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Black Country Partnership for Learning - Autumn Conference 2013 - Joint Conference - Apprenticeship Developments 2013

Black Country Partnership for Learning - Autumn Conference 2013 - Joint Conference - Apprenticeship Developments 2013

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  • We have planned a packed morning as you can see from the agenda, and I am pleased to say that we have three employer speakers later this morning who will share their experience with us.
  • The market is not saturated – there is more work to do and the remaining employers will require more sophisticated approaches to engage them.UKCES Employer Skills Survey 2011: England Results66% employers had funded or arranged on-or-off the job training for at least one of the employees over the preceding 12 months.34% are not trainingOnly a minority of employers arranged training designed to lead to a nationally recognised qualification.A national target list of large employers has been developed analysing the engagement of employers from: FTSE, Times Top graduate employers, Top 100 places to work and JCP employer list. Examples of employers on this list:
  • Approx 4,000 employers took part in the survey each year so thank you – here is a summary of the business benefits of having Apprenticeships you anticipated and what you experience of Apprenticeships Pleased to see that you continue to see Apprenticeships as a real driver to increase productivity, staff retention, quality of service  ‘Improved image of sector’ as a business benefit was the biggest change. Apprenticeships have had some poor media coverage, which may have resulted in this view, but these have mainly been a result of us driving up quality and standards through our quality statement. 
  •  The employer satisfaction also showed these results on the ability to influence. We recognise that many of you areheavily involved in delivering training as part of the Apprenticeship and that some partner with training provider, However, a third felt they could not – please talk to your account manager if this is case, we can support you to get what you need. The Prime Minister unveiled plans for improved Apprenticeships, with greater quality for the learner and ease of use for employers on 28th October; and I am sure many of you were at the event. The reforms will put the decisions in your hand and offer greater flexibility. You will hear more about this in the next presentation where Jennifer will provide a update policy. We have provided copies of the two key documents in your pack today.
  • We recently carried out a follow up to our major Apprenticeship evaluation survey which included a specific direct grant sample early analysis of the work suggests the following -but this is not yet finalised yet.
  • Our Employer Survey shows that you continue to retain the 16-18 recruitment levels, and 60% are intending to recruit in next 12 months There is also an increase the work experience opportunities for this age group – we hope that you can transition these into Traineeships.
  • We have planned a packed morning as you can see from the agenda, and I am pleased to say that we have three employer speakers later this morning who will share their experience with us.

Transcript

  • 1. Joint Conference Programme Apprenticeship Developments 2013 Friday 29th November 2013
  • 2. Background to the Conference Patrick Highton, BCPL Black Country Partnership for Learning29th November 2013
  • 3. Black Country Strategic Economic Growth Plan – Jatinder Sharma, Principal and Chief Executive, Walsall College and Member of Black Country Local Enterprise Partnership Board
  • 4. Black Country Strategic Economic Plan November 2013
  • 5. Driver 1: Improving Black Country Business Competitiveness Driver 2: Raising Employability, Education and Skills Driver 3: Transforming our Infrastructure and Environment
  • 6. Business +£3.7bn Skills Jobs +£1.4bn +£1.1b n Raising Productivity by £6.2bn
  • 7. Skills for the Future Workforce
  • 8. 2008 Performance
  • 9. 2008 Performance
  • 10. Apprenticeships
  • 11. Skills for the Workforce
  • 12. Black Country Business Survey Does Your Business Currently Employ Graduates? 14% Ye s 86% Are You in a Position to Offer Structured Training in the Next 2 Years? 50 40 30 20 10 0
  • 13. Skills for the Workforce Growth Sectors
  • 14. High Value Manufacturing Skills Gaps Engineering Programming Production
  • 15. Skills for HVM Challenges Opportunities “The lack of skilled workers is holding back our growth” "We see apprentices as the way forward to keep skills for the future” “We are very concerned with low level of apprenticeships – they don’t teach them how to use equipment” “We would be looking for experienced trainers, mentors and assessors who can deliver not only recognised qualifications but also a series of short focused courses along with simulated learning rigs” “We need to make people aware of some of the good prospects in engineering rather than banking and insurance” ‘”We are interested in working with schools. There is a need to change kid’s perceptions when they are younger”
  • 16. High Value Manufacturing Skills Gaps “Availability of skilled people. People that are willing to work. Work ethic is lacking, especially in poorer areas” “Staff and recruitment problems are the biggest ones. It’s an aging workforce”. The difficulty is finding suitable people to employ”. “There’s a lack of skills locally”. “The lack of skilled workers is holding back our growth”. The skills base. There is a general lack of recruits coming into the industry”.
