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  • 1. ICP Operator Manual v1.0 July 2, 1997 Copyright © 1997 Interactive Channel Technologies Inc. All trademarks are the properties of their respective owners.
  • 2. CONTENTS Interactive Television Preface .......................................................................................................... vii P f What’s in this Manual ............................................................................................................... viii Other Sources of Information ....................................................................................................... x How to Contact The Interactive ChannelSM ................................................................................ xi PART ONE: TUTORIAL Chapter 1: The Basics of Interactive Television ............................................. 1-1 User Equipment ......................................................................................................................... 1-3 Source Control Receiver ........................................................................................................ 1-3 Remote Control...................................................................................................................... 1-5 Chapter 2: The Home Experience ................................................................. 2-1 Ch t 2 Attractor Screen ........................................................................................................................ 2-2 Creating a Session ..................................................................................................................... 2-3 Session .................................................................................................................................. 2-3 ICP Operator Manual / i
  • 3. Contents Presentations............................................................................................................................. 2-4 Navigating Between Presentations ....................................................................................... 2-6 Interactive Applications ............................................................................................................ 2-7 Exploring the What's on TV Application ............................................................................... 2-8 Terminating a Session ............................................................................................................. 2-10 Chapter 3: How it Works ............................................................................. 3-1 Inside the ICP ............................................................................................................................ 3-4 The ITS.................................................................................................................................. 3-4 The AIS ................................................................................................................................. 3-5 Management of Audio Playback ...................................................................................... 3-6 Interpretation of User Input.............................................................................................. 3-7 The VTS ................................................................................................................................ 3-7 Management of Video Playback ....................................................................................... 3-8 Processing of Terminal Commands ................................................................................... 3-8 Receiving User Input................................................................................................................. 3-9 Playing Presentations .............................................................................................................. 3-12 Playing Audio ..................................................................................................................... 3-14 Playing Video....................................................................................................................... 3-16 Overlays and Terminal Commands ...................................................................................... 3-18 Overlays ......................................................................................................................... 3-18 Terminal Commands ........................................................................................................ 3-18 Navigating Through Presentations ......................................................................................... 3-20 Navigation Session Task ..................................................................................................... 3-20 Presentation File Server ....................................................................................................... 3-21 Selecting a Presentation ...................................................................................................... 3-22 Managing User Sessions ........................................................................................................ 3-24 Creating a Session ............................................................................................................... 3-24 Terminating a Session ......................................................................................................... 3-26 Starting an Application ....................................................................................................... 3-28 Other Functions of the ICP...................................................................................................... 3-30 Logging Messages.............................................................................................................. 3-31 Recording Statistics ............................................................................................................ 3-32 Updating Presentation Databases ....................................................................................... 3-34 ii ICP Operator Manual
  • 4. Contents Chapter 4: The Electronic Transfer of Content .............................................. 4-1 Ch t 4 Locations................................................................................................................................... 4-2 Content Studio ...................................................................................................................... 4-2 ICP ......................................................................................................................................... 4-3 Inside the BUP .......................................................................................................................... 4-4 BUP Setup ............................................................................................................................. 4-4 BUP Steps ............................................................................................................................. 4-5 File Transfer...................................................................................................................... 4-6 File Distribution ................................................................................................................ 4-7 Version Control ................................................................................................................. 4-9 Cleanup .......................................................................................................................... 4-10 Activation....................................................................................................................... 4-11 Operator Information ...................................................................................................... 4-12 Version Control Tasks ............................................................................................................. 4-13 Depot Directory ................................................................................................................... 4-13 Versioned Directories .......................................................................................................... 4-15 Current Directory................................................................................................................. 4-17 Controlling the BUP ................................................................................................................ 4-18 Activate a PDB Manually .................................................................................................... 4-18 Change the PDB Activation Time ....................................................................................... 4-18 Disable/Enable Activation .................................................................................................. 4-18 Change PDB Versions ......................................................................................................... 4-18 Obtain Status Information ................................................................................................... 4-19 Chapter 5: Working with the ICP ................................................................. 5-1 Ch t 5 Starting the SMT ....................................................................................................................... 5-2 Description ................................................................................................................................ 5-3 SMT Screen ............................................................................................................................... 5-4 Title Bar ................................................................................................................................. 5-4 Menu Bar............................................................................................................................... 5-4 Server Status Activity Window ............................................................................................. 5-6 Log Messages Window ........................................................................................................ 5-7 Colors ........................................................................................................................................ 5-8 Non-content .......................................................................................................................... 5-8 Content.................................................................................................................................. 5-8 ICP Operator Manual / iii
  • 5. Contents Working with SMT Menus and Windows ................................................................................ 5-9 Log Message Details........................................................................................................... 5-12 Stopping the SMT ................................................................................................................... 5-13 PART TWO: REFERENCE Chapter 6: Monitoring the System ................................................................ 6-1 Ch 6 Status ........................................................................................................................................ 6-2 Hosts ......................................................................................................................................... 6-5 Servers ...................................................................................................................................... 6-7 Chapter 7: Configuring the System ............................................................... 7-1 Ch t 7 Configuration File Syntax .......................................................................................................... 7-2 PROGRAM ............................................................................................................................ 7-3 PROC_CLASS ....................................................................................................................... 7-3 PATH ..................................................................................................................................... 7-3 ENV ....................................................................................................................................... 7-3 PARM .................................................................................................................................... 7-4 %INDEX Variable ............................................................................................................. 7-4 HEARTBEAT ......................................................................................................................... 7-4 MISSHBS .............................................................................................................................. 7-5 INSTANCES .......................................................................................................................... 7-5 STARTINDEX ....................................................................................................................... 7-5 SHUTDOWNINDEX ............................................................................................................. 7-6 RECOVERY ............................................................................................................................ 7-6 DELAY .................................................................................................................................. 7-6 SIGNAL_MASK ................................................................................................................... 7-7 WORKDIR ............................................................................................................................ 7-7 Viewing and Modifying Configuration Files ............................................................................. 7-8 Changing the Configuration File ......................................................................................... 7-10 iv ICP Operator Manual
  • 6. Contents Chapter 8: Performing Batch Updates .......................................................... 8-1 Ch t 8 Specifying Directory Information .............................................................................................. 8-2 Running the Setup Utility ...................................................................................................... 8-3 Obtaining Help ...................................................................................................................... 8-4 Exiting the Setup Utility ......................................................................................................... 8-4 Utility Commands .................................................................................................................. 8-5 Specifying Incoming and Staging Directories ....................................................................... 8-6 Specifying Presentation Directories ...................................................................................... 8-7 Specifying Audio and Video Directories ............................................................................... 8-8 Specifying Notification Information ...................................................................................... 8-9 Choosing a BUP Server ........................................................................................................... 8-11 Manually Activating a PDB .................................................................................................... 8-13 Changing the Activation Time ................................................................................................ 8-15 Disabling/Enabling Activation ................................................................................................ 8-17 Changing PDB Versions .......................................................................................................... 8-19 Viewing BUP Messages .......................................................................................................... 8-21 Viewing General BUP Information ........................................................................................... 8-22 Chapter 9: Starting and Stopping the System ................................................ 9-1 Ch t 9 Delayed Startup ......................................................................................................................... 9-2 Paused Startup .......................................................................................................................... 9-3 Automatic and Manual Startup ................................................................................................. 9-4 How to Start and Stop the System ............................................................................................ 9-6 Starting the System ............................................................................................................... 9-6 Stopping the System ............................................................................................................. 9-7 Starting and Stopping Sequence ............................................................................................... 9-9 Chapter 10: Troubleshooting ...................................................................... 10-1 Ch t 10 Appendix A: Log Files and Messages ......................................................... A-1 A di A Naming and Location of Log Files ...........................................................................................A-2 ICP Operator Manual / v
  • 7. Contents Rollover by Size ....................................................................................................................A-2 Rollover by Time ..................................................................................................................A-3 Rollover by Operator ............................................................................................................A-3 Fields in a Log Message ..........................................................................................................A-4 Appendix B: File Types ............................................................................... B-1 A di B Appendix C: ICP Directories ...................................................................... C-1 A di C INS Directory Structure ............................................................................................................ C-3 AIS Directory Structure ............................................................................................................ C-4 VTS Directory Structure ........................................................................................................... C-5 ITS Directory Structure ............................................................................................................ C-6 Appendix D: Fault Recovery ....................................................................... D-1 A di D Detecting Dead Processes ....................................................................................................... D-2 Recovery Actions .................................................................................................................... D-4 Shutdown ............................................................................................................................. D-4 Process Restart..................................................................................................................... D-6 Message Log........................................................................................................................ D-7 Ignore ................................................................................................................................... D-7 16 concurrent users log_on: log_off: statistics Appendix E: Statistics Files ......................................................................... E-1 peak time A di E Naming and Location of Statistics Files ................................................................................... E-2 Statistics File Rollover .............................................................................................................. E-3 Appendix F: Man-Pages ............................................................................. F-1 A di F vi ICP Operator Manual
  • 8. Contents Appendix G: Your System ........................................................................... G-1 A di G ICP Studio Content ITS AIS S VT Glossary .......................................................................................... Glossary-1 Gl Index I d ICP Operator Manual / vii
  • 9. Preface Interactive Television Preface W elcome to the Interactive Channel Platform (ICP), an interactive television (ITV) technology. ITV permits users to receive on-demand sound and images through their television. This manual explains the basics of ITV and the tasks that an operator must perform in order to manage the ICP’s technology. This manual is written specifically for ICP operators. This manual doesn’t need to be read in its entirety. The chapters are organized so that operators can easily access information from just one location. The ICP Operator Manual is divided into two parts: Part One, a tutorial, provides introductory information to an operator who requires an overview of the system prior to managing its daily operation. Part Two, a reference, provides specific information to an operator who man- ages the daily operation of the system. ICP Operator Manual / vii
  • 10. Preface WHAT’S IN THIS MANUAL If you are new to the ICP or ITV, it is recommended that you read Part One before using the reference material contained in Part Two. This manual is arranged as follows: PART ONE: TUTORIAL Chapter 1, “The Basics of Interactive Television” Fundamentals of interactive television. Chapter 2, “The Home Experience” Description of the ICP’s interactive services from a user’s perspective. Chapter 3, “How It Works” Explanation of the technology used in the ICP. Chapter 4, “The Electronic Transfer of Content” Explanation of the process used in the ICP to receive new interactive content. Chapter 5, “Working with the ICP” Introduction to the primary tool an operator uses to administer the ICP. PART TWO: REFERENCE Chapter 6, “Monitoring the System” Description of the system information which can be viewed online. Chapter 7, “Configuring the System” Instructions on how to customize the ICP software. Chapter 8, “Performing Batch Updates” Instructions on how to monitor and control the Batch Update Process. Chapter 9, “Starting and Stopping the System” Explanation of how to start and stop the ICP. viii ICP Operator Manual
  • 11. Preface Chapter 10, “Troubleshooting” List of common problems encountered when operating the ICP and how to solve them. Appendix A, “Log Files and Messages” List of system messages an operator can encounter and the files used by the system to store them. Appendix B, “File Types” Explanation of the file types used by the system to store information. Appendix C, “ICP Directories” Description of the directory tree used to store ICP software and data. Appendix D, “Fault Recovery” Description of the ICP’s automatic fault detection and resolution capabilities. Appendix E, “Statistics Files” Description of the files used by the ICP to store statistics. Appendix F, “Man-pages” List of all relevant man-pages. Appendix G, “Your System” Detailed information about the system at your site. Glossary Explanation of the terminology related to the ICP and ITV. If you encounter an unfamiliar term, refer to this section for a definition. Index ICP Operator Manual / ix
  • 12. Preface OTHER SOURCES OF INFORMATION Most of the information an operator will need is contained in this manual. However, other useful documents are available: Other Available Documentation manual pages SCR Installation XWITTE User Guide Manual Content Studio User Guide Installation Guide Interactive Application Environment Developer Kit Not every site will have all of these documents. If any of these documents are required, contact your on-site ICP specialist or contact The Interactive ChannelK (refer to the next section). Nevertheless, every ICP is installed with the most important documentation available for an ICP operator - on-line docu- mentation. On-line documentation is installed with every ICP in the form of manual pages (man-pages). Man-pages can be accessed at the operating system prompt by typing man followed by the name of the required man-page. For convenience, printed copies of ICP man-pages can be found in Appendix F: Man-Pages. Note that online man-pages may be more up-to-date than the printed man-pages. x ICP Operator Manual
  • 13. Preface HOW TO CONTACT THE INTERACTIVE CHANNELK This manual should provide answers to most of your questions regarding the operation of the ICP. However, if this manual does not answer a question, large sites have on-site ICP specialists to provide additional information. These specialists are a useful resource that will answer any questions that you may have regarding the operation of your system. Smaller systems may not have an on-site ICP specialist from The Interactive ChannelK. However, these sites can receive the same quality of service by contacting The Interactive ChannelK directly using the information provided below. There are several methods you can use to contact us: “insert telephone #” You can telephone the Customer Support Department during normal business hours from Monday to Friday. “insert e-mail address here” The best way to contact our Customer Support Department is by e-mail. Leave your questions and/or comments at this e-mail address for the customer support staff to process. You can also mail your questions and/or comments to The Interactive ChannelK by using the following address: The Interactive ChannelK Customer Support Department Dallas, Texas We welcome your comments, suggestions and inquiries. ICP Operator Manual / xi
  • 14. Chapter 1: The Basics of Interactive Television T he Interactive Channel Platform (ICP) provides the hardware and software solutions that permit users to receive interactive television (ITV). ITV permits users to receive on-demand sound and images through their televisions. Users of The Interactive ChannelK only require a Source Control Receiver (SCR) and a remote control to interact with their televisions. Of course, an account with the local cable company is also recommended! This chapter focuses on the hardware that a user requires to receive ITV from The Interactive ChannelK. Although this chapter is relatively brief, it is extremely important because it serves as the foundation upon which all other chapters are based. ICP Operator Manual / 1-1
  • 15. The Basics of Interactive Television There are two basic requirements for a user to receive ITV: • Specialized hardware at the user’s location. This hardware is described later in this chapter. • Specialized hardware and software at the cable television (CATV) source. It is the responsibility of the operator to manage the ICP at the CATV source so that the users can receive ITV. This part of the system is introduced in Chapter 3: How It Works and is discussed in greater detail in all following chapters and appendices. Content Studio ICP at CATV Source ICP at CATV Source ICP User Input Audio SCR CATV Head-end Video Remote ICP1-01.EPS 1-2 ICP Operator Manual
  • 16. The Basics of Interactive Television USER EQUIPMENT The ICP hardware at a user’s home consists of a settop box called a Source Contol Receiver (SCR) and an alphanumeric remote control unit. Note that some users will also have an infrared keyboard to communicate with the SCR. Source Control Receiver The SCR resembles a cable converter. It captures commands from the remote control and delivers these commands to the ICP. The SCR also processes the audio and video data sent from the ICP. The SCR is the link between the remote control (discussed in the next section) and the ICP at the CATV source. Note that the The SCR receives audio and video using a standard telephone line and a coaxial user’s cable line, respectively. The SCR contains cable and telephone jacks to send and telephone is busy when the receive information. The SCR permits the user to receive on-demand audio and SCR is video selections. receiving audio. ICP Operator Manual / 1-3
  • 17. The Basics of Interactive Television The SCR operates in three modes: 1) OFF: The red light on the SCR is illuminated. Users cannot receive ITV in this mode. 2) IDLE: The green light on the SCR is illuminated. The SCR is turned on but users can’t receive ITV. When the SCR is in this mode and the user is tuned to the ICP channel, the ICP sends a special screen to the user. 3) INTERACTIVE: The green light and The Interactive ChannelK hand on the SCR are illuminated. Users can receive ITV in this mode. Red Light Green Light Hand The lights and symbols represent electronic communication occurring (or not occurring) between the user and the ICP. The SCR can be set to use Channel 3 or Channel 4 as the Output Channel. The SCR has the following connectors on the rear panel: • Audio Out • Video Out • To TV • CATV In • From Decoder • Expansion Port Refer to the Source Control Receiver Installation Manual for additional infor- mation on the SCR. 1-4 ICP Operator Manual
  • 18. The Basics of Interactive Television Remote Control The SCR works with a remote control to allow a user to enter input. This input begins when a user presses keys on the remote control’s keypad and permits communication with the ICP. The remote control looks and acts like a standard remote control. It sends signals to the SCR. Every key has a specific function and individual keypresses send signals through the SCR to the ICP where those signals are pro- cessed. SCR Remote The remote control communicates with an SCR via an infrared port. An infrared receiver in the SCR interprets the keypresses. The remote control permits users to start and stop ITV services. Note that some users also use an infrared keyboard to communicate with the SCR. The keyboard permits the user to compose sentences for e-mail and other applications which permit the user to enter long alphabetic strings, perform extensive typing, etc. ICP Operator Manual / 1-5
