Please	
  share	
  your	
  email	
  address	
  with	
  us!	
  
We’d like to send you a link to this webinar’s recording an...
Welcome to the 

Military Families Learning Network
This material is based upon work supported by the National Institute o...
POLL
How would you best describe your current employer?
This material is based upon work supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agricultu...
•  Webinar participants who want to get 2.0 NASW CE Credits (or just
want proof of participation in this training) need to...
Today’s Presenters:
Dr. Scott Behson Dr. Scott Behson is a Professor
of Management at the Silberman College of
Business at...
Fathers,Work
and Family:
The Challenges for Today’s
Dads and How We Can
Respond
Scott Behson, PhD
Fairleigh Dickinson Univ...
Today’s Dads Pulled in Many
Directions
—  Provider/Caretaker
—  Husband/Partner
—  Father/Dad
—  Own Career/Spouse’s
—...
Today’s Generation of Fathers
—  Tripled time spent with children/on childcare
—  Doubled housework
—  Aspire to more e...
No Wonder That…
—  Over 60% of dads report significant work-
life conflict and stress (higher than moms!)
Challenges At Work
—  Men face barriers at work as they
expand family involvement
◦  Supervisors
◦  Coworkers
◦  Organiza...
How I Counsel Non-Military Dads
—  Examine own priorities
—  Discuss these with spouse and others
—  Calibrate career a...
How I Counsel Non-Military
Organizations
—  Increase time/place flexibility when possible
—  Redesign work for teams and...
Military Dads
—  Stressful work
—  A “calling” for many, with strong career/
personal identity
—  Forced travel/time aw...
How can we help military dads?
1.Awareness that other dads feel the
same pressures
—  Formal and informal peer support
—...
How can we help military dads?
2. Reduce chronic overwork
—  More regular hours
—  Schedules well in advance
—  Keep pe...
How can we help?
3. Smart use of technology
—  Ways to work more flexibly? Time/place?
—  Stay connected to loved ones w...
How can we help?
—  Your ideas?
Thank you!
—  Behson@fdu.edu
—  www.FathersWorkandFamily.com
—  @ScottBehson on twitter
Today’s Presenters:
Dr. Scott Behson Dr. Scott Behson is a Professor
of Management at the Silberman College of
Business at...
©2012	
  Na/onal	
  Fatherhood	
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How	
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Military	
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...
©2012	
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n  Where	
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n  On	...
©2012	
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   23	
  
NaAonal	
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_________________________...
©2012	
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Defining	
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24	
  
n  24	
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©2012	
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Defining	
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25	
  
Since	
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©2012	
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Children	
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©2012	
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Why	
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>	
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©2012	
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n  Nurturing	
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and	
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©2012	
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>	
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©2012	
  Na/onal	
  Fatherhood	
  Ini/a/ve	
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n  NFI	
  has	
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  studies	
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©2012	
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n  Pops	
  Culture	
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feel	
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©2012	
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The	
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n  Approximately	
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©2012	
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Military	
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  Who	
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©2012	
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Military	
  Dads:	
  Who	
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n  Regular	
  Dads	
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©2012	
  Na/onal	
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Military	
  Dads:	
  Who	
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n  That	
  have	
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©2012	
  Na/onal	
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Why	
  Programming	
  for	
  Military	
  Dads?	
  
n  So,	
  with	
  all	
...
©2012	
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Why	
  Programming	
  for	
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  Dads?	
  
n  Research	
  tell	
  ...
©2012	
  Na/onal	
  Fatherhood	
  Ini/a/ve	
  
Why	
  Programming	
  for	
  Military	
  Dads?	
  
n  Paren/ng	
  
n  Whe...
©2012	
  Na/onal	
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  Ini/a/ve	
  
Why	
  Programming	
  for	
  Military	
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n  Addresses	
  the	
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©2012	
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  Ini/a/ve	
  
Resilience	
  
n  I	
  aHended	
  the	
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  Family	
  Resilience	...
©2012	
  Na/onal	
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Resilience	
  
n  Family	
  Program	
  organiza/ons	
  can	
  be	
  very	
...
©2012	
  Na/onal	
  Fatherhood	
  Ini/a/ve	
  
Where	
  do	
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  start?	
  
n  So	
  where	
  do	
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  start	
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©2012	
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  Ini/a/ve	
  