  • 17. Skills for the Workforce Enabling Sectors
  • 18. Skills for the Unemployed
  • 19. Youth Claimants (age 16-24) rate
  • 20. Outlook for Apprenticeships in England following the Richards Review & Government’s Response – Richard Marsh, Director of Employer Engagement, Apprenticeship Division, Skills Funding Agency
  • 21. Apprenticeship Development and Excellence 2013 Employer Conference
  • 22. Agenda 52 Apprenticeship latest Employer views Future plans National Apprenticeship Service
  • 23. Apprenticeship latest Volumes • Participations rising still – but new starts down slightly in 2012/13 • But strong growth in Advanced and Higher starts • Durations have increased dramatically, success rates stabilised • 200,000 workplaces with Apprentices – growth in SMEs involved, • Supported by the £1,500 AGE grant now paid to 30,000 + SMEs Overall a period of relative stability but with further reform ahead,,, 53
  • 24. Apprenticeship latest the market is not saturated ‒ 200,000 of 4 million workplaces with Apprentices ‒ UKCES –under 30% of all employers had funded or arranged training leading to a recognised qualification 2011. ‒ Market analysis e.g. FTSE 100 and Times Top 100 reveals many household brands without Apprenticeships ‒ Under penetrated sectors e.g. I.T, Retail and London & SE in general ‒ Emerging sectors e.g. professional and business services need the concept of Apprenticeships „sold‟ to them 54
  • 25. Employer Satisfaction - Business Benefits Anticipated benefits – 2011/12 Subtitle here • Improve or maintain skills • Train people as employer wants • Improve productivity • Social responsibility • Create diverse workforce 55 Benefits experienced 2011/12 • • • • • 72% Improved productivity 69% Improved staff morale 67% Improved product or service quality 66% Improved image in sector 65% Improved retention Anticipated benefits – 2012/13 Benefits experienced 2012/13 •Improve product or service quality •Improve productivity •Improve staff retention •Improve ability to attract good staff • 72% Improved product or service quality • 68% Improved productivity • 67% Improved staff morale • 60% Improved retention Anticipated and realised benefits remain high and are increasingly well matched Based on 4,000 completed responses surveys published summer 2012 & 2013 (BIS website) National Apprenticeship Service
  • 26. All Employer Satisfaction – Ability to Influence 56 The ability to influence the structure, content, delivery or duration of the Apprenticeship training before or during the Apprenticeship training 2012/13 (2011/12 figure in brackets) • 50% of employers reported they had the ability to influence before training (55%) • 58% of employers reported they had the ability to influence during training (60%) • 67% of employers reported they had the ability to influence during or before (69%) • 33% of employers reported they did not have the ability to influence training (31%) Introduction of minimum durations and other measures may have reduced employer influence. This was not the intention or the future direction,, Based on 4,000 completed responses surveys published summer 2012 & 2013 (BIS website) National Apprenticeship Service
  • 27. Grant holding experience versus Provider led 57 • Grant holding employers (approximately 70) hold a funding contract with the SFA • They often use providers for some or all of their Apprenticeship • But their experiences are generally more positive Grant holders tell us that they: • experience greater influence and control over the quality, content and structure of their Apprenticeship training • find it easier expansion of the programme to others areas of the business • provide a broader range of learning, internal, e-learning, mentoring etc • feel they have ownership over the delivery model and assessment methods When using a provider the employer-provider relationship is rebalanced towards the employer – as the employer is the informed purchased National Apprenticeship Service
  • 28. Large Employer Intentions Surveys… April & October 58 16-18 Recruitment 2 out of 3 respondents are intending to recruit 16-18 year olds in the next 12 months. An increase of 15% from April Traineeships Nearly half of responders are planning to offer Traineeships this year Higher Apprenticeships 92% of respondents say they know about Higher Apprenticeships, 50 % planning to offer Higher Apprenticeships in their business Based on responses from 201 of the biggest 250 employers of Apprentices in England National Apprenticeship Service
  • 29. 59 Reform After several reviews and consultations,,,, We have now reached a point where we can start to plan for the future Government plans to put employers in control but will still need Providers / Colleges! National Apprenticeship Service
  • 30. 60 How will we deliver the reforms? Trailblazer projects are leading the way in implementing the reforms. Trailblazers are led by employers and will involve both large and small businesses and professional bodies. They will lead the way in developing new Apprenticeship standards and assessment approaches. This will build on what already exists to ensure that professionalism and quality in training are the primary focus.
