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  • 1. Social Networking & Web 2.0 Next Generation Online Communities Stanford Social Innovation Review Nonprofit Management Institute 2008September 2008 Jeff Patrick President Common Knowledge www.commonknow.com 415.543.7600 jpatrick@commonknow.com
  • 2. Jeff Patrick President, Founder Common KnowledgeSan Francisco | Los Angeles | Atlanta | Chicago 415.543.7600 jpatrick@commonknow.com
  • 3. Social Networking & Web 2.0
  • 4. Ecosystem External MySpace Peer Partner Sponsor Website Website Website Facebook Commercial Content Org YouTube Flickr Website Internal Blogosphere4 Common Knowledge Wednesday, September 24, 2008
  • 5. Interaction Types Organization’s Website Peer to Peer External Networks Pier to Peer FaceBook Organization MySpace Organization to Peer Organization Organization Flickr Organization5 Common Knowledge Wednesday, September 24, 2008
  • 6. Acquisition Path Organization Website External Networks FaceBook Org’s Social Organization Network Acquisition & Cultivation Database6 Common Knowledge Wednesday, September 24, 2008
  • 7. Why Do We Join Social Networks? Examples1. Social FaceBook, MySpace, Friendster, EONS Fills a basic human need to create relationships and connect with others.2. Support (Emotional) MayasMom.com Provides peer emotional support for people seeking guidance or help in some aspect of their personal or professional lives.3. Resource(s) LinkedIn, WikiPedia Provides members with information crucial to their lives whether personal or professional. This information is largely provided by peers, but can also be provided by network providers.4. Service(s) LinkedIn Provides members with services important to their lives whether personal or professional. This information can be provided by both peers and network providers. Ex. Stock advice.
  • 8. Why Do We Join Social Networks? Examples5. Credibility/Trust LinkedIn, FaceBook, People frequently join social networks because a personal level threshold of trust has MayasMom been established between the new member and the network provider or between the new member and a trusted source (i.e., friend, co-worker, publication)6. Recognition Amazon, eBay, Social networks often provide public recognition for an individual’s expertise. blogs7. Self Promotion Flickr, MySpace, Social networks are often used to promote oneself, product, or service. MySpace, for LinkedIn example, grew out of the grassroots efforts by small bands to distribute their music.8. Self Definition MayasMom.com, Many people join social networks because they personal identify with that network. Facebook, FaceBook was initially targeted and used exclusively by college students, LinkedIn, DailyKos, LinkedIn.com is for business professionals, EONS.com is for the baby boomer EONs generation.
  • 9. Levels of Participation Creators Publish Web pages, write blogs, upload videos to sites like YouTube 37% (Age: 18-21); 30% (22-26); 19% (27-40) Critics Comment on blogs and post ratings and reviews 37% (18-21); 34% (22-26); 25% (27-40) Collectors Use Really Simple Syndication (RSS) and tag web pages to gather information 16% (18-21); 18% (22-26); 16% (27-40) Joiners Use social networking sites. 70% (18-21); 57% (22-26); 29% (27-40) Spectators Read blogs, watch peer generated videos, and listen to podcasts 59% (18-21); 54% (22-26); 41% (27-40)9 Common Knowledge Wednesday, September 24, 2008
  • 10. Commercial Social Networking Sites *3-13-08 Compete.com
  • 11. Development & Use of SN Sites MySpace Users Facebook Users Online Population U.S. Population 2006Population 49.5 8.7 157.1 281.4(in millions)Males 48% 43% 48% 49%Females 52% 57% 52% 51%Age DemographicsUnder 18 23% 55% 20% 26%Adults (18+) 77% 45% 80% 74%User 21 to 34 22% 14% 17% 20%Users 35 to 49 30% 12% 28% 23%Users 50 to 64 14% 6% 23% 15%Users 65 and over 2% 1% 9% 12% Source: Nielsen/Netratings data, Nov 2006 & U.S. Census Bureau – 2000 Census