Programming	
  targeted	
  to:	
  
n  	
  Child	
  Development	
  Centers	...
©2012	
  Na/onal	
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  Ini/a/ve	
  
How	
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n  Types	
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n  ...
©2012	
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How	
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n  Involvement/Commitment	
  	
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©2012	
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Fatherhood	
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©2012	
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So	
  how	
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  use	
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  FRC?	
  
n  Mobile	
  (allows	
  y...
©2012	
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So	
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n  Take	
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©2012	
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So	
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n  Take	
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©2012	
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When	
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n  Use	
  in	
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©2012	
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Next	
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  Training	
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  for	
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n  24/7	
 ...
©2012	
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Recruitment	
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n  Market	
  heavily	
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©2012	
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Recruitment	
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  for	
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n  Leadership	
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©2012	
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BoHom	
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n Good	
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Families	...
©2012	
  Na/onal	
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Fatherhood.gov	
  
55
©2012	
  Na/onal	
  Fatherhood	
  Ini/a/ve	
  
NFI’s	
  Website	
  
56
Why Programming for Military Dads?
©2012	
  Na/onal	
  Fatherhood	
  Ini/a/ve	
  
Free	
  Resources	
  on	
  our	
  website	
  
57
©2012	
  Na/onal	
  Fatherhood	
  Ini/a/ve	
  
Father	
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  Blog	
  
58
©2012	
  Na/onal	
  Fatherhood	
  Ini/a/ve	
  
n  Tim	
  Red	
  –	
  Contact	
  informa/on:	
  
n  tred@fatherhood.org	
...
©2012	
  Na/onal	
  Fatherhood	
  Ini/a/ve	
  
Ques/ons?	
  
?
•  Webinar participants who want to get 2.0 NASW CE Credits (or just
want proof of participation in this training) need to...
This material is based upon work supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agricultu...
Military Families Learning Network"
This material is based upon work supported by the National Institute of Food and Agric...
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May 29-Fathers, Work and Family Life MFLN Family Development webinar presentation

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PowerPoint presentation for a 2 hour webinar on fathers, work and family life where presenters highlight the pressures faced by today’s working father, who are still expected to work hard to succeed in their careers while also being far more involved as parents than dads of previous generations. The presentation covers work-family struggles unique to military fathers. Several strategies dads can use to be more efficient and effective in both roles is also addressed in the presentation. In addition, the presentation explore ways dads can consciously think through their priorities. Finally, presenters discuss ways to help support dads as they cope with work-family conflict.

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May 29-Fathers, Work and Family Life MFLN Family Development webinar presentation