  • 31. What are your plans for Trailblazers? 61 Our first Trailblazers are in the following sectors: Aerospace Automotive Digital Industries Electrotechnical Energy & Utilities Financial Services Food and Drink Manufacturing Life &Industrial Sciences More than 70 organisations are already involved in the first phase of Trailblazer projects. They took on over 13,00 apprenticeship starts in 2011/12.
  • 32. What is the timetable for reform? The Trailblazers will pave the way for full implementation of the reforms during 2015/16 and 2016/17. The aim is that all new Apprenticeship starts from 2017/18 will be on the new programme. As the new standards are developed and agreed, we will cease funding Apprenticeships under former frameworks. Apprenticeship funding will go to employers to spend at Providers Details in December,,, 62
  • 33. Apprenticeship Developments in the Skills Landscape – Progress in the Region and Implications for Providers - Mickey Burke, Head of Area Relationship Team, Black Country, Telford and Wrekin, Skills Funding Agency
  • 34. Apprenticeship Developments in the Skills Landscape: Progress in the Region and Implications for Providers Mickey Burke - Head of Area Relationship Team 64
  • 35. Apprenticeship Developments in the Skills Landscape: Opportunities and Challenges for us all Mickey Burke - Head of Area Relationship Team 65
  • 36. Agenda: 1. Back to the Future…. 2. Progress and Opportunities 3. Challenges 4. Making it happen… 66
  • 37. 1. Back to the Future Speaking at the apprenticeships launch, education and skills secretary (?) promised that employers would be in the driving seat in terms of the design and development of apprenticeships which would offer a major boost to business and productivity. He added: 'Apprenticeships are one of the best ways we can fill our skills gaps. „ The chancellor of the exchequer (?) commented: 'The government is strongly committed to expanding and improving the apprenticeship programme in this country ... We must work in partnership…to ensure that even more businesses and even more young people are benefiting ….” 67
  • 38. 2. Progress and opportunities • • • • • • • • Apprenticeship Numbers are up!!! Success rates are up Focus on quality Greater Flexibilities National Apprenticeship Service Additional funding LEPS Localism 68
  • 39. 3. Challenges: • • • • • • Employer Engagement! The Employer Proposition Competing challenges IAG Complexity ? Working in Partnership; Collective BC „locality‟ response • Lessons Learned… 69
  • 40. 4. Making it happen… • • • • • What can you do? What can we all do? How can you engage How can you effect change? Two things to take way from today and implement….what will they be? “Government can provide opportunity. But opportunity means nothing unless people are prepared to seize it.” 70
  • 41. Coffee! 71
  • 42. Break
  • 43. Apprenticeships in the Context of Labour Market Developments – Professor Lorna Unwin, Institute of Education, University of London
  • 44. Apprenticeship and the Labour Market Professor Lorna Unwin Black Country Learning Partnership and LEP Conference 2013 l.unwin@ioe.ac.uk www.llakes.org.uk
  • 45. Apprenticeship Starts 2012/13 (2011/12) Data Service Health & Social Care Business Admin Management Customer Service Hospitality & Catering Children‟s Care, L&D Retail Hairdressing Industrial Applications Engineering 78,400 (70,820) 48,270 (44,550) 46,140 (44,980) 44,620 (59,090) 34,590 (35,540) 25,570 (25,840) 24,770 (31,240) 15,090 (16,610) 14,310 (18,800) 13,270 (13,280)
  • 46. West Midlands Starts 2012/13(Data Service) Level 2 Level 3 Higher Under 19 8,750 3,530 90 19-24 11,580 7,530 340 25+ 14,850 13,230 1,300
  • 47. Everywhere is Somebody‟s Workplace • What is YOUR WORKPLACE like as a learning environment? • Why are some workplaces more conducive to learning? • Why does quality of apprenticeships vary so much? • Is the apprenticeship model of learning suitable for every workplace and every sector?
  • 48. Worlds within worlds: how can the potential of the workplace be unlocked?