  • 19. The Basics of Interactive Television The following illustration shows the remote control and the functions of certain keys: SET UP TV This key is used Logs the user off by a technician. The Interactive Channel SM . # LETTER KEYPAD This key takes the user These keys type letters to the next screen. and words. They also function as HOT KEYS. NUMBER KEYPAD These keys correspond to HOT KEYS number choices that are seen These keys are shortcuts on the MAIN MENU to applications. and elsewhere. * SHIFT This key takes the user to This key makes alphabetic keys the previous screen. produce upper case letters. INSERT SYMBOL MENU This key puts a space between Users press MENU to go letters or numbers. to the main menu. DELETE CH+ AND CH- This key permits a Displays messages reminding selection to be deleted. the user to use the TV remote control to change channels. GUIDE This key takes the user to the What's on TV application. ENTER Users press the ENTER VOLUME SYMBOL key after most commands. This key controls volume. NEXT PREV Takes the user to This key is functional only the next screen. when displayed onscreen. FF REW This key lets the useruser fast key letslets the fast the user fast This key lets the user forward through a selection. replay a selection. BUY MUTE/PAUSE This key sends the This key stops a selection. user to the order screen. It is the remote control, working with the SCR, that permits ITV to be received at a user’s location. The next chapter details the interactive experience from a user’s perspective. 1-6 ICP Operator Manual
  • 20. Chapter 2: The Home Experience Chapter 2 T his chapter introduces the major concepts of how the user interacts with the ICP, what the user sees and some of the basics of using the remote control. This chapter also introduces important terminology which is used throughout the manual. These new terms include attractor screen, presentation, session, interactive application and navigation. ICP Operator Manual / 2-1
  • 21. The Home Experience ATTRACTOR SCREEN An attractor screen is an image which identifies the ICP’s interactive services and is the first screen a user sees after tuning to The Interactive ChannelSM. When an SCR is in the IDLE mode and the user is tuned to The Interactive ChannelSM, the SCR displays an attractor screen that is broadcast by the ICP. The frequency at which the ICP broadcasts the attractor screen is established during initial system configuration. Refer to Chapter 7: Configuring the System for additional information. This version of the ICP accomodates only one attractor screen, however, future releases will accomodate numerous attractor screens. The operator will be able to manually change these attractor screens using the Site Management Task (SMT). The SMT is explained in Chapter 5: Working with the ICP and Chapter 6: Monitor- ing the System. 2-2 ICP Operator Manual
  • 22. The Home Experience CREATING A SESSION A user can begin interacting with the ICP system by pressing the key. When pressed, the main menu appears on the television screen. This main menu replaces the attractor screen described in the previous section. The keypress sends an infrared signal to the SCR which communicates with the ICP. The ICP interprets this signal and sends the main menu to the user. This process, called logging onto the system, permits the user to receive interactive content. ICP Head-End Main Menu SCR Address ID and SCR Address ID MENU keypress SCR User Input Attractor Screen The SCR signal that goes to the ICP during logon contains the SCR’s unique address. This address lets the ICP identify the user’s SCR and enables it to send information to that SCR only. The ICP responds by sending the main menu to the SCR. Session Each SCR can A session occurs when a user connects or “logs” onto the ICP. Pressing the be configured key starts a session. This keypress changes the mode of the SCR to to have many keys that cause INTERACTIVE, as explained in Chapter 1: The Basics of Interactive Television. a logon. It may Refer to Chapter 3: How it Works for an in-depth discussion on how a session is (or may not) created. include the key. ICP Operator Manual / 2-3
  • 23. The Home Experience PRESENTATIONS Presentations are units of audiovisual information sent by the ICP to users. A typical presentation can include multiple video images, an optional supporting audio stream, and one or more input choices. When the user selects an input choice with the remote control, a new audiovisual presentation is transmitted. 8 * 0 # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ICP2-0005.EPS 2-4 ICP Operator Manual
  • 24. The Home Experience Input choices are presented as menus and provide the user with audiovisual selections. Menus permit the user to move through a series of different presenta- tions. Each presentation is a different collection of audio and video segments. These presen- tations are still-frame, photo- graphic-quality television pictures and can be accompa- nied by audio. The ICP stores, manages and distributes these presentations as individual users request them. SM trol con rce sou Dra ma Video 2 om Sitc 4 edy Com 1 ry enta um 3 5 Doc Adu lt En terta inm ent Graphics Overlay Text Overlay 2 4 1 3 5 ma Dra om Sitc edy Com ry enta um Doc ent inm terta lt En Adu ICP-0007.EPS The video images of a presentation can be overlaid with text or simple graphics. Some examples of graphic overlays include colored circles, squares and straight lines. These overlays are not part of the actual video images stored on disk but are generated dynamically during the course of a session. Text and graphics overlays are further described in Chapter 3: How it Works. ICP Operator Manual / 2-5
  • 25. The Home Experience Navigating Between Presentations Navigation is the process of moving from one presentation to another during a session. User input drives navigation. source control ON source control Menu choice source control Menu choice source control Presentation source control Hot key ICP2 0008 E Users can navigate between presentations quicker by using special function keys called hot keys. A user presses a hot key to navigate directly to a particular presentation. Refer to Chapter 1: The Basics of Interactive Television for a description of the remote control and its keys. 2-6 ICP Operator Manual
  • 26. The Home Experience INTERACTIVE APPLICATIONS Interactive applications are software programs which deliver custom interactive services as well as standard presentations to the user. Interactive applications also process user input. What's on TV, Today and Trivia are examples of interac- tive applications which are included with some ICP systems. Note that this manual refers to interactive applications and applications interchangeably. ICP CATVHead-end ICP Head-end User Input Audio Interactive Application ICP2-0009.EPS ICP Operator Manual / 2-7
  • 27. The Home Experience Exploring the What's on TV Application What's on TV is an interactive TV guide. Listings can be accessed for times of the day, specific days of the week or by subject. Of course, each ICP normally has numerous applications installed. The What’s on TV application is just one possible example to introduce an operator to ICP applications. 2-8 ICP Operator Manual
  • 28. The Home Experience To use What's on TV, follow these steps: 1) Press on the remote control after tuning to the ICP channel and wait until logon is complete. 2) From the main menu, select the option What's on TV. 3) Choose a particular type of television listing, e.g. All Shows, Movies or Sports. 4) After selecting a show category, a list of shows will be displayed. Choose a show from this list to begin viewing it. (The TV channel will automatically change to the show you select.) Here are some other keys available in What’s on TV: • displays additional channel information (each screen will typically show 5 channels) • sends the user to the previous screen • gives the user channel information for different days of the week • returns the user to the main menu Every application that a user (or an operator) encounters is likely to have a different theme or purpose. It really doesn’t matter what application a user may be using - each application and almost everthing that the ICP does is similarly driven by the keypresses of a user. It is these keypresses which deliver an attractor screen, create a session, allow a user to navigate between presentations and explore applications. Of course, a keypress also permits users to terminate a session and end the home experience as described in this chapter. Refer to the IAE Developer Guide: Tutorial for a more in-depth explanation of applications, including Trivia and User Registration. ICP Operator Manual / 2-9
  • 29. The Home Experience TERMINATING A SESSION Press the or keys on the remote control to exit the system. Note that the key also turns off the SCR, returning it to the OFF mode. These keystrokes are sent to the SCR which relays them to the ICP. For more informa- tion on what happens when a user logs off the ICP, see the Managing User Sessions section in Chapter 3: How It Works. Power TV SCR ICP2-0011.EPS 2-10 ICP Operator Manual
  • 30. Chapter 3: How it Works T he first two chapters discuss the ICP from a user’s perspective. This chapter focuses on the ICP hardware and software that: • manages audio playback and captures the input keyed in by users • manages video playback and processes terminal commands This chapter also discusses how the ICP plays presentations, navigates through presentations, manages user sessions and performs its important support functions. ICP Operator Manual / 3-1
  • 31. How it Works ICP ICP Head-end ITS VT S User Input AI S Audio Video <T erm ina lC om ma nds > ICP3-01.EPS A process is The Audio/Input System (AIS) manages audio playback and captures user input. one or more The Video/Terminal System (VTS) manages video playback and processes computer terminal commands. These two processes are discussed later in this chapter. programs. The audio and video signals that carry multimedia presentations originate from the ICP. These presentations are created using the Content Studio (CS) at sites remote from the ICP. The Content Studio is a multimedia authoring tool that creates presentations. For more information on the Content Studio, see the Content Studio User Guide. 3-2 ICP Operator Manual
  • 32. How it Works A sequence of steps, collectively called the Batch Update Process (BUP), is used to transfer the presentations from the Content Studio to the ICP. The BUP is normally an automated process, however, the operator can intervene if necessary. For more information on the BUP, see Chapter 4: The Electronic Transfer of Content and Chapter 8: Performing Batch Updates. ICP Content Studio ICP Head-end Presentations The Content Studio sends presentations to the ICP which receives and stores these presentations. Users can request these presentations. This chapter focuses on the ICP and the components and processes that make interactive services possible. ICP Operator Manual / 3-3
  • 33. How it Works INSIDE THE ICP The ICP contains the hardware and software responsible for delivering interac- tive services to users. These interactive services consist of audio segments and video images which are driven by user input. The ICP software consists of three major components: • ITS (Interactive Teminal Server) • AIS (Audio/Input System) • VTS (Video/Terminal System) The ITS The ITS consists of processes which are responsible for: • Interpreting user input • Playing the presentations users receive • Providing the support functions needed to keep the ICP operational • Starting and stopping the ICP • Creating and terminating sessions • Recording log messages 3-4 ICP Operator Manual
  • 34. How it Works ICP Head-end ICP ITS SCR VTS AIS The AIS and the VTS are intermediaries between the SCR and ITS. The AIS The AIS manages audio playback and captures user input. In a standard configu- ration, the AIS operates on a single, dedicated computer. However, in smaller configurations, the AIS may share a computer with other components of the ICP software. In larger configurations, there may be multiple AIS processes running on multiple computers. ICP Operator Manual / 3-5
  • 35. How it Works An AIS can service up to 48 user sessions simultaneously. This limit determines the number of AIS processes which are run. For example, a 96-user system requires two AIS processes. Small ICP Configuration Standard ICP Configuration Large ICP Configuration (48 - user system) (96 - user system) ITS ITS ITS VTS VTS AIS AIS/VTS AIS AIS Management of Audio Playback All audio information for a presentation is stored in the ICP. Each audio segment is contained in its own file. The AIS is responsible for reading data from these files and transmitting these audio segments to a user. Specialized audio hardware permits transmission of audio segments. An audio segment is transmitted to a user over a standard telephone line. The SCR receives the segment and forwards it to a TV that plays the segment through its speakers. ITS VTS AIS 3-6 ICP Operator Manual
  • 36. How it Works Interpretation of User Input The AIS captures user input and relays it to the rest of the ITS software. The AIS has many telephone line connections to receive input from multiple users. This allows the ICP to process many simultaneous sessions. Refer to the AIS section in Appendix G: Your System to find out how many lines are connected to your system. ICP ICP Head-end ITS AI S User Input The VTS The VTS manages video playback and processes terminal commands. In a standard configuration, all the processes of the VTS operate on a single com- puter dedicated to video functions. However, in smaller configurations, the VTS may share a computer with other components of the ICP software. In larger configurations, there may be multiple VTS processes running on multiple computers. ICP Operator Manual / 3-7
  • 37. How it Works Management of Video Playback The VTS communicates with the rest of the ICP to coordinate the delivery of video images to a user’s SCR. All video information for a presentation is stored in the ICP. This information is stored in files on disk. The VTS pro- cesses the video images and sends them through the cable line connected to an SCR. The VTS uses a specialized video hardware card to deliver video images. Processing of Terminal Commands In addition to receiving video images and audio, the SCR accepts terminal commands from the ICP. Terminal commands originate from interactive applica- tions. These terminal commands are transmitted from the ICP by the VTS. The VTS accepts commands from interactive applications and converts them into a signal that can be sent through the cable connection to an SCR. Refer to the Overlays and Terminal Commands section for additional information on terminal commands. 3-8 ICP Operator Manual
  • 38. How it Works RECEIVING USER INPUT Off-hook describes a line servicing an active session with a user. This off-hook line carries user input to the ICP. The ICP can only receive user input when a line is off-hook. A line remains off-hook during a session and can be used for only one session at a time. User Input Off-Hook State For more On-hook describes a line that is not information on carrying the input (or delivering the audio) logging on and off the ICP, see of an active session. An on-hook line is the Creating a available to deliver a logon request to the Session and ICP and start a new session for a user. Terminating a Session sections later in this chapter. On-Hook State ICP Operator Manual / 3-9
  • 39. How it Works Here are the steps which make receiving input possible: The user presses keys on the remote control. The keystrokes are transmitted via infrared signal to the SCR. The SCR receives and converts the keystrokes to touch tones and transmits them through the previously opened telephone connection to the head-end. ICP. 3-10 ICP Operator Manual
  • 40. How it Works The AIS captures the touch tones and any relays the commands, indicating which keys have been pressed, to other processes in the ICP. These processes respond to the input, usually by delivering new presentations to the user. ICP Operator Manual / 3-11
  • 41. How it Works PLAYING PRESENTATIONS Three ICP components are required to play presentations: • AIS • VTS • Presentation Server The AIS and VTS have already been discussed. However, the ICP also requires the Presentation Server to play presentations. The Presentation Server synchro- nizes the timing of audio and video elements to deliver ITV to a user’s location. Here are the steps the Presentation Server performs when it receives a presenta- tion play request: The Presentation Server separates the presentation into its elementary video images, audio segment and input choices. For the first video image which must be displayed, the Presentation Server submits a play request to a VTS. Normally, there is only one VTS and it receives all play requests. 3-16- 3-12 ICP Operator Manual
  • 42. How it Works For the audioaudio first segment which must be played, the Presentation Server submits a play request to an AIS. This step is bypassed if there isn't an audio segment in the presentation. If the Presentation Server encounters input choices in the presentation, it will send them to the interactive application which is currently running. This will be used by the application to validate user input. If there are any remaining images in the presentation, the Presentation Server instructs the VTS to play them at their specified start times. Content producers determine the relative start times of the elements within each presentation. They must set these times so the images and audio segment are synchronized when played. ICP Operator Manual / 3-13
  • 43. How it Works Playing Audio The Presentation Server needs the AIS and VTS to play the audio and video images in a presentation. We will now describe the first of these two processes that are so important to the ICP. The number of As described previously, the AIS uses the same telephone line connection to an lines attached SCR for both audio playback and user input reception. It must support the to the ICP simultaneous playback requirements for the many sessions that can be active at determines the maximum any time. number of simultaneous Here are the steps which make the delivery of audio possible: sessions. The user enters input in response to choices on the TV screen. The SCR captures the infrared signals generated by the remote control and sends them to the AIS. The input is captured by the AIS and relayed to other processes in the ICP. AI S 3-14 ICP Operator Manual
  • 44. How it Works Processes within the ICP instruct the Presentation Server to play the e user-selected presentation. VT S The Presentation Server submits a play request to the AIS. AI S The AIS reads the audio data from a file on disk. A specialized audio hardware card, under the direction of the AIS, decompresses the audio data and transmits it through the telephone line connection to the user's SCR. The SCR captures the signal and plays the audio over the TV speakers. i The audio that is played may be mixed with background audio at the user’s location. This is described in the Overlays and Terminal Commands section later in this chapter. ICP Operator Manual / 3-15
  • 45. How it Works Playing Video The VTS plays the video images of a presentation. Unlike the AIS that requires a separate telephone line for every active session, the VTS can send images to hundreds of SCRs through a single cable connection. However, there is a limit to the number of users a single cable connection can support. If the number of simultaneous ICP users exceeds this limit, additional cable connections must be used. Here are the steps which make the delivery of video possible: The user enters input in response to choices on the TV screen. The SCR captures the infrared signals generated by the remote control and sends them to the ICP. head-end. The input is captured by the AIS and relayed to other processes in the ICP. Processes within the ICP instruct the Presentation Server to play the user-selected presentation. VT S 3-16 ICP Operator Manual
  • 46. How it Works The Presentation Server submits a play request to the VTS. VT S The VTS reads image data from a file on disk. The VTS adds Subsystem address information components add address information to the data so that n> tio orma tocan be directed it it the data so that Inf ess can be directed to to the correct SCR. ddr <A the correct SCR. Text and graphic overlays (described in the next section) are added to the image if there are any used by an application. A specialized video hardware card Sei decompresses the nfel Mov d ie Hap s py Dav Fri ends video data and e transmits it through the telephone line cable line connection to the user's SCR. Address information and overlays are sent with this transmission. The SCR captures the signal and displays the image on the TV screen. 3-18-2. ICP Operator Manual / 3-17
  • 47. How it Works Overlays and Terminal Commands In addition to images, the VTS delivers overlays and terminal commands. Overlays Text and graphic overlays are generated by interactive applications and are displayed on top of images. These overlays are not produced as part of an image so that they can be changed easily when content changes. In fact, interactive applications can obtain the content for text and graphic overlays from a database of up-to-date information. Text and graphics embedded in an image would be much more difficult to change. Graphic Overlay Text Overlay 1 Rue Madeleine 2 Conquest of Paradise Terminal Commands In addition to images and audio, the SCR can accept terminal commands from applications. These include commands which make the SCR: • enable/disable background audio • write canned messages on a TV screen (refer to the Glossary for a definition of canned messages) • turn its message light on and off • move the screen cursor 3-18 ICP Operator Manual
  • 48. How it Works CD Player ion at Head-end i cat A ppl ICP VT S Cable Connection ICP3-21.EPS Here is how enable/disable background audio works: Note that the When the enable background audio command is executed by an application, the MuzakTM feed VTS delivers audio from a MuzakTM feed (a connection to an external audio or CD player supplier) or CD player at the head-end. The audio is transmitted through the must be turned on manually by cable connection to an SCR which mixes the audio with the audio segments of an operator. presentations. Note that this audio is not sent like standard telephone line audio. Another command is used to disable (or mute) background audio. ICP Operator Manual / 3-19
  • 49. How it Works NAVIGATING THROUGH PRESENTATIONS Navigation was There are two processes which permit users to navigate through presentations: first introduced in Chapter 2: The Home • the Navigation Session Task (NST) Experience. • the Presentation File Server (PF Server) Navigation Session Task The NST is an application which interprets user input to determine which presentation a user wants to visit. An NST is assigned to each session when it is created and released when the session is terminated. This assignment enables an NST to process user input by providing the Presentation Server with the presen- tation data to play. The ICP is Once assigned to a session, an NST normally remains with the session until it is configured to terminated. Note that the NST only services one session at a time (unlike most have an NST running for other ICP processes). Therefore, several NSTs are typically running within every the ICP simultaneously. telephone connection at the head-end. <inactive> <inactive> NST NST NST NST NST NST 3-20 ICP Operator Manual
  • 50. How it Works See Chapter 7: Configuring the System for more information on how the NST can be configured by the system installer. See Appendix G: Your System to see the number of simultaneous users which can be supported by your system (this will correspond to the number of NSTs which are running on your system). Presentation File Server Do not The Presentation File Server (PF Server) reads presentations from disk files. confuse the Presentations themselves are grouped into presentation databases (PDBs). A PF Presentation File Server Server is assigned to each PDB. with the Presentation When an interactive application needs to read a presentation from a PDB, the Server. application submits its request to the corresponding PF Server. The PF Server responds by returning the correct data to that application. ICP Operator Manual / 3-21
  • 51. How it Works Selecting a Presentation After a session has been created, the assigned NST instructs the Presentation Server to play the root presentation of a designated PDB. Content producers designate a presentation as the root. Subsequent presentations are then played under the direction of user input. Here are the steps involved in selecting a presentation: The user selects an input choice from the current presentation or presses one of the keys. special hot keys. (Some presentations do not require any input from the user. In this case, the NST simply requests the PF Server to retrieve the previous presentation.) The AIS captures the input signals transmitted by the SCR, and then delivers the signals to the NST servicing the session. 3-22 ICP Operator Manual
  • 52. How it Works The NST tracks the available input choices for the current presentation. This information is used to validate the user's input. 001 The NST then 1111101 commands the PF 011 0 Server to read the appropriate presentation. The NST submits a play request to the Presentation Server and supplies the presentation data obtained in the previous steps. The remaining steps in the delivery of a presentation have already been discussed. ICP Operator Manual / 3-23
  • 53. How it Works MANAGING USER SESSIONS A user must logon to the ICP in order to receive interactive content. A keypress allows users to logon to the ICP and begins a session with the ICP. Logon delivers the main menu to a user. Presentations can be accessed from the The logon and main menu area. A session lasts until the user logs off the system by pressing logoff procedures are the or keys. called session creation and session The Session Manager manages multiple active termination, sessions. Only one Session Manager is run on an respectively. ICP. When a user presses the key to logon, the Session Manager assigns processes to play presentations, interpret input, etc. When a user presses the or key, the Session Manager performs the logoff procedure. During the course of a session, control can be transferred from the NST to another interactive application. The Session Manager makes this possible as well. The end of this section describes this in detail. Creating a Session Here are the steps the Session Manager takes when creating a session: The user selects the TV channel delivering the interactive services of the ICP and presses the key. 3-24 ICP Operator Manual
  • 54. How it Works The SCR dials the phone number of the ICP .head-end. ICP The head-end answers the incoming phone call. The keystroke is transmitted to the head-endcaptured ICP and and captured by the AIS. The AIS indicates to the Session Manager that a user wishes to logon to the ICP. The Session Manager assigns a Presentation Server, VTS and NST to service the user's session. Control is given to the session's NST so the first presentation can be delivered to the user. Input reception and audio/video playback can now occur. The Session Manager does not assign an AIS because the one which fields the initial logon request is automatically used to service the remainder of the session. Refer to Chapter 2: The Home Experience for the user’s perspective on session creation. ICP Operator Manual / 3-25
  • 55. How it Works Terminating a Session The Session Manager also frees processes to service other sessions when a user decides to logoff. Here are the steps related to user logoff: There are The user presses the several conditions or keys on which can their remote control. result in session termination. See Chapter 10: Trouble- shooting. This keystroke is transmitted to the ICP by the the head-end by SCR and captured by the AIS. The NST (or another interactive application) servicing the session receives the notice to logoff (just as other input was received during the course of the session). 3-26 ICP Operator Manual
  • 56. How it Works The NST instructs the Session Manager to terminate the session. The Session Manager frees the processes assigned to the session so they can service other sessions. Under the direction of the Session Manager, the AIS is instructed to close the telephone line connection to the user's SCR. This returns the telephone line to its on-hook state and makes it available for new incoming calls. Refer to Chapter 2: The Home Experience for the user’s perspective on session termination. ICP Operator Manual / 3-27
  • 57. How it Works Starting an Application The Session The primary functions of the Session Manager have already been discussed: Manager allowing users to logon and logoff the ICP. However, the Session Manager allows any also allows the NST to give control of a session to other interactive application to start any other applications. application. A presentation consists of video images, input choices and possibly an audio stream. Note that a presentation can also contain a reference to an interactive application. When a user navigates to such a presentation, the specified applica- tion is given control of their session. Here are the steps which start an application such as What’s on TV or Today: The user navigates to a presentation which has a reference to an application. The user input is captured by the AIS. AI S 3-28 ICP Operator Manual
  • 58. How it Works The user input is received by the NST and it instructs the Session Manager to pass control to the appropriate application. The Session Manager gives control of the session to the selected application. If none is available, the request is denied and the user must select another input choice. All subsequent input by the user is delivered to the interactive application, not the NST. This continues until the application terminates. The Session Manager returns control to the NST which replays the last presentation. From here, user input is directed to the NST as before. In the remainder of this chapter, we will explain some of the other functions which are not visible to the operator, but are important nevertheless to system opera- tion. ICP Operator Manual / 3-29
  • 59. How it Works OTHER FUNCTIONS OF THE ICP The external functions of the ICP have already been discussed. These include: • receiving user input • playing presentations • delivering audio and video • user navigation • session creation and termination • entering and exiting interactive applications These features are the most vital to the ICP because they have a direct impact on users. However, there are also three support functions performed by the ICP. The three support functions are: • Logging messages This support function, performed by the ITS, occurs constantly while the ICP is running. It allows an operator to monitor ICP events. • Recording statistics This support function, performed by the ITS, also occurs constantly while the ICP is running. It allows the performance of the ICP to be analyzed. Note that this function of the ICP may not be available on some systems. • Updating presentation databases This process occurs frequently for some PDBs and infrequently for others depending on how often content changes. These three important support functions will now be explained in greater detail. 3-30 ICP Operator Manual
