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Health Problems as Wicked Problems:      How mobile tools might help?                MobiMooc12              Week 3 mHealt...
What is a wicked problem?• The term ‘wicked’ in this context is used, not in  the sense of evil, but resistant to solution...
Wicked• There is no definite formulation of the  problem, each problem is essentially  unique, often has not been faced be...
• “Wicked problem” concept originally  proposed by Rittel & Webber 1973• Wicked problems stand in contrast to  Tame proble...
First, I believe that this nation should                  commit itself to achieving the goal,                  before thi...
Key characteristics• Wicked problems are difficult to clearly define• Wicked problems have many interdependencies and are ...
Wicked examples•   Obesity prevention,•   Lowering smoking rates,•   Child protection,•   Indigenous disadvantage,•   Clim...
Facing Up to Wickedness• Gather the many partners and  stakeholders together and build are  shared commitment and an under...
How can mobile tools help?• Everyone has to keep  learning and  collaborating and to  keep looking out for   Reflect   Obs...
Good mLearn= Good mHealth• Mobile devices can potentially increase the  capacity of wicked workers to :  –   Learn from ot...
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Health problems as wicked problems

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These slides have been produced for MobiMOOC a free Massive Open Online Course as part of the week 3 theme on MHealth. See http://mobimooc.wikispaces.com/Mobile+health+%28mHealth%29 The slides will also be made available as well.

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Transcript of "Health problems as wicked problems"

  1. 1. Health Problems as Wicked Problems: How mobile tools might help? MobiMooc12 Week 3 mHealth Malcolm Lewis http://about.me/malcolm_lewis
  2. 2. What is a wicked problem?• The term ‘wicked’ in this context is used, not in the sense of evil, but resistant to solution.• Many problems in health are complex, multi- framed, cross-boundary, and hard to solve.• They often require collaborative and distributed leadership.• The solutions are not in books or journals• Evidence reviews are a loose guide.
  3. 3. Wicked• There is no definite formulation of the problem, each problem is essentially unique, often has not been faced before, and is entwined with other problems. The search for solutions never stops. Solutions are not good or bad or limited, but are judgment calls and are often difficult to measure.
  4. 4. • “Wicked problem” concept originally proposed by Rittel & Webber 1973• Wicked problems stand in contrast to Tame problems.• Tame not necessarily simple—they can be very technically complex like landing on the moon.
  5. 5. First, I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the Earth. US President John F. Kennedyhttp://www.universetoday.com/85935/i-believe-this-nation-should-commit-itself-kennedys-moon-shot-speech-to-congress/#ixzz25w0jQPpA
  6. 6. Key characteristics• Wicked problems are difficult to clearly define• Wicked problems have many interdependencies and are often multi-causal.• Attempts to address wicked problems often lead to unforeseen consequences.• Wicked problems are often not stable.• Wicked problems usually have no clear solution.• Wicked problems are socially complex.• Wicked problems hardly ever sit conveniently within the responsibility of any one organisation.• Wicked problems involve changing behaviour.• Some wicked problems are characterised by chronic policy failure.Tackling Wicked Problems: A Public Policy Perspectivehttp://www.apsc.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/6386/wickedproblems.pdf
  7. 7. Wicked examples• Obesity prevention,• Lowering smoking rates,• Child protection,• Indigenous disadvantage,• Climate change,• food security,• falls prevention,• Reducing Suicide rates,• Town planning,• Infection control,• Parenting difficult children• Drug law enforcement
  8. 8. Facing Up to Wickedness• Gather the many partners and stakeholders together and build are shared commitment and an understanding of everyones views and interests.• More or less arrive at a coherent sense of commitment to doing “what might help here, now.”
  9. 9. How can mobile tools help?• Everyone has to keep learning and collaborating and to keep looking out for Reflect Observe expected and unexpected outcomes. Plan Act
  10. 10. Good mLearn= Good mHealth• Mobile devices can potentially increase the capacity of wicked workers to : – Learn from others – Share their reflections – Collect outcomes data – Act collaboratively – Build local knowledge – Downes & Siemens Connectivism model of knowledge and learning may be what happens when a network of health and human services learn.
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