  • 49. Expansive-Restrictive Continuum • Every workplace (public and private sectors all sizes) is part of a productive system • Workplaces extend across an „expansiverestrictive‟ continuum as learning environments • Apprenticeships reflect the nature of the workplace as well as the sector • Employers, providers and other partners need strategies for being „more expansive‟
  • 50. Structures of Production „Owners‟ (Public or Private) Regulation Head Office Product Market Regional/Local Managers Technological Change Employees
  • 51. Apprenticeship aligns business & personal goals Learning/training seen as an „event‟ Dual status: learner & worker Existing skills accredited - fast track Boundary crossing internal & external Confined to immediate job - isolated Off-the-job promotes deeper learning Off-the-job limited to completing portfolio Vehicle for wider workforce development Bolted on - detached
  • 52. Stimulating Demand • Apprenticeship portrayed as employability programme - focus on youth • „Sold‟ as a „product‟ not as a model of skill formation • Re-position apprenticeship as a key strategy for business sustainability and growth - workforce development • Make employer support a priority • Maximise opportunities for sharing resources/sites/expertise
  • 53. Panel Q & A
  • 54. Lunch
  • 55. Apprenticeship Developments – A View from the West Midlands Training Provider Network – Chris Luty, Executive Director, BCTG Ltd
  • 56. West Midlands Training Provider Network
  • 57. Who Are WMTPN?  Representing over 400 Providers in eight sub-regions  Walsall Association  Sandwell Association  Dudley Association  Wolverhampton Association  Birmingham & Solihull  Coventry & Warwickshire  Hereford & Worcester  Shropshire, Telford & Wrekin  Staffordshire
  • 58. What We Do  Help communicate regional/National policy into local actions through     LEP Apprenticeship Plans Promoting apprenticeship take up with employers and young people Linking with regional stakeholders – DWP, SFA, NAS, AELP, NCS In practice this means      Representing Private Providers at World Skills regionally to encourage take up of skills competitions Manage NAS projects to promote Apprenticeship take up totalling £300,000 Providing over 15,000 Have a Go skills tasters for young people Reducing learners travel costs to encourage participation Making collective responses to consultations
  • 59. How Do We Do It?   WMTPN Members nominated by their local networks Members leading in seven Champions Areas         Skills Funding Agency / National Apprenticeship Service World Skills Education Funding Agency DWP and Job Centre Plus Local Enterprise Partnership & Education Skills Boards National Careers Service ESF Not Only Apprenticeship Provision     Programmes for the Unemployed Traineeships Study Programme 24+ Advanced Learning Loans
  • 60. Apprenticeships in the Black Country  12,390 Apprenticeship starts at Intermediate or Advanced Level in 2012/13 including   Increasing numbers of Providers delivering in subregion    2203 - Health & Social Care, 1155 – Management and 1- Farriery 274 Different Providers delivering Intermediate Courses 244 Different Providers delivering Advanced Courses Black Country Provider Network    A core of 60+ Providers with facilities and larger numbers locally Quarterly briefing events Private Provider representation at LEP Education Skills Board
  • 61. The Unknowns For Us All!  24+ Advanced Learning Loans     Challenging for Private Providers – VAT, Advanced & Higher Apprenticeship take up a concern The learner as the real customer Are we really delivering what they want, when they want it? Apprenticeship Reform   Proposals to place Apprenticeship Funding directly with employers May work for larger employers, but risks disengaging SME employers For More Information Visit - www.wmtpn.com
  • 62. Apprenticeship Division, Skills Funding Agency - Dan Baker, Business Development Manager
  • 63. Higher Apprenticeships Presented by Dan Baker 29 November 2013
