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Communication Style Standards
 

Communication Style Standards

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Harnessing the Power of Communications. Missy Blankenship

Harnessing the Power of Communications. Missy Blankenship

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    Communication Style Standards Communication Style Standards Presentation Transcript

    • COMMUNICATION STYLE STANDARDS “Harnessing the Power of Communication” October 1, 2005
    • COMMUNICATION STYLE STANDARDS Contents Page 2 I. Communication & Branding – an introduction Page 3-4 II. Mission Page 4 III. Confidentiality Page 5-6 IV. Abbreviations & Definitions Page 6 Friendship Corporate Identity V. A. Our Logo & Colors, Story of the Pyramid Page 6-7 B. Our Colors in Print Page 8 C. Letterhead / Stationery Page 8 D. Fonts Page 8 E. Our Professional Attitude- Dress, Building Page 9 F. Business Cards Page 9 G. PowerPoint Presentations Page 10 H. Labels, Folders, etc. Page 11 I. Labels, Mailing Page 11 VI. Correspondence A. Business letter Page 12-13 B. Memorandum Page 14-15 C. Faxing Page 16-18 D. Email Page 19-21 E. Quotes / Estimates Page 22-23 F. Brochures, Bulletins, Displays, Mail Designs Page 24-33 G. Telephone Page 34 H. Press Releases Page 35-37 VII. Common Style Usage for Punctuation & Grammar A. Apostrophe Page 38 B. Colon Page 38 C. Comma Page 39 D. Grammar (am I using the correct word?) Page 39-41 VIII. Customer Service Page 42-44 VIII. Friendship Website A. Logo, Fonts, Colors, Module Containers, Links, Domains Page 44-45 B. Alias Emails Page 45 C. HTML Code Page 45-48 D. Site Map, Tracking Reports, Administration Page 48-53 APPENDIX Templates Page 54 ADDENDUM Page 55- 2
    • I. Communication & Branding – an introduction According to Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary, communication is defined as: 1. a process by which information is exchanged between individuals through a common system of symbols, signs, or behavior 2. a technique for expressing ideas effectively (as in speech, in-person) or the technology of the transmission of information (as by print or telecommunication) Friendship’s Communication Style Standards were developed as part of the Comprehensive Marketing Plan process – to help achieve overall goals and objectives as per the Strategic Plan 2005-2010. The primary goals are: • to develop, enhance and oversee communications. • to maintain a professional image that communicates a progressive, high-quality organization. • to grow the brand of Friendship. These standards will serve as the authority for all communication vehicles, including our web- site, publications and other correspondence. The goal of this manual is to achieve consistency in all publications and correspondence that will convey a uniform corporate image befitting Friendship Industries and other Community Rehab Program (CRPs). As a rule of thumb, if in doubt, get a second opinion! STRONG BRANDING helps Friendship Industries achieve Strategic Plan Goals To Friendship Industries, the word “brand” carries many meanings. Our brand is: …our values and how those values are conveyed.…what we stand for and what we don’t. …our personality as an organization.…how and with whom we do business. …the care that goes into each product and service. …the look and feel of our facility. …the care shown to customers and clients.…the behavior of our employees. …all of our communications - in person, in policy, on the phone, online, in correspondence and in advertising. Branding is NOT simply new slogans, taglines or logos or stating that we’re “different, better or bigger”. And in today’s marketplace, Friendship’s Brand MUST be carried through in everything we do, both internally and externally. In developing our new marketing strategy, we included Brand consistency throughout. In developing our Brand, it was decided that the three components of Friendship should work together to develop a single plan under a similar “umbrella”: Commercial/Sales (The “Fuel” of Friendship), Rehab/Human Resources (The “Function” of Friendship) and Development/Public Relations (The “Fire” of Friendship). 3
    • STRONG BRANDING helps Friendship Industries achieve Strategic Plan Goals Despite our unique roles, responsibilities, audiences and purpose, we all have the same Mission, similar Goals and thus congruent Objectives for achieving them. Our Major Goals in Branding are to educate the community of the contributions made to the community by Friendship and to improve and increase our Public Image within our three (3) distinct areas of influence: Commercial/Sales & Marketing: • To increase awareness of Friendship 's commercial capabilities • To increase amount of regular daily commercial work for all clients • To increase amount of commercial work opportunities • To educate current customers and prospects of commercial capabilities, esp. equipment available and partnering opportunities, such as government set-asides Rehabilitative Services/Human Resources: • To increase awareness of Friendship 's rehab training capabilities • To increase amount of Supported Employment outcomes in Community businesses • To increase amount of work opportunities for ALL clients • To educate the community (and persons with disabilities) of the capabilities of persons with disabilities Development/Public Relations: • To increase awareness of the needs of persons with disabilities to increase stewardship • To increase amount of funds from donations, especially for special projects and programs • To increase amount of funding opportunities at Friendship, including grants • To educate the community of the needs of persons with disabilities II. Mission Friendship Industries develops and maintains employment and training opportunities for persons with disabilities in integrated work environments. 4
    • III. Confidentiality What does confidentiality mean? Each person working at Friendship Industries will come into contact with the disabled population we serve. For the sake of this document, these employees are known as our “clients” and are not to be confused with our commercial customers. In the course of our work with clients, we may be exposed to information and/or records, or within earshot of client consultation and/or professional’s discussions. All information regarding a client’s condition, treatment, or personal status is confidential. This information is not to be discussed with anyone not directly involved with the client’s rehabilitation plan. Client information is not to be released or disclosed by anyone other than authorized personnel. Violations of regulations regarding confidentiality place Friendship Industries and the employee in legal jeopardy. When a new client comes to Friendship, they are explicitly guaranteed the right to have all information about them treated confidentially. It’s the law, and it’s an ethical obligation for our organization, and for each one of us. What does confidentiality mean? It includes any details about an individual’s disability, behaviors, or circumstances, including: • Discussion with anyone outside of Friendship Industries in such detail that the client is identifiable • Information shared among employees who have no need to know, and should not know details about the individual client • Information discussed at staff meetings in the course of efficiently communicating a specific incident or occurrence about a specific client and repeated to individuals who are not staff We have great people working at all levels at Friendship, and we couldn’t get work accomplished without everyone who is here. BUT, when you pass on any information to someone about a client that they don’t need to know to do their job, you are violating a client’s rights, breaking the law, breaching your ethical responsibility, and creating the possibility of you and Friendship being subject to legal ramifications. It’s easy to forget who is and is not a client and it’s easy to pass on, without even thinking about it, information that you would not want passed on to others, if you were in the client’s situation. Remember, higher functioning clients are not staff and are not exempt from having their rights protected. These rights are not unique. In a traditional workplace setting, talking about an employee’s medical information, performance, behavior, or personal circumstances with someone who has no need to know is illegal. All of our employees, staff, clients, production and supervisory aides alike have these same rights. 5