  • 60. How it Works Logging Messages The ICP has numerous internal processes to deliver ITV to users. These pro- cesses will occassionally experience operating problems. Most problems can be handled by the system automatically. However, serious problems may require operator intervention. ICP processes record their actions in order to make troubleshooting possible (see Chapter 10: Troubleshooting). The Log Server allows ICP processes to record messages. These messages can have the following levels of severity: • regular • warning • severe A complete listing of messages produced by ICP processes can be found in Appendix A: Log Files and Messages. The Log Server receives messages from every ICP process, including the following: NST Session Manager Presentation Server Log Server VTS AIS ICP3-31.EPS ICP Operator Manual / 3-31
  • 61. How it Works The SMT is The Log Server saves messages to a log file in order to track messages. An the operator ’s operator can examine the log file online using the Site Management Task (SMT). window to the ICP. At The SMT is described in Chapter 5: Working with the ICP and Chapter 6: periodic Monitoring the System. intervals, it polls the Log A Log Server runs on each ICP computer and all the processes on a computer Server for the messages it has use only their local Log Server. Also, each Log Server has a log file. For more received. information on the log file, see Appendix A: Log Files and Messages. Processes produce messages from the time they start until they terminate. Therefore, system installers normally configure the Log Server as one of the first processes to be started during a system startup and among the last processes to be stopped during a system shutdown. Recording Statistics The ICP can service a large number of users simultaneously. Therefore, it is very important for system processes to quickly respond to user demands. These statistics The Statistics Server allows ICP processes to record statistics which can cannot be be used to evaluate system performance and compile business- and demo- viewed by an operator. The graphic-related data. These statistics include: only system information • the number of active users at various points in time available to an operator is the • the number of times a presentation is viewed by users information provided by the • disk usage of a process SMT. 3-32 ICP Operator Manual
  • 62. How it Works The Statistics Server writes all the statistics it receives to several files called statistics files. For more information on these files, see Appendix E: Statistics Files. Statistics Files Statistics Server A third-party database package is used to analyze the performance of the ICP. The statistics files used by the Statistics Server are transferred to a remote site where they become input to data analysis and report generation software. The raw information from the ICP can provide a wide spectrum of insights into the use, performance and time factors associated with ITV service. ICP Operator Manual / 3-33
  • 63. How it Works Updating Presentation Databases The ICP stores and distributes interactive content that changes frequently. This content is stored in PDBs that may need to be updated monthly, weekly or even daily. For more information on updating presentation databases, see Chapter 4: Batch Update Process and Chapter 8: Performing Batch Updates. 3-34 ICP Operator Manual
  • 64. Chapter 4: The Electronic Transfer of Content Chapter 4 T he Batch Update Process (BUP) electronically transfers presentation databases (PDBs) from a content producer’s workstation to the ICP. This chapter discusses the basics of the BUP. Refer to Chapter 8: Performing Batch Updates for detailed information on how an operator can monitor and manually control the BUP. ICP Operator Manual / 4-1
  • 65. The Electronic Transfer of Content LOCATIONS The BUP occurs at two physical sites: the Content Studio (CS) workstation and the ICP. Both of these sites are described in this section. Content Studio For more Content producers use the CS to create and modify PDBs. When the PDBs are information on ready for release, they are electronically transferred to the ICP. The CS starts the the CS, see the BUP by joining all the PDB files into one file prior to sending the data. Content Studio User Guide. Content Studio ICP Head-end PDB ICP4-01.EPS 4-2 ICP Operator Manual
  • 66. The Electronic Transfer of Content ICP Completed presentations are stored in PDBs within the ICP. Refer to the illustra- tion for a representation of a PDB. Each circle represents a presentation that consists of a sequence of images, audio and input choice information. These input choices allow the user to branch from one presentation to another. Typi- cally, an application will only use one PDB to store all its interactive content. Different applications may use different PDBs. ICP Head-end ICP4-02.EPS ICP Operator Manual / 4-3
  • 67. The Electronic Transfer of Content INSIDE THE BUP This section describes the tasks that must be done to setup the BUP and the steps involved in the BUP itself. BUP Setup The ICP system installer (not the operator) uses a setup utility during installa- tion. The setup utility is called cs_buprc.pl (see Chapter 8: Performing Batch Updates). The utility creates the configuration file, called the BUP Resource Configuration File (buprc), used by the BUP to obtain information about the ICP. Note that the setup utility is only run once and is not a part of each BUP. The system installer performs two tasks before PDBs can be electronically transferred: 1) userid creation The system installer creates a userid and password which is used by content producers during the BUP. Content producers require an operating system userid on one of the ICP computers before any file transfers can occur. The userid authorizes content producers to send material to an ICP computer. Normally, only one userid/password is created and used by all content produc- ers. 2) directory creation The system installer creates the directory structure which will be used during the BUP. This directory structure is documented in the BUP configuration file using the BUP setup utility. Directory creation is necessary for the BUP to work, but is only done once, not as part of each update. Refer to Appendix C: ICP Directories for directory structure information. 4-4 ICP Operator Manual
  • 68. The Electronic Transfer of Content BUP Steps Files can be electronically transferred from a content producer’s workstation to the ICP after the BUP setup. The six major steps of the BUP are: 1) File Transfer 2) File Distribution 3) Version Control 4) Cleanup 5) Activation 6) Operator Information ICP Operator Manual / 4-5
  • 69. The Electronic Transfer of Content File Transfer File Transfer Content producers start the BUP process. The CS joins all the PDB files into one brings PDB files from a file prior to sending the data. A PDB can then be transferred from a content content producer’s workstation to the ICP. This transfer uses a software program producer’s called File Transfer Protocol (FTP). During the BUP, this program is used workstation to to transfer files into the incoming directory. the ICP. PDB Files <F Content Studio TP > Inc dir omin PDB ect g joined file ory ICP4-03.EPS The incoming directory is /cs/data/incoming and this is documented in the buprc file. This directory contains a subdirectory for each PDB within the ICP and a PDB file is placed in its corresponding subdirectory. 4-6 ICP Operator Manual
  • 70. The Electronic Transfer of Content File Distribution File Dist- The ICP normally consists of several computers. The PDB data transferred in the ribution copies PDB previous step must be distributed to one or more of these computers. The files into number of computers depends on the number of users. their final ICP locations. Before files are distributed, the PDB data is moved from the incoming directory into the staging directory where the data is separated into its audio and video segments and other information (such as input choices). The staging directory is /cs/data/stage and this is documented in the buprc file. This directory contains subdirectories for each PDB. During the BUP, a PDB file is separated as de- scribed and placed into its corresponding subdirectory. Incoming Staging directory directory PDB Data PDB Audio segments Audio segments Video segments Other information ICP4-04.EPS ICP Operator Manual / 4-7
  • 71. The Electronic Transfer of Content There is a BUP The PDB file is separated using a utility called tar. This utility is run automati- Server running cally by the Batch Update Process (BUP) Server. The BUP Server coordinates for each PDB and it performs most of the work in the BUP. The BUP Server is always running as part of all the BUPs the ICP software and does not need to be started for each BUP. for its associated The BUP Server separates the PDB file sent by the CS using the file separation PDB. utility and places the resulting files in the staging directory. Next, it copies these files to various directories on various computers. 4-8 ICP Operator Manual
  • 72. The Electronic Transfer of Content Version Control Version Control More than one version of a PDB can reside in the ICP. Every PDB has an associ- performs the ated version number. This number increases when the PDB is updated using the tasks needed to maintain CS. The BUP is responsible for PDB version control tasks. multiple PDB versions. PDB versioning is useful for making transitions from old versions to new ver- sions. Versioning also permits a rollback to a previous version if a new version does not meet expectations. The BUP Version Controller is used by the BUP Server to perform PDB version control tasks. Specifically, the BUP Version Controller maintains the directory structure which allows multiple PDB versions to be used by the ICP software. These version control tasks are explained later in this chapter. ICP Content Studio BUP Server Week 1 BUP Version Version #1 PDB Controller Update ICP Content Studio BUP Server Version #1 Week 2 BUP Version Version #2 PDB Controller ICP Operator Manual / 4-9
  • 73. The Electronic Transfer of Content Cleanup Cleanup One of the final steps of the BUP consists of cleaning up all the PDB files that involves maintenance were sent from the CS workstation and created prior to file distribution. tasks. These files are removed automatically by the BUP Server. cs etc BUP Server data incoming <delete> PDB-A PDB-B PDB-C 4-10 ICP Operator Manual
  • 74. The Electronic Transfer of Content Activation Activation ICP software can be automatically instructed to use a new PDB version at a signals the ICP software to use scheduled time. They can also be instructed manually by an operator using the a new PDB SMT. In either case, this process is called activation. For example, a content version. producer can start a BUP on Monday at 9:00 a.m. and specify a scheduled activation time of 3:00 p.m. on the same day. Automatic Activation ICP Activate Version#3 at 3:00 PM Version #2 Content Producer PDB Version #3 Version #3 Manual Activation ICP Activate Version#3 at 3:00 PM Version #2 Operator Version #3 ICP Operator Manual / 4-11
  • 75. The Electronic Transfer of Content Operator Information Operator Messages are logged to a system log file while the BUP is running. These Information occurs messages can be viewed online using the SMT (see Chapter 5: Working with throughout the SMT). If an update is not successful, these messages may be helpful for the BUP and diagnostic purposes. keeps the operator informed of The SMT has a polling window specific to the BUP which provides additional progress. information not found in these messages. This window is described in greater detail later in this chapter. 4-12 ICP Operator Manual
  • 76. The Electronic Transfer of Content VERSION CONTROL TASKS The BUP Server coordinates the organization of multiple PDB versions during the BUP process. The BUP Server incorporates version numbers into PDB file names so that files from multiple versions can be placed in the same directory. The BUP Server also starts the BUP Version Controller which creates a versioned directory associated with a new PDB version. This section describes all the directories and processes related to version control. Depot Directory All the audio directories contain subdirectories for each PDB. Each of these, in turn, contain a subdirectory called depot. During a batch update, the BUP Server copies each file containing audio data from the staging directory to the depot directory corresponding to the PDB being updated. Audio Directory PDB depot Depot Directory BUP Server Staging Directory ICP4-06.EPS ICP Operator Manual / 4-13
  • 77. The Electronic Transfer of Content While making each copy, the BUP Server also incorporates a version number into the file name using the version associated with the update (this is generated by the CS). For example, if 00002318.au is a file in the staging directory and the version number is three, then the copied file will have a file name of 00002318.au:3. Each audio directory listed in the buprc file will have its own copy of this file. The BUP Server performs similar steps with video files. The BUP Server copies these video files to the video directories listed in buprc. The files in the depot directories are not used directly by ICP software. Instead, they use the files in the versioned directories described in the next section. 4-14 ICP Operator Manual
  • 78. The Electronic Transfer of Content Versioned Directories After the preceding step, the BUP Server starts the BUP Version Controller. The BUP Version Controller creates a subdirectory named vn (where n is the version number). This versioned directory is created under the PDB subdirectory of both the audio and video directories. The Version Controller creates files with the same name as the originals which point to the versioned files in the depot directories. This is known as symbolic linking. Video PDB v1 v2 depot Audio ICP4-07.EPS ICP Operator Manual / 4-15
  • 79. The Electronic Transfer of Content For example, if 00002318.au is an audio file that has been copied to /cs/data/audio/my_pdb/depot as 00002318.au:3, then the Version Controller creates a file called 00002318.au in a directory called /cs/data/audio/my_pdb/ v3. This directory will be created if it doesn’t already exist. The new file will point to 00002318.au:3. The Version Controller follows the same steps for all the remaining video files, placing them in a versioned directory under the video directory (for example, /cs/data/video/my_pdb/v3). The BUP Version Controller creates similar versioned directories under the ICP’s presentation directories (e.g. /cs/data/presentation/my_pdb/v3). It places all the remaining PDB files here. Unlike the versioned subdirectories in /cs/data/audio/my_pdb and /cs/data/ video/my_pdb, the ones in /cs/data/presentation/my_pdb contain the original copy of PDB files, not files pointing to the originals. Note that versioned directo- ries under the presentation directory (such as /cs/data/presentation/my_pdb/v3) are not accessed directly by ICP software. Instead, ICP software accesses the current directory described in the next section. 4-16 ICP Operator Manual
  • 80. The Electronic Transfer of Content Current Directory Unlike audio and video directories, a presentation directory does not contain a depot directory. Instead, the BUP Version Controller creates a directory called current (if it hasn’t already been created) which is symbolically linked to one of the vn directories. For example, if the PDB my_pdb is being updated, it will create /cs/data/presentation/my_pdb/current. This directory will not contain any files but will simply point to the versioned directory corresponding to the active version of my_pdb. For example, if version three is the active version of my_pdb, /cs/data/presentation/my_pdb/current will point to /cs/data/presentation/my_pdb/v3. The ICP software accesses the current directory in a presentation directory, rather than the actual versioned directories. Presentation Directory PDB Directory Current Directory v3 v2 ICP4-08.EPS ICP Operator Manual / 4-17
  • 81. The Electronic Transfer of Content CONTROLLING THE BUP An operator can perform several BUP-related tasks using the SMT: 1) activate a PDB manually 2) change the PDB activation time 3) disable/enable activation 4) change PDB versions 5) obtain status information Activate a PDB Manually An operator can manually activate the most recently acquired version of a PDB. This must also be done when a content producer wants manual activation of a PDB. Change the PDB Activation Time Using the SMT, an operator can change the scheduled activation time of the most recently acquired version of a PDB. Disable/Enable Activation There may be times when it is not suitable for a newly acquired PDB version to be activated. The operator can disable all scheduled activations of PDBs using an SMT menu command. When appropriate, the operator can re-enable automatic activations using another SMT menu command. (Note that manual activation can still be performed during this period.) Change PDB Versions The operator can change the active version of any PDB using the SMT. In fact, the operator can go back to an old version or move forward to a new version if the version number is known. 4-18 ICP Operator Manual
  • 82. The Electronic Transfer of Content Obtain Status Information The SMT also gives the operator two methods for obtaining information regard- ing the BUP. Using the Log Messages window, an operator can view the mes- sages generated by BUP software while a BUP is occurring. The BUP Informa- tion polling window provides other useful information such as the status of the current BUP. All of the manual BUP-related tasks an operator can perform with the SMT are described in Chapter 8: Performing Batch Updates. The SMT is described in Chapter 5: Working with the ICP and Chapter 6: Monitoring the System. Finally, see Appendix A: Log Files and Messages for a listing of all messages an operator can encounter during a BUP. ICP Operator Manual / 4-19
  • 83. Chapter 5: Working with the ICP Chapter 5 T he Site Management Task (SMT) is a text-based graphical user interface application which provides the administration functions of the ICP. This chapter explains the basics of the SMT and includes the following information: • how to start the SMT • a description of the SMT and its screen • the use of colors in the SMT • how to work with the SMT’s menus and windows • how to stop the SMT • other functions of the SMT It is important to read this chapter before reading Chapter 6: Monitoring the System. ICP Operator Manual / 5-1
  • 84. Working with the ICP STARTING THE SMT The operator must use the following steps to start the SMT: 1) Login as SMT from the operating system login prompt. 2) The ICP will prompt for the desired screen size. For example, the ICP will prompt the operator for this information: How many rows are in your display? How many columns are in your display? The typical screen size is 25 rows and 80 columns. This value changes depend- ing upon the type of terminal emulator that an operator is using. The system will start at a default setting unless the operator instructs it to do otherwise. The operating system automatically starts the SMT after the preceding steps. 5-2 ICP Operator Manual
  • 85. Working with the ICP DESCRIPTION The SMT is the primary facility for an operator to monitor and control the ICP. The user interface permits an operator to check the current status of the ICP and perform basic control operations which are further discussed in Chapter 6: Monitoring the System. The SMT is characterized by pull-down menus which display standard features and reflect the server activity on an ICP system. Depending on the type of terminal emulator you have, your screen may appear slightly different than the screens in this manual. The next section describes the primary elements of the SMT. ICP Operator Manual / 5-3
  • 86. Working with the ICP SMT SCREEN The SMT screen consists of several areas and windows. Some of these are always present while others are not (for example, all SMT polling windows can be opened and closed by request). Title Bar The SMT Title Bar displays information that the operator finds useful on a regular basis. This information is (from left to right): 1) Date and time 2) Number of unconfirmed severe messages (flashing with beeps, if any) 3) Active window title Refer to the section Colors for the color of the Title Bar. Menu Bar The SMT Menu Bar displays the following items: 1) SMT 2) Status 3) Hosts 4) Servers 5) Window 6) Help 5-4 ICP Operator Manual
  • 87. Working with the ICP The SMT Menu Bar never changes during the operation of the ICP. However, the various pull-down menus which appear beneath the six menu items can change. For example, the pull-down menu under Servers will only display the servers which are currently running, e.g. if a BUP Server is not running, the BUP Server menu item does not appear in the Servers menu. Refer to the section called Working with SMT Windows and Menus for informa- tion on how to move from one menu item to another. Refer to the section Colors for the color of the Menu Bar. ICP Operator Manual / 5-5
  • 88. Working with the ICP Server Status Activity Window The Server Status Activity window displays all the servers that are running. Most ICP systems require numerous servers to operate. Typically, a Supervisor, a Presentation Server, an AIS and a VTS are operational. The Server Status Activity window only displays those servers which are running. Those servers which are not presently running are not shown in the Server Status Activity window. For example, if the BUP Server is not running, this window does not display the BUP Server. This window is useful for an operator to get a quick accounting of all running systems. 5-6 ICP Operator Manual
  • 89. Working with the ICP Log Messages Window The Log Messages window area displays log messages which contain the following information: • Time the log message was generated • Host running the process which generated the message • Process which generated the message • Type of message (regular, warning or severe) • Routine name (for internal use only) Use the arrow keys to scroll through the available fields of information in each log message as well as the log messages themselves. For more information on log messages, including possible actions to take, see Appendix A: Log Files and Messages. The Log Messages window displays all messages that a process is likely to produce when an error occurs. Press <ENTER> to select a message. This displays additional information in the General Display window regarding the selected log message. ICP Operator Manual / 5-7
  • 90. Working with the ICP Note that the polling intervals can be set by the operator. This permits the operator to control the frequency at which the ICP polls the system for log messages. The previous menu selection permits the operator to set the polling interval in seconds. If an operator to detects too many log messages (or too few) it would be useful to check the polling interval. However, the system installer is likely to determine a polling interval for your system based upon the specifics of your system. Note that the polling interval value is displayed in the Window pull- down menu. Refer to the Logging Messages section in Chapter 3: How it Works for add- itional information on polling and windows. 5-8 ICP Operator Manual
  • 91. Working with the ICP COLORS The SMT display contains color which is used according to the conventions described in this section. Different colors represent different content within the SMT. For example, a severe log message is colored bright red. Here are the colors which accompany content and non-content: Non-content Window Frames: GREY Note that the Active Window Frames: CYAN colors of non- Active Window Controls: DARK GREEN content and content can be configured in Inactive Titles: GREY some systems. Title on Active Window: GREEN Main Title:WHITE Message Line: GREY Menu Line: GREY Shortcuts: BLUE Active Menu Selection or Choice: CYAN Active Title on Title Line: CYAN Content Static Fields and Labels: WHITE Columns: GREY Regular Log Message Level: GREY Warning Log Message Level: YELLOW Severe Log Message Level: RED Unconfirmed Severe Field: PINK ICP Operator Manual / 5-9
  • 92. Working with the ICP WORKING WITH SMT MENUS AND WINDOWS The SMT uses keys that permit operators to quickly perform certain tasks and go to certain windows. The screen shown below displays all of the shortcut conven- tions built into the SMT. Press k to display this help information or press m, scroll to Help and press <ENTER>. 5-10 ICP Operator Manual
  • 93. Working with the ICP The SMT’s screen can also be modified, depending on the needs of the operator. Note that the windows of the SMT can be active, although not visible. The following is an explanation of the various menu options which effect the windows of the SMT: Toggle Window Placement The typical SMT screen contains two separate windows: the Log Messages window and the Server Status Activity window. The Toggle Window Placement option permits the operator to change: • an entire screen of log messages or • an entire screen of Server Status Activity or • an entire screen of General Display information ICP Operator Manual / 5-11
  • 94. Working with the ICP Increase Lower Window This option permits the operator to increase the size of the Log Messages window (or whatever window is active in that location) in increments of one line at a time. Decrease Lower Window This option permits the operator to decrease the size of the Log Messages window (or whatever window is active in that location) in increments of one line at a time. General Display This option permits the operator to view additional information such as creating a Session List (described in further detail in Chapter 6: Monitoring the System). Note that all commands are placed in this area. Server Status Activity This option displays all of the active Servers in the ICP, and displays their status. Log Messages This menu provides timely information on how often the system polls the log messages. Note that although this window may not always be visible, it is always active. 5-12 ICP Operator Manual
  • 95. Working with the ICP Log Message Details This option displays important Log Message information and supplements the information provided in the Log Messages window. This window is critical for operators because it provides the additional informa- tion that operators can use for troubleshooting purposes. ICP Operator Manual / 5-13
  • 96. Working with the ICP STOPPING THE SMT There are two methods to stop the SMT: 1) Type q or 2) select SMT(Quit. 5-14 ICP Operator Manual
  • 97. Working with the ICP The SMT will prompt for confirmation before exiting. Press <ENTER> to exit or <ESC> to cancel. If you want to learn more about the SMT, don’t press <ENTER > to quit! Read Chapter 6: Monitoring the SMT for a more detailed explanation of the SMT. ICP Operator Manual / 5-15
  • 98. Monitoring the System Chapter 6: Monitoring the System Chapter 6 C hapter 5: Working with the ICP summarizes the fundamentals of the text- based graphical user interface and provides enough information for an operator to begin exploring how to interact with the ICP. This chapter builds upon the fundamentals discussed in the previous chapter and details the specifics of SMT operation. Screen captures are used extensively to assist the operator in understanding the text. The chapter begins with an in-depth discussion of the following menu line items found in the SMT Menu Bar: • Status • Hosts • Servers Note that this chapter only explains these three menu line items because the other menu line items were discussed in the previous chapter. A thorough understanding of this chapter will assist in the daily monitoring, managing and understanding of the SMT and, to a greater extent, the ICP. ICP Operator Manual / 6-1
  • 99. Montoring the System STATUS The SMT polls the Log Server for information at regular, operator-defined intervals. This polling enables the SMT to acquire timely information from a variety of sources. For additional information on logging messages, refer to Chapter 3: How it Works. The Status option on the SMT Menu Bar includes polling information and permits the operator to perform certain tasks. 6-2 ICP Operator Manual
  • 100. Monitoring the System Host Status Information polls the servers of the ICP and determines their status. Selecting Open polling window displays the following screen: The previous screen shows an operator that the AIS and the VTS are not presently active, however, the ITS is active. The ability of an operator to quickly access this vital information is very important. After all, it would be useful to know that the AIS and the VTS are “invalid hosts”! Refer to Chapter 3: How it Works for an overview of their significance . Selecting Close polling window returns to the previous screen. Note that the operator can manually enable and disable polling. ICP Operator Manual / 6-3
  • 101. Montoring the System Similar to log message polling, the operator can instruct the system to poll the hosts of the ICP. Select Set polling intervals to define the polling intervals for the hosts of the ICP. Again, polling intervals are defined in seconds and permit an operator or a system installer to check the status of all operational hosts on the ICP at a given time. 6-4 ICP Operator Manual
  • 102. Monitoring the System Note that your Polling information is typically available for the following: system may display additional • the status of the host (already described) information, • the Supervisor depending on the processes • log messages (refer to Chapter 5: Working with the ICP for information on that are the SMT, log messages and polling) running! • sessions • applications • presentations • BUP (refer to Chapter 8: Performing Batch Updates for information on BUP- related options accessible through the SMT) The operator requires this information in order to know the status of the system. The SMT regularly polls the system information and the operator can use this information regularly. The following will now be described in greater detail: the Supervisor, sessions, applications and presentations. Note that most of the menu options are similar to the Host Status Information option, therefore, only their differences will be discussed. ICP Operator Manual / 6-5
  • 103. Montoring the System Supervisor Select the Open polling window. The SMT displays the following information: Use the Decrease Lower Window selection to view all of this information. For more information on the Supervisor, refer to Chapter 3: How it Works. 6-6 ICP Operator Manual
  • 104. Monitoring the System Sessions Select the Open polling window. ICP Operator Manual / 6-7