  • 64. Background to Higher Apprenticeships Higher Apprenticeships were introduced in response to employer demand for Higher Level Skills and to give Apprenticeships some parity with academic Programmes. Higher Apprenticeships are critical to the economy: • They respond to employers‟ higher level skill needs • Support business growth • Meet individuals‟ career aspirations and • Enhance opportunities for social mobility Government made higher Apprenticeships a key part of its plan for growth in March 2011 Originally SASE frameworks were capped at Level 5. Following consultation that cap has now been removed and Apprenticeship frameworks have been developed that are equivalent to Masters Level (Level 7) 95 | Presentation title – 00/00/2012
  • 65. Numbers of Higher Apprenticeships Total Numbers for England Less than 100 starts in 2007/08 Less than 200 Starts in 2008/09 Around 1,500 Starts in 2009/10 (on Approximately 6 Frameworks) Around 2,200 Starts in 2010/11 Around 3,700 Starts in 2011/12 Around 8,900 Starts in 2012/13 Strong growth but Government wants a step change increase in HA‟s David Cameron announced the Higher Apprenticeship Fund in 2011. 96 | Presentation title – 00/00/2012
  • 66. Numbers of Higher Apprenticeships Black Country residents 0 starts in 2007/08 0 Starts in 2008/09 Around 40 Starts in 2009/10 Around 50 Starts in 2010/11 Around 120 Starts in 2011/12 Around 290 Starts in 2012/13 Massive growth in percentage terms but small proportion of the overall @13,000 Apprenticeship starts in the Black Country 97 | Presentation title – 00/00/2012
  • 67. Higher Apprenticeship Fund Government ambition to invest £25 million in the creation of an additional 23,000 Higher Apprenticeships over the lifetime of the parliament (By May 2015). Rationale for the investment – it works – for every £1 the government invests in Apprenticeships there is a net return to the economy of £18 (increased productivity and output, economic growth, lower spending on welfare etc). Return is greater at Higher levels. Investment has meant that in 2013 we now have more than 40 Higher Apprenticeship Frameworks with more in development across a diverse range of sectors. Developments with professional bodies to link HA‟s to entry to some of the professions. (eg Accountancy, Banking, Engineering etc) 98 | Presentation title – 00/00/2012
  • 68. Full List of HA‟s Full List of Higher Apprenticeship Frameworks available in 2013: * denotes still in development Accounting Advanced Manufacturing Engineering L4 Advertising and Marketing Communications Agriculture Banking Business and Administration Business, Innovation and Growth Care Leadership and Management Commercial Airline Piloting* Construction Technical and Professional Contact Centre Operations Creative and Digital Media: Interactive Media* Employment Related Services Engineering Environmental Technologies* Express Logistics Facilities Management Fashion and Textiles (Technical) Food and Drink Hospitality Management Human Resource Management Insurance IT, Software, Web and Telecoms Professionals Legal Services* 99 | Presentation title – 00/00/2012
  • 69. Full List of HA‟s Continued Life Sciences Management Power Engineering (Utilities Engineering Operations)* Professional Services: Audit, Accountancy, Tax* Professional Services: Audit, Tax, Management Consultancy Project Management Providing Financial Advice Public Relations Retail Management* Space Engineering* Supply Chain Management Sustainable Building Technologies* Sustainable Resource Management* The Water Industry (Systems Operation and Management / Waste Management Water) The Water Industry (Utilities Network Management) Vehicle Maintenance and Repair* Work based learning for Practitioners* 100 | Presentation title – 00/00/2012
  • 70. The Richard Review / Apprenticeship Implementation Plan Government Implementation Plan now published some key points 1. Move to employer ownership of apprenticeship and its delivery (including funding direct to the employer) 2. Apprenticeship Standards will be one page documents set by industry and replace frameworks. Levels also set by industry related to job roles (will include highers) 3. Focus on outcomes not content or process (end test carried out independently) 4. Narrowing of definition of apprenticeships – Government will set small number of mandatory criteria. 5. Competency demonstrated through independent assessment. 6. Good IAG and awareness raising needed – better data sharing to inform 101 | Presentation title – 00/00/2012 choice.