    • What You Can Do: Ask yourself three key questions before any discussion concerning an employee. These can be considered “THE 3 Ws” • Who am I saying this to (Who am I talking to)? • Why am I saying this (Does this person need this information to do their job)? • Where am I saying this (Is someone close enough to hear what is being discussed)? Although it goes against everything we’ve been taught all of our lives, when in doubt, don’t share. IV. Abbreviations & Definitions “Friendship Industries is …” in acceptable terminology: • Work Center, Employment Services Organization or Community Rehab Program (in place of “Sheltered Workshop”) • Disabled or Persons with Disabilities (in place of “Handicapped” or “Retarded”) • Employee, Our Workers (in reference to all Staff and Clients of Friendship Industries) • Integrated Work Environment (in place of “we work with those handicapped people”) • Productive workers, not a Charity • Not-for-Profit is a tax status, not the way we do Business • ESO Employment Services Organization • CRP Community Rehab Program • NP Non Profit • NPO Non Profit Organization • NPA Non Profit Agency V. Friendship Corporate Identity NOTE: Unless otherwise noted, ALL templates can be found on I:Shared FilesFRIENDSHIP MARKETING Friendship Industries’ corporate identity is comprised of TWO major elements: our logo (including corporate colors and fonts) and our professional attitude. Our logo should be used on all collateral materials, including but not limited to, brochures, business cards, letters, fax transmissions, website, online profiles, signs, vehicles and any event or promotion we sponsor. 6
    • A. OUR LOGO & COLORS: is the main visual image associated with Friendship and represents our progressive thinking, focus and dedication to our Mission. The Story of our Logo … The Pyramid: A Pyramid of green and orange represents Friendship Industries. Why? As plans began for our new building in the 90’s, we needed an easily identifiable logo to remind our donors, clients, customers, families and the community of just who and what was Friendship Industries. • A symbol was needed to reflect the four aspects of our programs – our job training programs, job support services, rehabilitation services, and life skills training programs. • A symbol was needed to remind people that Friendship is here for the duration. Our agency’s move to a new facility showed that we are growing and gaining strength. Our symbol should tell people that we would always be here. • A symbol was needed to assure people that Friendship is here to serve the community and persons with disabilities -- with compassion and warmth. • A symbol was needed to represent the strength of the individuals Friendship serves and the balance we provide with our services…the four sides of being human – the physical, the mental, the social, and the religious…represented by the body, the mind, the personality and the character. From a physical standpoint, the Pyramid is a structure with four sides…a square floor plan with a strong base and three triangular faces meeting at a pinnacle. Historically, the Pyramid is a symbol of strength and duration due to its association with the tombs of ancient Egypt. Green, among many cultures, signifies growth and abundance. And, Pyramid is a Greek derivation of the word “fire”—hence the orange color. What better structure to show strength and duration? What better colors to signify compassion, warmth, growth and energy? What a great symbol to show the pride and power of those who work here! This is the story of the green and orange Pyramid, encompassing all that makes us Friendship Industries. Cindy Smead of Firefly Studio and King Custom Etching created the pyramid in our lobby. Story courtesy of Sandra Quigg, Director of Development 1998-2005, Friendship Industries, Inc. And, for the short version of The Story of our Logo – The Pyramid: Friendship’s logo, the four-sided pyramid, represents the Fuel (Commercial Operations), the Fire (Development), and the Function (Rehabilitation Services) of our organization. The color green symbolizes growth and prosperity, while the color orange represents fire or passion for our mission. 7
    • B. FRIENDSHIP COLORS IN PRINT • PMS orange 144 • PMS green 3425 The Logo with only the Pyramid is available for use at: TEMPLATESLogosLogo_plain.doc The Logo with only the Pyramid AS A PICTURE FILE is available for use at TEMPLATESLogosFI Pyramid only.jpg The Logo with Pyramid AND TEXT is available for use at TEMPLATESLogosLogo_with_text.doc The Logo with Pyramid and Text AS A PICTURE FILE is available for use at TEMPLATESLogosLogo_with_text_small.jpg AND TEMPLATESLogosLogo_with_text_large.tif The Logo with Pyramid, Text and PMS Color Information for signs can be found at: TEMPLATESLogosVan_Logo_with_text.doc C. LETTERHEAD / STATIONERY: • Use Hammermill Via Neutrals Writing 24#, Ivory Smooth. D. FONTS: Friendship Industries, Inc. 801 Friendship Drive Harrisonburg, Virginia 22802 Friendship = Copperplate Gothic Bold Industries, Inc. = Garamond in italic and bold 801 Friendship, etc. = Myriad Roman (or Verdana, in the absence of Myriad) 8
    • E. OUR PROFESSIONAL ATTITUDE: includes the way we dress and how we maintain our workplace. Corporate identity is not to be taken lightly. At all times and in all things, it should be remembered that we are representatives of Friendship Industries and its Mission, and as such, are responsible for reflecting a high level of professionalism. • Dress: Part of a professional attitude is how we dress. It is very important to remember that when we travel – either to meet with organizations, customers, clients and/or families, donors, media, or for other events, that we are all representatives of Friendship Industries and its professional attitude. Please refer to the Employee Handbook for specific examples. • Building: Friendship’s building is as much a part of our corporate identity as our logo and the way we dress. It is important to mind the environment in which we work, and to maintain its professional appearance. Therefore, if you notice something that detracts from the building’s appearance, take the time to either fix it, or notify the appropriate staff. F. BUSINESS CARDS: in order to expand the “brand” of Friendship in all that we do, each of us should carry business cards which reflect not only our position with the organization but say something about the work we do, whether commercial or directly mission-related. Two actual samples in PDF format follow, incorporating all of the elements of our “brand”. To view PDFs, templates and alternative text are available in Word document format at: TEMPLATESBusiness CardsBusiness Cards 3-up.pdf TEMPLATESBusiness CardsFriendship BIZ CARD SET-UPS.2005.doc 9
    • G. POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS: to further expand the “brand” of Friendship, we have created templates for use in .ppt presentations. One actual sample follows; there are five different versions, each incorporating different taglines of our “brand”. Templates are available in .ppt form at: TEMPLATESPPT TemplatesTagline-Connected_to_the_Past.ppt Tagline-Friendship_is_more_valuable.ppt Tagline-Innovation_meets_Tradition.ppt Tagline-Its_just_Right.ppt Tagline-We_Can_Do_That.ppt Tagline-Put_Friendship_to_Work_for_You.ppt and TEMPLATESPPT TemplatesPower Point Slides-Blue.ppt Power Point Slides-White.ppt 10
    • H. LABELS, Folders etc.: to further expand the “brand” of Friendship, we have created templates for labels for use on folders and other collateral materials requiring identification. The Label Template is available in a Word document (.DOC) and as a Picture File (.JPG) and as a Macromedia Fireworks File (.PNG) for altering at: TEMPLATESCards-Labels3x4card_label.doc TEMPLATESCards-Labels3x4card_label.jpg TEMPLATESCards-Labels3x4card_label.png I. LABELS, Mailing: to further expand the “brand” of Friendship, we have created templates for labels for use on mailings, especially those in plain white 9x12 envelopes. The Label Template is available in a Word document for printing in color or black/white at: TEMPLATESCards-Labels6-up Mailing Label.doc 801 Friendship Drive Harrisonburg VA 22802-4566 TO: 11
    • VI. Correspondence A. BUSINESS LETTER (See actual example on following page.) • Always print your letter on Friendship letterhead. • In the absence of pre-printed letterhead, the Friendship letter template is available at: TEMPLATESLetterheadbusiness_letter_template.doc • Always check your spelling. • Arial, Times New Roman and Verdana are the only acceptable fonts for composing letters. • Chose clear, familiar words. Do not use jargon. • Only type one space after sentences. • Remember to answer who, what, when, where, why and how in your letter. • Keep sentences short. • Use active voice whenever possible. Correct: A dozen people read the report. Incorrect: The report was read by a dozen people. • Avoid sexist or racist language. • Tell the reader the reason for your letter in the first paragraph. • Use the person’s name. Be sure to spell it correctly. Do not use Sir or Madam. • If desired, a P.S. is included at the bottom of the letter after the closing. • Headlines may be used for impact or sales jargon. 12