  • 105. Montoring the System Applications Select the Open polling window. As described previously, every ICP is likely to have different installed applica- tions. Nevertheless, this pull-down menu option displays all applications that are available to users. Note that you may have to decrease the size of the lower window in order to view all of the applications that are available on your system. 6-8 ICP Operator Manual
  • 106. Monitoring the System The Application Information screen displays all of the installed applications. Applications were introduced in Chapter 2: The Home Experience. ICP Operator Manual / 6-9
  • 107. Montoring the System Presentations 6-10 ICP Operator Manual
  • 108. Monitoring the System HOSTS The operator can do several things with HOSTS: • Add Host • Remove Host • Prevent Auto-Start • Start/Continue • Shutdown Add host prompts for the addition of a host. • Add host prompts for the addition of a host. • Remove host prompts for the removal of a host • In order to prevent auto-start, the operator must select an appropriate host prior to requesting this action. • In order to start/continue, the operator must select an appropriate host before start/continue • Shutdown prompts for which host to shutdown. ICP Operator Manual / 6-11
  • 109. Montoring the System Add Host Remove host prompts for the removal of a host Shutdown prompts for which host to shutdown. Because three servers are operational, the operator has the option of shutting down any of three available servers. Note that shutting down a server will impact any users which are presently logged onto the system. Therefore, only shutdown servers during non-peak hours. 6-12 ICP Operator Manual
  • 110. Monitoring the System SERVERS A server is an ICP process which services requests from other ICP processes. This manual has discussed all of the processes in great detail. The SMT provides operators with a mechanism to control these servers and view information as it relates to each individual server. The following servers are included under this pull-down menu: • Supervisor • Log Server • Name Server • Presentation Server • AIS • VTS (this server is typically displayed, however, note that it is not presently running on the system from which the screen capture originated) • BUP Server ICP Operator Manual / 6-13
  • 111. Montoring the System Supervisor Start Process Kill Process Choose server Name Server Process List Choose Name Server AIS Full Info Line Disconnect Line Busy a Line Idle a Line BUP Server Activate an Update Change Time of Update Disable/Enable Timer Change verison Choose BUP Refer to Chapter 8: for information on how to control the BUP. 6-14 ICP Operator Manual
  • 112. Monitoring the System ICP Operator Manual / 6-15
  • 113. Montoring the System 6-16 ICP Operator Manual
  • 114. Monitoring the System ICP Operator Manual / 6-17
  • 115. Montoring the System 6-18 ICP Operator Manual
  • 116. Monitoring the System ICP Operator Manual / 6-19
  • 117. Montoring the System 6-20 ICP Operator Manual
  • 118. Monitoring the System ICP Operator Manual / 6-21
  • 119. Montoring the System 6-22 ICP Operator Manual
  • 120. Monitoring the System ICP Operator Manual / 6-23
  • 121. Chapter 7: Configuring the System Chapter 7 T he ICP can be customized using configuration files. There is a configur- ation file under the /cs/etc directory of each ICP computer. A configura- tion file name begins with the name of a computer and is suffixed with .super. For example, if the ICP has a computer named rho, its configuration file will be called /cs/etc/rho.super. A configuration file only applies to the computer it resides on. It contains a separate section for each process that must be run on this computer. Every section begins with a line identifying the process it applies to. Subsequent lines contain the configuration information for this process, one item per line. The Supervisor process uses the information in a configuration file. As explained in Chapter 9: Starting and Stopping the System, a Supervisor runs on every computer and starts all the processes for that computer. ICP Operator Manual / 7-1
  • 122. Configuring the System CONFIGURATION FILE SYNTAX A configuration file consists of a section for each process that must be run. Each section consists of several lines of configuration data applying to this process. Sec tio n1 Co nfi gu Fil ration ITS e Sec tio n1 VTS Co nfi gu Sec Fil ration tio e AIS Co n1 nfi gu Fil ration e ICP7-01.EPS Each line begins with a tag identifying what option is being configured. This information is followed by the actual configuration values. A line can also contain a comment beginning with a pound sign (#). However, these lines are ignored. The remainder of this chapter describes all the tags and the values that can follow them. 7-2 ICP Operator Manual
  • 123. Configuring the System PROGRAM The PROGRAM tag must be specified on the first line in a section. This tag is followed by a name that identifies the process being configured. The name can have a maximum length of 255 characters and consist of letters, numbers and underscores. Typical names look similar to CS_SUPERVISOR, CS_SESSION_MGR, etc. (In the future, this will read Supervisor and Session Manager, respectively.) PROC_CLASS The PROC_CLASS tag is optional and can be used to include a process in a group or class. Process classes are used by the Supervisor and are intended for internal fault recovery purposes. However, they are beyond the scope of this manual and are not discussed. This tag is followed by the class name, which uses the same naming rules described for the PROGRAM tag. This tag may be phased out in the next release and replaced. PATH The PATH tag The Supervisor needs the path to the executable file of a process in order to start must precede it and this tag provides that information. The PATH tag is followed by the path, PARM tags, if which can contain references to environment variables. Here is an example of this any. tag: PATH $CS_BIN$/cs_log_svr Here, CS_BIN is an environment variable referring to a directory. For example, CS_BIN might refer to /cs/bin. In this case, after the variable has been replaced, the path will be /cs/bin/cs_log_svr. (Note that the next version will not have $CS_BIN$.) ENV The ENV tag is used to define an operating system environment variable that will be used by a process. Multiple ENV tags, one per line, can appear in the configu- ration section of a process. The following example shows how this tag can be used: ENV LOG_SVR_VAR=1234 ICP Operator Manual / 7-3
  • 124. Configuring the System PARM Many processes can take command line arguments when they are started by the PARM tags, if used, must Supervisor. The PARM tag is used to specify these arguments. If more than one follow the argument needs to be used for a process, each must be specified on a separate PATH tag. line starting with this tag. Here is an example showing how a log file is specified for the Log Server: PARM -f PARM /cs/data/itv.log Notice that each argument which is separated by one or more spaces on a command line must be specified on a separate line in the configuration file. %INDEX Variable When using the PARM tag, you can make use of the special configuration file variable %INDEX. As each instance (see the INSTANCES section later in this chapter) of a process is started, any occurrences of this variable are replaced with the instance number of the process. The first instance is given a number of 0. (The next version is likely to be 1.) Also, %INDEX+<n> can be used where <n> is replaced with a number greater than 0. This combination will be replaced by an instance number incremented by the specified amount. An example of this is shown below: PARM some_file_%INDEX+1 Here, some_file_%INDEX+1 will be replaced by some_file_1 for the first in- stance of a process, some_file_2 for the second instance, etc. HEARTBEAT WARNING: The HEARTBEAT tag allows heartbeats to be configured for a server (see Appendix D: Fault Recovery for more information on this topic). This tag is All applications followed by a space-separated list of at most sixty values from 0-59. These and servers values indicate the seconds of each minute when the Supervisor will issue should be heartbeats. An example of this tag is given below: configured with heartbeats for fault recovery HEARTBEAT 10 20 30 40 50 purposes. 7-4 ICP Operator Manual
  • 125. Configuring the System Here, the Supervisor will issue heartbeats to the server at the 10-, 20-, 30-, 40- and 50-second marks of every minute. If this tag is not specified, no heartbeats will be sent to a server. MISSHBS Servers are The Supervisor uses the MISSHBS tag to determine how many heartbeats can be normally missed by a server before it is considered to have malfunctioned. This tag is configured to not miss any required for each server and can be followed by a value from 0 to 255. (See heartbeats. Appendix D: Fault Recovery for more information on missed heartbeats.) INSTANCES See the section The INSTANCES tag allows multiple occurrences of a process to be run. For PARM for a example, a typical ICP will have several NSTs running (see Chapter 3: How it description of an associated Works) and this is accomplished using the INSTANCES tag. This tag must be variable called specified for every process that will be run and takes a value of at least 1. (The %INDEX. next version is likely to be 0.) STARTINDEX The STARTINDEX tag indicates the relative order of a process within the Supervisor’s start-up sequence (see Chapter 9: Starting and Stopping the System). It is followed by a value in the range 0-65535. For example, the Log Server is typically configured with the following line: STARTINDEX 2 which means it will be started after processes having a lower STARTINDEX and before those having a higher STARTINDEX. Processes can share start indices and, in this case, the order in which they are started is arbitrary (but after processes with lower indices and before those with higher indices). Also, index numbers can be omitted for processes (these pro- cesses will all be started at the end of the start-up sequence). Therefore, the start index of 2 in the preceding example is not a guarantee that the Log Server will be the second process started. ICP Operator Manual / 7-5
  • 126. Configuring the System Note that, by convention, core system processes (e.g. Session Manager, Presen- tation Server, PF Server, etc.) are configured with start indices under 100. Other processes are grouped together and given start indices at multiples of 100. SHUTDOWNINDEX The The SHUTDOWNINDEX tag parallels the STARTINDEX tag by indicating the SHUTDOWN- order of a process in the Supervisor’s shutdown sequence (see Chapter 9: INDEX tag can be followed by Starting and Stopping the System). A process with a lower index than another a value in the will be shutdown first. Indices can be shared by multiple processes (in which range 0-65535. case each will be shutdown in an arbitrary order). If a shutdown index is not given for a process, it will be assigned an index of 0. RECOVERY The RECOVERY tag is required in each configuration section and is followed by one of the following: • SHUTDOWN • RESTART Currently, IGNORE and • LOG_EVENT LOG_EVENT • IGNORE produce identical results. As discussed in Appendix D: Fault Recovery, the Supervisor is capable of taking four recovery actions when a process fails. This tag determines which action should be used. DELAY The DELAY tag is used by the Supervisor to determine how long to wait (pres- ently, in seconds) before starting the next process in the system start-up se- quence. This is described in Chapter 9: Starting and Stopping the System. The value must be 0 or greater. If this tag is not specified, a delay value of 0 will be used. Note that the Supervisor begins waiting for the specified delay period only after receiving confirmation that a process has started. 7-6 ICP Operator Manual
  • 127. Configuring the System SIGNAL_MASK The SIGNAL_MASK tag is optional and is followed by the name of a signal which will be blocked from a process. The signals that can be blocked are defined in the operating system header file signal.h. If more than one signal must be blocked, each must be specified on a separate line with this tag. WORKDIR The WORKDIR tag is optional (but usually specified) and is used to specify the If the working directory working directory of a process. If it is not specified, the current working direc- cannot be tory of the Supervisor, when it starts the process, will be used. This tag is found, it will be followed by the path to the working directory, which can contain variable names created by the as shown: Supervisor. $CS_WORKDIR$/cs_nst ICP Operator Manual / 7-7
  • 128. Configuring the System VIEWING AND MODIFYING CONFIGURATION FILES Note that the As already mentioned, each ICP computer has a configuration file in the /cs/etc operator directory. This file rarely needs to be changed by an operator since this is doesn’t have normally done only once by the system installer. However, it can be modified as access to an operating necessary using an operating system editor. For example, enter the following at system the operating system prompt: prompt. %xedit /cs/etc/rho.super This allows a system installer to view and/or edit the configuration file /cs/etc/ rho.super on the ICP machine named rho using the operating system’s xedit editor. The sections in a configuration file are usually marked by comments that indicate the process being configured. Note that you must select the computer whose file you want to view or modify since some processes only run on a single computer while others run on every computer. For example, the VTS only runs on one computer, however, the Log Server runs on every computer. Note that each file can be configured differently. You must scroll through a configuration file to find the section you want. For example, the configuration section for the Session Manager can only be found on the machine running the Session Manager itself. Note that CS_SESSION_MGR and CS_BIN$ are likely to change. Here is what this section might look like: #----------------------------------------------- # Sample Configuration Data for Session Manager #----------------------------------------------- PROGRAM CS_SESSION_MGR PATH $CS_BIN$/cs_session_mgr/ cs_session_mgr HEARTBEAT 10 20 MISSHBS 3 INSTANCES 1 STARTINDEX 6 SHUTDOWNINDEX 2 RECOVERY SHUTDOWN DELAY 1 WORKDIR $CS_BIN$/cs_session_mgr 7-8 ICP Operator Manual
  • 129. Configuring the System In the preceding example: Note that the 1) The first tag is PROGRAM which indicates that the Session Manager is first three being configured in this section. lines are comments 2) The path to the executable file for the Session Manager is specified next. which make 3) The Session Manager is a server process so the HEARTBEAT tag must be this section included. In this example, heartbeats will be issued to the Session Manager easy to find in at the 10- and 20-second marks of every minute. the configura- tion file. 4) The Supervisor will assume the Session Manager has malfunctioned if it doesn’t respond to 3 consecutive heartbeats, as indicated by the MISSHBS tag. 5) As described in Chapter 3: How it Works, only one Session Manager is run on the ICP and this is accomplished with the INSTANCES tag. 6) The STARTINDEX tag specifies that, during system startup, the Session Manager will be started after any processes with start indices less than 6 but before any with indices greater than 6. Note that a value of 6 does not guarantee the Session Manager will be the sixth process started since processes can share start indices and some start indices may not be used at all. 7) The SHUTDOWNINDEX tag indicates when the Session Manager will be shutdown during the system shutdown sequence. Processes with lower values are stopped sooner than those with high shutdown indices. There- fore, the value of 2 (shown in this example) means the Session Manager will be among the first to be shutdown. (It does not guarantee the Session Manager will be the second process terminated for the same reason stated previously for the STARTINDEX tag.) 8) The RECOVERY tag with the value of SHUTDOWN indicates that the Supervisor must shutdown all other processes on the machine if the Session Manager terminates abnormally. 9) The DELAY tag indicates that the Supervisor will wait for 1 second during its startup sequence before starting the process following the Session Man- ager. 10) The WORKDIR tag indicates the path to the working directory for the Session Manager. ICP Operator Manual / 7-9
  • 130. Configuring the System Changing the Configuration File A configuration file is an ordinary text file, and the tags and configuration values in a section can be changed with any text editor. For example, xedit (described in the previous section) can be used to change tags and configuration values. After changes have been saved, the processes on the machine with the changed file must be restarted. This is typically accomplished using the SMT, as de- scribed in Chapter 9: Starting and Stopping the System. Do not turn a machine off and on to restart all processes in this situation. 7-10 ICP Operator Manual
  • 131. Chapter 8: Performing Batch Updates Chapter 8 T he Batch Update Process (BUP) brings new versions of PDBs (and their associated media) to the ICP. As described in Chapter 4: The Electronic Transfer of Content, the BUP is started by a content producer using the Content Studio (CS). However, an operator has some manual control over the BUP as well as methods to obtain BUP-related information. Specifically, an operator can: • activate a PDB • disable/enable scheduled activations • change a scheduled activation time • change PDB versions • view BUP messages • view general BUP information These tasks are all done using the SMT and are described in the remainder of this chapter. However, the system installer must initialize the ICP before any BUPs can be run. This is done during ICP installation and is also discussed. ICP Operator Manual / 8-1
  • 132. Performing Batch Updates SPECIFYING DIRECTORY INFORMATION Several directories must be present on the ICP machines before performing a BUP. The ICP system installer creates these directories and documents them in the BUP resource configuration file (buprc) so that they can be used during the BUP. Refer to Appendix C: ICP Directories for information concerning the directory structure of the ICP. The following directory structures are illustrated in Appen- dix C: ICP Directories: • INS • AIS • VTS • ITS 8-2 ICP Operator Manual
  • 133. Performing Batch Updates Running the Setup Utility Note that The system installer uses the cs_buprc.pl utility (located in /cs/bin) to document cs_buprc.pl is the directories described in the buprc file. It prompts for all the information it only run initially, not as needs rather than taking any command line parameters. part of every update. Enter the following command to start the setup utility: /cs/etc%cs_buprc.pl Run this utility in the system configuration directory (/cs/etc) because the buprc file must be created here. ICP Operator Manual / 8-3
  • 134. Performing Batch Updates Obtaining Help The system installer works with the setup utility by entering commands at its command prompt: command (h for help)> Several commands are available within the setup utility and these can be displayed at any time by entering the help command as follows: command (h for help)> h The following commands (or indicated letter) are valid: [a]dd <string> - add {path} data to list. [d]el <row> - delete row number <row> from list. [f]inish - finished editing the current list. [h]elp - prints help. [q]uit - exit from the program. The current [INCOMING] configuration is: [1] /cs/data/incoming This listing also appears if you enter an invalid command. Each command has a one-letter equivalent which is shown in square brackets preceding the command itself. Also, the first two commands must be followed by values, as indicated by the words in angle brackets. Exiting the Setup Utility You can exit from the setup utility at any time by using the quit command: command (h for help)> quit 8-4 ICP Operator Manual
  • 135. Performing Batch Updates or command (h for help)> q This will terminate your session without saving any information to the buprc file (or creating a new file if none already exists). Utility Commands Information about each of the directories described previously is entered and stored as lists. Each item in the list consists of one or more space-separated fields such as a host name (machine name) or a directory path. The information which is required will be indicated while you are entering a specific directory list. The add command is used to add a list item to the beginning of a list. For WARNING: example, to add an item with two fields, the host name rho and path /cs/data/mydir, enter the following: The setup utility does not do any error command (h for help)> add rho /cs/data/mydir checking. Make sure your or input is correct. command (h for help)> a rho /cs/data/mydir The delete command is used to remove an indicated item from a list: command (h for help)> del 3 or command (h for help)> d 3 This will remove the third item from the current list. Finally, use the finish command when you are done editing the current list: ICP Operator Manual / 8-5
  • 136. Performing Batch Updates command (h for help)> finish or command (h for help)> f This allows you to enter the list for the next directory. If all the directory information has been specified, the setup utility will write the directory information to the buprc file and exit. Specifying Incoming and Staging Directories When it begins, the setup utility displays the following message: BUPRC editor The [INCOMING] section of the BUPRC file requires no more than 1 line(s) of the form: path for example: /cs/data/incoming The current [INCOMING] configuration is: [1] <empty> Here, the utility is prompting for information about the system’s incoming directory. If the buprc file doesn’t exist in the current working directory, you will see <empty> (as shown). Otherwise, the incoming directory will be shown in place of <empty>. Enter the path of the incoming directory using the add command. When you are done, enter the finish command to move to the staging directory. Both commands are described in the previous section and are used in the following example: command (h for help)> add /cs/data/incoming 8-6 ICP Operator Manual
  • 137. Performing Batch Updates The current [INCOMING] configuration is: [1] /cs/data/incoming command (h for help)> finish Enter the staging directory as you did the incoming directory: BUPRC editor The [STAGING] section of the BUPRC file requires no more than 1 line(s) of the form: path for example: /cs/data/stage The current [STAGING] configuration is: [1] <empty> command (h for help)> add /cs/data/stage The current [STAGING] configuration is: [1] /cs/data/stage command (h for help)> finish Next, the setup utility will prompt for the presentation directory information. This requires more information to be entered than for the incoming and staging direct- ories. Specifying Presentation Directories For the presentation directory, you must enter a list of host names and paths. These correspond to all the locations within the ICP where presentation files are stored. At most ten locations (i.e. list items) can be entered. For a typical site, there will be two presentation directories with a /cs/data/presentation path. ICP Operator Manual / 8-7
  • 138. Performing Batch Updates BUPRC editor The [PRESENTATION] section of the BUPRC file requires no more than 10 line(s) of the form: host path for example: zeus /cs/data/presentations The current [PRESENTATION] configuration is: [1] <empty> command (h for help)> add zeus /cs/data/ presentation After entering this information, you will be prompted for the audio and then the video directory information. This is described in the next section. Specifying Audio and Video Directories Although most ICP systems will have only a few audio directories, the setup utility accepts a maximum of ten. The second directory is a backup location on the Integrated Network Server (INS). For each audio directory, you must specify a host name, a comma-separated list of audio file extensions and, finally, an WARNING: absolute path. Make sure you enter the The comma-separated list of file extensions is used by the BUP Server when it correct distributes files from the staging directory into the audio directory. It will only extensions and copy files with the extensions indicated in buprc. Typically, the only audio file check for extensions that are entered are CAF and/or AU. spelling. Otherwise, there will be BUPRC editor problems with the BUP. The [AUDIO] section of the BUPRC file requires no more than 10 line(s) of the form: host ext1,ext2,..,extn path for example: apollo au,caf /cs/data/audio 8-8 ICP Operator Manual
  • 139. Performing Batch Updates Note that typically two The current [AUDIO] configuration is: locations are specified [1] <empty> (target and backup). command (h for help)> add apollo au,caf /cs/ data/audio command (h for help)> finish For the video directory, enter similar information. However, the extensions you will likely enter are JPG and/or JPL and the path you will most likely enter is /cs/data/video. Specifying Notification Information As described in Chapter 4: The Electronic Transfer of Content, a newly acquired PDB only becomes useful after it has been activated. During activation, the BUP Server instructs the PF Server corresponding to a PDB to use the new version. The BUP Server searches for PF Servers from the list of hosts (the notification list) specified in the buprc file. The setup utility prompts for this notification list after all of the preceding directory information has been entered. Host names are added to this list using the same add command described previously. For example, BUPRC editor The [NOTIFY] section of the BUPRC file requires no more than 10 line(s) of the form: host for example: zeus The current [NOTIFY] configuration is: [1] <empty> command (h for help)> add zeus ICP Operator Manual / 8-9
  • 140. Performing Batch Updates command (h for help)> add delta If a buprc file adds the two host names zeus and delta to the notification list. Usually, the hosts already exists, in the notification list will be identical to the host names in the presentation it will be directory list (except in the backup location). renamed to buprc.old. Enter the finish command when this list has been entered. This saves all of the information input during the session to the buprc file (the file will be created if it doesn’t already exist). The finish command also terminates the setup utility. 8-10 ICP Operator Manual
  • 141. Performing Batch Updates CHOOSING A BUP SERVER WARNING: The ICP typically stores many different PDBs and an interactive application only uses a single PDB at any one time. However, different interactive applications Be sure to may use their own PDBs (and there can be multiple versions of each of their choose the BUP Server PDBs). before performing the There is a BUP Server running on the ICP for each PDB. For example, if there is a tasks described PDB named yp used by the Yellow Pages application and another PDB named later in this chapter. today used by the Today application, there will be BUP Servers running for both. The BUP Server for a PDB handles all the management tasks for that PDB and its various versions (e.g. performing BUPs, manual activation, changing activation time, etc.). Before the operator can work with a PDB using the SMT, the desired BUP Server (i.e. the desired PDB) must be chosen. To choose a BUP Server, select Servers (BUP Server(Choose BUP from the SMT’s menu. ICP Operator Manual / 8-11
  • 142. Performing Batch Updates Selecting the Choose BUP menu option provides the operator with a list of options and prompts the operator for the name of the BUP Server to activate: 8-12 ICP Operator Manual
  • 143. Performing Batch Updates MANUALLY ACTIVATING A PDB A PDB can be Typically, when content producers publish a new version of a PDB, they will manually specify the time when it should be activated and activation will take place activated even automatically. However, they also have the option of allowing the operator to if it has been scheduled for manually activate the new version. This is done using the SMT’s menu. automatic activation. To manually activate the most recently acquired version of a PDB, first select the BUP Server servicing that PDB. This has already been described in the section Choosing a BUP Server. Next, from the SMT’s menu, select Servers(BUP Server(Activate Update. ICP Operator Manual / 8-13
  • 144. Performing Batch Updates A message will be displayed in the SMT’s General Display window indicating if the action was successful. Otherwise, log messages in the Log Messages window and/or messages in the General Display window will indicate that the operation failed. See Chapter 10: Troubleshooting for possible solutions in this case. 8-14 ICP Operator Manual
  • 145. Performing Batch Updates CHANGING THE ACTIVATION TIME Content producers can choose to have a PDB activated manually or auto- matically at a specified time. Usually, the latter option is chosen. In this case, the operator can change the scheduled activation time using the SMT. This may be required for several reasons including the following: • the content producer specified an incorrect activation time • the content producer decides on another activation time after the PDB has been tranferred to the ICP To change the activation time, first select the BUP Server corresponding to the desired PDB. This is described earlier in the section Choosing a BUP Server. Next, from the SMT’s menu, select Servers(BUP Server(Change Time of Update. ICP Operator Manual / 8-15
  • 146. Performing Batch Updates If multiple This produces a dialog box which displays the scheduled activation time of the BUPs have most recently acquired PDB version. Change the date and time to the desired occurred, make sure that you values. If the action is unsuccessful, log messages in the Log Messages window activate the and/or messages in the General Display window may appear. In this case, see correct one! Chapter 10: Troubleshooting for possible solutions. The General Display window will notify the operator if the activation time was successfully changed. 8-16 ICP Operator Manual
  • 147. Performing Batch Updates DISABLING/ENABLING ACTIVATION Using the SMT, an operator can prevent the scheduled activation of a PDB. This is useful in various situations including the following: • there is a problem with the PDB and it shouldn’t be activated • there are problems with the system and an activation shouldn’t be performed To prevent the scheduled activation of a PDB, first select the BUP Server corresponding to the PDB. This has been described previously in the section Choosing a BUP Server. ICP Operator Manual / 8-17