  • 71. Resources Apprenticeship website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/News-Media/LatestNews/~/~/link.aspx?_id=C0E72E74DA424B6BBBE56BED93FA16A3&_z=z Apprenticeship Vacancies Higher Apprenticeships advertised here https://apprenticeshipvacancymatchingservice.lsc.gov.uk/navms/Forms/Candidate/Apprenticeships.aspx Apprenticeship Frameworks Online – search for full framework specs and ones in development by sector / level etc http://www.afo.sscalliance.org/ Youtube clip on HA‟s http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DG3PqhU5prM&feature=youtu.be Learning Aims Reference Application (check if HA is funded) https://gateway.imservices.org.uk/sites/lara/Pages/Welcome.aspx 102 | Presentation title – 00/00/2012
  • 72. Workshops 1, Higher Apprenticeships – Case Studies – Adult Care Sector and Food and Beverage Industries Paul Kitchen, Business Services Team – University College Birmingham 2. Apprenticeships and Higher Apprenticeships – Market Positioning – a case study of Applied Science Technicians Penny Riddle, Business Development Director – Halesowen College 3. Business Benefits of Taking on an Apprentice – The Employer View – Colin Parker, Director, Black Country Skills Factory
  • 73. BCPL/BCLEP Apprenticeship Conference Higher Level Apprenticeships University College Birmingham BCPL/BCLEP Apprenticeship Conference
  • 74. Higher Level Apprenticeships • 2011 – there were 2100 Higher Apprentices • 2015 – planned increase to 19,000 • Employers working with professional bodies and providers BCPL/BCLEP Apprenticeship Conference
  • 75. Higher Level Apprenticeships • Employer Led and Work Based • Must have parity with existing Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) • Developers are encouraged to use QCF, FHEQ,HE Qualifications and use Professional Body recognition even though these might not be credit bearing in themselves • Minimum credit value increased to 90 credits for level4/5 and 120 for level6/7 (10 hours per credit) BCPL/BCLEP Apprenticeship Conference
  • 76. Higher Level Apprenticeships As long as : • Meet the employer skills requirements • Support individual learners to maximise their potential and particularly act as a basis for progression to the next level of learning associated with job role • Offers employers the opportunity to develop occupational competencies and technical knowledge at degree level to undertake defined job roles BCPL/BCLEP Apprenticeship Conference
  • 77. Accounting Advanced Manufacturing Engineering L4 Advertising and Marketing Communications Agriculture Banking Business and Administration Business, Innovation and Growth Care Leadership and Management Commercial Airline Piloting* Construction Technical and Professional Contact Centre Operations Creative and Digital Media: Interactive Media* Employment Related Services Engineering Environmental Technologies* Express Logistics Facilities Management Fashion and Textiles (Technical) Food and Drink Hospitality Management Human Resource Management Insurance IT, Software, Web and Telecoms Professionals Legal Services* Life Sciences BCPL/BCLEP Apprenticeship Conference • Management Power Engineering (Utilities Engineering Operations)* Professional Services: Audit, Accountancy, Tax* Professional Services: Audit, Tax, Management Consultancy Project Management Providing Financial Advice Public Relations Retail Management* Space Engineering* Supply Chain Management Sustainable Building Technologies* Sustainable Resource Management* The Water Industry (Systems Operation and Management / Waste Management Water) The Water Industry (Utilities Network Management) Vehicle Maintenance and Repair* Work based learning for Practitioners*
  • 78. Existing Frameworks Current Frameworks have until April 2014 to meet the new SASE requirements (The Specification of Apprenticeship Standards for England (SASE) sets out the minimum requirements to be included in a recognised English Framework. Compliance with the SASE is a statutory requirement of the Apprenticeships, Skills, Children and Learning (ASCL) Act.) No longer mandatory for HLA: Employer Roles and Responsibilities Functional Skills Personal Learning and thinking skills Optional elements will no longer count towards the credit value for a framework and funding will not be available BCPL/BCLEP Apprenticeship Conference
  • 79. Professional Qualifications • Non Credit bearing Professional Body Qualifications • Encouraged to use these as part of the framework • Developers will need to ensure a nominal credit value is assigned and this is supported by the various bodies involved in order for it to be understood in the framework • Where combined qualifications are used they will have to be NOS compliant BCPL/BCLEP Apprenticeship Conference
  • 80. Funding • Employer contribution • Adult Learning Loans • Student Loans *Providers who may already be NVQ approved will have to go through another Quality Approval Process (QAP) BCPL/BCLEP Apprenticeship Conference
  • 81. Provision at UCB  Two Higher Apprenticeships Hospitality Management Level 4 Care Leadership and Management Level 5 BCPL/BCLEP Apprenticeship Conference
  • 82. Hospitality Management Level 4  Diploma - skills  Principles – knowledge Job roles:  Hospitality Manager  Head of Department  Kitchen Manager  Head/Executive Chef  Front Office/Reception Manager  Accommodation Manager  Housekeeping Manager  Food & Beverage/Restaurant/Bar Manager BCPL/BCLEP Apprenticeship Conference
  • 83. Care Leadership and Management Level 5  Diploma – skills & knowledge Job roles:  Adults’ Residential Management  Adults’ Management  Adult’s Advanced Practice  Specialist Pathways • Business Development & Enterprise • Learning Disabilities BCPL/BCLEP Apprenticeship Conference
  • 84. Delivery Methods • Assessor visits for competency elements • Knowledge delivery once per week • Combination and flexibility to workplace • Capacity building for employers/mentors/coaches/ • Increased online ,block, workplace BCPL/BCLEP Apprenticeship Conference
  • 85. Future Richards review Future of Apprenticeships in England. Implementation Plan • Standards designed by employers • Standards replacing current frameworks and will be very short • Single approach to assessment which employers and professional bodies will develop • Assessment at the end of programme with synoptic element to the end-point assessment • Apprenticeships will be graded BCPL/BCLEP Apprenticeship Conference
  • 86. Delivery Methods • Assessor visits for competency elements • Knowledge delivery once per week • Combination and flexibility to workplace • Capacity building for employers/mentors/coaches/ • Increased online ,block, workplace BCPL/BCLEP Apprenticeship Conference
  • 87. Paul Kitchen p.kitchen@ucb.ac.uk Sector Skills Alliance www.afo.sscalliance.org BCPL/BCLEP Apprenticeship Conference
  • 88. Penny Riddle Business Development Director Halesowen College
  • 89. » HE fees putting off a significant number of learners from progressing to university. » Parents’ reluctance for their children to get into debt. » Graduate unemployment rates in the West Midlands. » Limited opportunities for 3 leavers to progress – other than into HE.
