and Curriculum’ in W Vaille & J Geake (eds), The Gifted Enigma; a collection of articles , Hawker Brownlow Education, Cheltenham, VIC
  • 20. Product Modifications
    • Involve higher order thinking processes
    • Promote creative and critical thinking
    • Require problem solving
    • Involve group interaction
    • Variable levels of pacing
    • Allow for debriefing of the process
    • Involve open-endedness
    • Allow for freedom of choice.
    Vaille, W & Geake, J 2003, ‘Pedagogy and Curriculum’ in W Vaille & J Geake (eds), The Gifted Enigma; a collection of articles , Hawker Brownlow Education, Cheltenham, VIC
  • 21. Learning Environment
    • Flexible and open
    • Encourage independent learning
    • Accepting and non judgemental
    • Encourage complex and abstract thought.
    Vaille, W & Geake, J 2003, ‘Pedagogy and Curriculum’ in W Vaille & J Geake (eds), The Gifted Enigma; a collection of articles , Hawker Brownlow Education, Cheltenham, VIC