  • 148. Performing Batch Updates Next, from the SMT’s menu, select Servers(BUP Server(Disable/Enable Timer. This selection prevents a scheduled activation. Note that this only applies to the selected BUP Server and PDB (other PDBs will not be affected). To re-enable activation, again select Servers (BUP Server(Disable/Enable Timer. When activation has been re-enabled, any scheduled activation which was suppressed (due to being disabled) will immediately be executed. However, if there was an activation pending for a different time period, it will not be acti- vated. If there are problems performing these operations, log messages in the Log Messages window and/or messages in the General Display window may appear. In this case, refer to Chapter 10: Troubleshooting for possible solutions. 8-18 ICP Operator Manual
  • 149. Performing Batch Updates CHANGING PDB VERSIONS Switch PDB SMT menu items can also be used to change to previous or newer versions of a versions when PDB. This may be useful when there are problems with the active version. the system is not busy or only a few For example, to switch to version three of a PDB named my_pdb, select users are logged Servers(BUPServer(Change Version. on. ICP Operator Manual / 8-19
  • 150. Performing Batch Updates The SMT then prompts the operator for a version number. It is possible for a user to be viewing a PDB while versions are switched. If this happens, the user will see presentations from the new version only when he/she navigates forward. As long as the user navigates back through previously viewed presentations, he/she will continue to obtain presentations from the old version. 8-20 ICP Operator Manual
  • 151. Performing Batch Updates VIEWING BUP MESSAGES During the BUP, messages are produced indicating the start and completion of certain steps, unusual conditions, etc. These are sent to the Log Server (as described in the Logging Messages section of Chapter 3: How it Works) and can be viewed online from the SMT’s Log Messages window. For more information on how this is done, see Chapter 6: Monitoring the System. See Appendix A: Log Files and Messages for a complete listing of log messages produced during the BUP. ICP Operator Manual / 8-21
  • 152. Performing Batch Updates VIEWING GENERAL BUP INFORMATION The SMT provides information about BUPs which are in progress or those last completed. An operator can view this information from the SMT’s BUP Informa- tion polling window. This is opened by selecting the following: Status(BUP Information(Open Polling Window. This window contains the following fields of information for each BUP Server: • name of its associated PDB • version number of the last updated PDB • location of the incoming directory • type of activation (manual or automatic) • status of the BUP Server’s timer (which determines whether automatic activation is enabled or disabled) • name of PF Servers and the path to the presentation directories containing their PDB files • AIS and VTS information The following illustration shows a sample BUP Information polling window. 8-22 ICP Operator Manual
  • 153. Chapter 9: Starting and Stopping the System Chapter 9 T he Supervisor is responsible for starting and stopping the ICP. The Supervisor runs on each ICP computer and is configured to start as soon as a computer is turned on. The Supervisor remains operational until a computer is turned off, even after the ICP has been stopped. The Supervisor has two command line options that affect how it starts the system. These startup options are: • delayed startup • paused startup Both of these options will be described now. ICP Operator Manual / 9-1
  • 154. Starting and Stopping the System DELAYED STARTUP This feature is The operator can instruct the Supervisor to wait before it begins the system needed only startup procedure. Delaying system startup allows a problem (such as faulty because ICP drivers) to be corrected before the rest of the system is started. computers are configured to start the The –d option on the Supervisor’s command line is used to specify a delay time Supervisor as period. For example, soon as they are turned on. %cs_super_svr -d 25 will cause the Supervisor to wait for 25 seconds before beginning system startup. A value of zero can be used to prevent any delay. If this option is not used at all, the Supervisor will wait for 10 seconds by default. A negative value can also follow the –d option. When the Supervisor encounters a negative value, it will wait to be prompted before starting the system. This feature is described in the next section. 9-2 ICP Operator Manual
  • 155. Starting and Stopping the System PAUSED STARTUP Typically, the Supervisor will automatically start the system startup procedure after it has waited for a specified delay period. However, there may be times when the delay period isn’t long enough to fix problems with the system. Therefore, the Supervisor has a pause mode command line option. This option prevents system startup until the operator instructs the Supervisor to do so. The operator uses the SMT to give this instruction. The paused startup option is an extension of the delayed startup option. The paused startup option is useful when configuration files need to be modified or other long tasks must be done before system startup. To enable pause mode, use the –p option on the Supervisor’s command line: %cs_super_svr -p Pause mode can also be enabled using –d with a negative delay value. Note that if pause mode is enabled, any delay time value will be ignored. ICP Operator Manual / 9-3
  • 156. Starting and Stopping the System AUTOMATIC AND MANUAL STARTUP Note that the The delay and pause mode features control what happens before the Supervisor present system begins its system startup procedure. During the system startup sequence itself, does not the Supervisor starts all required ICP processes individually. See the Starting support these features, and Stopping Sequence section later in this chapter. however, a future version Normally, the system startup procedure is automatic and the Supervisor will start will. all processes without prompting and according to a predetermined order and schedule. However, if it has been started in pause mode, the Supervisor will wait to be prompted before beginning the system startup procedure. See the How to Start and Stop the System section later in this chapter. 9-4 ICP Operator Manual
  • 157. Starting and Stopping the System Delayed Startup Paused Startup ICP system is turned on. ICP system is turned on. ON ON OFF OFF The Supervisor waits The Supervisor waits for a delay period for operator's signal. (possibly zero seconds). SMT Supervisor <Signal> Supervisor The Supervisor starts all required ICP processes according to a predetermined order and schedule. Supervisor Process A Process B ICP9-1.EPS ICP Operator Manual / 9-5
  • 158. Starting and Stopping the System HOW TO START AND STOP THE SYSTEM Starting and stopping the ICP should only be done when problems occur and only after careful consideration of other options. Refer to Chapter 10: Trouble- shooting and Appendix A: Log Files and Messages for additional resources to identify and solve common ICP problems. The entire process of starting and stopping the system is normally fully auto- mated and transparent to an operator. As already mentioned, the Supervisor is typically configured to start the system as soon as an ICP computer is turned on. However, an operator can influence system startup with the SMT by using the Supervisor’s paused startup mode. An operator can also shutdown the system using the SMT. Starting and stopping the system will be described now. Starting the System The ICP is configured so that the Supervisor begins the system startup sequence when it is started itself. The Supervisor will wait a predetermined time, by default 10 seconds, before starting the ICP system. The operator can use the SMT to stop the startup procedure during this 10-second delay period. The SMT assumes a Supervisor is running. Therefore, the operator can start the system by turning on all computers or rebooting the system. 9-6 ICP Operator Manual
  • 159. Starting and Stopping the System Stopping the System WARNING: If the system is stopped without being turned off, the Supervisor will stop all processes, but keep running itself. The operator uses the SMT to shutdown the Stopping the system will system. Select the Hosts (Shutdown menu item to perform this task. instantly terminate all active user sessions. Try not to do this during busy periods. ICP Operator Manual / 9-7
  • 160. Starting and Stopping the System The SMT will prompt the operator for confirmation before issuing a shutdown request. Each host computer must be shutdown one at a time in order to shut- down the entire system. 9-8 ICP Operator Manual
  • 161. Starting and Stopping the System STARTING AND STOPPING SEQUENCE This section explains the actions taken by the Supervisor during the system startup and shutdown procedures. The DELAY As already discussed, the Supervisor can be started with or without a pause configuration mode option or delay time value. The Supervisor starts immediately when an ICP option applies to an individual machine is turned on. However, it can also be started manually from the command process. The line (but this is rarely done). Supervisor’s delay command Here are the steps the Supervisor performs when it is started: line argument indicates how many seconds to wait before The Supervisor waits for the specified beginning the delay period if there is any. system startup (If the pause mode is selected, the procedure. Supervisor waits for the operator's signal). Supervisor <Delay Period> <Initiate Startup Procedure> The Supervisor reads the configuration file from the /cs/etc/ directory. cs Supervisor etc Co nfi gu r Fil ation e The Supervisor starts each process specified in the configuration file, one after another. Supervisor Process A Process B ICP Operator Manual / 9-9
  • 162. Starting and Stopping the System When the ICP is being shutdown, the Supervisor automatically terminates all the processes it started. The Supervisor uses the SHUTDOWNINDEX configuration value for each process to determine its order in the shutdown sequence (see Chapter 7: Configuring the System for more information). The Supervisor itself normally remains operational even after all other processes have been shutdown. 9-10 ICP Operator Manual
  • 163. Chapter 10: Troubleshooting Chapter 10 POST-DENTON ICP Operator Manual / 10-1
  • 164. Appendix A: Log Files and Messages A Appendix A L ogging messages for the purpose of troubleshooting is an auxilary function of the ICP. The Log Server is responsible for logging messages and it uses a log file to save all the messages it receives. In this section, we will discuss the naming and location of ICP log files. Also, we will describe the fields in a log message. Sample log messages are included in Chapter 6: Monitoring the System. The end of this appendix will list log mes- sages generated by the ICP in the next version of the manual. Log files are not examined directly by operators. Instead, the messages they contain must be viewed online using the SMT. See Chapter 6: Monitoring the System for an explanation of how this is done. ICP Operator Manual / A-1
  • 165. Log Files and Messages NAMING AND LOCATION OF LOG FILES The number of messages which are generated by all the ICP processes requires a Log Server on each ICP machine. Each server has its own log file which is specified in the system configuration file. Typically, log files are placed in the /cs/data/log directory of each machine and will all end in .log. Because of the number of messages which are generated while the ICP is running, a single log file can become quite large. To keep file sizes reasonable, the Log Server rolls over to a new log file when any of the following conditions occur: Note that these are optional triggers, and • a predetermined number of messages have been written to the current file may or may not be • a specified period of time has elapsed configured, • an operator requests rollover to a new file in the SMT therefore, the Log Server might never Each of these methods will be described in the following sections. switch to a new file. Rollover by Size Suppose the Log Server is configured to rollover to a new file after every 5000 messages. Assuming its log file is named itv.log, the server will rename the current file itv.log.1-5000 and begin writing to a new itv.log file when it receives the 5001st message. Similarly, when it receives the 10001st message, it will rename its log file itv.log.5001-10000 and begin writing to a new itv.log file. Here, the numbers 5000 and 10000 are called the message indices, and reflect the order in which a message is received. (Do not confuse message index with message identifier, which is described later in this chapter.) Therefore, the name itv.log.1-5000 indicates this log file contains the first 5000 log messages saved by the Log Server. Similarly, the name itv.log.5001-10000 indicates this log file contains the 5001st to the 10000th log message. A-2 ICP Operator Manual
  • 166. Log Files and Messages The number of messages before a rollover occurs is specified in the system configuration file. If no value is given, the log file will not be rolled over as described here. For more information on the system configuration file, see Chapter 7: Configuring the System. Note that the Log Server is rarely configured to rollover to a new log file after a fixed number of messages have been written. Typically, the method described in the next section is used. Rollover by Time Note that this The Log Server can be instructed to rollover to a new log file at a specific time method can be each day. This is done using scheduling features of the operating system. The used in conjunction naming rules for the old and new log files are the same as those described in the with the previous section. previous method, For example, suppose the first and last messages in the current file have indices however, this is rarely done. of 1052 and 1507 when the Log Server is instructed to rollover to a new file. In this case, the server will name the current file itv.log.1052-1507 and begin writing to itv.log (assuming itv.log is the log file name specified in the system configuration file). Rollover by Operator The operator can force the Log Server to switch to a new file at any time. This is done using an SMT menu command. For more information on this topic, see Chapter 6: Monitoring the System. The naming rules for the old and new log files are the same as already described. ICP Operator Manual / A-3
  • 167. Log Files and Messages FIELDS IN A LOG MESSAGE Several pieces of information are included in each log message sent to the Log Server. This information can be viewed in the SMT. The following is a list of the fields in a log message which are available to an operator: • date and time message was logged (in the format LOG:mm/dd/yy hh:mm:ss) • name of the host which “started” the log message • name of the process which generated the message (e.g. SUPERVISOR SERVER) • message severity (see the section Logging Messages in Chapter 3: How it Works) • routine name (which can be useful for troubleshooting purposes) Note that these fields are in the Log Messages window. Additional information is available in the Log Message Details window. To receive detailed information on a particular log message, scroll to the particu- lar log message and press <ENTER>. The following detailed information is included in the Log Message Details window: • Source File • Source File Line • Revision String • Version String • Compile Date • Log Time • Log Message Number A-4 ICP Operator Manual
  • 168. Appendix B: File Types B Appendix B T his section gives a list of all the file types, identified by their extensions, used by the ICP software. Note that some interactive applications may use other extensions that aren’t listed here. Extension Description PTH There is at most one PTH file per PDB. It is a text file that contains a list of hot keys that can be used while navigating a PDB. HIA Files of this type contain references to the audio and image files that make up the presentations in a PDB as well as the input choices available to users in each presentation. There is one HIA file per PDB. BTR BTR files are indexes into HIA files and are used to retrieve the information they contain. There is one BTR file per PDB. Together, the HIA, BTR and PTH files of a PDB are called its presentation file (there may only be BTR and HIA files since PTH files aren't necessary). RFA These files contain scripts of commands indicating which audio files must be added, updated and deleted. ICP Operator Manual / B-1
  • 169. File Types RFI Identical to RFA files but apply to image, not audio, files. JPG The images delivered by the ICP to a user are stored in JPEG files that have an extension of JPG. CAF These files contain the audio data delivered by the ICP to a user. BUP BUP files were used in the BUP process of a previous ICP version but have since become obsolete. Currently, BUP files are transferred to the ICP and simply deleted at the end of the BUP. PFU These files were used by a previous ICP system but are no longer used. They are transferred to the ICP and deleted after the BUP has completed. RLA RLA files are used by the CS to create RFA files. These files are transferred to the ICP but not used thereafter. They are simply deleted as part of the BUP clean-up process. RLI Identical to RLA files but are used to create RFI, not RFA, files. SUPER Files with this extension are system configuration files. There is one such file on every ICP machine, in the /cs/etc directory. For more information on these files, see Chapter 7: Configuring the System. LOG Files with this extension are system log files and are stored in the /cs/data/log directory of each ICP machine. See Appendix A: Log Files and Messages for more information on these files. B-2 ICP Operator Manual
  • 170. Appendix C: ICP Directories C Appendix C E ach ICP machine has a directory tree containing ICP software and data. This tree is under the /cs directory. Other than the standard operating system directories, this directory is the only one present under the root. To browse this The cs directory contains the following subdirectories: directory tree, you must go to an operating • bin system prompt. • data An operator does not have • log the ability to • scripts do this. • etc • man • working • output • lib • release ICP Operator Manual / C-1
  • 171. ICP Directories The ICP consists of four primary components: • INS • AIS • VTS • ITS The remainder of the chapter illustrates the directory structures of these four primary components. C-2 ICP Operator Manual
  • 172. ICP Directories INS DIRECTORY STRUCTURE INS bin sparc_solaris data apps application-specific log datatbases audio pdb incoming scripts pdb video pdb etc presentation pdb stage man pdb man1 working man3 executable names output program-specific output files lib terminfo release ICP Operator Manual / C-3
  • 173. ICP Directories AIS DIRECTORY STRUCTURE AIS bin sparc_solaris data audio pdb log scripts etc man man1 working man3 executable names output program-specific output files lib terminfo release C-4 ICP Operator Manual
  • 174. ICP Directories VTS DIRECTORY STRUCTURE VTS bin sparc_solaris data video pdb log scripts etc man man1 working man3 executable names output program-specific output files lib terminfo release ICP Operator Manual / C-5
  • 175. ICP Directories ITS DIRECTORY STRUCTURE ITS bin sparc_solaris data ITS log apps application-specific scripts datatbases etc presentation man pdb man1 working man3 executable names output program-specific output files lib terminfo release C-6 ICP Operator Manual
  • 176. Appendix D: Fault Recovery Appendix D T he ICP is a dynamic environment which runs multiple processes to support numerous concurrent users. The ICP system usually receives numerous logon and logoff requests, even during non-peak hours. In response to this, the system has been designed to remain operational for a high percentage of the time it is in use. There are many events in the ICP which can cause a process to fail. Regardless of the reason, the ICP has built-in mechanisms to detect dead processes and take recovery measures. The Supervisor manages these two functions. ICP Operator Manual / D-1
  • 177. Fault Recovery DETECTING DEAD PROCESSES As already mentioned in Chapter 9: Starting and Stopping the System, there is a Supervisor running on each ICP machine. A Supervisor starts all the other ICP processes on the machine it runs on. For this reason, the operating system will notify the Supervisor immediately when any of these processes terminate. In addition, the Supervisor is in regular communication with each server under its control. This level of communication enables the Supervisor to detect when a server has malfunctioned but not terminated. The operating system detects The operating system notifies a terminated process. the Supervisor that a process has terminated. Supervisor Process <process terminated> Operating System Operating System For example, a machine running an AIS will also have a Supervisor running on it. The Supervisor will request periodic responses from the AIS to confirm it is operating. These requests, called heartbeats, are used by the Supervisor to determine if the AIS is unable to function. If the AIS fails to respond to a pre-configured number of heartbeats, the Supervisor will assume it has malfunctioned and take recovery action(s). D-2 ICP Operator Manual
  • 178. Fault Recovery The system’s configuration file specifies the times when heartbeats are gener- ated. Each server can receive heartbeats at different times. Also, the number of missed heartbeats before recovery actions occur is specific to each server. For more information on configuring heartbeats for a server, see Chapter 7: Config- uring the System. Supervisor <OK!!> <Are you OK??> AIS ICP Operator Manual / D-3
  • 179. Fault Recovery RECOVERY ACTIONS When a dead process (or malfunctioned server) has been detected, the Super- visor can perform one of four recovery actions. Which action is taken depends on how the process has been configured. The four recovery methods are: • shutdown • process restart • message log • ignore Shutdown The Supervisor The most drastic action the Supervisor can take when a process fails is terminat- normally ing all processes. This is done only for the processes on a single computer, i.e. doesn’t the computer running the Supervisor and the failed process. terminate itself when performing a shutdown. Session Manager Supervisor <terminate> <terminate> NST <terminate> AIS Presentation Server D-4 ICP Operator Manual
  • 180. Fault Recovery The Name The following processes are normally configured with this recovery method: Server is part of the ITS and runs on every ICP • Session Manager machine. Its • Presentation Server functions are not discussed in • Name Server this manual • Log Server because they are beyond its • AIS scope. • VTS • Presentation Server • Supervisor (even when the Supervisor itself has malfunctioned, all pro- cesses will be terminated) When a machine has been shutdown, the operator must restart all the processes on that machine. This is done using the SMT, as explained in Chapter 9: Start- ing and Stopping the System. ICP Operator Manual / D-5
  • 181. Fault Recovery Process Restart When a process fails, the Supervisor has the ability to restart it automatically. Normally, all ICP processes other than those already listed are configured in this manner. When one of these processes terminates abnormally, the Supervisor will attempt to restart it as soon as the failure has been detected. Typically, the first attempt is successful and the system can continue functioning normally. However, if the first attempt is unsuccessful, the Supervisor will continue trying every minute until the process restarts. Supervisor Supervisor Supervisor <restart> <restart> <restart> <restart unsuccessful> <restart unsuccessful> <successful restart> D-6 ICP Operator Manual
  • 182. Fault Recovery Message Log A message is The Supervisor can also log a message always logged when a process terminates and do when a process fails, i.e. it is nothing else. This feature is only useful logged in both for those processes that need to run for the previous a fixed time period and, in this case, the cases as well. termination is actually expected. Supervisor Currently, none of the ICP processes are configured with this recovery method. <log message> <NST failed> Log Server Ignore Currently, this fault recovery method behaves identically to the previous method by simply logging a message. However, in future versions of the ICP, the Super- visor will completely ignore a process failure when this method has been se- lected. A message will not be logged. This option will be useful in future ICP versions. For example, applications will be frequently started or terminated based on the level of system activity. When these processes terminate, it is usually not because of failure and the IGNORE option prevents the system log file from being cluttered with unnecessary process failure messages. This option can be specified in existing configuration files for forward compatability with future versions of the ICP. ICP Operator Manual / D-7
  • 183. Appendix E: Statistics Files 16 concurrent users log_on: log_off: E statistics peak time Appendix E I n addition to logging messages, the ICP performs the auxiliary function of recording system statistics. The Statistics Server handles this task, which was explained in the Recording Statistics section of Chapter 3: How it Note that the Works. Statistics Server and Just as the Log Server uses a log file to save the messages it receives, the statistics files Statistics Server uses statistics files to save the statistics sent to it by ICP are not part of some ICP processes. systems. In this chapter, we will explain the naming conventions and locations of these statistics files. Note that these files are not for use by operators. Instead, they are taken to a remote site where third-party data analysis and report generation software use them as input for evaluating the system’s performance and compil- ing business- and demographic-related data. ICP Operator Manual / E-1
  • 184. Statistics Files NAMING AND LOCATION OF STATISTICS FILES There is at least one Statistics Server for the entire ICP and it maintains at least one statistics file for each type of statistics. All of these files are kept under the /cs/data/stats directory of the computer running the Statistics Server. Each statistics file has a name similar to name.yyyy.mmm.dd.hh. Each part of the name is described below: • name identifies the type of statistics being stored in the file • yyyy is the year the file was opened • mmm is the month the file was opened • dd is the day the file was opened • hh is the hour the file was opened For example, the file used to store statistics from the Session Manager might be called session.1997.Jan.25.13. This naming convention relates to the statistics file process that is described in the following section. cs data stats session.1997.jan.25.13 E-2 ICP Operator Manual
  • 185. Statistics Files STATISTICS FILE ROLLOVER The Statistics Server switches to new statistics files every hour in a process called rollover. For example, if two files used by the Statistics Server are session.1997.Jan.25.13 and ps.1997.Jan.25.13 then the server will close these files and begin writing to the new files session.1997.Jan.25.14 and ps.1997.Jan.25.14 at 2:00 p.m. on Jan 25, 1997. This process is done so that statistics files can be periodically transmitted to a remote site. 1:00 PM session.1997.jan.25.13 Statistics Server ps.1997.jan.25.13 <Rollover> 2:00 PM session.1997.jan.25.14 Statistics Server ps.1997.jan.25.14 ICP Operator Manual / E-3
  • 186. Appendix F: Man-Pages Appendix F T his section contains the ICP man-pages which may be of use to an operator for troubleshooting purposes. All other ICP man-pages are shipped with the system and are available online. To view a man-page online, enter the following command at the operating system prompt: %man <man-page name> Here, <man-page name> is the name of the man-page (e.g. cs_ais_svr). Note that online man-pages may be more up-to-date than the printed man-pages in this appendix. ICP Operator Manual / F-1
  • 187. Man-Pages cs_ais_svr - Audio/Input Server SYNOPSIS cs_ais_svr [ -h ] [ -v ] [ -i instance ] [ -n NumberOfLine ] [ -S host[:instance] ] DESCRIPTION The AIS provides a common, hardware-independent interface to the audio/input lines. If either the -v or -h flag is provided, the cs_ais_svr does not start up. It provides requested information to stderr and exits. In all other cases, the cs_ais_svr starts normally and runs until it receives a SIGPWR signal. The instance parameter is required only when two or more cs_ais_svr processes are to run on the same host. By default, the cs_ais_svr is capable of servicing up to 96 audio agents. This value can be changed to a value in the range of 1 to 256. One of the first tasks that the cs_ais_svr performs is registration with the Session Manager. If the Session Manager process is located on another host and/or the instance of the Session Manager process is not the default, the -S parameter must be used. The cs_ais_svr requires at least two audio couriers to be operating. OPTIONS -h Print help message. -v Print version information. -i instance This server’s instance. -n NumberOfLine The maximum number of line handler processes that can register with the server. The default is 96. F-2 ICP Operator Manual
  • 188. Man-Pages -S host[:instance] Specify the host and optionally instance on which the Session Manager is running. BUGS The startup messages may be found on stderr. They are always sent to the Log Server. SEE ALSO cs_ipc_courier(1), cs_ais_agt_xwitte(1), cs_ais_agt_dialogic(1) ICP Operator Manual / F-3
  • 189. Man-Pages cs_buprc - buprc file setup utility SYNOPSIS cs_buprc DESCRIPTION The cs_buprc setup utility is used by the ICP system installer to create the buprc file. This file is needed by the BUP Server to perform batch updates. The buprc file documents the directory structure used to store PDBs and receive new PDB data. The utility itself is a Perl script and is started by entering the following command at the operating system prompt: %cs_buprc.pl buprc Information The information in the buprc file consists of six lists. These lists specify the following information: incoming directory The tar file transmitted by a content producer is placed under this directory. staging directory During a BUP, the BUP Server uses a working directory under the staging directory. presentation directories All the files in a PDB other than audio and video files are placed under a presentation directory. audio directories The audio files in a PDB are placed under an audio directory. F-4 ICP Operator Manual