  • 12. Development & Use of SN Sites MySpace Users Facebook Users Online Population U.S. Population 2006Population 49.5 8.7 157.1 281.4(in millions)Males 48% 43% 48% 49%Females 52% 57% 52% 51%Racial BreakdownWhite 87% 89% 89% 80%Black 9% 8% 8% 13%Asian 3% 2% 2% 4%Other 1% 0% 1% 3% Source: Nielsen/Netratings data, Nov 2006 & U.S. Census Bureau – 2000 Census
  • 13. Development & Use of SN Sites MySpace Users Facebook Users Online Population U.S. Population 2006Population (millions) 49.5 8.7 157.1 281.4Males 48% 43% 48% 49%Females 52% 57% 52% 51%Household IncomeLess than $25,000 6% 4% 6% 28%$25,000-49,999 22% 18% 23% 23%$50,000-74,999 10% 29% 27% 18%$75,000-99,999 20% 19% 19% 11%$100,000-149,999 15% 18% 16% 10%$150,000+ 7% 11% 8% 9% Source: Nielsen/Netratings data, Nov 2006 & U.S. Census Bureau – 2000 Census
  • 14. Social Network Continuum Web 1.0 --------------------------------------------------Web 2.0 Strategy UGC Interaction Content Website dominated by Website dominated by UGC organization driven content Driver No member Member interaction driven Member interaction interaction by content driven by profile Depth UGC limited to UGC Mildly UGC heavily No UGC Rating & Integrated into integrated into 100% UGC Comments home & sub pages home & sub pages Typical Nonprofit14 Common Knowledge Wednesday, September 24, 2008
  • 15. Empowerment  Social networks ensure that members decide what, when, and how they want AND distribute information. – Ex. Facebook  Social networks provide tools necessary to easily pursue their objectives for joining themselves – Ex. Flickr  Social networks mark a shift away from hierarchical distribution of information and messaging to a flatter model: Peer-to-peer sharing15 Common Knowledge Wednesday, September 24, 2008
  • 16. Sharing  Sharing is the social part of a social networking Gossip, What’s New, Could you recommend…  Successful social networks facilitate sharing at all times  Sharing can happen between members and non- members, friends, colleagues, family, or simply people who share common interests on the social network  Sharing also means sharing (and less control over) an organization’s message16 Common Knowledge Wednesday, September 24, 2008
  • 17. User Centric: The Profile’s Central Role Article Comments Articles Photo Comments Photo Galleries Discussion Posts Forums/Groups Blog Posts Discussions Blog Post Comments Topical Blogs Group Directories Review Topics Friends Other Personas Photos Activity Feed17 Common Knowledge Wednesday, September 24, 2008
  • 18. The Profile’s Central Role Article Comments Articles Photo Comments Photo Galleries Discussion Posts Forums/Groups Blog Posts Discussions Blog Post Comments Topical Blogs Group Directories Review Topics Friends Other Personas Photos Activity Feed18 Common Knowledge Wednesday, September 24, 2008
  • 19. The Profile’s Central Role Article Comments Articles Photo Comments Photo Galleries Discussion Posts Forums/Groups Blog Posts Discussions Blog Post Comments Topical Blogs Group Directories Review Topics Friends Other Personas Photos Activity Feed19 Common Knowledge Wednesday, September 24, 2008
  • 20. Profiles as User Directory Hub  Personas act as connective tissue between Content and Users  Interconnected paths constitute the user’s “SiteLifespan”  Along the way these paths accumulate measurable points of value: – Time-on-site = education – User registrations – Advocacy actions – User generated content – Volunteers20 Common Knowledge Wednesday, September 24, 2008
  • 21. Ladders of Engagement for OSN Views an article with Reads and recommends Click’s on other user’s Finds another story comments another user’s comment Persona reference in Persona Reads a public blog entry Submits a blog post Blog post approved, gets Receives Persona big exposure messages21 Common Knowledge Wednesday, September 24, 2008
