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Options for Captioning Video at MIT

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Guidelines for captioning video at MIT - why and how.

Guidelines for captioning video at MIT - why and how.

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  • 1. Options  for  Captioning  Video  at  MIT  –  contact  accessibility@mit.edu     When  is  Captioning  Required:     MIT  is  legally  obligated  to  follow  Section  504  of  the  Rehabilitation  Act.  Under  Section  504,  we   must  create  content  that  gives  “equal  access”  to  people  with  disabilities.  Captioning  may  be   necessary  and  required  to  make  audio  and  audiovisual  information  and  communication   accessible  to  people  who  are  deaf  or  hard  of  hearing  in  a  wide  range  of  situations.   Many  entities  have  obligations  under  civil  rights  laws  that  prohibit  discrimination  and  require   the  provision  of  accommodations,  such  as  captioning,  to  ensure  equal  access,  an  equal   opportunity  to  participate,  and  effective  communication  with  people  who  are  deaf  or  hard  of   hearing.    These  entities  have  obligations  under  the  Individuals  with  Disabilities  Education  Act   (IDEA),  the  Rehabilitation  Act  of  1973,  the  Americans  with  Disabilities  Act  (ADA),  and  other  laws.   When  Required:  http://www.nad.org/issues/technology/captioning/when-­‐required   Title  II  of  the  ADA:  http://www.ada.gov/t2hlt95.htm   CVAA  (Video  Accessibility  Act):  http://www.nad.org/issues/civil-­‐rights/communications-­‐ act/21st-­‐century-­‐act   Section  504:  http://www.dol.gov/oasam/regs/statutes/sec504.htm     Benefits  of  Captioning:   - - - Allows  a  diverse  audience  to  view  your  video:   o Deaf  and  hearing  impaired   o People  for  whom  English  is  a  second  language   o Situations  where  noise  is  an  issue  or  volume  is  turned  off   Increases  comprehension  and  retention:   o Text  and  audio  reinforce  learning  concepts   o Fosters  understanding  and  use  of  unique  vocabulary  terms   o Helps  those  with  learning  disabilities   Increases  Search  Engine  Optimization  (SEO)   Captioning  increases  viewing  by  40%:  http://www.reelseo.com/subtitles-­‐viewing/       1) TechTV  Videos   - Caption  yourself:  http://ttv.mit.edu/faq/#captions   - AMPS  can  caption  for  you  for  a  fee  of  approximately  $2-­‐3/minute.    For  a  quote,  contact   amps-­‐info@mit.edu     2) YouTube  Videos     a) YouTube  supports  caption  files  and  will  also  attempt  to  convert  a  text  transcript  into  a   timed  synchronized  caption  file:   https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/2734796?hl=en     Contact  Stephani  Roberts  –  Web  Accessibility  Consultant  –  accessibility@mit.edu  
  • 2.   b) *YouTube  has  partnered  with  3PlayMedia  to  provide  captioning  services  for  a  fee,   $2.50/minute:  http://www.youtubecaptions.com/       *  a  youTube  account  is  required  to  use  this  service.     c) YouTube  Caption  Software  and  Services:   https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/100076?hl=en&ref_topic=3014331     3) Cielo24  –  Captioning  partnership  of  major  vendors  and  California  universities   24  Hour  turnaround  for  $1+/minute.  http://www.cielo24.com/     4) Amara  –  Amara  is  a  free  online  captioning  tool  that  connects  to  youtube  or  other  online   video  repositories  and  allows  you  to  listen,  type,  and  work  on  the  timing  of  captions.  You   can  then  download  an  .srt  caption  file  and  upload  it  to  where  your  video  lives  on  TechTV  or   youTube.  http://www.amara.org/en/     5) MovieCaptioner  Tool  (Mac/Windows)  –  This  captioning  software  is  intuitive  and  does  not   require  an  Internet  connection.  Load  your  video  from  your  drive  and  begin  captioning.  It   takes  a  bit  of  time  to  learn,  but  is  quite  simple.  Our  team  has  a  few  copies  of  this  available   for  you  to  try  out.  http://www.synchrimedia.com/  -­‐  contact  us  at  accessibility@mit.edu             Contact  Stephani  Roberts  –  Web  Accessibility  Consultant  –  accessibility@mit.edu