  • 190. Man-Pages video directories The video files in a PDB are placed under a video directory. activate hosts This list documents all the hosts running Presentation File Servers. The entries in the first five lists consist of host name and path name pairs and are used to indicate the locations of all the associated directories (for more information on these directories, see cs_bup_svr(1) or cs_bup_ver_ctl(1)). The last list contains only a list of host names and is used by the BUP Server to search for Presentation File Servers when a PDB is activated. The setup utility is used to input these six lists of information and save them to the buprc file. It can also be used to modify the information in an existing buprc file (if any). In this case, the old file is renamed to buprc.old before the new changes are saved. Note that the setup utility only works within the current directory, meaning it must be invoked from /cs/etc (which is where the buprc file must be placed). Setup Utility Commands The setup utility accepts commands at its command prompt: cs_buprc> These commands are: help or h Displays a summary of all setup utility commands. quit or q Terminates the setup utility without saving any changes. add string or a string Adds an entry (i.e. a host or host/path pair) to the current list. delete n or d n Removes the specified entry from the current list. ICP Operator Manual / F-5
  • 191. Man-Pages delete or d Removes all entries from the current list. list or l Displays all the entries in the current list. finish or f Indicates that input for the current list is completed. If the current list is the last one, the setup utility terminates after all information entered during the session is saved. Otherwise, the setup utility moves to the next list. OPTIONS None. BUGS None known. SEE ALSO CS(3), cs_bup_svr(1), cs_bup_ver_ctl(1), ICP Operator Manual(1) F-6 ICP Operator Manual
  • 192. Man-Pages cs_bup_svr - Batch Update Process Server SYNOPSIS cs_bup_svr [ -? ] [ -h ] [ -o secs ] [ -f rcfile ] [ -k count ] -i instance [ -p cs_pf_conv path ] [ -c cs_bup_ver_ctl path ] DESCRIPTION The Batch Update Process Server (BUP Server) is the main component in the Batch Update Process (BUP). The BUP is used by the content producer and operator to transfer new versions of presentation databases (PDBs) to the ICP. The BUP Server runs continuously while the ICP is running. There is a BUP Server running for each PDB in the ICP and all servers run on the same ICP machine. It handles much of the PDB management tasks including: - acquiring new versions of a PDB - activating a desired PDB version - disabling/enabling PDB activation The BUP Server requires two other processes during the BUP: the Presentation File Conversion Utility and the Batch Update Process Version Controller (BUP Version Controller). BUP Resource Configuration File The BUP Server requires a configuration file called the BUP Resource Configuration file (buprc). This file contains host and directory information needed by the BUP Server during a BUP. It is located in the directory /cs/etc and is created during ICP installation using the setup utility cs_buprc.pl see (cs_buprc(1)). Batch Update Process A content producer starts a BUP by transferring a tar file to the ICP. This file contains all a PDB’s data and is placed in the incoming directory (/cs/data/incoming/<pdb_name>, where <pdb_name> is the name of the PDB). The BUP Server assigned to that PDB checks for a tar file periodically. Once found, the BUP Server, untars the tar file into its constituent files and places them into the staging directory (/cs/data/stage/<pdb_name>). Next, the BUP Server copies the ICP Operator Manual / F-7
  • 193. Man-Pages files in the staging directory to their final locations in the ICP. It also invokes the Presentation File Conversion Utility to change the format of some PDB files and the BUP Version Controller to handle the version control tasks needed to maintain multiple PDB versions. Finally, the BUP Server sends a signal to the appropriate Presentation File Server (PF Server) to begin using the newly acquired PDB version. This is normally done at a scheduled time specified by the content producer. However, it can also be done under the direction of the operator (using the SMT). In either case, this step is called activation. Disabling/Enabling Activation Under the direction of an operator (using the SMT), the BUP Server can prevent any scheduled activations from occurring. This may be useful if there are problems with a newly acquired version of a PDB or if there are problems with the system. For more information on using this feature, see cs_smt(1). OPTIONS -? or -h Displays help information. -o secs The BUP Server will check for the presence of tar files in the staging directory at periodic intervals. The period is specified with this parameter in units of seconds. The default is every five seconds. -f rcfile This parameter is used to specify the full path name of the buprc file. The default is /cs/etc/ buprc. -k count Specifies how many versions of a PDB should be kept. Old versions are purged to stay within this limit. However, it is recommended that this parameter be omitted and all versions of a PDB be maintained. The default limit is set to a high enough value to prevent any versions from being deleted. -i instance F-8 ICP Operator Manual
  • 194. Man-Pages This parameter is used to specify the instance of the BUP Server. By convention, the instance should be the name of the PDB the server applies to. -p cs_pf_conv path This parameter is used to specify the path of the Presentation File Conversion utility. The default value is /cs/bin/cs_pf_conv. -c cs_bup_ver_ctl path This parameter is used to specify the path of the BUP Version Controller. The default is /cs/ bin/cs_bup_ver_ctl. SEE ALSO CS(3), cs_bup_ver_ctl(1), cs_pf_conv(1), cs_buprc(1), cs_smt(1), ICP Operator Manual(1) ICP Operator Manual / F-9
  • 195. Man-Pages cs_bup_ver_ctl - Batch Update Process Version Controller SYNOPSIS cs_bup_ver_ctl [ -? ] [ -h ] -v version -k count -s parent_dir [ -d depot_dir ] [ -m [ -a ] ] -r pdb_name DESCRIPTION The Batch Update Process Version Controller (BUP Version Controller) is used to perform the tasks needed to maintain multiple versions of PDBs in the ICP. It is invoked as needed by the BUP Server and is normally never started manually from the command line. Version Control The BUP Version Controller operates on either the audio files, video files or all the other files in a PDB. When operating on audio files, it creates symbolic links to the audio files from a versioned directory named vn, where n is the version number of the new PDB. The versioned directory is located under a parent directory containing audio files from all versions (normally, /cs/data/audio/ <pdb_name>). The audio files themselves are stored in a depot directory (normally, /cs/data/ audio/<pdb_name>/depot ). When operating on video files, the BUP Version Controller performs identical steps. However, the parent and depot directories are normally /cs/data/video/ <pdb_name> and /cs/data/video/depot. When operating on the other files in a PDB, the parent directory normally becomes /cs/data/presentation/<pdb_name>. In this case, there is no depot directory. Instead, the versioned directory contains the PDB files themselves. Also, a directory called current (/cs/data/presentation/<pdb_name>/current) is created and is symbolically linked to the correct versioned directory (if the current directory already exists, it is modified if necessary to point to the currently active version). Therefore, when ICP software accesses the current directory, it will be retrieving files from the correct PDB version. Purging Old Versions The BUP Version Controller maintains a limited number of versions of a PDB. A command line argument indicates the number of versions to keep. However, the BUP Server currently invokes the F-10 ICP Operator Manual
  • 196. Man-Pages BUP Version Controller with a large enough limit to effectively disable this feature. OPTIONS -? or -h Displays help information. -v version Specifies the number of the versioned directory that will be created. -k count Specifies how many backup versions of a PDB should be kept. It is recommended that this value be high enough so that no version is purged. -s parent_dir Specifies the path to the parent directory of all the versioned directories. Normally, this will be /cs/data/audio/<pdb_name> for audio files, /cs/data/video/<pdb_name> for video files and / cs/data/presentation/<pdb_name> for all the other files in a PDB. -d depot_dir Specifies the name of the depot directory. For audio or video files, this will normally be a subdirectory named depot under the parent directory mentioned above. This parameter is ignored if the BUP Version Controller is operating on the other files in a PDB (i.e. the -m option isn’t specified). -m Indicates that the BUP Version Controller must operate on only the video files in a PDB. If, in addition, the -a option is specified, the BUP Version Controller will operate on audio files instead. Without the -m option, the BUP Version Controller will operate on all the files in a PDB other than the audio and video files. -a Indicates that the BUP Version Controller must operate on only the audio files in a PDB. This option must be used in conjunction with the -m option (otherwise it has no effect). ICP Operator Manual / F-11
  • 197. Man-Pages -r pdb_name Specifies the PDB name. BUGS None known. SEE ALSO CS(3), cs_bup_svr(1), cs_buprc(1), ICP Operator Manual(1) F-12 ICP Operator Manual
  • 198. Man-Pages cs_ipc_courier - InterProcess Communication Courier SYNOPSIS cs_ipc_courier [ -? ] [ -h ] [ -v ] [ -n name ] [ -i instance ] [ -t ] -m area type name instance DESCRIPTION The IPC courier allows server processes to exchange messages. Each courier process is dedicated to specific source and target servers. These are also known as the master and target server, respectively. OPTIONS -? or -h Print help message on screen and terminate. -v Print version information. -n name Set the courier’s process name. Default is ipc_courier. -i instance Set courier’s instance. Default is CS_IPC_DEFAULT_INSTANCE. -t Turn off message exchange timeouts. This causes the courier to wait indefinitely for a response. ICP Operator Manual / F-13
  • 199. Man-Pages -m area type name instance This parameter is required to construct the master server’s network name. Here, the four values correspond to the master server’s service area, type, name and instance, respectively. EXAMPLE cs_ipc_courier -m CS_SA_AUDIO CS_SERVER CS_AUDIO_SERVER 1 -n cs_ais_courier -i 0 BUGS None known. SEE ALSO CS(3), CS_IPC(3) F-14 ICP Operator Manual
  • 200. Man-Pages cs_ipc_ns - InterProcess Communication Name Server SYNOPSIS cs_ipc_ns [ -? ] [ -h ] [ -d ] DESCRIPTION The Name Server provides a name service function to processes. It also allows processes to register with a textual name and network ID for InterProcess Communication (IPC). It allows processes (such as the IPC courier or server agents) to register anonymously. Other processes can then perform a search using the textual name (e.g. cs_session_mgr) and obtain a network ID or search using the network ID and obtain the textual name. The Name Server is distributed. It resolves requests across physical platform boundaries by querying Name Servers on other network nodes. A process must register itself to the Name Server at startup time by calling CS_IPC_Init. CS_IPC_Init ensures that the process is deregistered when it exits. Once the process is registered, other processes who wish to communicate with it can search for its identifier or name. The Name Server also allows processes to query it for a list of currently registered processes. OPTIONS -? or -h Print the usage message. -d Run the Name Server in debug mode which allows processes to re-register with the Name Server without deregistering first. ICP Operator Manual / F-15
  • 201. Man-Pages BUGS None known. SEE ALSO CS_NS(7), cs_ipc_ns_con(1), CS_IPC_LookupProcessByNetworkName(3), CS_IPC_LookupProcessByNetworkID(3), CS_IPC_Init(3) F-16 ICP Operator Manual
  • 202. Man-Pages cs_itt_mgr - Interactive Television Terminal Manager SYNOPSIS cs_itt_mgr [ -? ] [ -h ] DESCRIPTION The Interactive Television Terminal (ITT) Manager handles the allocation and deallocation of ITT ID’s for XWITTE’s. The ITT Manager is required if any XWITTEs are going to be used. The ITT Manager allows the XWITTE programs to simulate a television and settop by providing a method for the XWITTEs to communicate directly with the AIS and VTS. Since the AIS and VTS communicate with the ITT Manager, the ITT Manager should be started before these processes. OPTIONS -? or -h Display help information and terminate. BUGS None known. SEE ALSO CS(3), CS_ITT(3), CS_WITTE(3), cs_itt_con(1), cs_video_server(1), cs_audio_server(1) ICP Operator Manual / F-17
  • 203. Man-Pages cs_log_svr - Log Server SYNOPSIS cs_log_svr -f log-file [ -s max-entries ] DESCRIPTION The Log Server receives log messages (defined in cs_log_msg.h) that are sent from processes using the log API (CS_LOG). Messages are logged by processes while they are starting, terminating and running. Messages are used to report errors and other important events. If a log file’s maximum size (specified using the -s switch) has been reached, the Log Server receives a SIGUSR1 signal and the currently opened log file (named using the -f switch) is closed. The currently opened log file is renamed to <logfile>.x where x is the index of the last log message in the file. All new log messages will go to the new <logfile>. The Log Server will also switch log files in this manner when it receives the CS_LOG_CUTOVER message instructing it to “cut over” to a new file. The cs_smt(1) has a menu option for cutting over log files. The Log Server searches the cut over files when requests from the SMT for messages are received. The log API includes three macros to send log messages to the Log Server. They are: CS_LOG_REG, CS_LOG_WARN and CS_LOG_SEVR. The macros take a list of parameters: - Log number - Log message string - Optional parameters OPTIONS -f log-file Specify the name of the file (with path) you wish to write log messages to. Messages are written in a binary format, so either a log client or cs_log_to_text must be used to view the messages. You must have writable access to this file/directory. F-18 ICP Operator Manual
  • 204. Man-Pages -s max-entries Specify the maximum number of log entries that will be allowed in the log file. The default is no limit. EXAMPLE The following example starts the Log Server using a file called myLog to store (up to a maximum of 2000) log messages. cs_log_svr -f ~/myLog -s 2000 BUGS None known. SEE ALSO CS(3), CS_LOG(3) ICP Operator Manual / F-19
  • 205. Man-Pages cs_nst - Navigation Session Task SYNOPSIS cs_nst [ -? ] [ -h ] [ -v ] [ -y ] [ -i instance ] [ -S hostname[:instance] ] [ -D hostname[:dbName] ] [ -r dbName ] [ -N hostname[:instance] ] [ -e errNodeName ] DESCRIPTION The NST is the navigation application. It communicates with the PF Server(s) to retrieve presentation information and the Presentation Server to play presentations. A command line argument determines which PF Server an NST uses when it starts. OPTIONS -? Show help message. -h Show help message. -v Display version information. -y Keep navigation statistics (the default is to not report navigation node statistics to the Statistics Server). -i instance Assign an instance to the NST (not usually required) F-20 ICP Operator Manual
  • 206. Man-Pages -S hostname[:instance] Set the hostname (and optionally instance) where the Session Manager is located. -D hostname[:dbName] Set the hostname (and optionally instance) where the PF Server is located. The instance is the name of the initial database. If the -D option is not used the -r option must be specified. -r dbName Set the name of the initial database to use when navigation begins. -N host[:instance] Set the hostname where the Statistics Server is located. The Statistics Server hostname can also be specified using the CS_STATS_HOST environment variable. -e errNodeName Specify a node name which contains a presentation to display when a navigation error occurs. By default, the IAE will send a terminal command to display the message “INVALID ENTRY, RETRY”. BUGS None known. SEE ALSO CS(3), CS_IAE(3), cs_ps(1), cs_pf_server(1) ICP Operator Manual / F-21
  • 207. Man-Pages cs_pf_conv - Presentation File Conversion Utility SYNOPSIS cs_pf_conv [ -? ] [ -h ] [ -V ] [ -v ] databaseName DESCRIPTION The cs_pf_conv program converts the PDB produced on the CS to a format compatible with big-endian architectures (and back again). The PDB name supplied is the root name of the presentation files (e.g. info for info.hia and info.btr). Given a PDB with the files info.hia and info.btr, the utility will produce info.hia.new and info.btr.new. These files are usable on a big- endian system. Running cs_pf_conv again on the new files will create little-endian versions. OPTIONS -? or -h Display usage message. -V Run in verbose mode. -v Display version information. BUGS None known. SEE ALSO CS(3), CS_PF(3), cs_pf_server(1) F-22 ICP Operator Manual
  • 208. Man-Pages cs_pf_server - Presentation File Server SYNOPSIS cs_pf_server [ -? ] [ -h ] [ -v ] [ -V ] [ -u version ] -p database DESCRIPTION The Presentation File Server (PF Server) reads data from PDBs and delivers it to application programs. This database contains records for each presentation and includes the following information: - a media handle for an audio track - one or more media handles for video images - timing information - a choice table of which presentation to play next based on user input The path to the PDB and the base of the database name is to be supplied (e.g. infotravel for the database represented by infotravel.hia and infotravel.btr). OPTIONS -? or -h Display usage message. -v Display version information. -V Enable verbose mode. ICP Operator Manual / F-23
  • 209. Man-Pages -u version Use the given update version. -p database Provide the pathname and database name to read. BUGS The database administration functions ( open,close) have not been implemented. The PF Server can open the database at startup only, meaning updates will require shutting down the server. SEE ALSO CS(3), CS_PF(3), CS_IAE(3), cs_pf_con(1), cs_pf_conv(1), cs_ps(1) F-24 ICP Operator Manual
  • 210. Man-Pages cs_ps - Presentation Server SYNOPSIS cs_ps [ -? ] [ -h ] [ -v ] [ -i instance ] [ -S host[:instance] ] DESCRIPTION The Presentation Server’s responsibilities involve the following subtasks: - Receive requests from applications. - Divide presentations into components (media objects and pretxels) and dispatch the media objects to different Media Servers at precisely synchronized time marks. - Receive input keystrokes from the Input Server. The Presentation Server will send complete input strings to the corresponding application. The following is a detailed description about each task. Receiving requests from applications After registering with the Session Manager, applications can request the Presentation Server to play presentations. Scheduling requests The Presentation Server divides presentations into pretxels (presentation elements) before they are played. Each pretxel has a relative start time associated with it. The first pretxel from the presentation is assumed to start at zero relative time. The rest of the pretxels are inserted in an event list which will interrupt the Presentation Server when it is time to play a certain pretxel. Each media object (i.e. audio or video object) in a pretxel is started sequentially. The next object will not be started until the previous object is done. The input format object is sent first, then the video object (along with any text or graphics overlays), and finally the audio. The Presentation Server sends play media requests to the Media Servers via couriers. At least one presentation courier must be started. (See cs_ipc_courier(1) for more details on couriers.) ICP Operator Manual / F-25
  • 211. Man-Pages Systems with many active sessions should use multiple presentation couriers. Input buffering and processing The Presentation Server receives input keystrokes from the AIS and processes four of these: ENTER, FFWD, REW and PAUSE. All other characters are sent to the appropriate application once a terminating character (usually ENTER) is received. OPTIONS -? or -h Display usage message. -v Display version information. -i instance Set the Presentation Server instance. -S host[:instance] Set the host name and optionally instance where the Session Manager is located. BUGS None known. SEE ALSO CS(3), CS_PS(3), CS_SES(3), cs_session_mgr(1), cs_ais_svr(1), cs_vhi_svr(1), cs_vts_svr(1), cs_nst(1) F-26 ICP Operator Manual
  • 212. Man-Pages cs_session_mgr - Session Manager SYNOPSIS cs_session_mgr DESCRIPTION The Session Manager Server accepts logon requests from the AIS and creates an interactive session. This involves matching the logon request with the appropriate application. Applications must register with the Session Manager on startup. The Session Manager does not spawn applications directly. Applications must already be running and registered before the Session Manager will assign them to an interactive session. Media Server processes must also register with the Session Manager. The Session Manager allocates sessions to Media Servers using a simple least-loaded algorithm. Since the Media Servers and applications communicate with the Session Manager, the Session Manager should be started and running before these processes begin. OPTIONS None. BUGS None known. SEE ALSO cs_ais_svr(1), cs_vts_svr(1), cs_ps(1) ICP Operator Manual / F-27
  • 213. Man-Pages cs_smt - Site Management Task SYNOPSIS cs_smt [ -d ] [ -n number ] [ host... ] DESCRIPTION The Site Management Task (SMT) is the operator’s window to the ICP. It provides the operator with status information about the system, messages from active ICP processes and the ability to perform various administrative tasks. The SMT has a text-based GUI interface with pull-down menus and windows. It is designed so that it can be run remotely. The ICP does not require the SMT in order to operate. In fact, the SMT is designed to start-up only when an operator logs on to the system. It also is designed to log off the operator from the system when it is terminated. SMT Menu Bar The SMT Menu Bar consists of the following pull-down menus: SMT This menu contains commands that let the operator refresh the SMT display, exit from the SMT, etc. Status This menu contains commands that let an operator view status information about various components of the ICP (such as the AIS, VTS, etc.). Servers This menu contains commands that let an operator perform various administrative tasks on various ICP components (such as the AIS, VTS, BUP Server, etc.). Window This menu is used by an operator to manage the windows in the SMT’s display. F-28 ICP Operator Manual
  • 214. Man-Pages Help This menu is used by an operator to obtain help information. See Chapter 5: Working with the ICP and Chapter 6: Monitoring the System in the ICP Operator Manual for complete details on all the SMT’s menu commands and windows. OPTIONS -d This option starts the SMT in developer mode. This is an internal option and is not to be used by operators. -n number This sets the environment variable CS_SYS_NUMBER to the specified value. This environment variable is used to identify which ICP the SMT will work with. host... These arguments specify the hosts running ICP components. Note that the SMT can be started without specifying any hosts. In this case, a host must be added from the SMT’s menu in order for the SMT’s functions to become available. BUGS None known. SEE ALSO CS(3), CS_IPC(3), ICP Operator Manual(3) ICP Operator Manual / F-29
  • 215. Man-Pages cs_stats_svr - Statistics Server SYNOPSIS cs_stats_svr [ -? ] [ -h ] [ -i instance ] [ -v ] [ -D stats_file_dir ] DESCRIPTION The Statistics Subsystem consists of the Statistics Server and the Statistics API. The Statistics Server must be started after the Name Server and Log Server have been started. There should be only one server running on the system. The Statistics Server process is the main task in the Statistics Subsystem. It is responsible for allocating and deallocating statistics files and writing statistics messages to them. OPTIONS -? or -h Display help information. -i instance Specify the instance number. -v Display the version of this software. -D stats_file_dir Specify the path to store the statistics file. BUGS None known. F-30 ICP Operator Manual
  • 216. Man-Pages SEE ALSO CS_STATS(3), cs_stats_con(1) ICP Operator Manual / F-31
  • 217. Man-Pages cs_super_svr - Supervisor Server SYNOPSIS cs_super_svr [ -? ] [ -h ] [ -v ] [ -s ] [ -t ] [ -p ] [ -d time ] [ -w time ] [ -c courierPath ] -f config DESCRIPTION The Supervisor Subsystem is designed with one server process, cs_super_svr, and three agent processes: cs_super_spawner, cs_super_hbter and cs_ipc_courier. The Supervisor is designed to be constantly running on a machine. Therefore, it can start and stop the system without exiting. The main task in the Supervisor Subsystem is cs_super_svr. It reads the host configuration data file and builds the data tables. It starts the Supervisor agent processes cs_super_spawner, cs_super_hbter and cs_ipc_courier. The cs_super_svr runs in two different modes: pause mode (running with option -p) and standard mode. In standard mode, the -d option specifies how long the cs_super_svr will wait before attempting to start a system for the first time. By default it waits 10 seconds and will accept messages to change to pause mode or to start immediately. The configuration file is read when the system is started. The cs_super_svr starts the system based on the specified configuration file. To start the system, cs_super_svr sends “start process” messages to cs_super_spawner. The cs_super_spawner is responsible for starting and monitoring all processes in the system. The cs_super_spawner reports all status changes to the Supervisor Server process. Once the system is up, cs_super_svr sends heartbeat information to the cs_super_hbter process. The cs_super_hbter is responsible for periodically sending heartbeat, or keep-alive, messages to various processes. If any process fails to respond to a specified number of heartbeat messages, the cs_super_hbter reports this to the cs_super_svr. The frequency of the heartbeats and the number that can be safely missed are specified in the system configuration file. The cs_ipc_courier is used to exchange “status changed” messages with registered servers. Refer to the “Register for Notification Request” command below. F-32 ICP Operator Manual
  • 218. Man-Pages The cs_super_svr also handles the following commands: Start System This is used when cs_super_svr is running in pause mode or during the initial Supervisor startup (see option -d above). Shutdown System Bring the system down, but leave the Supervisor and its agents running. Shutdown All Shutdown the system and terminate the Supervisor and its agents. Start Process Start a new process. Kill Process Kill a process. Disable Heartbeat Process Stop sending heartbeat messages to a process. Enable Heartbeat Process Restart sending heartbeat messages to a process. Register For Notification Request When the Supervisor receives a “Register For Notification” request message, the server that made the request will be informed when the status of specified processes change. The Supervisor will forward a “Status Changed” message to the registered server on a status change. There are currently two status changes: “process is up” and “process is down”. ICP Operator Manual / F-33
  • 219. Man-Pages CONFIGURATION FILE FORMAT Process Record Definition Each process record is defined with multiple fields where each field is a one-line command. Every field starts with a field tag and the field data follows. The defined field tags are: PROGRAM The program name. Below are some of the standard process names: CS_NS Name Server CS_LOG_SERVER Log Server CS_STATS_SERVER Statistics Server CS_ITT_MGR ITT Manager CS_SESSION_MGR Session Manager CS_PF_SERVER Presentation File Server CS_AUDIO_SERVER Audio Server CS_PRESENTATION_SERVER Presentation Server CS_VIDEO_SERVER Video Server PROC_CLASS Used to specify the class name which the process belongs to. Can be any text string. PATH The full path to the program, including the name of the file. PARM Specifies a command line option for a program. Each option that would be separated by a space uses a single PARM entry. The special entry PARM ‘’ specifies an empty option. ENV Defines an environment variable to be added to the environment of a process. One F-34 ICP Operator Manual
  • 220. Man-Pages environment variable can be specified per line, but many variables can be specified. They have the form VAR=VALUE. HEARTBEAT Heartbeat time marks indicates when to send a heartbeat message to a server. Values range from 0 to 59, corresponding to seconds in a minute. MISSHBS The number of heartbeats a server process is allowed to miss before it is considered to have malfunctioned. INSTANCES The number of copies of the specified program to run. STARTINDEX Specifies the relative order of startup. Values range from 0 to 65535. A process with a smaller STARTINDEX than another will be started first in the system startup sequence. This record must be present. SHUTDOWNINDEX Specifies the relative order of shutdown. Values range from 0 to 65535. A process with a smaller SHUTDOWNINDEX than another will be shutdown first during the system shutdown sequence. If this record is not present, the value defaults to zero. RECOVERY Fault recovery level. There are four recovery levels: RESTART, SHUTDOWN, LOG_EVENT and IGNORE. Currently, IGNORE behaves the same as LOG_EVENT but in future versions of cs_super_svr, it will disable all recovery actions, including any log messages. DELAY Specifies how many seconds to wait before starting the next process. ICP Operator Manual / F-35
  • 221. Man-Pages SIGNAL_MASK Signal mask specifies signals the process will ignore. WORKDIR The working directory for the process. For each process record, the PROGRAM field must be defined first. The PATH field must be defined before the PARM field. The field tag and data must be separated by at least one space or tab. With the exception of the HEARTBEAT tag, all characters after the first space in a data field are ignored (unless the space is inside quotes). The HEARTBEAT tag accepts a list of values separated by spaces. Variables The following variables can be used throughout a configuration file. They are replaced by the values described. %INDEX The %INDEX is used in the PARM line of the configuration file. It represents the instance number of a process and allows a process to be passed a unique instance number. %INDEX can also be used with a constant such as %INDEX+1 so that the instance value can start at an arbitrary value. By default they start at 0. %INDEX+$ENV_VAR$ will also work, where $ENV_VAR$ is an integer environment variable. $ENV_VAR$ The Supervisor will attempt to replace any string of the form $ENV_VAR$ with the environment variable ENV_VAR before processing. Environment variables can be used throughout the configuration file. F-36 ICP Operator Manual