  1. 1. Please  share  your  email  address  with  us!   We’d like to send you a link to this webinar’s recording and resources, and notifications for future webinars.!   Provide  feedback  and  earn  CE  Credit  with  one  link:     We will provide this link at the end of the webinar! Welcome to the 
 Military Families Learning Network Webinar 
 Fathers, Work and Family Life! This material is based upon work supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Office of Family Policy, Children and Youth, U.S. Department of Defense under Award Numbers 2010-48869-20685 and 2012-48755-20306.
  2. 2. Welcome to the 
 Military Families Learning Network This material is based upon work supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Office of Family Policy, Children and Youth, U.S. Department of Defense under Award Numbers 2010-48869-20685 and 2012-48755-20306. Research and evidenced-based
 professional development ! through engaged online communities! eXtension.org/militaryfamilies! ! !  
  3. 3. POLL How would you best describe your current employer?
  4. 4. This material is based upon work supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Office of Family Policy, Children and Youth, U.S. Department of Defense under Award Numbers 2010-48869-20685 and 2012-48755-20306. To receive notifications of future webinars and other learning opportunities from the Military Families Learning Network, sign up for the Military Families Learning Network Email Mailing list at: http://bit.ly/MFLNlist https://www.facebook.com/MilitaryFamilyAdvocate https://twitter.com/MilFamAdvocate #eXfamdev https://www.youtube.com/user/MIlFamLN
  5. 5. •  Webinar participants who want to get 2.0 NASW CE Credits (or just want proof of participation in this training) need to take an evaluation and post-test. A link to these will be provided towards the end of the webinar.! »  CE Certificates of completion will be emailed to participants taking the evaluation and post-test within 2-4 weeks." »  Questions/concerns surrounding the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) CE credit certificates can be emailed to this address: MFLNmilitaryfamilyadvocate@gmail.com! »  Sometimes state/professional licensure boards for fields other than social work recognize NASW CE Credits, however, you would have to check with your state and/or professional boards if you need CE Credits for your field. ! " •  To learn more about obtaining CE Credits, please visit this website: http://blogs.extension.org/militaryfamilies/family-development/professional- development/nasw-ce-credits/! CE Credit Information!
  6. 6. Today’s Presenters: Dr. Scott Behson Dr. Scott Behson is a Professor of Management at the Silberman College of Business at Fairleigh Dickinson University, where he teaches, conducts research, and provides consulting services in work-family balance and workplace flexibility. He earned a Ph.D. from the University at Albany, State University of New York and a B.S. from Cornell University. He has published over 17 academic journal publications, presented over 40 times at prestigious national and international conferences, won seven research and teaching awards, and was named a Who’s Who in Work-Family Research by the Sloan Work-Family Research Network. Behson also runs the popular blog, Fathers, Work and Family, dedicated to supporting work-family balance for fathers. His writing has appeared at the Harvard Business Review, Time, the Wall Street Journal, Huffington Post and Good Men Project, and he has appeared on CBS This Morning, NPR Morning Edition, and HuffPost Live. Tim Red is the Senior Program Military Consultant for the National Fatherhood Initiative (NFI). He joined NFI after serving 30 years in the military with the last twenty in an Active Duty status. He served as the State Family Program Director for the Texas National Guard for four years. He also was mobilized and then deployed overseas in support of the Kosovo Peacekeeping mission for seventeen months. Currently, he works with Military Family Programs to help them understand the importance of reaching out to fathers and how to best do that. INSERT   PHOTO   INSERT   PHOTO  
  7. 7. Fathers,Work and Family: The Challenges for Today’s Dads and How We Can Respond Scott Behson, PhD Fairleigh Dickinson University As part of a webinar for The Department of Defense
  8. 8. Today’s Dads Pulled in Many Directions —  Provider/Caretaker —  Husband/Partner —  Father/Dad —  Own Career/Spouse’s —  Face a different set of expectations than their own dads —  “Funhouse mirror” version of working women’s dilemma
  9. 9. Today’s Generation of Fathers —  Tripled time spent with children/on childcare —  Doubled housework —  Aspire to more egalitarian households BUT —  Same # of work hours —  Similar career ambitions —  Less financial/job security —  Sole/primary provider in 85% of dual-parent households —  Social (and self) pressure to be providers —  Workplaces that expect “all in” commitment