  • 90. » Curriculum development at L4/5 must lead to an employment outcome. » The light bulb moment: the HNC in Computing that we planned to introduce was the knowledge component of the Higher Apprenticeship for IT, Software, Web and Telecoms Professionals.
  • 91. » Grades required to study Sciences at universities have increased. » Market research showed a demand for technicians in companies in the Black Country. » Employers indicated difficulties in recruiting technicians: » No local apprenticeship at the required level » Graduates’ practical laboratory skills not good enough and salary expectations too high.
  • 92. » Knowledge component: HNC in Applied Biology or Applied Chemistry » Skills component: Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Laboratory and Associated Activities. » Progression to more specific Higher Apprenticeships planned for 2015.
  • 93. » Future of Apprenticeships in England: Implementation Plan: » 8 Trailblazer Projects set up » Includes a project on Life Sciences and Industrial Science
  • 94. SKILLS FACTORY Presentation Heading (Arial 36pt) Date/ Sub Heading (Arial 18pt) Business Benefits of an Apprenticeship
  • 95. Colin Parker - Profile Colin Parker - Black Country Skills Factory Director Industry Experience 30+ years in automotive component industry in West Midlands (Lucas, Perkins, Denso, Honda, TRW, Arrk), Roles in Plant Management, General Management & Operations. Range of company (site) size 1,500 employees  100 employees Range of management styles Japanese, US, UK Range of sites with and without Apprentice schemes. (since mar 201
  • 96. High Value Manufacturing Skills Crisis Black Country Manufacturing is facing a Skills “Double-Whammy 1st - Whammy 1. Despite High Unemployment in the region, Engineering employers report :- “Unable to recruit suitably skilled staff to fill our vacancies” The Black Country Consortium i54 Enterprise Zone Skill Report :- “ 15 broad classifications of Skills shortage reported by Black Country high value manufacturing companies”
  • 97. High Value Manufacturing Skills Crisis 2nd - Whammy Skilled Workforce Age Distribution %age of workforce in age group 25 20 Ideal „Even‟ age distribution More than 50% skilled workforce over 50 High value manufacturing employers need to take action NOW to minimise Demographic the increase in the„Time Bomb‟ crisis skills 15 Ideal 10 Typical 5 0 20 - 25 26 - 30 31 - 35 36 - 40 41 - 45 46 - 50 51 - 55 56 - 60 61 - 65 Age Large proportion of skilled workforce will retire in the next few years
  • 98. High Value Manufacturing Skills Crisis 2 Options. 1. Recruit externally (at an ever increasing cost) those with existing skills 2. Develop the existing workforce through up-skilling and “grow your own” X
  • 99. Business Benefits of Apprenticeship Apprenticeship Case Study Production Maintenance Technicians Business Situation in 1998  Undergone Rapid Business Expansion £0  £125m in 6 years Growth forecast to continue year on year.  High technology equipment across multiple shifts  Struggling to achieve breakdown targets  Maintenance employees 0  25 in 6 years Difficult to recruit qualified technicians  Maintenance labour turnover 30%
  • 100. Business Benefits of Apprenticeship Vicious Circle Lack of Job Satisfaction + Pressure Overtime Shift Premium Increase in working hours  Additional shift patterns introduced  High and sustained overtime Technician Leaves Company PRODUCTION OUTPUT PRESSURE Externally recruit (compromise on quality?) Recruitment Many Additional Costs Costs No time / availability for Not Achieving Customer Expectations training Loss of Productivity  lack of output Special Transport (due to lack of familiarity with equipment  Slow fixing of breakdowns Additional  Mis-diagnosis of faults Spare Parts  mistakes causing additional problems Needed to break the vicious circle.