  • 222. Man-Pages Sample Below is a sample configuration file block. #—————————————————————————————————— # Configuration data for Audio Agent #—————————————————————————————————— PROGRAM CS_AUDIO_AGENT_XWITTE PATH $CS_BIN$/cs_ais_agt_xwitte PARM -w PARM /export/data/audio/ PARM -e PARM .au PARM -i PARM %INDEX+1 INSTANCES 4 STARTINDEX 15 RECOVERY RESTART STARTMODE IMMEDIATE WORKDIR $CS_BIN$/cs_audio_agent_xwitte OPTIONS -? or -h Display help information and terminate. -v Display version information and terminate. -s Redirect the stdout and stderr of all programs started by the Supervisor to the files <program>.stdout and <program>.stderr. ICP Operator Manual / F-37
  • 223. Man-Pages -t Start the system in test mode. The Supervisor agents are not started in test mode. -p Start the system in pause mode. The Supervisor and its agents are started, then the Supervisor waits for a message to start the system. -d time The value, in seconds, to delay the initial start of the system. If time is less than zero the Supervisor will wait for a message to start the system. This is equivalent to pause mode. If time is equal to zero the Supervisor will start the system immediately. If time is greater than zero the Supervisor will wait for the specified period before starting the system. The Supervisor will accept a message to start sooner. The default is 10 seconds. -w time The amount, in seconds, that the Supervisor will wait for a process to startup. The value will be rounded to the nearest multiple of two. The default is 10 seconds. -c courierPath The directory where cs_ipc_courier resides. Do not include the name of the file. The default is the directory the cs_super_svr was started from. -f config The path to the system configuration data file, including the name of the configuration file. This file contains all the information used to start the system. This parameter is mandatory. BUGS None known. SEE ALSO cs_super_svr_con(1) F-38 ICP Operator Manual
  • 224. Man-Pages cs_today_app - Today, a News, Weather and Sports Application SYNOPSIS cs_tvguide_app [ -? ] [ -h ] [ -v ] [ -i instance ] [ -A host[:instance] ] [ -S host[:instance] ] [ -D host[:dbName] ] [ -r dbName ] DESCRIPTION The Today application displays news, weather and sports information based on user input. It uses the Today Server (cs_today_svr). Either the -D or -r switch must be specified. OPTIONS -? or -h Display help information on the accepted arguments. -v Display version information. -i instance Set the instance of the application. -A host[:instance] Set the host (and optionally instance) of the Today Server. -S host[:instance] Set the host (and optionally instance) of the Session Manager. ICP Operator Manual / F-39
  • 225. Man-Pages -D host[:dbName] Set the host (and optionally instance) of the PF Server. The instance must be the name of the database which contains the presentations for the Today application. -r dbName Set the name (instance) of the presentation database which contains the presentations for the Today application. BUGS None known. SEE ALSO cs_today_svr(1) F-40 ICP Operator Manual
  • 226. Man-Pages cs_today_svr - Server for Today, a News, Weather and Sports Application SYNOPSIS cs_today_svr[ -? ] [ -h ] [ -v ] [ -i instance ] [ -d datapath ] DESCRIPTION The Today Server is responsible for servicing the Today application’s requests. The Today Server has to be started before the Today applications. OPTIONS -? or -h Display help information on the accepted arguments. -v Display the version information. -i instance Specify the server instance. -d datapath Specify the path to the news data. BUGS None known. SEE ALSO cs_today_app(1) ICP Operator Manual / F-41
  • 227. Man-Pages cs_trivia - Trivia Game Application SYNOPSIS cs_trivia [ -? ] [ -h ] [ -cheat ] [ -seed seed ] [ -i instance ] [ -D hostname[:dbName] ] [ -r dbName ] [ -S hostname[:instance] ] DESCRIPTION The Trivia Game is an application designed to be run on the ICP. It asks the user randomly chosen trivia questions with multiple choice answers. If the user selects the correct answer, they obtain ten points and are allowed to continue. If the user gives one incorrect answer, the game ends. OPTIONS -? or -h Print help message. -cheat Cheat mode displays the correct answer on each question screen. -seed seed Specify the seed value used to generate random values. Two sessions of trivia executed with the same seed value will produce identical questions. -i instance Assign an instance to Trivia. -D host[:dbName] Set the hostname (and optional instance) where the PF Server is located. This option or the -r option must be specified. F-42 ICP Operator Manual
  • 228. Man-Pages -r dbName Set the name of the database which holds the trivia presentations. This option or the -D option must be specified. -S host[:instance] Set the Session Manager hostname (and optionally instance). FILES The Trivia application uses the file trivia.scores to track the high scores. It also uses the temporary file trivia.lock for internal purposes. When one trivia application is accessing the score file, it creates the lock file to inform other trivia instances that the score file is busy. If the lock file exists when one instance of trivia needs to access the score file, it waits until the lock file is deleted by the locking instance. BUGS None known. ICP Operator Manual / F-43
  • 229. Man-Pages cs_tvguide_app - What’s on TV Application SYNOPSIS cs_tvguide_app [ -? ] [ -h ] [ -v ] [ -i instance ] [ -A host[:instance] ] [ -S host[:instance] ] [ -D host[:instance] ] [ -r dbName ] [ -d yymmdd ] [ -t hhmm ] DESCRIPTION The What’s on TV ICP application displays TV programming information based on user input. It uses the What’s on TV Server (cs_tvguide_svr). OPTIONS -? or -h Display help information on the accepted arguments. -v Display version information. -i instance Set the instance of the application. -A host[:instance] Set the host (and optionally instance) of the What’s on TV Server. -S host[:instance] Set the host (and optionally instance) of the Session Manager. -D host[:instance] Set the host (and optionally instance) of the PF Server. The instance must be the name of F-44 ICP Operator Manual
  • 230. Man-Pages the PDB which contains the What’s on TV presentations. -r dbName Set the name (instance) of the PDB which contains the What’s on TV presentations. One of either -r or -D must be specified. -d yymmdd This debug switch is used to set the current date used by the What’s on TV application. This switch can be used in conjunction with the -d option of cs_tvguide_svr. -t hhmm This debug switch is used to set the current time used by the What’s on TV application. When this switch is used the time will remain the one specified (i.e. it will not change). BUGS None known. SEE ALSO cs_tvguide_svr(1), cs_tvguide_convert(1) ICP Operator Manual / F-45
  • 231. Man-Pages cs_tvguide_convert - What’s on TV File Conversion Utility SYNOPSIS cs_tvguide_convert [ -? ] [ -h ] [ -p dataFilePath ] [ -f textInputFile ] DESCRIPTION The What’s on TV Server does not read the text data file supplied by Content Producers. The conversion utility is used to transform the data into a form readable by the What’s on TV Server. The data files produced by the conversion utility are platform-specific. For example, if the What’s on TV Server runs on a SPARC machine, then the data files must be created on a SPARC machine. The conversion utility takes one input file and outputs a number of files necessary for the What’s on TV Server. When run, the program produces output to indicate progress. As it creates the daily listing files, it will output a letter ‘g’ for each “general” television program it finds and an ‘s’ for each “sporting event”, and an ‘m’ for each “movie”. Note that the creation of index files is time consuming. This utility is only used to convert the text file into a readable format, it does not have to be running in order to start the server or applications. The input and output files are described below. OPTIONS -? or -h Display help information on the accepted arguments. -p dataFilePath The path of the directory which will contain the output data files. By default the data files are written to the current directory. F-46 ICP Operator Manual
  • 232. Man-Pages -f textInputFile The name of the input text file containing the television program listings. FILES Input File The conversion utility needs to be supplied with a text file containing television program listings. This text file is not created by the Interactive Channel, but is supplied by Content Producers. The file name is specified by the -f switch on the conversion utility command line. Output Files All of the following files are created by the cs_tvguide_convert program and are needed by the What’s on TV Server. -tv[yymmdd].dat -tv[yymmdd].lis -title.inx -type.inx -subtype.inx -tvch.dat tv[yymmdd].dat These files contain the full television program listings for one day. For example, March 20, 1997 listings are located in tv970320.dat. tv[yymmdd].lis These files contain a brief listing of the television programs that are aired on the date yymmdd. For example, the March 20, 1997 listings are located in tv970320.lis. title.inx type.inx subtype.inx These files are index files for the current week’s programs. tvch.dat This file contains a table listing cable to television channel mappings, along with the networks’ names and abbreviations. BUGS None known. ICP Operator Manual / F-47
  • 233. Man-Pages SEE ALSO cs_tvguide_svr(1), cs_tvguide_app(1) F-48 ICP Operator Manual
  • 234. Man-Pages cs_tvguide_svr - What’s on TV Server SYNOPSIS cs_tvguide_svr [ -? ] [ -h ] [ -p dataFilePath ] [ -d yymmdd ] DESCRIPTION The What’s on TV Server is responsible for servicing the What’s on TV applications’ requests. The What’s on TV Server has to be started before any What’s on TV applications are run. The data files read by the What’s on TV Server are created by the cs_tvguide_convert program. The resulting data files are platform-specific. For example, if the What’s on TV Server runs on a SPARC machine, then the data files have to be produced on a SPARC machine. The data files must be present for the current date (or the date specified by the -d switch) in order for the server to initialize. A list and description of the required data files is given below. OPTIONS -? or -h Displays help information on the accepted arguments. -p dataFilePath Specify the path to the directory which contains the necessary What’s on TV data files. By default, the current directory is assumed to contain the necessary files. A list of the necessary files appears in the Files section. -d yymmdd This debug switch sets the current date used by the What’s on TV Server. ICP Operator Manual / F-49
  • 235. Man-Pages FILES All of the data files needed by the What’s on TV Server are created by the conversion utility, cs_tvguide_convert. This is the list of the required files and their description. -tv[yymmdd].dat -tv[yymmdd].lis -title.inx -type.inx -subtype.inx -tvch.dat tv[yymmdd].dat These files contain the full television program listings for the day corresponding to the filename. For example, the March 20, 1997 listings are located in tv970320.dat. tv[yymmdd].lis These files contain a brief listing of the television programs that are aired on the date yymmdd. For example, the March 20, 1997 listings are located in tv970320.lis. title.inx type.inx subtype.inx These files are index files for the current week’s programs. tvch.dat This file contains cable to television channel conversion information, along with network names and abbreviations. BUGS None known. F-50 ICP Operator Manual
  • 236. Man-Pages SEE ALSO cs_tvguide_app(1), cs_tvguide_convert(1) ICP Operator Manual / F-51
  • 237. Man-Pages cs_ims_svr - Video Hardware Interface Server for the IMS Video Card SYNOPSIS cs_ims_svr [ -? ] [ -h ] [ -V instance ] [ -s time ] [ -d device ] [ -r path ] DESCRIPTION The IMS Server is the software interface to the IMS video hardware card. It is responsible for updating the resource table on the hardware card. The interface to the hardware card is through the CS_IMS API calls. OPTIONS -? or -h Print the usage messages. -V instance The instance number of this Video Server. Default is 0. -s time Specify the delay period before the vhiRender call, in test mode, returns. -d device The special device file corresponding to the IMS video hardware card. The default is /dev/null, corresponding to a test server. -r path Specify the location where the resource files are located. F-52 ICP Operator Manual
  • 238. Man-Pages BUGS None known. SEE ALSO cs_vts_svr(1), cs_vts_agt_ims(1), ICP Operator Manual / F-53
  • 239. Man-Pages cs_vts_agt_ims - Video Agent for the IMS Video Card SYNOPSIS cs_vts_svr [ -h ] [ -? ] [ -i instance ] [ -V host[:instance] ] [ -H host[:instance] ] [ -L host[:instance] ] [ -t ] [ -w prefix ] [ -r prefix ] [ -e postfix ] DESCRIPTION The IMS Agent is responsible for interpretation of video play requests, loading image files, constructing TGPS and VBI data, etc. The resulting data are placed into a number of internal buffers for the IMS Server to retrieve. The IMS Agent communicates with the IMS Server by exchanging the IMS play requests. OPTIONS -? or -h Print the usage messages. -i instance The instance number of this IMS Agent. Default is 0, and the maximum is 3. -V host[:instance] Specify the host on which the Video Server is running. Default is localhost:0. The IMS Agent registers with the VTS at the startup, so that the VTS can send play requests to the agent later. -H host[:instance] Specify the host and the instance on which the IMS Server is running. Default is the localHost:0. The IMS Server must be on the local host. The IMS Agent registers with the IMS Server at startup, so that it can send an IMS play request to it later. F-54 ICP Operator Manual
  • 240. Man-Pages -L host[:instance] Specify the host and the instance on which the Load Generator is running. Default is the localHost:0. This option is significant only if the testing mode option -t is set. -t Start the IMS Agent in the test mode, during which the IMS Server will communicate with the load generator for every play request sent to it. -w prefix Specify the path to the Video directory containing the image files. -r prefix Specify a prefix for the video files. By default there is none. -e postfix Specify the extension of the video files. Default is .jpg. BUGS None known. SEE ALSO cs_vts_svr(1), cs_vhi_svr(1) ICP Operator Manual / F-55
  • 241. Man-Pages cs_vts_agt_xwitte - Video Agent for the XWITTE SYNOPSIS cs_vts_agt_xwitte [ -? ] [ -h ] [ -V host[:instance] ] [ -I host[:instance] ] [ -i instance ] [ -w prefix ] [ -e postfix ] DESCRIPTION The XWITTE Agent is responsible for interpretation of the video play requests, loading the image files, and transferring the data to the XWITTE video process. OPTIONS -? or -h Print the usage message. -V host[:instance] Specify the host on which the VTS is running. Default is localhost:0. The XWITTE Agent registers with the VTS at startup, so that the VTS can send play requests to the agent later. -I host[:instance] Specify the host and the instance on which the ITT Manager is running. Default is the localHost:0. The XWITTE Agent registers with the ITT Manager at startup, to obtain information required for XWITTE video play. -i instance Specify the instance of this agent. -w prefix Specify the path to the Video directory containing the image files. F-56 ICP Operator Manual
  • 242. Man-Pages -e postfix Specify the extension of the video files. Default is .jpg. BUGS None known. SEE ALSO cs_vts_svr(1), cs_xwitte(1) ICP Operator Manual / F-57
  • 243. Man-Pages cs_vts_svr - Video/Terminal Server SYNOPSIS cs_vts_svr [ -? ] [ -h ] [ -i instance ] [ -S host:instance ] [ -g address ] [ -a version imgHandle database ] [ -D ] DESCRIPTION The VTS accepts video play requests from other ICP components (typically the Presentation Server), and dispatches them to the corresponding video agents. The agents then process the requests by preparing data for appropriate hardware/software units for final video transmission. The VTS also provides a stress-testing mode in which it will communicate with the load generator on every play request for stress-testing purposes. OPTIONS -? or -h Print the usage message. -i instance The instance number of this VTS. Default is 0. -S host:instance Specify the host on which the Session Manager is running. Default is localhost:0. The VTS registers with the Session Manager running on this host and sends session create (or logon) requests to this process. -g address Specify the global address where all the attractor images should be sent. F-58 ICP Operator Manual
  • 244. Man-Pages -a version imgHandle database Specify the version, the image handle and the database name of the attractor screen image. -D Turn on debugging mode. This mode will allow the XWITTE to be used as an input device to test the VTS. BUGS None known. SEE ALSO CS(3), cs_ps(1), cs_session_mgr(1) ICP Operator Manual / F-59
  • 245. Man-Pages cs_wp_app - White Pages Application SYNOPSIS cs_wp_app [ -? ] [ -h ] [ -v ] [ -n [ svrname ] ] [ -i instance ] [ -S host[:instance] ] [ -D host[:dbName] ] [ -r dbName ] [ -A host[:instance] ] DESCRIPTION The White Pages Server is responsible for servicing the requests of White Pages applications. The server receives the query request from an application and then calls the appropriate CodeBase functions to perform the necessary search. The White Pages application looks up the White Pages Server at startup, therefore it is necessary for the server to be started before any of the agents. If the White Pages Server ever goes down, then all the White Pages applications must be restarted. OPTIONS -? or -h Display help information on the accepted arguments. -v Display the version and copyright string. -n svrname The server process name. It should be the same as the one you provided when starting the server process. -i instance The instance number of this program. F-60 ICP Operator Manual
  • 246. Man-Pages -S host[:instance] The host name where the Session Manager is running and the instance number of that Session Manager. -D host[:dbName] The host name (and, optionally, instance) of the PF Server. -r dbName The name of the PDB containing the White Pages presentations. This is equivalent to -D :dbName. -A host[:instance] The host name where the White Pages Server is running and its instance number. FILES The data files required by the White Pages Server are in DBase4 format and contain all the available residential listings. BUGS None known. SEE ALSO cs_wp_svr(1) ICP Operator Manual / F-61
  • 247. Man-Pages cs_wp_svr - White Pages Server SYNOPSIS cs_wp_svr [ -? ] [ -h ] [ -v ] -p dataFilePath DESCRIPTION The White Pages Server is responsible for servicing the requests of White Pages applications. The server receives the query request from an application and then calls the appropriate CodeBase functions to perform the necessary search. The White Pages application looks up the Yellow Pages Server at startup, therefore it is necessary for the server to be started before any of the agents. If the White Pages Server terminates, then all the White Pages applications must be restarted. OPTIONS -? or -h Display help information on the accepted arguments. -v Display the version and copyright string. -p dataFilePath The path of the directory which contains the necessary data files. (Note: this parameter is required.) FILES The data files required by the White Pages Server are in DBase4 format and contain all the necessary residential listings. F-62 ICP Operator Manual
  • 248. Man-Pages BUGS None known. SEE ALSO cs_wp_app(1) ICP Operator Manual / F-63
  • 249. Man-Pages cs_xwitte - X-Windows Interactive Television Terminal Emulator (XWITTE) SYNOPSIS cs_xwitte [ -a audio_path ] [ -appcode application_code ] [ -audiohost hostname port_number ] [ -bg background_color ] [ -f script_execute_file ] [ -fg foreground_color ] [ -i input_path ] [ -kgeom keypad_geometry ] [ -legacy ] [ -na ] [ -nv ] [ -o script_record_file ] [ -s host ] [ -v videopath ] [ -vgeom video_geometry ] DESCRIPTION The XWITTE is a development and testing tool that simulates an SCR. It consists of a window that simulates the remote control keypad, and a second window that simulates a TV screen. The entire functionality is handled by three separate processes: an input process (cs_xwitte_input) to simulate the remote control keypad, a video process (cs_xwitte_video) for playing images and terminal commands, and an audio process (cs_xwitte_audio) for playing sound. The three processes are spawned by the executable cs_xwitte. Keypad Input The keypad accepts input through a mouse or a keyboard. All keys present on the real remote control are supported. The following table lists the keys on the keypad window and their keyboard shortcuts: Input Keypad Computer Keyboard POWER Ctrl-P SETUP Ctrl-S TVITV Ctrl-T ‘A’...‘Z’ ‘A’...‘Z’ ‘.’ ‘.’ ‘*’ shift-8 or ‘*’ ‘#’ shift-3 or ‘#’ ‘-’ (minus) ‘-’ ‘+’ (plus) ‘+’ F-64 ICP Operator Manual
  • 250. Man-Pages ‘_’ (space) spacebar ‘0’...‘9’ ‘0’...‘9’ SHIFT Shift DELETE Delete, Del or Backspace MENU Ctrl-M TVGUIDE Ctrl-G CH+ Ctrl-Shift-C CH- Ctrl-C VL+ Ctrl-Shift-V VL- Ctrl-V ENTER Enter or Return PREV Ctrl-R BUY Ctrl-B NEXT Ctrl-N REWIND left-arrow MUTE/PAUSE Pause/Break FASTFORWARD right-arrow Quit Ctrl-Q Refresh Ctrl-F The SETUP button on the keypad allows the user to indicate which host the ITT Manager is running on. Video Output The video process window combines the video screen from the television and the status lights from the SCR. The window displays the JPEG image and terminal objects, i.e. text and graphics, received from the ICP. It also echoes keypad input entered throughout the input process. Audio Output Audio output can only be played on a terminal with sound capability (i.e. a SPARC workstation or PC with a sound card). OPTIONS -a audio_path Specify the absolute path of the audio process executable (cs_xwitte_audio). ICP Operator Manual / F-65
  • 251. Man-Pages -appcode application_code Specify the application code for the startup application. By default, the XWITTE specifies the NST. -audiohost hostname port_number Specify the address of a remote client for receiving audio data. -bg background_color Specify the background color of the input process. -f script_execute_file Specify and execute an XWITTE script file. -fg foreground_color Specify the foreground color of the input process. -i input_path Specify the absolute path of the input process executable (cs_xwitte_input). -kgeom keypad_geometry Specify the geometry of the input process window (keypad). -legacy Emulate legacy (i.e. old RMX-based system) SCR commands. -na Disable audio playback. -nv Disable video playback. F-66 ICP Operator Manual
  • 252. Man-Pages -o script_record_file Specify an XWITTE script file to generate. -s host Specify the host on which the ITT Manager is running. -v videopath Specify the absolute path of the video process executable (cs_xwitte_video). -vgeom video_geometry Specify the geometry of the video window. SUBPROCESS EXECUTION The XWITTE spawner process cs_xwitte must be able to locate the subprocess executables (cs_xwitte_audio, cs_xwitte_input and cs_xwitte_video). The spawner process will attempt to find the subprocess executables in the following order: (1) If the command line options identifying the absolute path names of the subprocesses are used (i.e. -a, -i, or -v), then these are the paths that are searched. If the execution fails, then the spawner terminates with an error (see example 1). (2) If the spawner process was executed using its absolute path name, then this path name is used to search for the subprocesses (see example 2). If this fails, the search proceeds to the next step. (3) The spawner searches all the path names set in the shells PATH environment variable until it finds the subprocess executables. If this fails, then the spawner terminates with an error (see example 3). ICP Operator Manual / F-67
  • 253. Man-Pages SCRIPTS To simplify testing, the XWITTE is capable of playing and recording script files that contain commands that are interpreted by the input subprocess. These commands represent keystrokes and timing information that simulate operation of a remote control keypad. To record a script file, start the XWITTE with the -o option (see example 4). To play a script file, start the XWITTE with the -f option (see example 5). When running the XWITTE in script mode, a pop-up window with three push buttons appears: Rewind, Pause and Play. Rewind will reset the script file so that it is played from the beginning. Pause will freeze a script file. Play will resume execution of a script after pause has been pressed. The following is a table with remote control keys in the left column and their corresponding script language commands in the right (see example 6): Input keypad Script command POWER <ONOFF> SETUP na TV <TVITV> ‘A’...‘Z’ ‘A’...‘Z’ ‘.’ ‘.’ ‘*’ ‘*’ ‘#’ ‘#’ ‘-’ (minus) ‘-’ ‘+’ (plus) ‘+’ ‘_’ (space) ‘ ‘ (space) ‘0’...‘9’ ‘0’...‘9’ SHIFT <SHIFT> DELETE <DELETE> MENU <MENU> TVGUIDE <GUIDE> CH+ <CHUP> CH- <CHDN> VL+ <VLUP> VL- <VLDN> ENTER <ENTER> PREV <PREV> BUY <BUY> NEXT <NEXT> REWIND <REW> MUTE / PAUSE <PAUSE> F-68 ICP Operator Manual
  • 254. Man-Pages FAST FORWARD <FF> Quit <QUIT> Refresh <REFRESH> EXAMPLES (1) Launch the XWITTE specifying the absolute pathnames of the subprocess executables on the command line. (Here % is the operating system command prompt.) % cs_xwitte -a /cs/bin/cs_xwitte_audio -i /cs/bin/cs_xwitte_input -v /cs/bin/cs_xwitte_video (2) Launch the XWITTE specifying the absolute pathname of the spawner process. % /cs/bin/cs_xwitte (3) Launch the XWITTE so the spawner process searches the PATH environment variable for subprocesses. Assume that the directory containing the subprocesses is in the path. % cs_xwitte (4) Launch the XWITTE in script record mode. All keystrokes plus the time between keystrokes will be recorded to the script file “xwitte.out”. % cs_xwitte -o xwitte.out ICP Operator Manual / F-69
  • 255. Man-Pages (5) Launch the XWITTE in script play mode using “xwitte.out” as input (assume that example 4 has been executed). Pressing PLAY on the pop-up window will cause the XWITTE to simulate the keystrokes recorded in example 4. % cs_xwitte -f xwitte.out (6) The following is a script file created in a similar fashion as example 4: <ONOFF> uwait 8044517 <MENU> uwait 4622495 M uwait 1069322 <ENTER> uwait 4202372 <ONOFF> Used as input in example 5, this script would command the XWITTE input subprocess to do the following (broken down by line number): (1) Enter the ICP. (2) Wait 8044517 microseconds. (3) Simulate a MENU keypress. (4) Wait 4622495 microseconds. (5) Simulate an ‘M’ keypress. (6) Wait 1069322 microseconds. (7) Simulate an ENTER keypress. (8) Wait 4202372 microseconds. F-70 ICP Operator Manual
  • 256. Man-Pages (9) Simulate a POWER keypress and exit the ICP. MESSAGES Three methods of message reporting exist. Messages that would be displayed on an SCR are displayed on the video window. These messages may contain modifications and extra information that would be useful to developers and testers. Messages specific to the XWITTE are displayed in pop-up windows. Errors that prevent XWITTE startup are reported on standard error. MESSAGES SENT TO VIDEO “Attempting to enter the ICP” The input process is entering the ICP after the POWER key has been pressed. “Send request to enter the ICP to ITT Manager” The input process is about to send a logon request to the ITT Manager. “No free line handler. Try again later.” This error message occurs during the logon procedure if the ICP has no free line handler (audio agent) available to accept input from the XWITTE input process. “System is busy. Try again later.” This error will occur if an attempt is made to re-enter the ICP while the XWITTE is still in the process of exiting the previous session. “ITT Manager permit logon” This message indicates that the XWITTE has successfully entered the ICP. “No session available. Try again later.” This error message may occur when attempting to enter the ICP if the ITT Manager cannot allocate a free session for the XWITTE logon. “Successfully entered ICP.” This message is displayed when the XWITTE has successfully entered the ICP. ICP Operator Manual / F-71
  • 257. Man-Pages “Attempting to exit the ICP.” The input subprocess will attempt to exit the ICP by sending a POWER keypress to the line handler. “Successfully exited ICP.” The request to exit the ICP was successful. “No session is active.” This message appears if input is entered but an ICP session is not active. MESSAGES SENT TO POP-UP WINDOWS “Cannot find the ITT Manager’s address.” This error occurs when entering the ICP if the XWITTE cannot determine the network address of the ITT Manager. “Unable to create IPC message. Cannot register with ITT Manager.” This error occurs when entering the ICP if the XWITTE cannot create an IPC message to register with the ITT Manager. “IPC exchange with ITT Manager failed.” This error occurs when entering the ICP if the XWITTE cannot exchange an IPC message with the ITT Manager. “Insufficient resources for a new session.” This error occurs when entering the ICP if the ITT Manager has insufficient memory for a new session. “Deregister with ITT failed.” This error occurs when entering the ICP if a timeout occurs while waiting for the ICP to reply to the XWITTE’s request to deregister. F-72 ICP Operator Manual
  • 258. Man-Pages “Session is already active.” This error occurs if a user attempts to enter the ICP with an XWITTE that is already running a session. “Unable to initialize name server.” This error occurs during the logon procedure if the XWITTE is unable to initialize the Name Server running on the system. “Unable to send request to enter ICP to ITT Manager.” This error occurs when entering the ICP if the XWITTE cannot exchange an IPC message with the ITT Manager. “IPC exchange failed while requesting an ITV session.” This error occurs when entering the ICP if the XWITTE cannot exchange an IPC message with the ITT Manager. “IPC exchange failed during disconnect.” While exiting the ICP, the XWITTE requests to disconnect from the line handler. If a timeout occurs while the XWITTE is waiting for the ICP to reply, this error is reported. “Unable to initialize IPC with line handler.” This error occurs if the XWITTE is unable to initialize the IPC routines allowing it to communicate with a line handler. “IPC exchange failed sending keystroke.” This error occurs if the XWITTE is unable to send keypad input to a line handler. ICP Operator Manual / F-73
  • 259. Man-Pages MESSAGES SENT TO STANDARD ERROR “Cannot create audio process: <audio>” “Cannot create input process: <input>” “Cannot create video process: <video>” The XWITTE spawner process was unable to spawn the process. “Cannot find <executable>” The XWITTE spawner process was unable to locate the required executable file. “Unable to open <filename> for input.” The XWITTE was unable to open the script file <filename> for input. “Unable to open <filename> for output.” The XWITTE was unable to open the script file <filename> for output. SEE ALSO cs_itt_mgr(1), cs_vts_agt_xwitte(1), cs_ais_agt_xwitte(1) F-74 ICP Operator Manual
