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MELJUN CORTES SAD ch10

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MELJUN CORTES SAD ch10

MELJUN CORTES SAD ch10


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  • 1. Chapter 10Preparing The SystemsProposal Systems Analysis and DesignMELJUN CORTES
  • 2. Major Topics • Systems proposal • Determining hardware/software needs • Tangible and intangible costs and benefits • Systems proposal • Using tables, graphs, and figuresKendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-2
  • 3. Systems Proposal In order to prepare the systems proposal analysts must use a systematic approach to: • Ascertain hardware and software needs. • Identify and forecast costs and benefits. • Compare costs and benefits. • Choose the most appropriate alternative.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-3
  • 4. Ascertaining Hardware andSoftware Needs Steps used to determine hardware and software needs: • Inventory computer hardware currently available. • Estimate current and projected workload for the system. • Evaluate the performance of hardware and software using some predetermined criteria. • Choose the vendor according to the evaluation. • Obtain hardware and software from the vendor.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-4
  • 5. Steps in Acquiring ComputerHardware and SoftwareKendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-5
  • 6. Hardware Inventory When inventorying hardware check: • Type of equipment. • Status of equipment operation. • Estimated age of equipment. • Projected life of equipment. • Physical location of equipment. • Department or person responsible for equipment. • Financial arrangement for equipment.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-6
  • 7. Evaluating Hardware Criteria for evaluating hardware: • Time required for average transactions (including time for input and output). • Total volume capacity of the system. • Idle time of the central processing unit. • Size of memory provided.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-7
  • 8. People that EvaluateHardware The people involved: • Management. • Users. • Systems analysts.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-8
  • 9. Purchasing, Leasing, orRenting Decision There are three options for obtaining computer equipment: • Buying. • Leasing. • Rental.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-9
  • 10. Buying Advantages Disadvantages Cheaper than leasing Initial cost is high or renting over the long run Ability to change Risk of obsolescence system Provides tax Risk of being stuck if advantages of choice is wrong accelerated depreciation Full control Full responsibilityKendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-10
  • 11. Leasing Advantages Disadvantages No capital is tied up Company doesn’t own the system when lease expires No financing is Usually a heavy penalty required for terminating the lease Leases are lower than Leases are more rental payments expensive than buyingKendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-11
  • 12. Renting Advantages Disadvantages No capital is tied up Company doesn’t own the computer No financing is required Easy to change systems Cost is very high because vendor assumes Maintenance and the risk (most expensive insurance are usually option) includedKendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-12
  • 13. Evaluating Hardware Support When evaluating hardware vendors, the selection committee needs to consider: • Hardware support. • Software support. • Installation and training support. • Maintenance support. • Performance of the hardware.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-13
  • 14. Software Alternatives Software may be: • Custom created in-house. • Purchased as COTS (commercial off-the- shelf) software. • Provided by an application service provider (ASP).Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-14
  • 15. Creating Custom Software Advantages Disadvantages Specific response to May be significantly specialized business higher initial costs needs compared to others Innovation may give Ongoing maintenance competitive edge In-house staff for Necessity of hiring or maintenance working with a Pride of ownership development teamKendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-15
  • 16. Purchasing COTS Packages Advantages Disadvantages Refined in the Programming focused, commercial world not business focused Increased reliability and Must accept existing functionality features Often lower initial cost Limited customization Already in use by other Uncertain financial firms future of vendor Help and training comes Less ownership and with software commitmentKendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-16
  • 17. Using an ASP Advantages Disadvantages Organizations can focus Loss of control of data, on what they do best systems, IT employees and schedules No need to hire, train, Concerns over financial retain a large IT staff viability, stability of ASP There is no expenditure Security, confidentiality, of employee time on IT and privacy concerns tasks Loss of potential strategic advantageKendall & © 2005 Pearson regarding innovativenessKendall Prentice Hall 10-17
  • 18. Software Evaluation • Use the following to evaluating software packages: • Performance effectiveness • Performance efficiency • Ease of use • Flexibility • Quality of documentation • Manufacturer supportKendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-18
  • 19. Analytic Hierarchy Processing(AHP) • Analytic Hierarchy Processing requires decision makers to judge the relative importance of each criteria and indicate their preference regarding the importance of each alternative criteria. • A disadvantage of AHP stems from the use of the pairwise method used to evaluate alternatives.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-19
  • 20. Expert Systems Expert systems are rule-based reasoning systems developed around an expert in the field.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-20
  • 21. Neural Nets Neural nets are developed by solving a number of specific type of problems and getting feedback on the decisions, then observing what was involved in successful decisions.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-21
  • 22. Recommendation Systems • Recommendation systems are software and database systems that reduce the number of alternatives by ranking, counting, or some other method. • A recommendation system does not use weights. • It simply counts the number of occurrences.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-22
  • 23. The Web and Decision Making • The World Wide Web may be used to extract decision-making information. • Push technologies automatically deliver new Internet information to a desktop. • Intelligent agents learn your personality and behavior and track topics that you might be interested in based on what it has learned.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-23
  • 24. Identifying and ForecastingCosts and Benefits May forecast costs and benefits of a prospective system through: • Graphical judgment. • Moving averages. • Analysis of time series.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-24
  • 25. Estimating Trends Trends may be estimated using: • Graphical judgment. • The method of least squares. • Moving average method.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-25
  • 26. Costs and Benefits Systems analysts should take tangible costs, intangible costs, tangible benefits, and intangible benefits into consideration to identify cost and benefits of a prospective system.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-26
  • 27. Tangible Benefits • Tangible benefits are advantages measurable in dollars that accrue to the organization through use of the information system. • Examples: • Increase in the speed of processing. • Access to information on a more timely basis.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-27