    • 801 Friendship Drive Harrisonburg, Virginia 22802 Phone (540) 434-9586 Fax (540) 434-1407 www.Friendship-Industries.com January 10, 2005 John Doe, CPA VSCPA 4309 Cox Rd. Glen Allen, VA 23058 Dear John, This is an example of the correct format for a business letter. Verdana, Times New Roman or Arial fonts are acceptable when writing a business letter. Character size should always be between 10 and 12 points. Because business letters are usually printed on Friendship Industries letterhead, be sure to leave enough space at the top and bottom of the page. A two-inch margin for the top of the page is sufficient and can be formatted by using the File/Page Setup option. Side margins should be set at .75 inches, while the bottom and top margins should be 1.5 inches. The first element of a business letter is usually the date, followed by the recipient’s name and address. There should be one space between the date and the address, as well as between the address and the salutation. Only one space is needed between the salutation and the beginning of the first paragraph. Paragraphs should not be indented, but separated by a space, as shown here. Once the body of the letter is complete, leave two spaces and then type your closing, which for all purposes should be “Sincerely.” After four more spaces, type your name followed by your title on the following line. If you will be including any documents with the letter, alert the recipient by adding “Enc.” following the title and one space. It is also appropriate to include a summary of what is included with the letter if there are several items, as shown below. Sincerely, (your signature here) Amy Parker Marketing Manager Enc: five articles two brochures cc: Jen Syer, Tina Lambert 13
    • B. MEMORANDUM Memos are used for specifically identified groups; therefore, no address is needed. However, specific headers are always required when writing a memo. Use tabs to line up the information in the headings (to, from, date and subject) to make the appearance of the memo more professional. The format of a memo is basically the same as that of a business letter, meaning that the spacing is single with double-spacing between paragraphs. Memos should be as clear and concise as possible. When the body of the memo is complete, do not add a salutation or sign your name to the end. Do, however, add a cc: at the end to show all recipients of the memo. If attachments will be included, remember to include an enclosure at the end of the memo. Enclosure: Two brochures Memorandum (See actual example on following page.) • Always use Friendship Industries letterhead. • Always check your spelling. • Only acceptable fonts are Verdana, Myriad, Times New Roman and Arial. • Always include the headers (to, from, date and subject) when creating a memo. • Use tabs to line up the information to the right of the headers. • Use single-spacing with double-spacing between paragraphs. • There is no need to sign your name at the end of a memo. The sender’s name is already at the top of the page. • Remember to include a cc: at the end of the memo to show all recipients of the memo. • If attachments will be included, remember to include an enclosure. In the absence of pre-printed letterhead or for format reminder, the Friendship Memorandum template is available for use at: TEMPLATESMemosmemo_template.doc For hand-written memos, a lined version is available at: TEMPLATESMemosmemo_template_with_lines_version2.doc 14
    • MEMO 801 Friendship Drive Harrisonburg, Virginia 22802 Phone (540) 434-9586 Fax (540) 434-1407 www.Friendship-Industries.com To: Tina Lambert From: Jennifer Silver Date: January 17, 2005 Re: How to create a memorandum cc: Amy Parker Memos are used for specifically identified groups; therefore, no address is needed. However, the above headers are always required when writing a memo. Use tabs to line up the information in the headings (to, from, date and subject) to make the appearance of the memo more professional. The format of a memo is basically the same as that of a business letter, meaning that the spacing is single with double-spacing between paragraphs. Memos should be as clear and concise as possible. When the body of the memo is complete, do not add a salutation or sign your name to the end. Do, however, add a cc: in the headings to show all recipients of the memo. If attachments will be included, remember to include an enclosure at the end of the memo. Enclosure: Two brochures 15
    • C. FAXING (short for Facsimile) (See actual example on following page.) • Always use letterhead (if you are not using the pre-printed fax cover sheet shown on the following page). • Fax cover sheets are available for use beside the fax machines. • Always include this fax transmittal cover sheet whenever faxing anything. • Be sure to fill out the entire sheet in as much detail as you can. • Always check your spelling. • Don’t forget to write in the number of pages that you’re faxing (including fax cover sheet). • There are two electronic versions of the fax cover sheet available: Version 1 with letterhead for printing is available at: TEMPLATESFax Sheetsfax_template_version1.doc You may use this template when you wish to send your cover sheet and fax via e-mail. Version 2 with letterhead for hand-written fax cover sheets at: TEMPLATESFax Sheetsfax_template_with_lines_version2.doc You may use this template to fill out your fax information, print it on letterhead (OR use the template as-is with letterhead logo and address already inserted), and then fax via normal methods. • A CONFIDENTIALITY/PRIVACY NOTICE is required on all correspondence. This is the standard Friendship Industries Statement: CONFIDENTIALITY/PRIVACY NOTICE The documents included in this transmission may contain information that is confidential and/or legally privileged. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent responsible for delivering the information to the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution, or action taken in reliance on the contents of these documents is strictly prohibited. If you have received this document in error, please notify the sender immediately to arrange for return or destruction of these documents. 16
    • Version 1 FAX 801 Friendship Drive Harrisonburg, Virginia 22802 Phone (540) 434-9586 Fax (540) 434-1407 www.Friendship-Industries.com Please deliver to: Attention: Tina Lambert Company: VSCPA Fax Number: 540-435-1234 From: Jennifer Silver Date: January 17, 2005 Subject: Proper Fax Format attached Pages: 2 (including cover sheet) Faxes are mainly used to transmit other document(s) to recipients when the document is not available in a format suitable for transmitting via email, email is not available or USPS mail is not speedy enough. The body of the message on the Cover Sheet is usually very brief and relates only to the attachment to clarify what is being transmitted. This version illustrates a printed version of the Cover Sheet. The next version illustrates a Cover Sheet that would normally be handwritten. CONFIDENTIALITY/PRIVACY NOTICE The documents included in this transmission may contain information that is confidential and/or legally privileged. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent responsible for delivering the information to the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution, or action taken in reliance on the contents of these documents is strictly prohibited. If you have received this document in error, please notify the sender immediately to arrange for return or destruction of these documents. 17
    • Version 2 FAX 801 Friendship Drive Harrisonburg, Virginia 22802 Phone (540) 434-9586 Fax (540) 434-1407 www.friendship-industries.com Please deliver to: Attention: _____________________________ Company: _____________________________ Fax Number: __________________ From: _____________________________ Date: __________________ Subject: _____________________________ Pages: __________ (including cover sheet) ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ CONFIDENTIALITY/PRIVACY NOTICE The documents included in this transmission may contain information that is confidential and/or legally privileged. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent responsible for delivering the information to the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution, or action taken in reliance on the contents of these documents is strictly prohibited. If you have received this document in error, please notify the sender immediately to arrange for return or destruction of these documents. 18
    • D. EMAIL (See actual example on following page.) • Email can be a powerful communication tool. With the myriad of viruses, spam, etc., you can NOT communicate well via email unless your intended recipient actually opens your message. Think of it the same way you think about “advertising mail” … it is only a good medium if you can get your message opened and get it read. • Never assume that your e-mail messages are private, nor that only you or the recipient can read them. Email is a privilege, not a right, and should be treated with a professional attitude. • Please remember to use business letter format when composing an e-mail that will be viewed by a professional audience. • Identify a well-written subject line and use the recipient’s name, when available, to encourage reading. Subject lines are valuable for sorting and categorizing messages, too. (Limit subject lines to ten words or less.) Subject lines can also be used in to indicate urgency or length, for instance, “Urgent Response Requested” or “FYI (long message)”. • Whenever referring to someone in an email, include them on the cc: line. • The only acceptable fonts are Verdana, Arial and Times New Roman. • Do not use colored backgrounds (a.k.a. stationery) in your e-mails. • Capitalizing words that are not in titles is generally termed as SHOUTING! • The only acceptable colors for composing e-mails are black and blue unless highlighting words with a color for sales/marketing purposes or using a logo. • Always check your spelling and format. • Be consistent in your messages. If you refer to an attachment, be sure to attach the file BEFORE sending the email. • Your signature should be professional, complete and include additional, alternate contact information such as a phone number, mailing/physical address is optional unless requiring a response via this method. A signature clearly identifies who you are and how you can be contacted. Follow the example below: Name, Title Friendship Industries, Inc. www.Friendship-Industries.com E-mail address Phone Number Fax Number • A tagline is also acceptable to be included, such as: Celebrating 40 Years of Service Connected to the Past – Partnering for the Future Putting Friendship to Work for You, OR: 19