  • 22. Ladders of Engagement for OSN Views a Public Photo Uploads a Photo Receives a photo Invites user to connect Gallery comment from a user as friends Encourage action via Capture Email Add to marketing Advocacy/Fundraising bulletin, widget, etc. channels appeals22 Common Knowledge Wednesday, September 24, 2008
  • 23. Utility/Needs Fulfillment  Social networks fill one or more needs of the member (see why we join)…people must have a strong reason for visiting, joining, and returning to the community  Because needs vary dramatically, a wide range of engagement options are typically required23 Common Knowledge Wednesday, September 24, 2008
  • 24. Community Development 1. Identify Your Audience Focus on audiences with shared values, interests, needs, motivation – community should center around audience personal/professional life priorities 2. Identify the Need Establish a clear need that your organization/community is fulfilling 3. Seed Rich Content Before the community creates its own, provide content that will entice users to come by and sign up 4. Make Sharing Easy Whether its photos, videos, or blog posts, members should always have the option to share content with each other 5. Seed the Community Identify key members to help seed the community ahead of time with content (blogs, photos, groups, etc.) to avoid the “Empty Pub” problem24 Common Knowledge Wednesday, September 24, 2008
  • 25. Birth of a Community 6. Leverage existing community If you have a large database of online/offline supporters – make sure these supporters are the first to be invited when the site launches. 7. Allow for Organic Growth Sometimes users take a community in a different direction than anticipated – avoid fighting this natural change and work with members to improve their experience based on how they are using the site. 8. Leverage Other Social Networks FaceBook, MySpace, and others are not competitors. Provide tools on these networks that draw attention to SC’s own social networks. 9. Marketing and Promotion You will most likely sell what you market. Don’t count on “viral marketing”.25 Common Knowledge Wednesday, September 24, 2008
  • 26. Case StudyInternational FundFor Animal Welfare
  • 27. IFAW Seal Campaign IFAW Seal Campaign Site Total Impressions: 33,574,147 Total Clicks: 29,360 CTR: .09% Community Mbrs 98,000+ Total $$: $130K +30% (YoY)
  • 28. IFAW Seal Campaign
  • 29. IFAW Seal Campaign Join the Campaign 1: Personal Info 2: Personal Message 3: Avatar or photo 4: Audio Message
  • 30. IFAW Seal Campaign Take Action Make a Donation
  • 31. IFAW Seal Campaign Community 1 1: Video Podcast 2: Recent Blog Posts 5 2 3: Recent Comments 3 4: Blogroll 5: MySpace Friends 6: Tagging 4 6
  • 32. IFAW Seal Campaign
  • 33. IFAW Seal Campaign Campaign Marketing (Online) – CampusPlus (college students) – ENN (Online Enviro Community) – CanWest Media Sales – Assorted Blog Ads – Grist – Online College Newspapers – GroovyGreen – Local Newspaper -Ottawa – National Geographic Citizen – Treehugger – Assorted Blog Ads  Animals – Tribal Fusion, Inc.  Women – Undertone Networks  Progressive – USA Today (targeted)  Political – Yahoo! (targeted: Pets/Animals)  Others – Online College Newspapers
  • 34. IFAW Seal Campaign Email Campaign – Target email house list of 500K+ – Email Series over 6 months  January – Frame the issue  February – Introduce the campaign site  March – Advocacy  April – Giving  May – Wrap-up  June – Summary of Results – Strong imagery (repurposed from site & real-time) – Strong & specific calls-to-action
  • 35. IFAW Seal Campaign Best Practices Summary – Multiple Ways to Initiate Relationship – Integrated Ladder of Engagement – Peer-to-Peer Communication – User Generated Content (Multi-Media) – Network of Micro Communities – Active Solicitation
  • 36. Q&A36 Common Knowledge Wednesday, September 24, 2008
  • 37. Jeff Patrick President, Founder Common KnowledgeSan Francisco | Los Angeles | Atlanta | Chicago 415.543.7600 jpatrick@commonknow.com