  • 28. Intangible Benefits • Intangible benefits are advantages from use of the information system that are difficult to measure. • Examples: • Improved effectiveness of decision-making processes. • Maintaining a good business image.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-28
  • 29. Tangible Costs • Tangible costs are those that can be accurately projected by systems analysts and the business accounting personnel. • Examples: • Cost of equipment. • Cost of resources. • Cost of systems analysts time.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-29
  • 30. Intangible Costs • Intangible costs are those that are difficult to estimate, and may not be known • Examples: • Cost of losing a competitive edge. • Declining company image.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-30
  • 31. Selecting the Best Alternative To select the best alternative, analysts should compare costs and benefits of the prospective alternatives using: • Break-even analysis. • Payback. • Cash-flow analysis. • Present value method.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-31
  • 32. Break-Even Analysis • Break-even analysis is the point at which the cost of the current system and the proposed system intersect. • Break-even analysis is useful when a business is growing and volume is a key variable in costs.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-32
  • 33. Break-Even AnalysisKendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-33
  • 34. Payback Payback determines the number of years of operation that the system needs to pay back the cost of investing in it.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-34
  • 35. Break-Even Analysis Showing aPayback PeriodKendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-35
  • 36. Cash-Flow Analysis • Cash-flow analysis is used to examine the direction, size, and pattern of cash flow associated with the proposed information system. • Determine when cash outlays and revenues will occur for both: • The initial purchase. • Over the life of the information system.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-36
  • 37. Present Value Method • Way to assess all the economic outlays and revenues of the information system over its economic life and to compare costs today with future costs and todays benefits with future benefits. • Use present value when the payback period is long, or when the cost of borrowing money is high.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-37
  • 38. Selecting the Best Alternative Guidelines to select the method for comparing alternatives: • Use break-even analysis if the project needs to be justified in terms of cost, not benefits. • Use payback when the improved tangible benefits form a convincing argument for the proposed system.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-38
  • 39. Selecting the Best Alternative Guidelines to select the method for comparing alternatives (continued) • Use cash-flow analysis when the project is expensive, relative to the size of the company. • Use present value when the payback period is long or when the cost of borrowing money is high.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-39
  • 40. Items in the Systems Proposal • When preparing a systems proposal, systems analysts should arrange the following ten items in order: • Cover letter. • Title page of project. • Table of contents. • Executive summary (including recommendation).Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-40
  • 41. Items in the Systems Proposal When preparing a system’s proposal, systems analyst should arrange the following ten items in order (continued): • Outline of systems study with appropriate documentation. • Detailed results of the systems study. • Systems alternatives (three or four possible solutions). • Systems analysts recommendations. • Summary.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-41
  • 42. Items in the Systems Proposal(Continued) When preparing a system’s proposal, systems analyst should arrange the following ten items in order: • Appendices • Assorted documentation. • Summary of phases. • Correspondence. • Other material as needed.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-42
  • 43. Guidelines for Using Tables Some guidelines to use tables effectively are: • Integrate it into the body of the proposal. • Try to fit the entire table vertically on a single page. • Number and title the table at the top of the page.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-43
  • 44. Guidelines for Using Tables Some guidelines to use tables effectively are (continued): • Make the title descriptive and meaningful. • Label each row and column. • Use a boxed table if room permits. • Use footnotes if necessary to explain detailed information contained in the table.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-44
  • 45. Guidelines for Using Graphs Some guidelines for using graphs are: • Choose a style of graph that communicates your intended meaning well. • Integrate the graph into the proposal body. • Give the graph a sequential figure number and a meaningful title. • Label each axis, any lines, columns, bars, and pieces of the pie on the graph.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-45
  • 46. Guidelines for Using Graphs Some guidelines for using graphs are (continued): • Include a key to indicate differently colored lines, shaded bars, or crosshatched areas.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-46
  • 47. Types of Graphs • Line graphs • Column charts • Bar charts • Pie chartsKendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-47
  • 48. Line Graphs • Used to show change over time • Changes of up to five variables on a single graph • May show when lines intersectKendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-48
  • 49. Line Chart ExampleKendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-49
  • 50. Column Charts • Show a comparison between two or more variables • Compare different variables at a particular point in time • Easier to understand than line graphsKendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-50
  • 51. Column Chart ExampleKendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-51
  • 52. Variations of Column Charts • 100 percent stacked chart • Includes 100 percent stacked charts • Show how different variables make up 100 percent of an entity • Deviation Column Chart • Shows deviation from averageKendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-52
  • 53. Bar Charts • Used to show one or more variables within certain classes or categories during a specific time period • May be sorted or organized by: • Alphabetical. • Numerical. • Geographical order. • Progressive order.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-53
  • 54. Pie Charts • Used to show how 100 percent of a commodity is divided at a particular point in time • Easier to read than 100 percent stacked column charts or 100 percent subdivided bar charts • Disadvantage is they take a lot of room on the pageKendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-54
  • 55. Pie Chart ExampleKendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-55
  • 56. Oral Presentations When delivering the oral presentation, keep in mind the principles of delivery: • Project loudly enough so that the audience can hear you. • Look at each person in the audience as you speak. • Make visuals large enough so that the audience can see them.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-56
  • 57. Oral Presentations(Continued) • When delivering the oral presentation, keep in mind the principles of delivery. • Use gestures that are natural to your conversational style. • Introduce and conclude your talk confidently.Kendall & © 2005 PearsonKendall Prentice Hall 10-57