    • • A CONFIDENTIALITY/PRIVACY NOTICE is required on all correspondence. This is the standard Friendship Industries Statement: CONFIDENTIALITY/PRIVACY NOTICE The documents included in this transmission may contain information that is confidential and/or legally privileged. If you are not the intended recipient, or the employee or agent responsible for delivering the information to the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution, or action taken in reliance on the contents of these documents is strictly prohibited. If you have received this document in error, please notify the sender immediately to arrange for return or destruction of these documents. • If you receive emails from people you don’t know or with strange or even blank subject lines from people you do know, do you open them? Remember this when sending emails yourself. If you receive emails with any file attachments ending in .exe, .scr, .dbf, or other unfamiliar endings delete them immediately. • Respond to email messages as soon as you can. If you receive an important message that you cannot deal with immediately or it is a request that will take some time to respond to, send a brief message letting the sender know that you received the message and will reply as soon as possible. The standard rule is to respond within 48 Hours. • Provide an automatic reply when out of the office for an extended period. If you are unable to respond to your emails in a timely manner due to vacation, sickness, travel, etc., be sure to set-up an auto reply for your email address and provide a referral for immediate assistance (i.e. who is covering for you while you are out) and your return date. • If you are angry, wait to respond. You risk damaging your relationship. • Guidelines for making emails easy to read: Limit the line length (60-70 characters) to prevent odd wrapping. Use appropriate fonts and punctuation. You may use bold, italics or underlines, but not all mail systems support these. In this case you can indicate emphasis by surrounding a word with * asterisks * or _ underscores _ . (Example: _BOLD_ or * UNDERLINE *) Address only one topic per email. If you must address more than one topic, leave a space between subjects. Limit the total length of the message. Include the original message in your email to provide context for replies and forwards. If you reply to only a specific questions, enclose it in angle marks, such as: <When will my order arrive?> check for spelling and grammar. Once the email is sent, you can’t get it back. Check for content that could be misinterpreted. 20
    • The electronic version of the Friendship letterhead template is available for use at: TEMPLATESLetterheade-letterhead.doc Your Name Your Title Friendship Industries, Inc. Celebrating 40 Years of Service Connected to the Past - Partnering for the Future Office 800.777.9586 (or Your Direct Dial #) Fax 540.434.1407 YourEmail@Friendship-Industries.com Mail Management & Fulfillment / Contract Packaging & Manufacturing CONFIDENTIALITY/PRIVACY NOTICE The documents included in this transmission may contain information that is confidential and/or legally privileged. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution or action taken in reliance on the contents of these documents is strictly prohibited. If you have received this document in error, please notify me immediately. 21
    • E. QUOTES / ESTIMATES (See actual example on following page) • Most quotes and estimates will be generated via Mail Shop. However, some correspondence for pricing requires a more professional, marketing-style format on Friendship letterhead. The format will change slightly based on the individual needs of the estimate and the company receiving the estimate. • The Friendship template for quotes and estimates if a Word document is preferred, can be found at: TEMPLATESQuotesquote_template.doc 22
    • QUOTE 801 Friendship Drive Harrisonburg, Virginia 22802 Phone (540) 434-9586 Toll-Free (800) 777-9586 Fax (540) 434-1407 TomHook@Friendship-Industries.com www.Friendship-Industries.com Friendship Contract Packaging & Manufacturing Friendship Mail Management & Fulfillment Tuesday, November 21, 2006 John Elliott Distribution Engineer Rubbermaid Commercial Products, LLC 3124 Valley Ave. Winchester, VA 22601 Dear John: Thank you for the opportunity to bid on your Broken Pack & Replacement Components Distribution as well as your Returned Goods Processing. This quotation is based upon the RFQ we received from you last week. This quotation has the following terms and conditions: Term of Contract – Three Years Payment – 2% 60 days, Net 90 Shipping – All small package shipments are third party billed to Rubbermaid. Rubbermaid pays all shipping between Rubbermaid and Friendship. Quality Measurement – Shipping Errors less than 5,000 DPPM Outbound Service – On-time, Line Fill, and Documentation Accuracy all at 100% Unit prices are based upon minimum lines shipped annually of 15,000 and number of returns processed at 210,000 annually. Quote is based upon your Storage, Handling and Staffing profiles. RCP will provide all cartons, pallets, and other item specific packaging materials. Includes an allocation of 25,000 square feet of warehouse space with appropriate racking and shelving. Broken Pack & Replacement Components Distribution $8.10 per line shipped Returned Goods Processing $1.07 per processed piece We look forward to the opportunity of working with Rubbermaid Commercial Products on these and other projects. Regards, Tom Hook Vice President Commercial Operations 23
    • F. BROCHURES, BULLETINS, DISPLAYS, MAIL DESIGNS (See actual examples as follows) To further our Marketing campaign, we have developed a cohesive design which can be carried throughout and adapted to any department as follows: • Brochure – an 8.5 x 11 sheet with front and back graphic format; can be tri-folded and used as a self-mailer as well. • Bulletin – an 8.5 x 11 sheet with front and back graphic format; the template can be laser- printed on one or both sides and used as a self-mailer or flier for ACTION ITEMS. • Display – a 3-panel design for use at Trade Shows and other public events. • Postcard – TBA for our Direct Mail needs. • To VIEW the Friendship Templates as Photos or PDFs, they can be found at: TEMPLATESBrochure-Bulletin-DisplayBulletinBulletin_Back_Blank.jpg TEMPLATESBrochure-Bulletin-DisplayDISPLAY3Panel_Display.jpg TEMPLATESBrochure-Bulletin-DisplayBrochure_Front_blank.jpg TEMPLATESBrochure-Bulletin-DisplayBrochure_Back_blank.jpg TEMPLATESBrochure-Bulletin-DisplayBrochure-Commercial Commercial_Brochure_Final_Outside.pdf TEMPLATESBrochure-Bulletin-DisplayBrochure-Commercial Commercial_Brochure_Final_Inside.pdf • To use the Friendship Templates to CREATE NEW MATERIALS in either Macromedia Fireworks (.PNG) or MS Publisher (.PUB) programs, they can be found at: TEMPLATESBrochure-Bulletin-DisplayBulletinBulletin_Back_Blank.png TEMPLATESBrochure-Bulletin-DisplayBulletinBulletin_Back_Blank.pub TEMPLATESBrochure-Bulletin-DisplayDISPLAY3Panel_Display.png TEMPLATESBrochure-Bulletin-DisplayBrochure_Outside_Blank.pub TEMPLATESBrochure-Bulletin-DisplayBrochure_Back_Blank.png And for Rehab Marketing, Templates can be found at: I:Shared FilesFRIENDSHIP MARKETINGREHAB MARKETING Client_Brochure_Final.pub Supported_Employment_Brochure_Final.pub Job_Coach_Bulletin_Final.pub • In order to understand the concepts behind the blank formats and our branding efforts, view the actual designs used for the 3-Panel Trade Show Display and the Commercial and Rehab Brochures as follows: 24
    • BULLETIN (8-1/2 X 11 FORMAT) 25
    • 3Panel Display 26
    • COMMERCIAL BROCHURE OUTSIDE 27
    • COMMERCIAL BROCHURE INSIDE 28
    • CLIENT BROCHURE OUTSIDE (FOCUS ON POTENTIAL CLIENTS) 29
    • CLIENT BROCHURE INSIDE (FOCUS ON POTENTIAL CLIENTS) 30
    • SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT BROCHURE OUTSIDE (FOCUS ON SERVICES FOR EMPLOYERS) 31
    • SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT BROCHURE INSIDE (FOCUS ON SERVICES FOR EMPLOYERS) 32
    • JOB COACH BULLETIN (FOCUS ON POTENTIAL EMPLOYERS) 33