  10. 10. No Wonder That… —  Over 60% of dads report significant work- life conflict and stress (higher than moms!)
  11. 11. Challenges At Work —  Men face barriers at work as they expand family involvement ◦  Supervisors ◦  Coworkers ◦  Organizational Cultures ◦  Increased Time Demands —  Still expected to be primary provider and “all-in” for career ◦  Extra flexibility stigma for men ◦  90% desire paternity leave, almost none take it ◦  Many must hide family priorities
  12. 12. How I Counsel Non-Military Dads —  Examine own priorities —  Discuss these with spouse and others —  Calibrate career and family accordingly —  Financial simplification —  Assess your work situation —  Time management and prioritization —  Negotiate for increased work flexibility —  Protect family time from creeping demands of work —  Be present during family time —  Take some “me time” for recharging —  Build informal support network of peer dads
  13. 13. How I Counsel Non-Military Organizations —  Increase time/place flexibility when possible —  Redesign work for teams and redundancy —  Proper use of technology for flexibility —  Reduce excessive work expectations —  Time management and prioritization —  Space for part-time, informal and ad-hoc solutions —  Supervisor and leadership support for balanced culture —  Long-term approach to employees
  14. 14. Military Dads —  Stressful work —  A “calling” for many, with strong career/ personal identity —  Forced travel/time away from family —  Less freedom to go against supervisor, rules, culture or system —  Male-dominated workforce —  Often a “macho” culture —  Financial pressures —  Chronic overwork Stress, divorce levels much higher for military families —  http://www.rand.org/news/press/2013/09/03.html
  15. 15. How can we help military dads? 1.Awareness that other dads feel the same pressures —  Formal and informal peer support —  Role-modeling by leaders The goal: Make it more ok and normal to talk about concerns and struggles
  16. 16. How can we help military dads? 2. Reduce chronic overwork —  More regular hours —  Schedules well in advance —  Keep people unplugged from work after hours —  Make them use all available vacation time —  Use it or lose it sick/personal days The goal: Reduce stress and allow time for life
  17. 17. How can we help? 3. Smart use of technology —  Ways to work more flexibly? Time/place? —  Stay connected to loved ones while away The goal: maintain family connections and enhance communication
  18. 18. How can we help? —  Your ideas?
  19. 19. Thank you! —  Behson@fdu.edu —  www.FathersWorkandFamily.com —  @ScottBehson on twitter
  20. 20. Today’s Presenters: Dr. Scott Behson Dr. Scott Behson is a Professor of Management at the Silberman College of Business at Fairleigh Dickinson University, where he teaches, conducts research, and provides consulting services in work-family balance and workplace flexibility. He earned a Ph.D. from the University at Albany, State University of New York and a B.S. from Cornell University. He has published over 17 academic journal publications, presented over 40 times at prestigious national and international conferences, won seven research and teaching awards, and was named a Who’s Who in Work-Family Research by the Sloan Work-Family Research Network. Behson also runs the popular blog, Fathers, Work and Family, dedicated to supporting work-family balance for fathers. His writing has appeared at the Harvard Business Review, Time, the Wall Street Journal, Huffington Post and Good Men Project, and he has appeared on CBS This Morning, NPR Morning Edition, and HuffPost Live. Tim Red is the Senior Program Military Consultant for the National Fatherhood Initiative (NFI). He joined NFI after serving 30 years in the military with the last twenty in an Active Duty status. He served as the State Family Program Director for the Texas National Guard for four years. He also was mobilized and then deployed overseas in support of the Kosovo Peacekeeping mission for seventeen months. Currently, he works with Military Family Programs to help them understand the importance of reaching out to fathers and how to best do that. INSERT   PHOTO   INSERT   PHOTO  
  21. 21. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   21   How  to  successfully  engage   Military  Dads      
  22. 22. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   n  Where  do  you  work  with  military  families?   n  On  an  installation   n  Off-­‐base   n  Both   n  None  of  the  above   Audience  Poll   22
  23. 23. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   23   NaAonal  Fatherhood  IniAaAve™     ________________________________________________      Improving  the  well-­‐being  of  children     by  increasing  the  propor/on  of  children  with   involved,  responsible,  and  commiHed  fathers     in  their  lives.    
