From a Good Sales Call to a Great Sales Call
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From a Good Sales Call to a Great Sales Call

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From the book "From a Good Sales Call to a Great Sales Call" by Richard Schroder (McGraw-Hill, 2010) easy steps salespeople can use to conduct their own “performance evaluation”—and then apply ...

From the book "From a Good Sales Call to a Great Sales Call" by Richard Schroder (McGraw-Hill, 2010) easy steps salespeople can use to conduct their own “performance evaluation”—and then apply valuable lessons learned from their errors and successes.

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From a Good Sales Call to a Great Sales Call From a Good Sales Call to a Great Sales Call Presentation Transcript

  • From a Good Sales Call to a GREAT Sales Call Close More by Gathering Candid Prospect Feedback Richard M. Schroder Now available from McGraw-Hill
  • Question for Audience What percentage of the time do you think salespeople get the complete and accurate truth from prospects about why they lost?
  • Why did I lose?
    • First question salespeople ask themselves when they lose: Why did I lose?
    • Salespeople often ask prospects why they lost in a new business situation
    • Prospects share the complete truth LESS THAN HALF THE TIME
  • Salesperson’s Stated Perceptions vs. Actual Reasons Salesperson’s assessment is completely wrong Salesperson’s understanding is complete and accurate Salesperson has part of the story but other part is unknown 32% 40% 28% In 60% of new business situations, salespeople do not have a complete and accurate understanding of why they lost
  • The Final Overlooked Element of the Sales Process 1. Getting in the door 2. Establishing a connection 3. Conducting a needs analysis 4. Presenting 5. Answering questions / objections 6. Closing the sale 7. Conducting a post-decision debrief Conduct a post-decision interview with the prospect after each sales cycle has ended (win or lose) Sales training has failed to cover this important final element of the sales process.
  • The Final Overlooked Element of the Sales Process
    • If you don’t truly understand why you win and lose, how are you expected to improve your performance?
    • Only after you obtain accurate and candid feedback on your sales performance can you institute meaningful change
    • Post-decision debriefs allow you to mitigate your own unique sales process deficiencies
    • 90% of salespeople believe they could improve upon how they debrief with prospects
  • Primary Reasons Prospects are Not Candid
    • Prospects do not want to hurt the salesperson’s feelings
    • Prospects fear confrontation
    Reasons prospects are not candid during debriefs Ways in which salespeople inhibit feedback process Overlap of Communication Gaps
    • The real reasons for loss may make the prospect look bad
    • Earlier problems in the sales process can impact prospects’ candor
    • Prospects don’t spend a lot of time giving salespeople bad news
  • Primary Reasons Salespeople Inhibit the Feedback Process
    • Salespeople are not in an objective position
    • Salespeople are often unprepared when conducting a debrief
    • Salespeople usually do not know the right questions to ask
    • The true reasons for loss are difficult to obtain if the salesperson is not selling directly to the decision maker
    • Inherent issues with selling through intermediaries, channels or partners
    Reasons prospects are not candid during debriefs Ways in which salespeople inhibit feedback process Overlap of Communication Gaps
  • Salespeople Are Often Unprepared when Conducting a Debrief
    • The “break-up” call is worst time to gather feedback
    • Prospects want to get salesperson off the phone quickly, limiting feedback
    • Salespeople are not fully prepared with line of questioning
    • Only 19% of salespeople set up a separate call to perform post-decision debriefs with prospects
  • Salespeople Do Not Know the Right Questions to Ask
    • Limited research and literature on subject
    • Sales training programs / seminars do not cover Win / Loss reviews
    • Sales managers often overlook this key aspect of the sales process
    • Only 18% of salespeople have been involved in a formal Win / Loss program
  • Setting Up a Post-Decision Debrief Call Getting in the door (i.e., cold calling, networking and referrals) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Establishing a connection/ rapport Conducting a needs analysis Presenting Answering questions and handling objections Closing the sale Debriefing with prospects Ask for permission to conduct a post-decision interview early in the process -- once you have begun presenting your services
    • Do not debrief when you first hear you lost the deal
    • Schedule a separate debrief call after you have accepted the loss and let the prospect know that you will not try to change their decision
    • Ask: “Do you have your calendar handy?”
  • Use a Debrief Questionnaire
    • Salespeople who use a debrief questionnaire have a 15% HIGHER CLOSE RATE
    • Maximizes feedback / keeps conversation focused
    • Allows you to easily take organized notes
    • Questionnaire can be referred back to should you reengage with prospect in the future
  • Post-Decision Debrief Questionnaire
    • Average interview can take 10-15 minutes (but can run as long as 40 minutes)
    • Great way to learn from your successes and failures
    • Consider having someone else conduct the interview for you (e.g., someone else from your company, outside cold-caller, etc.)
    • For a customizable Word version of a sample debrief guide, go to www.theanovagroup.com/debriefguide.htm
  • How to Act During a Debrief Call
    • Start the call in a positive manner that sets the tone for candor
    • Make sure that you really want to hear constructive feedback (the prospect will be able to tell if you don’t)
    • Take responsibility for everything that occurred during the sales process
    • Don’t get defensive or angry, don’t debate with the prospect and don’t try to resell the prospect
  • Proven Techniques to Gather the Most Valuable Info
    • Take notes to make prospect feel important and keep them talking
    • Probe for specifics. Ask, “How do you mean?” or “Say more”
    • Use silence to get the prospect talking
    • Understand that whatever the prospect talks about most was important to them during the sales process
  • Benefits of Post-Decision Interviews
    • Develop organic self-improvement training program
    • Take responsibility for the true, candid reasons why prospects buy and don’t buy from you / your company
    • Improve the effectiveness of your sales presentations
    • Determine key drivers for closing new business
    • Identify prospect perceptions of the strengths and weaknesses of your products and services
    • Uncover unmet prospect / customer needs
    • Gather competitive intelligence
  • From a Good Sales Call to a GREAT Sales Call Close More by Gathering Candid Prospect Feedback Richard M. Schroder Now available from McGraw-Hill