    • G. TELEPHONE COMMUNICATIONS ETIQUETTE Factors affecting the image you project on the phone: Clear diction, proper volume and appropriate speed will sound more professional. Posture; an individual sitting up straight will sound more businesslike. Eating, drinking and chewing gum are rude and usually obvious to the other party. Three ways to build rapport: Use the caller’s name to personalize the conversation. Find a common ground. Match the caller’s speaking rate, a subtle way to gain and focus the caller’s attention. Actions to make a good impression: Answer promptly. Use the appropriate identification of your company, your department and yourself. Use positive language to convey a strong image. Negative phrases may be misunderstood. Be helpful to make a good impression. Guidelines for returning calls: Tell the screener you are returning a call. Express regret (if unable to take a call previously) or appreciation (that your call was taken). Explain why and to whom you are transferring the caller: Show courtesy and transfer to the appropriate person or department; shuffling from department to department conveys disorganization. Ask if the caller minds being transferred. Be sure someone is there to speak with the caller: Make sure someone is there to receive or if a transfer into a voice mail is acceptable. Guidelines for creating a voice mail greeting: Customize the greeting rather than using a generic, system-generated message. Update the greeting frequently. A personal greeting makes a better impression and encourages callers to leave a message. Explain how you check messages. Reassure callers and check messages frequently. Give the caller alternatives (another number or another person) to leaving a message. Guidelines for leaving a voice mail message: State your name, telephone number and purpose immediately. Leave a brief message. Repeat your name (and company) and telephone number. When using a speakerphone: Eliminate background noises. Ask whether caller can hear you. Speak clearly and loudly; more volume than usual may be necessary. 34
    • H. PRESS RELEASES (PR): HOW TO (see template and actual example to follow) • Create the PR in a word document format using the PR Template; save as a Word Document (file name extension will be .doc) The Friendship Press Release Template can be found at: I:Shared FilesFRIENDSHIP MARKETINGPRESS RELEASES-MEDIA PRESS RELEASE TEMPLATE.doc PRESS RELEASE TEMPLATE.jpg PRESS RELEASE TEMPLATE.pdf • Always have the President review and approve the PR before proceeding. • After approval, convert the word document into a .PDF (protected document format) file. For creating PDF format files: Click on “File” in your MS Word toolbar after completing the document Select “Print” In the “Print” Dialog pop-up box, choose “printer name” at the drop-down box Select Adobe PDF in place of your default printer for your PDF Converter/Writer At the “Save PDF File As” Dialog pop-up box, choose where to save the PDF file (NOTE: If you do not have PDF Converter software, contact the Sales & Marketing/Customer Service Office for assistance.) • EMAIL everyone on the company's Media List with Press Releases, using BCC (blind carbon copy) or individual emails for each. NOTE: Send PR emails in both plain TEXT format and HTML; media prefers no attachments, different media/reporters prefer different formats so always send both. For creating HTML format emails: Open a new Email Message Open your Word Document (.doc) PR Click on “File” in your MS Word toolbar after completing the document Select “Save As Webpage” (file name extension will be .HTM or .HTML) The new HTML file will automatically open Click “Edit” in your toolbar Choose “Select All” Right Click the highlighted items and choose “Copy” Go back to your new Email Message and Paste the HTML file you have just created into the body of the email You are now ready to send your HTML-formatted email • MAIL a hard copy (in color) to the more prominent, business-related Newspapers, Journals, VA Business Magazine, HR Chamber and TV3 to ensure they get the PR The Media List (in Excel format) is available for use at: I:Shared FilesFRIENDSHIP MARKETINGPRESS RELEASES-MEDIA 35
    • • Copies in both Word Document (.doc) and PDF formats should be given to the Director of Sales and Marketing for archiving on the Friendship Industries website and our records of collateral materials. • All PRs are posted on the http://www.Friendship-Industries.com website under the tab quot;About Usquot; and sub-tab quot;Press Releases, etc.quot; by uploading the file into File Manager PRESS RELEASE TEMPLATE 36
    • 801 Friendship Drive, Harrisonburg, VA 22802 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 9/20/05 Contact: Missy Stover, Director of Development Phone: 540-434-9137 Fax: 540-434-1407 Email: MissyStover@Friendship-Industries.com Friendship Industries Announces New Director of Development Harrisonburg, Virginia—David Flick, President of Friendship Industries, Inc., announced the hiring of Melissa “Missy” Stover as Director of Development, effective September 12. After earning a Bachelor of Arts degree from Bridgewater College Stover served at Bridgewater College as Assistant Director of Annual Fund from 1998 to 2003 and as Director of Advancement Services from 2003 until she joined Friendship Industries. Friendship Industries is an Employment Services Organization existing to serve persons with disabilities in Harrisonburg and Rockingham County by providing opportunities and choices through integrated work experience, training, and support services. ### 37
    • VII. Common Style Usage for Punctuation & Grammar A. APOSTROPHE ( ’ ) • Marks an omission of one or two letters to the singular form by adding ’s (even if it ends in s). Example: the renter’s car • Add ’ to the end of plural nouns that end in s. Example: Educators’ Seminar • Add ’s to the end of compound words. Example: My sister-in-law’s house • Add ’s to the last noun to show joint possession of an object. Example: Kristin and Randy’s office • Use an apostrophe where one or more letters (or numbers) have been omitted in a word or number. It’s is only used as a contraction for it is. To figure out if you need the apostrophe, read the sentence to yourself. If the sentence makes sense by saying it is, use it’s. If it doesn’t make sense, use its. Below lists other forms of this rule. I am = I’m you are = you’re she is = she’s it is = it’s do not = don’t she would = she’d he would have = he would’ve let us = let’s who is = who’s she will = she’ll they had = they’d he will = he’ll • Do not use the apostrophe unnecessarily. Example: Yes – Friendship Board of Directors, No – Friendship’s Board B. COLON ( : ) • Used to introduce material that elaborates on what has already been said or introducing quotes. • Use a colon to introduce a series following an independent clause. Example: Three nations supported the measure: France, England and Spain. • The colon often can be effective in giving emphasis. Example: He had only one hobby: eating. • Use the colon for time elapsed (1:31:07) and time of day (8:31 p.m.). • Dialogue: Use a colon for dialogue. Example: Bailey: What were you doing? • The colon is used for question-and-answer interviews. Example: Q: Did you strike him? • Use a comma to introduce a direct quotation of one sentence that remains within a paragraph. Use a colon to introduce longer quotations within a paragraph. • Colons go outside quotation marks unless they are part of the quotation itself. Example: “He had one concern: quality.” 38
    • C: COMMA ( , ) • Used to separate words or phrases for clarity, especially after introductory clauses. Example: When Julie finished traveling, she went back to school. • Use a comma to set off an element not essential to the meaning of the sentence. Example: The November Paton Award Winner, Chad Nyboer, will be recognized at the September Regional Advisory Council. • Use a comma to separate parts of a series, but do not put a comma before the conjunction in a simple series Example: Mary had orange juice, toast and eggs. • Use a comma to separate equal adjectives. (If the comma could be replaced by and without changing the sense, the adjectives are equal.) Example: a new, easy method • Use a comma in most numerical numbers above 999. Example: 4,345 Exceptions: addresses, serial numbers, social security numbers and years. Example: In 1979, he lived at 1234 Main Street. • Use a comma to separate main clauses joined by: and, but, or, not, yet, so or for. • Commas always go inside quotation marks unless you are introducing a direct quote, are at the start of an indirect, partial quote or if the quote ends with ? or ! Example: “The mission is moving forward,” said Dzierzawski. D. GRAMMAR A lot: This phrase is always two words. Accept/Except: Accept means to receive something. Except means to exclude something. Acronyms: Use acronyms on ONLY the second reference. Some common acronyms – ESO, CRP, NP, NPO, etc. See Definitions. Put acronyms in parentheses for first mention and DO NOT put the acronym in parentheses in second mention. If the acronym is too confusing to the reader, spell it out each time. Addresses: If you put a mailing address in paragraph form, use commas between the parts that would go on individual lines on an envelope and commas to separate parts of the same line. Example: Friendship Industries, 801 Friendship Drive, Harrisonburg, VA 22802. • Spell out the words: Alley, County, Crossing, Place, Plaza and Terrace • Abbreviate the words: Ave., Bldg., Blvd., Cir., Dr., Expwy., Frwy., Ln., Pkwy., Rd., and St. • However, spell out if there isn’t a number or if it is a specific building name: Broadway Avenue or One American Square. • Use figures for an address number: 9 Morningside Cir. Put the suite number on the same line as the street address, but separate it with a comma: 1421 W. Mockingbird Ln., #100. • Spell out and capitalize First through Ninth as street names; use figures with two letters for 10th and higher. Example: 7 Fifth Ave. and 100 21st St. 39