  24. 24. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   Defining  the  Issue   24   n  24  million  children  live  in  homes  absent  their  biological   father*   n  1  of  3  children  na/onally  -­‐  triple  the  rate  of  1960  -­‐  live  in   father-­‐absent  homes*   n  2  of  3  in  the  African  American  community  live  in  father-­‐ absent  homes*   n  2  of  5  children  in  father-­‐absent  homes  have  contact  with   their  fathers  less  than  once  per  month**   n  9  in  10  moms  and  dads  believe  there  is  a  father  absence   crisis  in  America  today***     *  From  the  U.S.  Census  Bureau,  “America’s  Families  and  Living  Arrangements:  2010”   **  From  Aquilino,  W.S.  (2006).  The  noncustodial  father-­‐child  rela/onship  from  adolescence  into  young  adulthood.  Journal  of  Marriage  and   Family,  68,  929-­‐946     ***From  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve’s  “Mama  Says”  and  “Pop’s  Culture”  surveys  (2009  and  2006)       >  There  are  record  levels  of  father  absence  in   America  
  25. 25. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   Defining  the  Issue   25   Since  1965,  fathers  have  more  than  doubled  their  /me  doing   child  care  and  house  work*     Societal  agreement  on  the  no/on  that  dads  should  not  only   provide  for  their  children,  but  nurture  and  guide  them,  too     *Anthes,  E.  (2010,  May/June).  Family  guy.  Scien4fic  American  Mind     >  However,  today’s  involved  fathers  are  more   involved  than  ever  
  26. 26. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   26   Children  in  father-­‐absent  homes  are  two  to  five  /mes  more  likely  to:   n  live  in  poverty   n  fail  in  school   n  develop  emo/onal  or  behavioral  problems   n  abuse  drugs   n  be  abused  and  neglected   n  become  involved  in  crime   n  commit  suicide   Why  Fathers  MaKer   >  The  Consequences  of  Father  Absence  
  27. 27. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   27   Why  Fathers  MaKer   >  The  Benefits  of  Father  Involvement   Children  with  involved  fathers  are  more  likely  to  have:     n  beHer  cogni/ve  outcomes,  even  as  infants   n  higher  self-­‐esteem  and  less  depression  as  teenagers   n  higher  grades,  test  scores,  and  overall  academic   achievement   n  lower  levels  of  drug  and  alcohol  use   n  higher  levels  of  empathy  and  other  pro-­‐social  behavior  
  28. 28. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   n  Nurturing  Fathering  and  Paren/ng  is  first     and  foremost  a  philosophy  that  emphasizes     the  importance  of  raising  children  in  a  warm,     trus/ng,  and  empathic  household.   n  Nurturing  from  Fathers  is  just  as  important  and   needed  as  Nurturing  from  Mothers   n  Men  don’t  gravitate  towards  the  word  Nurturing   but  Involved/Responsible/CommiHed  Fathers   provide  it  everyday   Nurturing  –  a  Benefit  of  Father  Involvement   28
  29. 29. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   29   >  NFI  is  a  non-­‐profit,  non-­‐parAsan  organizaAon  that  was  founded  in  1994  to  begin  a   society-­‐wide  movement  to  renew  fatherhood  in  America.     Who  is  NaAonal  Fatherhood  IniAaAve  (NFI)?     NaAonal  Fatherhood  IniAaAve  Mission:     To  improve  the  well-­‐being  of  children  by  increasing  the     propor/on  of  children  with  involved,  responsible,  and  commiHed     fathers  in  their  lives.   Educate   Educate  and  inspire  all   Americans,  especially   fathers,  through  public   awareness  campaigns,   research,  and  other   resources.     Equip     Equip  fathers  &  develop   leaders  of  na/onal,  state,   and  community   fatherhood  ini/a/ves   through  curricula,  training,   and  technical  assistance.   Engage   Engage  every  sector  of   society  through  strategic   alliances  and  partnerships.   NFI’s  Mission  is  carried  out  using  a  “Three  E”  Strategy  
  30. 30. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   30   n  NFI  has  published  more  studies  about  fatherhood  than  any  other  organizaAon   n  NFI  has  published  35  research  reports  including:   n  3  na/onal  surveys  on  fatherhood  and  marriage   n  24  state  surveys  on  fatherhood  and  marriage   n  7  research  compila/ons   n  A  report  on  the  economic  cost  of  father  absence       n  NFI  has  the  quickest  and  broadest  access  to  the  largest  amount  of  fatherhood  research       n  By  accessing  its  research  compila/on,  Father  Facts,  combined  with  knowledge  of     Census  data  and  other  relevant  data  sources,  NFI  can  provide  the  public  with     informa/on  on  fatherhood  quickly  and  accurately.     >  NFI,  through  the  publicaAon  of  research    educates  the  public  about  the  importance   of  strengthening  fatherhood  in  America.       What  Does  NaAonal  Fatherhood  IniAaAve  Do?   Research    
  31. 31. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   n  Pops  Culture  Survey  –over  50%  of  Fathers   feel  like  they  are  replaceable   n  What  Mama  Says  Survey  –  over  50%  of   Mothers  feel  like  the  Father  is  replaceable   n  One  Hundred  Billion  Dollar  Man  Study     What  Does  NaAonal  Fatherhood  IniAaAve  Do?   Research   31