  • 260. Man-Pages cs_yp_app - Yellow Pages Application SYNOPSIS cs_yp_app [ -? ] [ -h ] [ -v ] [ -n ] [ -A host[:instance] ] [ -S host[:instance] ][ -D host[:dbName] ] [ -r dbName ] [ -i instance ] DESCRIPTION The Yellow Pages application permits navigation and retrieval of Yellow Pages information. It uses the Yellow Pages Server (cs_yp_svr). OPTIONS -? or -h Display help information on the accepted arguments. -v Display version information at startup. -n Turn off the “Please Wait” screens. This option is useful on systems where the response times of the Yellow Pages application is so small as to make the wait screens unnecessary. -A host[:instance] Set the host and, optionally, instance of the Yellow Pages Server. -S host[:instance] Set the host and, optionally, instance of the Session Manager. ICP Operator Manual / F-75
  • 261. Man-Pages -D host[:dbName] Set the host and, optionally, instance of the PF Server containing the Yellow Pages presentations (one of either -D or -r must be specified). -r dbName Set the PDB name containing the Yellow Pages presentations (one of either -D or -r must be specified). -i instance Set the instance for the Yellow Pages application. BUGS None known. SEE ALSO cs_yp_svr(1) F-76 ICP Operator Manual
  • 262. Man-Pages cs_yp_svr - Yellow Pages Server SYNOPSIS cs_yp_svr [ -? ] [ -h ] [ -p dataFilePath ] DESCRIPTION The Yellow Pages Server is responsible for servicing requests from Yellow Pages applications. The server receives the query request from an application and then calls the appropriate CodeBase functions to perform the necessary search. The Yellow Pages applications find the Yellow Pages Server at startup, therefore it is necessary for the server to be started before any of the agents. If the Yellow Pages Server terminates for any reason, all the Yellow Pages applications must be restarted. OPTIONS -? or -h Display help information on the accepted arguments. -p dataFilePath Specify the path of the directory which contains the necessary data files. FILES The data files required by the Yellow Pages Server are in DBase4 format and contain all the necessary business and catagory listings. BUGS None known. SEE ALSO cs_yp_app(1) ICP Operator Manual / F-77
  • 263. Glossary ICP t StudioS Conten IT AI S S VT Glossary Access Time The access time is the length of time from the user pressing a key on his/her remote control, until the video image is presented on the television set. Activation Activation is the process of instructing the ICP software to use a different version of a PDB. This is performed by the BUP Server. Address The address includes identifying information that permits the ICP to recognize a particular SCR. When a user wants to start a session, a key is pressed that delivers a command to the SCR. The SCR communicates with the ICP. This signal is encoded with an address that is recognizable to the ICP. AIS AIS is an acronym for the Audio/Input System. ICP Operator Manual / Glossary-1
  • 264. Glossary Application An application is a software program which delivers customized interactive services, as well as presentations, to users of the ICP. The NST is an example of an application. Attractor Screen An attractor screen is an introductory image delivered by the ICP to a user. AU AU is an extension used for files which contain audio data in a specific format. AV AV is an acronym for AudioVisual. Background Audio The presentations delivered by the ICP contain audio segments. Under the direction of interactive applications, audio from a MuzakTM feed or CD player in the ICP can also be transmitted and mixed, by the SCR, with the regular audio signals. This is called background audio. Big-Endian Big-endian is the order of bytes in a word in which the most significant byte is first. Little-endian reverses the order. BTR BTR files contain indexes into HIA files and are used to find the data within them. BUP BUP is an acronym for Batch Update Process. This is the process used by ICP operators to acquire PDBs from content producers. Glossary-2 ICP Operator Manual
  • 265. Glossary buprc buprc is an acronym for Batch Update Process Resource Configuration file. This is the BUP Server’s configuration file. BUP Server The Batch Update Process (BUP) Server is the component of the ITS which controls PDB updates. BUP Version Controller The BUP Version Controller, used by the BUP Server, performs PDB version control tasks. CAF CAF files contain the audio data delivered by the ICP to a user. There is a CAF file for every AU file. Canned Message A canned message is a message pre-programmed into the SCR. Interactive applications can instruct the SCR to display these messages using a terminal command. CATV CATV is an acronym for CAble TeleVision. Coaxial Cable Coaxial cable is a transmission medium with a central core that conducts electricity. Some cable companies use coaxial cable for data transmission. ICP Operator Manual / Glossary-3
  • 266. Glossary Content Producers Content producers generate the ICP’s interactive content in the form of PDBs. The PDB’s are stored in the ICP for on-demand distribution to users. Content Studio The Content Studio (CS) is the software package used by content producers to manage and assemble presentations and PDBs. cs_buprc.pl cs_buprc.pl is a utility which documents the ICP directory structure in the buprc file used in the BUP process. This is run by the ICP installer during system installation. Depot Directory A depot directory stores data from presentations. The audio and video directories (/cs/data/audio and /cs/data/video) both contain a depot directory. Fault Recovery Fault recovery is a built-in ICP mechanism that detects dead processes and takes recovery measures. Frame A frame refers to a single television frame or a single video image. A standard TV signal contains thirty frames, or images, per second. FTP FTP is an acronym for File Transfer Protocol. FTP is software which can be used to transfer files from one computer on the Internet to another. CS-published files are sent via FTP to the ICP where they are processed. Glossary-4 ICP Operator Manual
  • 267. Glossary Head-end The head-end is the physical location of the CATV signal source. Heartbeat A heartbeat is a message sent by the Supervisor to a server process at a pre- defined time mark. If a predefined number of consecutive heartbeat messages have been missed, that process will be considered no longer functioning prop- erly. HIA HIA files are a component of the PDB and are indexes into BTR files. They are used to find data in BTR files. Hot Keys The remote control has hot keys that permit the user to navigate to different applications quickly. This is a navigational shortcut. When content producers create a PDB, they can assign navigational shortcuts to remote control keys. When the user presses one of these hot keys, they will move to a predefined presentation within the PDB. IAE IAE is an acronym for the Interactive Application Environment. The IAE is a toolkit used by software developers to create interactive applications for the ICP. Designed as a C++ class library, this toolkit allows ICP applications to display images, play sound and receive user input. IDLE The SCR can operator in three modes and one of these is the IDLE mode. In this mode, the SCR is turned on but it cannot deliver interactive content from the ICP. ICP Operator Manual / Glossary-5
  • 268. Glossary ICP ICP is an acronym for Interactive Channel Platform. ICP is a hardware/software system which delivers interactive television to users. Incoming Call The SCR must dial the number of the ICP and establish a telephone line connec- tion before a user can receive the ICP’s interactive services. This phone call to the ICP is called an incoming call. Incoming Directory The Content Studio sends PDB files to the ICP. These files are sent into an incoming directory. INS INS is an acronym for Integrated Network Server. Interactive communication Interactive communication is an enhancement of one-way or passive communi- cation such as traditional television. Users of interactive communications services, such as the ICP, actively respond to and control the information they receive. Interactive Session See Session. Interactive Application See Application. IPC IPC is an acronym for InterProcess Communications. IPC is a software compo- nent which is used by ICP processes to communicate with one another. Glossary-6 ICP Operator Manual
  • 269. Glossary ITS ITS is an acronym for Interactive Terminal Server. The ITS processes user input and transmits audio and video signals. ITV ITV is an acronym for Interactive TeleVision. ITV refers to interactive communica- tion services delivered through the TV. JPEG JPEG is an acronym for Joint Photographic Experts Group. The video images in presentations are stored on disk in JPEG files which have an extension of JPG. Latency When the Presentation Server sends an audio play request to the AIS or video play request to the VTS, it takes some time for the actual audio or video signals to reach a user’s TV. This time period is called latency. Little-Endian See Big-Endian. Log File ICP processes generate messages while they are running. These are saved to files on disk called log files. Log Messages ICP processes record their actions and other diagnostic information by generat- ing messages called log messages. These are saved in log files and can be viewed online by the operator. ICP Operator Manual / Glossary-7
  • 270. Glossary Log Server The Log Server is used by ICP processes to record messages. The Log Server saves these to disk and sends them to the SMT for online viewing. Man-Pages The online help provided by the operating system is stored in files on disk. Each file is called a man-page. To access ICP man-pages, type %man <name> where <name> is the name of the man-page and press <ENTER>. For help on man-pages, type %man man Menus Menus are a set of input choices presented by a computer program. For example, most presentations delivered by the ICP have menu choices displayed, allowing navigation to other presentations. Multimedia Information can be delivered through different mediums such as sound, still pictures, video, etc. Multimedia is the combination of two or more of these mediums to deliver information. Name Server The Name Server runs on every ICP machine and performs tasks which allow ICP processes to communicate with one another. Navigation Navigation is the process of moving from one presentation to the next during a session. User input drives navigation. Glossary-8 ICP Operator Manual
  • 271. Glossary NST NST is an acronym for Navigation Session Task. It is an interactive application which processes user input by determining which presentation should be played. Off-Hook State The off-hook state occurs when a telephone line is servicing an active session. On-Hook State The on-hook state occurs when a telephone line is not serving an active session. Overlays Overlays are simple text and graphics that can be placed over the video images of a presentation. See Text and Graphics Overlays. PDB PDB is an acronym for a Presentation DataBase. Presentations are grouped into PDBs. They customarily consist of HIA, BTR, JPEG and CAF files. Platform A platform refers to both hardware and software which provides broad support functions. For example, all of the following can be called platforms: • the SUN SPARCstation • the Intel 80486 microprocessor • an operating system such as UNIX Polling Window Polling windows show status information for ICP processes. This information is displayed in the SMT. ICP Operator Manual / Glossary-9
  • 272. Glossary Presentation A presentation is a unit of audiovisual information sent by the ICP. Images usually present one or more choices and have a supporting audio track. When the user selects a presented choice via his or her remote keypad, a new audiovi- sual presentation is delivered. Presentation Database See PDB. Presentation File Server (PF Server) The PF Server reads presentations from disk files before delivery to the user. A PF Server is assigned to each PDB. Presentation Server The Presentation Server transmits presentations to a user by submitting audio and video play requests to the AIS and VTS, respectively. It also synchronizes each component in a presentation. Pretxel A pretxel is a fragment of a presentation. It contains a sequence of multimedia objects and a relative start time. There is an implicit ordering of the multimedia objects in a prextel, including an input format, a video frame and an audio stream. Process A process is one or more software programs such as the AIS, VTS, NST, etc. PTH PTH is a text file extension that contains a list of hot keys that can be used while navigating the PDB. There is at most one PTH file per PDB. Glossary-10 ICP Operator Manual
  • 273. Glossary RFA RFA is a script produced by the Content Studio listing all audio segments that need to be updated/deleted/added. RFI RFI is a script produced by the Content Studio listing all image (or video) segments that need to be updated/deleted/added. RLA RLA files are created and used by the Content Studio to create RFA files. RLI RLI files are created and used by the Content Studio to create RFI files. SCR SCR is an acronym for Source Control Receiver. Segment Presentations contain audio and video segments. An audio segment is an individual audio track while a video segment is a single image. Server A server is an ICP process which services requests from other ICP processes. Session A session is the period of time between a user logging on and logging off the ICP. ICP Operator Manual / Glossary-11
  • 274. Glossary Session Creation Session creation occurs when a user logs onto the ICP. The logon process permits users to receive interactive material in their home. Session Manager The Session Manager performs three functions: 1) session creation 2) session termination 3) allows users to enter applications such as What’s on TV, Today, etc. Session Termination Session termination occurs when users logoff the ICP. The logoff process terminates the interactive service provided by the ICP. Severe Message A severe message is a type of log message generated by ICP processes. It is the most serious message that can be produced. Site Management Task The Site Management Task (SMT) is a text-based graphical user interface application providing administration of the ICP. One of the SMT’s functions is to start and stop the ICP. The SMT can also be used for viewing log messages generated by the ICP processes, as well as retrieving ICP status information. Source Control Receiver The Source Control Receiver (SCR) is a settop box that permits users to receive ITV. Glossary-12 ICP Operator Manual
  • 275. Glossary Staging Directory The staging directory is the working directory of the BUP Server. There is a staging directory for each PDB under the /cs/data/stage directory. Statistics Server The Statistics Server receives statistics from various ICP processes and saves them to files on disk. These statistics are used to analyze the ICP’s performance. SUPER SUPER is the extension used for the system configuration files. Supervisor Supervisor is an ICP process that performs the startup and shutdown of the ICP. It also performs fault recovery tasks. Symbolic Linking Files and directories can be created which simply “point to” other files or directories. This is known as symbolic linking. TAR TAR is an acronym for Tape ARchiving. It is an algorithm for joining files. This third-party MS-DOS utility is called TAR.EXE. Several vendors produce TAR utilities for a variety of platforms. The BUP process uses GNU’s TAR utility. Terminal Commands Interactive applications can control an SCR by turning its message light on/off, enabling/disabling background audio, etc. This is done by issuing terminal commands to the SCR. ICP Operator Manual / Glossary-13
  • 276. Glossary Text and Graphics Overlays The video images in a presentation can be enhanced with text and graphic overlays. Unlike images which are stored on disk, text and graphic overlays are generated by interactive applications during a session and placed over images. The graphics are limited to colored circles, squares, lines, etc. User The user is the consumer who uses the interactive services of the ICP. Version Control Version control performs the tasks needed to maintain multiple PDB versions. Version Controller See BUP Version Controller. Video Directories Video directories are used to store the video segments of presentations. VTS VTS is an acronym for the Video/Terminal System. Warning Message A warning message is a type of message generated by ICP processes while they are running. This type of message is intended for errors which cause no disrup- tion for a user’s session but require attention. Glossary-14 ICP Operator Manual
  • 277. Glossary XWITTE XWITTE is an acronym for X-Windows Interactive Television Terminal Emulator. XWITTE is a development and testing tool that simulates an ICP session through a software-generated remote control and SCR. XWITTE includes a window that simulates the television screen. The entire functionality is handled by three separate processes: a process to simulate the remote control keypad, a video process for playing images, and an audio process for playing sound. Refer to the XWITTE User Guide for further information. ICP Operator Manual / Glossary-15
  • 278. Index Index disabling/enabling 8-17–8-18 Symbols address 2-3, Glossary-1 insertion of 3-16 # 7-2 Agent %INDEX variable 7-4 VHI Agent * 2-9 man-page F-54–F-55 -d option 9-2 XWITTE Agent -p option 9-3 man-page F-56–F-57 /cs/data/audio 4-16 AIS 3-2, 3-5–3-7, Glossary-1 /cs/data/incoming 4-6, 8-6 audio hardware 3-6, 3-15 /cs/data/presentation 4-16 audio playback 3-6, 3-13, 3-14–3-15 /cs/data/stage 4-7 configuration of 3-5–3-7 /cs/data/stats E-2 man-page F-2–F-3 /cs/data/video 4-16 role in session termination 3-26 /cs/etc 7-1, 8-3 user input processing 3-7, 3-9–3-10, 3-10 0 2-9 AIS Directory Structure C-4 8 2-9 application Glossary-2 attractor screen 2-2, Glossary-2 A frequency 2-2 AU Glossary-2 access time Glossary-1 audio hardware 3-6, 3-15 activation 4-11, 4-18, 8-13–8-14, 8-15–8- audio playback 3-6, 3-14–3-15 16, Glossary-1 explanation of 3-14–3-15 audio segments 3-6 ICP Operator Manual
  • 279. Index decompression of 3-15 AV Glossary-2 C cable line 1-3, 3-16, Glossary-3 B CAF files B-1, Glossary-3 canned messages 3-18, Glossary-3 background audio 3-19, Glossary-2 CATV 1-2, Glossary-3 Batch Update Process 4-1, 8-1, Glossary-2 coaxial cable Glossary-3 activation 4-11, 4-18–4-19, 8-9–8-10 command line arguments 7-4 audio directory 4-16 configuration directory 8-3 BUP Server 4-13 configuration file 7-1 BUP Version Controller 4-9, 4-15 changing 7-10 buprc 4-14, 8-6, 8-9–8-10 comments 7-2, 7-8 changing activation time 4-18 DELAY tag 7-6, 7-8, 7-9, 9-9 cleanup 4-10 ENV tag 7-3 creating directory structure 4-4 environment variables 7-3, 7-7 current directory 4-17 example of 7-8 definition 3-3 HEARTBEAT tag 7-4–7-5, 7-8, 7-9 directory structure 4-13, 8-2 INSTANCES tag 7-5, 7-8, 7-9 disable/enable activation 4-18 location 7-1 file distribution 4-7 MISSHBS tag 7-5, 7-8, 7-9 file transfer 4-6 modifying 7-8 File Transfer Protocol 4-6 naming 7-1, B-1 head-end userid creation 4-4 order of tags 7-3 incoming directory 4-6, 4-7, 8-6, Glossary-6 PARM tag 7-4 manual intervention 4-18, 8-1 PATH tag 7-3, 7-8, 7-9 messages 4-12, 4-19, 8-21 PROC_CLASS tag 7-3 obtaining information 4-12, 4-19, 8-22 PROGRAM tag 7-3, 7-8, 7-9 presentation directory 4-16, 8-2 RECOVERY tag 7-6, 7-8, 7-9 role of system installer 4-4, 8-4 sections 7-1, 7-2, 7-8 setup program 4-4 SHUTDOWNINDEX tag 7-6, 7-8, 7-9, 9-10 staging directory 4-7, Glossary-13 SIGNAL_MASK tag 7-7 steps of 4-5 STARTINDEX tag 7-5–7-6, 7-8, 7-9 symbolic linking 4-15, Glossary-13 syntax 7-2 tar utility 4-8 tags 7-2 version control 4-9, 4-13, Glossary-14 viewing 7-8 versioned directories 4-15 WORKDIR tag 7-7, 7-9 video directory 4-16 configuring servers 7-4–7-5, 7-5 Big-Endian Glossary-2 content producer 3-13, 3-22, 4-2, 4-11, 4-18–4- BTR files B-1, Glossary-2 19, 8-1, 8-13, Glossary-4 BUP Glossary-2 Content Studio 3-2, 3-3, 4-2, Glossary-4 BUP files B-1 creating a session. See session: creation BUP Server 4-8, 4-13, 8-9, Glossary-3 cs_ais_svr F-2–F-3 choosing from SMT 8-11–8-12 cs_buprc.pl 4-4, Glossary-4 BUP Version Controller 4-9, 4-15, Glossary-3 activate list 8-9–8-10 buprc 4-14, 8-6, 8-9–8-10, Glossary-3 add command 8-5, 8-6 adding entries 8-5 command prompt 8-4 ICP Operator Manual
  • 280. Index commands 8-4–8-10 delete command 8-5 E exiting 8-4–8-5 finish command 8-5–8-6, 8-6, 8-10 ENV tag 7-3 finishing data entry 8-5–8-6, 8-6, 8-10 environment variables help command 8-4 CS_BIN 7-3, 7-7, 7-8, 7-9 lists 8-5 removing entries 8-5 starting 8-3, 8-6 F cs_buprc.pl utility 8-3 fault recovery D-1–D-7, Glossary-4 cs_ipc_courier F-13–F-14 detecting dead processes D-2 cs_ipc_ns F-15–F-16 heartbeats 7-4–7-5, D-2, Glossary-5 cs_itt_mgr F-17 ignore D-7 cs_log_svr F-18–F-19 missed heartbeats 7-5, D-3 cs_nst F-20–F-21 recovery methods 7-6, D-4–D-7 cs_pf_conv F-22 restart D-6 cs_pf_server F-23–F-24 shutdown D-4–D-5 cs_ps F-25–F-26 file conversion utility cs_session_mgr F-27 man-page F-22 cs_stats_svr F-30–F-31 File Transfer Protocol 4-6, Glossary-4. See also cs_super_svr F-32–F-38 FTP cs_today_app F-39–F-40 file types cs_today_svr F-41 BTR B-1, Glossary-2 cs_trivia F-42–F-43 BUP B-1 cs_tvguide_app F-44–F-45 CAF B-1, Glossary-3 cs_tvguide_convert F-46–F-48 HIA B-1, Glossary-5 cs_tvguide_svr F-49–F-51 JPG B-1 cs_vhi_svr F-52–F-53 LOG B-1 cs_vts_agt_vhi F-54–F-55 PFU B-1 cs_vts_agt_xwitte F-56–F-57 PTH B-1, Glossary-10 cs_vts_svr F-58–F-59 RFA B-1, Glossary-11 cs_wp_app F-60–F-61 RLA B-1, Glossary-11 cs_wp_svr F-62–F-63 RLI B-1, Glossary-11 cs_xwitte F-64–F-74 SUPER 7-1, B-1, Glossary-13 cs_yp_app F-75–F-76 frame Glossary-4 cs_yp_svr F-77 FTP Glossary-4. See also File Transfer Protocol current directory 4-17 D G General Display window 8-14, 8-16 DELAY tag 7-6, 7-8, 7-9, 9-9 delayed start-up 9-2 depot directory 4-13, Glossary-4 H detecting dead processes D-2 recovery methods D-4–D-7 head-end 3-4, Glossary-5 directory structure 4-13, 8-2 audio hardware 3-6, 3-15 video hardware 3-8 HEARTBEAT tag 7-4–7-5, 7-8, 7-9 ICP Operator Manual
  • 281. Index heartbeats D-2, Glossary-5 HIA files B-1, Glossary-5 L hot keys B-1, Glossary-5 latency Glossary-7 Little-Endian Glossary-7 I log file B-1, Glossary-7 location of A-2 IAE Glossary-5 naming of A-2 ICP Glossary-6 rollover A-2–A-3 IDLE mode 1-4, 2-2, Glossary-5–Glossary-6 rollover by operator A-3 ignore recovery method D-7 rollover by size A-2–A-3 incoming call Glossary-6 rollover by time A-3 incoming directory 4-6, 4-7, 8-6, Glossary-6 log messages 3-30, 3-31–3-32, 8-21, A-4, Glos- infrared keyboard 1-5 sary-7 INS Directory Structure C-3 fields 5-7, A-4 INSTANCES tag 7-5, 7-8, 7-9 severity 3-31 interactive applications 2-7, 4-3, Glossary-2 Log Messages window 8-16 interaction with PF Server 3-21 Log Server 3-31–3-32, A-1–A-4, Glossary-8 starting 3-28–3-30 configuration of 3-32, A-2 What's on TV 2-8–2-9 log file rollover A-2–A-3 Interactive Channel Log Messages window. See Site Management Task: contacting xi Log Messages window Interactive Channel Platform vii, Glossary-6 man-page F-18–F-19 AIS 3-5–3-7 rollover by operator A-3 head-end 4-3 rollover by size A-2–A-3 ITS 3-4–3-5 rollover by time A-3 starting and stopping 9-6–9-7 SMT polling 3-32 VTS 3-7–3-8 logging off 2-3, 2-10, 3-26 interactive communications Glossary-6 logging on 2-3, 3-24–3-25 INTERACTIVE mode 1-4, 2-3 interactive session Glossary-6 Interactive Television vii, 1-1–1-2, Glossary-7 M hardware 1-2 IPC Glossary-6 main menu 2-3, 3-24 IPC Courier man-page x, F-1, Glossary-8 man-page F-13–F-14 accessing x, F-1 ITS 3-4–3-5, Glossary-7 manual functions of 3-4 other sources of information x ITS Directory Structure C-6 purpose of vii ITV vii, Glossary-7 MENU key 2-3, 3-24 menus 2-5, Glossary-8 MISSHBS tag 7-5, 7-8, 7-9 J multimedia Glossary-8 JPEG Glossary-7. See also JPG files JPG files B-1, Glossary-7. See also JPEG N Name Server D-5, Glossary-8 man-page F-15–F-16 ICP Operator Manual
  • 282. Index navigation 2-6, 3-20–3-22, Glossary-8 presentation directory 8-2 Navigation Session Task 3-20–3-21 Presentation File Server 3-21, 8-9, Glossary-10 user input 3-22–3-24 man-page F-23–F-24 Navigation Session Task 3-20–3-21, Glossary-9 Presentation Server 3-12–3-13, Glossary-10 configuration of 3-20 audio playback 3-14–3-15 interaction with PF Server 3-22–3-24 man-page F-25–F-26 interaction with Presentation Server 3-22–3-24 synchronizing audio and video 3-12–3-13 man-page F-20–F-21 video playback 3-12–3-13, 3-16 role in session termination 3-26 pretxel Glossary-10 user input validation 3-22–3-24 PROC_CLASS tag 7-3 process Glossary-10 process restart method D-6 O processes AIS 3-5–3-7, Glossary-1 OFF mode 1-4, 2-10 BUP Server 4-8, 4-13, 8-9–8-10, Glossary-3 off-hook state 3-9, Glossary-9 BUP Version Controller 4-9, 4-15, Glossary-3 on-hook state 3-9, 3-26, Glossary-9 command line arguments 7-4 on-line documentation x environment variables 7-3 on-site representative xi fault recovery 7-4–7-5, 7-5, 7-6 operator information 4-12 instances 7-5 other sources of information x ITS 3-4–3-5, Glossary-7 overlays 3-18, Glossary-9, Glossary-14 Log Server 3-31–3-32, A-1–A-4, Glossary-8 Name Server D-5, Glossary-8 P Navigation Session Task 3-20–3-21, Glossary-9 Presentation File Server 3-21, 8-9–8-10, Glos- PARM tag 7-4 sary-10 PATH tag 7-3, 7-8, 7-9 Presentation Server 3-12–3-13, Glossary-10 paused start-up 9-3 Session Manager 3-24–3-29, Glossary-12 PFU files B-1 Site Management Task Glossary-12 platform Glossary-9 Statistics Server 3-32, Glossary-13 playing presentations 3-12–3-13 Supervisor 7-1, 9-1, Glossary-13 polling 3-32 VTS 3-7–3-8, Glossary-14 polling window Glossary-9 working directory 7-7 POWER key 2-3, 2-10, 3-24, 3-26 PROGRAM tag 7-3, 7-8, 7-9 presentation 2-4, Glossary-10 PTH files B-1, Glossary-10 audio segments 2-4 input choices 2-4, 3-13 menu 2-5 R navigating 3-20–3-22 recording statistics 3-30, 3-32 playing 3-12 RECOVERY tag 7-6, 7-8, 7-9 reference to an application 3-28–3-29 remote control 1-5 text and graphic overlays 2-5 asterick key 2-9 video images 2-5 eight key 2-9 presentation database 3-21, 4-3, 4-9, Glossary-9 hot keys 2-6, 2-9, Glossary-5 changing versions 8-19 MENU key 2-3, 3-24 root presentation 3-22 POWER key 2-3, 2-10, 3-24, 3-26 switching versions 4-18 TV key 2-3, 2-10, 3-24, 3-26 updating 3-30, 3-34 zero key 2-9 ICP Operator Manual
  • 283. Index restart recovery method D-6 Menu Bar 5-4–5-5 RFA files B-1, Glossary-11 non-content colors 5-9 RFI Glossary-11 polling 6-5 RLA files B-1, Glossary-11 polling window Glossary-9 RLI files B-1, Glossary-11 preventing system start-up 9-6 root presentation 3-22 Server Status Activity option 5-12 Server Status Activity window 5-6 starting 5-2 S starting the system 7-10 stopping 5-14–5-15 segment Glossary-11 stopping the system 9-7 server Glossary-11 switching PDB versions 8-19 session 2-3–2-4, Glossary-6, Glossary-11 Title Bar 5-4 creation 2-3, 3-24–3-25, Glossary-12 toggle window placement option 5-11 management 3-24–3-29 Window menu 5-11–5-12 off-hook line state 3-9 Site Managment Task on-hook line state 3-9 changing attractor screens 2-2 termination 2-3, 2-10, 3-26, Glossary-12 SMT. See Site Management Task Session Manager 3-24–3-29, Glossary-12 Source Control Receiver 1-3, Glossary-11 General Display window 8-14 address 2-3 man-page F-27 audio processing 1-3 maximum number of sessions 3-25 dialing head-end 3-25 session creation 3-24–3-25 IDLE mode 1-4, 2-2, Glossary-5–Glossary-6 session termination 3-26 infrared port/receiver 1-5 starting an application 3-28–3-29 INTERACTIVE mode 1-4, 2-3 setup utility. See cs_buprc.pl modes of operation 1-4 severe message Glossary-12 OFF mode 1-4 shutdown recovery method D-4–D-5 transmission of MENU key 3-25 SHUTDOWNINDEX tag 7-6, 7-8, 7-9, 9-10 turning off 2-10 signal.h 7-7 user input reception 3-10 SIGNAL_MASK tag 7-7 user input transmition 3-10, 3-14 Site Management Task 5-3, Glossary-12 video processing 1-3 activating a PDB 8-13–8-14 staging directory 4-7, Glossary-13 BUP Information window 4-19, 8-22 STARTINDEX tag 7-5–7-6, 7-8, 7-9 changing PDB activation time 8-15–8-16 statistics choosing a BUP Server 8-11–8-12 recording. See Statistics Server: recording statistics colors 5-9 statistics directory. See Statistics Server: statistics content colors 5-9 directory decrease lower window option 5-12 statistics file E-1–E-3 disabling/enabling activation 8-17–8-18 data analysis and report generation 3-33 General Display option 5-12 location of E-2 General Display window 8-16 naming of E-2 help 5-10 remote transfer of 3-33 increase lower window option 5-12 rollover E-3 keys 5-10 using E-1 log message details option 5-12 Statistics Server 3-32, 3-33, Glossary-13 log messages option 5-12 man-page F-30–F-31 Log Messages window 5-7 recording statistics 3-32 Log Server polling 3-32 ICP Operator Manual
  • 284. Index rollover of statistics file E-3 statistics file E-1–E-3 U SUPER files 7-1, B-1, Glossary-13 Supervisor 7-1, 9-1, Glossary-13 updating PDBs 3-30, 3-34 command line arguments 9-2, 9-3 user Glossary-14 delayed start-up 9-2 user input detecting dead processes D-2 explanation of 3-7, 3-10 fault recovery 7-6, D-1–D-7 off-hook line state 3-9 heartbeats 7-4–7-5, D-2, Glossary-5 receiving 3-10 ignore recovery method D-7 man-page F-32–F-38 missed heartbeats 7-5, D-3 V paused start-up 9-3 version control 4-9, 4-13, Glossary-14 restart recovery method D-6 Version Controller. See BUP Version Controller shutdown recovery method D-4–D-5 versioned directories 4-15 shutdown sequence 7-6, 7-9, 9-9 VHI Server start-up sequence 7-5–7-6, 7-6, 7-9, 9-4, 9-9 agent symbolic linking 4-15, Glossary-13 man-page F-54–F-55 symbollic linking Glossary-13 man-page F-52–F-53 system installation video directories Glossary-14 creating directories 4-4 video directory 8-2, Glossary-14 creating userids 4-4 video hardware 3-8 system installer 4-4 video image system shutdown 7-6 decompression of 3-16 system start-up 7-5–7-6, 7-6, 9-4 video playback 3-8, 3-16 delayed start-up 9-2 explanation of 3-16 paused start-up 9-3 VTS 3-2, 3-7–3-8, Glossary-14 address insertion 3-16 T background audio transmission 3-19 configuration of 3-7–3-8 TAR Glossary-13. See also tar utility man-page F-58–F-59 tar utility 4-8, Glossary-13 terminal commands 3-8–3-13 telephone line 1-3, 3-14 text and graphic overlays 3-16, 3-18 audio and input transmission 3-14 video decompression 3-16 off-hook state 3-9 video hardware 3-8 on-hook state 3-9, 3-26 video playback 3-8, 3-13, 3-16 terminal commands 3-8, 3-18–3-19, Glossary-13 VTS Directory Structure C-5 background audio 3-19 examples of 3-18–3-19 terminating a session. See session: termination W text and graphic overlays 2-5, 3-16, 3-18, Glossary- warning message Glossary-14 9, Glossary-14 What's on TV 2-8–2-9 Today man-page F-39–F-40, F-41 Trivia man-page F-42–F-43 TV key 2-3, 2-10, 3-24, 3-26 ICP Operator Manual
  • 285. Index man-page F-44–F-45, F-46–F-48, F-49–F-51 special keys 2-9 starting 2-9 using 2-9 White Pages man-page F-60–F-61, F-62–F-63 WORKDIR tag 7-7, 7-8, 7-9 working directory 7-7 X xedit 7-8 XWITTE Glossary-14 agent man-page F-56–F-57 man-page F-64–F-74 video images B-1 Y Yellow Pages man-page F-75–F-76, F-77 ICP Operator Manual