    • • Abbreviate compass points that indicate directional ends of a street or quadrants of a city in a numbered address: 200 E. 42nd St. and 600 N. Elm St., N.W. Do not abbreviate if the number is omitted: East 42nd Street and North Elm Street, N.W. Affect/Effect: Affect as a verb means to influence. Effect as a verb means to cause. Affect as a noun is rarely used in medical terminology and should be avoided. Effect as a noun means result. Ampersand (&): Use the ampersand when it is part of a company’s formal name: Goodman & Company, Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co. The ampersand should NOT otherwise be used in place of “and” in any print or online communication. Among/Between: In general, between is used when introducing two items, while among is used when introducing more than two items. Between is used if one or both items contain multiple parts but is considered in whole as a single entity. Annual: An event cannot be described as “annual” unless it has been held for at least two successive years. Because/Since: Use because to denote a specific cause-effect relationship. Use since to denote a reference to a point in time in the past or in a casual sense when the first event of a sequence led logically to the second but without direct cause. Beside/Besides: Beside means at the side of. Besides means in addition to. Biannual/Biennial: Biannual means twice a year. Biennial means every two years. Bimonthly: Means every other month. Semimonthly means twice a month. Cannot: This is always one word. The contraction is can’t. Capital/Capitol: Capital is the city where a seat of government is located. Capitol is a building. Dollar Amounts: Use the $ sign and a figure in all references. Do not add .00 for full dollar amounts (ex. $1.50, $35, $99.99). For amounts less than $1, use the figure and the word “cents” (ex. 25 cents). E.G., I.E.,: The initials stand for exempli gratia and mean for example. Grammatically, it is treated the same way as i.e., which comes from the Latin id est, meaning. Both should be used in lowercase with a period after each letter, and a comma after that. Although handled the same way, e.g., is not interchangeable with i.e., which serves mostly to reiterate or emphasize what you have just said; e.g., goes further toward defining your statement. Ellipsis ( ... ): Treat an ellipsis as a three-letter word ... constructed with three periods and one space before and after the grouping. Use an ellipsis to indicate the deletion of one or 40
    • more words. An ellipsis also may be used to indicate a pause or hesitation in speech, or a thought the speaker or writer does not complete. Ensure/Insure: Ensure is used to mean a guarantee. Insure is only used for references to insurance. Entitled/Titled: Entitled means having a right to do or have something. Titled refers to the name of a publication, program or service. Books are “titled,” not “entitled.” ET AL.: It is two words from the latin et alia meaning and others. The et is a word of its own and the al. (note the period) is short for alia. Farther/Further: Farther refers to physical distance. Further refers to an extension of time or degree. Fewer/Less: Fewer is used to describe an amount of individual items. Less is used to describe a bulk amount or a quantity as a whole. Its, It’s: Its is the possessive form of the neuter pronoun: The company lost its assets. It’s is a contraction for it is or it has: It’s up to you. It’s been a long time. Lay/Lie: Lay means to put something down. Its past tense and past participle is laid, while its present participle is laying. Lie means to recline horizontally or to make an untrue statement. If lie is used to mean reclining horizontally, its past tense is lay, past participle is lain and present participle is lying. If lie is used to mean making an untrue statement, its past tense is lie, past participle is lied and present participle is lying. That/Which: In general, that is used to introduce an essential clause (no use of a comma before the clause), while which is used to introduce a nonessential clause (use of a comma before the clause). That and which can be used in the same sentence if there are two essential clauses (use that on first instance and which on second instance). 41
    • VIII: Customer Service What is “Customer Service”? It is an organization's ability to supply their customers' wants and needs. This definition sums up what excellent customer service is beautifully: quot;excellent customer service (is) the ability of an organization to constantly and consistently exceed the customer's expectations.quot; Accepting this definition means expanding our thinking about customer service; if we're going to consistently exceed customers' expectations, we have to recognize that every aspect of our business has an impact on customer service, not just those aspects of our business that involve face-to-face customer contact. Improving customer service involves making a commitment to learning what our customers' needs and wants are, and developing action plans that implement customer friendly processes. Good customer service is the bread and butter of our business. To build Business-to-Customer Loyalty, we must provide true customer service. In today’s market environment, service has become a cliché and it seems like “everyone’s doing it.” So, if everyone is doing it, why not jump ahead of the pack by providing even more creative, personalized service to our customers than our competitors can? To truly deliver excellent Customer Service and to exceed our customer’s expectations, it is up to all of us to educate everyone in our organization to be equally as concerned about our customers as our Management Team. 8 Simple Rules For Good Customer Service Developing loyalty through good customer service is the lifeblood of any business. We can offer promotions and slash prices to bring in new customers, but unless we can get those customers to come back, our business won’t be profitable for long. Good customer service is all about bringing customers back. And about sending them away happy – happy enough to pass positive feedback about our business along to others, who may then try us for themselves and in turn become repeat customers. If you’re a good salesperson, you can sell anything to anyone once. But, it is the company’s approach to customer service that determines whether or not you’ll ever be able to sell that person anything else. The essence of good customer service is forming a relationship with customers – a relationship that an individual customer feels that he would like to pursue. 42
    • How does one go about forming such a relationship? By remembering the one true secret of good customer service and acting accordingly: “You will be judged by what you do, not by what you say.” Here are 8 Simple Rules For Good Customer Service: 1) Answer the phone and return calls. Get call forwarding or an answering service. Keep a portable phone handy when leaving the desk. Make sure that someone is picking up the phone when someone calls our business. (People who call want to talk to a live person, not a “fake recorded robot”.) And, return calls promptly when unable to take a call. 2) Don’t make promises unless we WILL keep them. Not plan to keep them…WILL keep them. Reliability is one of the keys to any good relationship, and good customer service is no exception. If you say, “Your mail will be delivered to the Post Office on Tuesday”, make sure it is delivered on Tuesday. Otherwise, don’t say it. The same rule applies to appointments, deadlines, etc. Think before you give any promise – because nothing annoys customers more than a broken one. 3) Listen to your customers (and everyone’s a “customer”)…really listen. Is there anything more exasperating than telling someone what you want or what your problem is and then discovering that person hasn’t been paying attention and needs to have it explained again? Let your customer talk and show him you’re listening by suggesting how to solve the problem. 4) Deal with complaints. No one likes hearing complaints, and many of us have developed a reflex shrug, saying, “You can’t please all the people all the time”. Maybe not, but if you give the complaint your attention, you may be able to please this one person this one time - and position your business to reap the benefits of good customer service. 5) Be helpful - even if there’s no immediate profit in it. For the business that goes the extra mile for customer, “word of mouth” is golden. (The best advertising is FREE.) This type of spectacular service garners more repeat business and the best referrals. 6) Train staff to be ALWAYS helpful, courteous, and knowledgeable. Do it yourself or hire someone to train them appropriately. Talk to them about good customer service and what it is (and isn’t) regularly. Most importantly, give every staff member enough information and power to make those small customer-pleasing decisions, so he/she never has to say, “I don’t know, but so-and-so will be back at...” 7) Take the extra step. Whatever the extra step may be, if you want to provide good customer service, take it. They may not say so to you, but people notice when people make an extra effort and will tell other people. Go the extra mile. 43