  32. 32. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   The  Facts  on  Military  Fathers     n  Approximately  593,000  ac/ve-­‐duty  Service  Members  and   nearly  300,000  U.S.  Reservists  are  dads.       n  Approximately  1.8  million  children  of  military  dads  are   affected  by  the  unique  stresses  of  military  life.       n  150,000  military  fathers  are  currently  deployed,  with   deployments  ranging  from  30  days  to  15  months.       n  This  means  that  approximately  300,000  children  are   currently  separated  from  their  fathers.
  33. 33. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   Military  Dads:  Who  Are  They?  
  34. 34. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   Military  Dads:  Who  Are  They?   n  Regular  Dads  .  .  .   n  Parents   n  Providers   n  Husbands    
  35. 35. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   Military  Dads:  Who  Are  They?   n  That  have  faced  or  are  facing:   n  Deployment  Separa/on   n  Child  Custody   n  Divorce   n  Reunion  /  Reintegra/on     n  Combat  Stress   n  Health  Issues   n  Communica/on  Challenges   It  is  a  challenge  for  them  to  be  involved,  responsible,  and  committed.    
  36. 36. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   Why  Programming  for  Military  Dads?   n  So,  with  all  that  said,  the  question  is  still   asked  –  “Why  should  we  have   programming  for  Military  Dads?”   n  So  why  should  we?   n  How  many  of  you  are  currently  working   with  Military  Dads  speciGically?   36
  37. 37. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   Why  Programming  for  Military  Dads?   n  Research  tell  us:   n  Military  life  and  family  life  can  compete  with  each   other.     n  Service  members  are  looking  more  for  work/family   “fit”  than  ever  before.   n  Service  members  make  re-­‐enlistment  decisions  based   on  family  circumstances,  leader  support,  &  sa/sfac/on   with  services.   n  Service  members  are  more  able  to  focus  on  mission   when  family  concerns  are  addressed.  
  38. 38. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   Why  Programming  for  Military  Dads?   n  Paren/ng   n  Where  are  Men  taught  how  to  be  Fathers?   38
  39. 39. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   Why  Programming  for  Military  Dads?   n  Addresses  the  6  Protec/ve  Factors   n  Nurturing  and  aHachment   n  Knowledge  of  paren/ng  and  child  and  youth   development   n  Parental  resilience   n  Social  connec/ons   n  Concrete  support  for  parents   n  Social  and  emo/onal  competence  of  children  
  40. 40. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   Resilience   n  I  aHended  the  DOD/USDA  Family  Resilience   Conference  where  I  experienced  many   great  programs  designed  to  improve  the   resiliency  of  Mothers,  Spouses,  Families,   Children  and  Parents.     n  However,  no  one  at  this  conference   (except  for  NaAonal  Fatherhood  IniAaAve)   was  talking  about  a  crucial  piece  of  the   Family  –  Fathers.  Why  is  that?  
  41. 41. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   Resilience   n  Family  Program  organiza/ons  can  be  very   successful  in  improving  the  resiliency  of   Mothers  and  Children  from  Military   Families.  But,  if  that  Military  Father  is   struggling  with  resiliency  or  has  none,  it  will   be  very  challenging  to  sustain  resiliency   successes  for  Mothers,  Children  and   Families.  
  42. 42. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   Where  do  you  start?   n  So  where  do  you  start  a  Military   Family  Program  on  an  installation  or   in  the  National  Guard  /Reserves?   42
  43. 43. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   Programming  targeted  to:   n   Child  Development  Centers   n   Family  Advocacy   n   New  Parent  Support  Programs   n   Chaplains   n   Family  Programs  (ACS,  FFSC,  AFRC,  MCCS,  USCG  Work-­‐Life)   n   Na/onal  Guard  Family  Programs  (States  and  Wings)   n   Army,  Air  Force,  Navy,  and  Marine  Forces  Reserves  Family   Programs     n  Local  Community-­‐based  organiza/ons  that  support  the   military     n  Leadership  
  44. 44. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   How  do  we  reach  them?   n  Types  of  programs:   n   Training  specifically  for  fathers   n   Skill-­‐building  resources  specifically  for  fathers   n   Reunion/Reintegra/on  events     n   Pre-­‐Deployment  briefings     n   Fatherhood  Resource  Centers     n   Leadership  Educa/on  
  45. 45. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   How  do  we  reach  them?   n  Involvement/Commitment    by  Senior   Military  Leadership  is  impera/ve  to  a  very   successful  and  sustaining  Military  Dad   Program  on  an  installa/on   45