    • 8) Throw in something extra. Whether it’s a coupon for a future discount, additional information on how to use the product, or a genuine smile, people love to get more than they thought they were getting. And don’t think that a gesture has to be large to be effective. Applying these eight simple rules consistently will have Friendship Industries well known for its good customer service. And, the best part? The irony of good customer service is that over time it will bring in more new customers than promotions and price slashing ever did! IX: Friendship Website A. LOGO, FONTS, COLORS, MODULE CONTAINERS, LINKS, DOMAINS • Logo: please refer to Section V. for proper Logo standards. • Fonts: can be found as “Styles” in the html editor module as follows: For ALL FI Web Headlines = Georgia (serif font) = Size 4 For ALL FI Text = Verdana (sans serif font) = Size 2 • Colors: Text =BLACK Headlines =GREEN Other =as needed for emphasis • Module Containers: GREEN (which is a shaded round “piped” border) NOTEPAD for Calendars ONLY PAPER for History ONLY • Website Archives: all collateral materials (example: Newsletters, Press Releases, Articles, Communications Style Guide, etc. should be archived on the Website); some will be for public information while others should be placed under the tab STAFF Only “Internal Documents” • Web Links: Whether you are blogging, posting messages on forums, listserves or message boards or completing an online profile, ALWAYS use: http://www.Friendship-Industries.com to create live hyperlink to our website; this is for consistency's sake and proper web routing (i.e. better web search results or Search Engine Optimization, for example: Google) including the http:// portion gives our complete web address (also known as our “url” or Uniform Resources Locator) Contact the Website Administrators for further questions: Laura Wine, Missy Blankenship, Tom Hook, George Homan 44
    • Forwards to www.Friendship-Industries.com come to us from other Friendship-owned domains: www.contract-packaging.com www.mailing-services.com www.youvegotmail.org www.friendship-industries.org B. ALIAS EMAILS For Website Tracking: communityroom@friendship-industries.com contactus@friendship-industries.com development@friendship-industries.com developmentoffice@friendship-industries.com government@friendship-industries.com humanresources@friendship-industries.com imports@friendship-industries.com links@friendship-industries.com mailing@friendship-industries.com manufacturing@friendship-industries.com officemanager@friendship-industries.com outsourcing@friendship-industries.com packaging@friendship-industries.com shipping@friendship-industries.com Alias Email Usage is being tracked by each email recipient on the following spreadsheet I:Shared FilesFRIENDSHIP WEBSITEWEB_SITE_TRACKING.xls C. HTML CODE For complete information on HTML Code (HyperText Markup Language) (HTML), which is the publishing language of the World Wide Web, visit: http://www.htmlhelp.com/reference/html40/alist.html Here are some basic codes to know for use on the Friendship website: TO ADD EXTRA SPACES &nbsp; is used to represent a (non-breaking) standard space. For example, to indent a paragraph, the HTML code would look like this: <P> &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; This first line of text is supposed to be indented. However, many browsers will not render it as intended. </P> TO CREATE A NEW PARAGRAPH <P> is used to start a new paragraph TEXT </P> is used to end or close a paragraph 45
    • TO CREATE A LINE BREAK (OR WHITE SPACE) <BR> is used to start a new line TEXT </BR> is used to end or close a line TO LINK TO AN INTERNAL PAGE http://www.friendship-industries.com/FI-Web/DesktopDefault.aspx?tabid= (ADD PAGE NUMBER HERE) OR find the page you wish to link to; highlight and copy the targeted page address from your web browser. Then highlight the text that should be clicked on to take the web viewer to this other page of the website. Click on the hyperlink function (looks like the World with a chain link) and then a simple paste of the browser address you’ve already copied into the hyperlink function dialog box will work TO OPEN A LINK IN A NEW WINDOW (for external or internal pages as well as files and downloads) (insert this code after the link leaving ONE blank space) target=_blank This prevents web viewers from becoming “stuck” at other websites; they can simply close the new browser window to continue viewing our website. TO ADD WEB LINKS IN THE FAQ MODULE There is no HTML code section in the FAQ Module, you must add the HTML syntax to your FAQ text. For example, if my answer contained a link: Please refer to <a href=quot;http://www.yahoo.comquot;> Yahoo </a> for the answer. Will read as “Please refer to Yahoo for the answer.” And link you to Yahoo. TO ADD FILE LINKS IN THE FAQ MODULE If my answer contained a FILE link and the file should open in a new browser window: Please refer to <a href=quot;/FI-Web/Portals/57ad7180-c5e7-49f5-b282- c6475cdb7ee7/filename.pdfquot; target=_blank> this file </a> for the answer. 46
    • TO ADD EMAIL LINKS IN THE FAQ MODULE There is no HTML code section in the FAQ Module, you must add the HTML syntax to your FAQ text. For example, if my answer contained a link: Please contact <a href=mailto:someone@somesite.comquot;> NAME OF PERSON OR EMAIL ADDRESS </a> for the answer. Will read as “Please contact (name) or (name@email.com) for the answer.” and open your email program for a new message. TO ADD LINKS TO FILES (which are in File Manager) /FI-Web/Portals/57ad7180-c5e7-49f5-b282-c6475cdb7ee7/filename.pdf TO ADD PDF “How To” INFO – in TEXT Downloadable documents may be in a PDF file format. For information on using PDF documents, visit Adobe's page on PDF accessibility at http://www.adobe.com/enterprise/accessibility/main.html . Get a free download of the Adobe Reader at http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readermain.html . TO ADD PDF “How To” INFO – in HTML CODE (Copy and Paste exactly as below; the text will look just like the example above.) <P>&nbsp;<FONT face=Verdana size=2>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Downloadable documents may be in a PDF file format.&nbsp; <BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; For information on using PDF documents, visit Adobe's page on PDF accessibility<BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; at </FONT><A href=quot;http://www.adobe.com/enterprise/accessibility/main.htmlquot; target=_blank><FONT face=Verdana size=2>http://www.adobe.com/enterprise/accessibility/main.html</FONT></A><FONT face=Verdana size=2> .&nbsp; </FONT></P> <P><FONT face=Verdana size=2>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Get a free download of the Adobe Reader&nbsp; <BR>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; at </FONT><A href=quot;http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readermain.htmlquot; target=_blank><FONT face=Verdana size=2>http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readermain.html</FONT></A><FONT face=Verdana size=2> .<BR><BR></FONT></P> 47
    • TO ADD BACK BUTTON – in GIF (Picture File Format) <p align=quot;centerquot;><a href=quot;http://www.friendship-industries.com/FI- Web/DesktopDefault.aspx?tabid=ENTER PAGE NUMBER HEREquot;><img height=quot;36quot; src=quot;http://www.friendship-industries.com/FI-Web/Portals/57ad7180-c5e7- 49f5-b282-c6475cdb7ee7/BACK.gifquot; width=quot;72quot; border=quot;0quot; /></a> </p> Insert name of webpage you wish to go “back” to from this page (see bold section above; this is a simple “copy/paste” function from your browser’s address line when you find the proper page). The HTML Module (WYSIWYG or What You See is What You Get) works very similar to a Word Document. D. SITE MAP Much of the information contained in the website is as much of a benefit to each of our positions and our responsibilities as Friendship Ambassadors as it is for our world wide web audience of customers, prospects, and stakeholders. Familiarize yourself with what the website contains so that you can offer links to the information to others. Suggestions for needed information and links to other websites is always appreciated. MAIN TABS Home Employment & Training Products & Services Support Friendship About Us 48
    • Home Site Map What's New? Finding Help Accessibility-WorkWorld DisabilityInfo.gov Community Room Calendar Holiday Schedule Media Information Mission & History Staff Contacts Directions to Friendship Nat. Disability Awareness Month Hurricane Updates Friendship is... Search This Site (search for Keywords to find what you need easier) Employment & Training Department of Rehabilitative Services Community Services Board Employer Services Positions Sought with Your Company Rehabilitative & Training Services Work Assessment Work Adjustment Extended Employment Pre-Vocational Medicaid Waiver Program Career Opportunities Supported Employment & Placement Services Professional Driver Positions Flex Force Positions Staff Positions Volunteer Opportunities College Internships Confidentiality Policy Volunteer Job Description CARF: The Rehabilitation Accreditation Commission Transportation Myths & Facts About People With Disabilities Products & Services Sales & Marketing - Business Development Products & Services Fact Sheet quot;Friendship Worksquot; Video International Sourcing & Importing Contract Packaging What To Look For in a Contract Packager? How do you Know you Need a Packager? Contact the Packaging Dept./Get a Quote How to Package Your Brand for Success 1. A clone is not a Brand. 2. Find the Story inside your Brand. 3. Discover the Perfect Name for your Brand. 4. Take your Brand to the zoo. 49
    • 5. Put a human face on your Brand. 6. Dot.com your Brand online. 7. Stay focused on the core of your Brand. 8. Know your Brand's fanatic customers. 9. Find natural friends for your Brand. 10. The Perfect Package ties your Brand together. Contract Manufacturing & Distribution Packaging & Manufacturing Capabilities Fulfillment & Mail Management Mailing FAQs What is an indicia and why in the world do I need one? What if I don't have an indicia? How can I qualify to mail at NonProfit rates? Can you use my NonProfit permit number to mail in Harrisonburg? What can I do to clean up my list? What needs to happen to mail a Periodical? Where do I send the mail list? What are PLANET Codes and why should I consider using them? What is Move Update and NCOA (National Change of Address)? For Links to more information on Fulfillment & Mail Management: Mailing 101 - Pg 01 - USPS Basic Design Guidelines Mailing 101 - Pg 02 - Why We Automate Mailing 101 - Pg 03 - Design Standards, Part 1 Mailing 101 - Pg 04 - Design Standards, Part 2 Mailing 101 - Pg 05 - Automation Compatible Specifications Mailing 101 - Pg 06 - How to Decide if Your Mailpiece Qualifies for Standard Mail Mailing 101 - Pg 07 - Letter Design Quick Reference Mailing 101 - Pg 08 - Mail List Maintenance Mailing 101 - Pg 09 - Mail List DeDuping Mailing 101 - Pg 10 - Machineable Invitation Envelopes Mailing 101 - Pg 11 - Canadian Mailing for Publications RFQ-Request For Quote Template for Fulfillment Services RFQ-Request for Quote Template for Mailing Services Transfer Request Letter Template, Approved NonProfit-No Permit/Auth Number Transfer Request Letter Template, NonProfit Permit Transfer Request Letter Template, Use Company Name in Indicia Using Tabs, Wafer Seals and Glue Strips USPS Ancillary Service Endorsements Explained, February 2003 USPS Bound Printed Matter Explained Q720, August 2003 USPS Business Reply Mail Explained S922, October 2004 USPS Media Mail Explained E713, March 2004 USPS NonProfit Permit Application Form PS3624, October 1996 USPS NonProfit Permit Eligibility Explained QS670, August 2003 USPS NonProfit Transfer Permit Form PS3623, October 1996 USPS On-Line Resources, September 2003 USPS Periodical Additional Entry Form PS3510, November 2001 USPS Periodical Eligibility E211, March 2004 USPS Periodical Ride- Along Rules E260, July 2003 USPS Permit Imprints Explained P040, November 2003 50
    • Indicias & Permits NonProfit Permits Quotes OnLine & Mail Lists USPS Postage Rates All USPS Postal Rates, June 2002 MFSA - Info on 2005 Rate Hike Proposal, April 8, 2005 URGENT: New USPS Personalization Rule & How It May Affect Your Postal Rates USPS Letter Rates June 2002 USPS NonProfit Letter Rates June 2002 USPS Renewal Notice Fees for Permits PS3621A, June 2002 USPS Interactive Postage Calculator for Business Mailings Fulfillment & Mailing Capabilities Contact the Mail Management Dept. Hurricane Update Certified Government Contracting What is NISH/JWOD and Why do I Care? Contact the Government Contracting Liasion Central Contractor Registry for Government Contractors JWOD Commercial Products JWOD Federal Government Set-Asides NISH (formerly National Industries for the Severely Handicapped) Credit Application Friendship's OnLine Commercial Brochure Support Friendship What is a Stakeholder? Who are Friendship's Stakeholders? What is in the Stakeholders Report? Links to Annual Stakeholders Report Donate Now Downloadable Form Donate Now Web Submission Form Why Do You Need My Support? GuideStar, the on-line standard for nonprofit accountability What Can I Do and How Can I Support Friendship? How Do I Benefit from Friendship? The Needs of Our Community Annual Stakeholders Report Donate Now About Us Our History Values & Vision Statements Press Releases & Articles Friendship Events Calendar Friendship Community Room Calendar Directions & Map Contact Us for Delivery/Pickup Scheduling Media Information Calendar: Friendship Events Updates Friendship Fact Sheets: Our History Friendship Fact Sheets: Our Leadership Friendship Fact Sheets: Our Mission Friendship Fact Sheets: Who We Are 51
    • Newsletters: Under Construction Press Releases & Articles Sales & Marketing - Business Development Staff Profile Testimonials & Quotes Links We'd Like to Share... Tell Us What You Think... Survey Contacts Strategic Planning Templates Marketing Plan Templates RFP Templates Communication Style Standards-Guide Template Ambassadors Program Templates MAIN TABS (when Logged into Site) Home Staff - File Upload (available on login only) Employment & Training Products & Services Support Friendship About Us Contacts Staff (available on login only) Staff-Only Calendar Employee Information Employee Handbook Ethics Code Performance Feedback Forms Time Sheet Form Schedule Change Form Employee Newsletters Internal News NISH Institute On-Line Training Board of Directors Users Online ADMIN TAB - HIDDEN PAGES (these pages are linked under Main Tabs) Home Page Hidden Pages Employment & Training Hidden Pages Products & Services Hidden Pages Support Hidden Pages About Us Hidden Pages Administrator Guides (available on login only) Updates & Information 52
    • Admin (only available to Website Administrators) Site Settings Tabs Security Roles User Accounts Site Log (used to generate Website Reports) Bulk Email File Manager _______________________________________________________________________ Website Usage is being tracked in various reports. These reports can be found at: I:Shared FilesFRIENDSHIP WEBSITEWEB_SITE_REPORTS.xls Website Training Document can be found at: I:Shared FilesFRIENDSHIP WEBSITEWEBSITE_TRAINING.xls For more information on the Website Administration, refer to the latest Wyse Communicator Administrator Guides in the Admin Section of the website. The Admin Guide can also be found at: I:Shared FilesFRIENDSHIP WEBSITECommunicator.pdf 53
    • APPENDIX TEMPLATES ALL templates can be found on I:Shared FilesFRIENDSHIP MARKETING TEMPLATESLogosLogo_plain.doc TEMPLATESLogosFI Pyramid only.jpg TEMPLATESLogosLogo_with_text.doc TEMPLATESLogosLogo_with_text_small.jpg TEMPLATESLogosLogo_with_text_large.tif TEMPLATESLogosVan_Logo_with_text.doc TEMPLATESBusiness CardsBusiness Cards 3-up.pdf TEMPLATESBusiness CardsFriendship BIZ CARD SET-UPS.2005.doc TEMPLATESPPT TemplatesTagline-Connected_to_the_Past.ppt Tagline-Friendship_is_more_valuable.ppt Tagline-Innovation_meets_Tradition.ppt Tagline-Its_just_Right.ppt Tagline-We_Can_Do_That.ppt Tagline-Put_Friendship_to_Work_for_You.ppt TEMPLATESPPT TemplatesPower Point Slides-Blue.ppt Power Point Slides-White.ppt TEMPLATESCards-Labels3x4card_label.doc TEMPLATESCards-Labels3x4card_label.jpg TEMPLATESCards-Labels3x4card_label.png TEMPLATESCards-Labels6-up Mailing Label.doc TEMPLATESLetterheadbusiness_letter_template.doc TEMPLATESMemosmemo_template.doc TEMPLATESMemosmemo_template_with_lines_version2.doc TEMPLATESFax Sheetsfax_template_version1.doc TEMPLATESFax Sheetsfax_template_with_lines_version2.doc TEMPLATESLetterheade-letterhead.doc TEMPLATESQuotesquote_template.doc TEMPLATESBrochure-Bulletin-DisplayBulletinBulletin_Back_Blank.jpg TEMPLATESBrochure-Bulletin-DisplayDISPLAY3Panel_Display.jpg TEMPLATESBrochure-Bulletin-DisplayBrochure_Front_blank.jpg TEMPLATESBrochure-Bulletin-DisplayBrochure_Back_blank.jpg TEMPLATESBrochure-Bulletin-DisplayBrochure-Commercial Commercial_Brochure_Final_Outside.pdf TEMPLATESBrochure-Bulletin-DisplayBrochure-Commercial Commercial_Brochure_Final_Inside.pdf TEMPLATESBrochure-Bulletin-DisplayBulletinBulletin_Back_Blank.png TEMPLATESBrochure-Bulletin-DisplayBulletinBulletin_Back_Blank.pub TEMPLATESBrochure-Bulletin-DisplayDISPLAY3Panel_Display.png TEMPLATESBrochure-Bulletin-DisplayBrochure_Outside_Blank.pub TEMPLATESBrochure-Bulletin-DisplayBrochure_Back_Blank.png REHAB MARKETINGClient_Brochure_Final.pub Supported_Employment_Brochure_Final.pub Job_Coach_Bulletin_Final.pub PRESS RELEASES-MEDIAPRESS RELEASE TEMPLATE.doc PRESS RELEASE TEMPLATE.jpg PRESS RELEASE TEMPLATE.pdf PRESS RELEASES-MEDIAMedia List__Date___.xls ####### 54