  46. 46. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   Fatherhood  Resource  Center  
  47. 47. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   So  how  do  you  use  the  FRC?   n  Mobile  (allows  you  to  take  the   informa/on  to  the  Dads)   n  Light  weight   n  Resource  holders  can  be  removed   n  Can  mount  on  the  wall   n  Can  change  posters  
  48. 48. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   So  how  do  you  use  the  FRC?   n  Take  the  FRC  to  where  Fathers  are  gathered   n  Exchange   n  Gym/Fitness  Center   n  Barber  Shop   n  Dining  Hall/Dining  Facility   n  Bowling  Alley  
  49. 49. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   So  how  do  you  use  the  FRC?   n  Take  the  FRC  to  events  Fathers  may  be  aHending   n  Chaplains  are  hos/ng  a  Men’s  Breakfast   n  Paren/ng  Classes   n  Marriage  Enrichment   n  Stress/Anger  Mgmt  Classes   n  Reunion/Reintegra/on   n  Pre-­‐Deployment  Briefings   n  Family  Days   n  Leadership  Mee/ngs   n  FRG  Mee/ngs  (introduce  to  Moms)  
  50. 50. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   When  to  use  the  resources?   n  Use  in  Home  Visits   n  Use  in  Counseling  sessions   n  Place  in  New  Baby  Gip  Packages   n  Give  to  a  Deploying  Expectant/New  Dad   n  Use  as  a  tool  to  educate  Leadership  
  51. 51. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   Next  Step  –  Training  specifically  for  Dads   n  24/7  Dad   n  7  Habits  of  the  24/7  Dad   n  Doctor  Dad   51
  52. 52. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   Recruitment  challenges  for  training   n  Market  heavily  but  Dads  do  not  show  up   n  Don’t  want  to  aHend  classes  aper  work   n  Leadership  will  not  let  them  take  classes   during  the  work  day   n  If  I  go  to  a  Fatherhood  Class  I  am  doing   something  wrong   52
  53. 53. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   Recruitment  strategies  for  training   n  Leadership  buy-­‐in  (Good  Dad=Strong,   Prepared  Family=Mission  Success)   n  Educate  Senior  Leadership  on  the  hours   spent  by  Junior  Leadership  on  Family   Advocacy  cases   n  Offer  classes  at  the  unit   n  Financial/Promo/on  incen/ves   53
  54. 54. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   BoHom  line   n Good  Dads  =  Strong,  Prepared   Families  =  Mission  Success   54
  55. 55. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   Fatherhood.gov   55
  56. 56. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   NFI’s  Website   56 Why Programming for Military Dads?
  57. 57. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   Free  Resources  on  our  website   57
  58. 58. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   Father  Factor  Blog   58
  59. 59. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   n  Tim  Red  –  Contact  informa/on:   n  tred@fatherhood.org   n  Work  #  (240)  912-­‐1262   n  Cell  #  (214)  478-­‐1635  
  60. 60. ©2012  Na/onal  Fatherhood  Ini/a/ve   Ques/ons?   ?
  61. 61. •  Webinar participants who want to get 2.0 NASW CE Credits (or just want proof of participation in this training) need to take an evaluation and post-test. Here is the link: https://vte.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_0UFOk7AV07OrZKR »  CE Certificates of completion will be emailed to participants taking the evaluation and post-test within 2-4 weeks." »  Questions/concerns surrounding the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) CE credit certificates can be emailed to this address: MFLNmilitaryfamilyadvocate@gmail.com! »  Sometimes state/professional licensure boards for fields other than social work recognize NASW CE Credits, however, you would have to check with your state and/or professional boards if you need CE Credits for your field. ! " •  To learn more about obtaining CE Credits, please visit this website: http://blogs.extension.org/militaryfamilies/family-development/professional- development/nasw-ce-credits/! CE Credit Information!
  62. 62. This material is based upon work supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Office of Family Policy, Children and Youth, U.S. Department of Defense under Award Numbers 2010-48869-20685 and 2012-48755-20306. Next Webinar: July 17, 2014 @ 11:00 am Eastern Needs and Supportive Strategies for Professionals Working with LGBT Military Families https://learn.extension.org/events/1571#.U3yi4V5aqzA
  63. 63. Military Families Learning Network" This material is based upon work supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Office of Family Policy, Children and Youth, U.S. Department of Defense under Award Numbers 2010-48869-20685 and 2012-48755-20306. Find all upcoming and recorded webinars covering: ! Family Development
 Military Caregiving ! Personal Finance ! Network Literacy! ! http://www.extension.org/62581 !

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