  • 101. Business Benefits of Apprenticeship Production Maintenance Technician Apprentice Program  Started 2 or 3 apprentices per year (over a 6 - 7 year period)  Apprenticeships lasted 4 years (new  level 2  level 3  additional training)  Undertook mix of both Craft and Technician Apprenticeships (C&G + BTEC routes) Undertook mix of Mechanical and Electrical Maintenance Apprenticeships  Used Block release and Day release method of off-the-job training  Recruited apprentices through own external advertising, plant tour and interview assessment  Created program of additional specific off-job training required over and above the requirements of the apprenticeship qualification.
  • 102. Business Benefits of Apprenticeship Production Maintenance Technician Apprentice Program Key points for Successful Apprenticeships.  Apprentices were treated as “Additional” Headcount on Shift headcount planning (They were seen as extra „benefit‟ by others on the shift.)  Apprentices assigned to the Shift Team Leader to ensure proper on-the-job training  Apprentices periodically rotated around different sections in the plant (for future flexibility and continuous learning + boredom prevention)  Independent Apprentice Mentor designated (originally HR person  ex- Apprentice after 5 years)  Regular formal review with apprentice by college, manager and mentor
  • 103. Business Benefits of Apprenticeship Production Maintenance Technician Apprentice Program Results - 7 years later.  Company Sales growth Achieved  25 % of Production Maintenance Department are ex- Apprentices  Only 1 Apprentice drop-out during apprenticeship (competitive and thorough selection process)  Major reduction in Labour Turnover of maintenance technicians External 30%  18% Apprentices n/a  5% Good News - BUT Why was Apprentice Labour turnover much lower than Externally Recruited Technicians ?
  • 104. Business Benefits of Apprenticeship Organisational Culture All Organisations have their own Culture (Values, Attitudes, Behaviours, Norms) A Successful Employee :1) Has required skills / able to learn required future skills 2) Shares the Values, Attitudes, Behaviours & Norms Mainly in-built Difficult to change/influence Conditioned by previous experience Has learned “What is Normal” over working life. Hard to unlearn  causes job dis-satisfaction Hidden at interview Business Benefits of Apprenticeships Need to find Apprentices are a blank canvas = Lower Labour Turnover experience) (Not Conditioned by much previous  Chance to learn “What is Normal” + better „fit‟ team member in your company Better & happier team member
  • 105. Business Benefits of Apprenticeship My Lessons / Advice regarding Engineering Apprenticeships Great Benefits to the Company  Right Skills  Right Culture (Attitude & Behaviours)  Lower Labour turnover = improved Productivity + Lower costs = improved Profitability + Competitiveness BUT This is a long term Investment  Don‟t do it cheap (you need to attract the right calibre of person)  Don‟t do it for a quick fix or to deliver a quick result.  Need to invest plenty of your staff time in delivering appropriate on-job training.  Need to keep investing in them throughout and AFTER their apprenticeship. People are loyal if they can see career progression (not necessarily money) (e.g. more skill, more responsibility, more interest)
  • 106. The Black Country Skills Factory: – is an employer -led education & training collaboration being coordinated by the Black Country Consortium Ltd with pump prime funding from UKCES. Objective :To address the current skills shortfall in the High Value Manufacturing sector (HVM) in the Black Country for both large and small employers.
  • 107. The 4 Activity Strands STRANDS MAIN PURPOSE Up-skilling of Existing Workforce Counteract ageing workforce. Reflect new technology. 2 Apprenticeships Penetrate into SME’s 3 School Engagement Increase pipeline of people wanting to enter into the HVM sector. 4 Skills Factory Profile First point of contact for skills in HVM 1
  • 108. SKILLS FACTORY : Up-Skilling “Voice” of the Employer (> 70 employers directly engaged) 1) Delivery method - “Bite-sized” practical training in specific topics. (Right content, trainer and equipment) 2) Priority skills shortage areas identified :Maintenance Multiskilling Results to date Welding 184 training days completed CNC Machining 22 companies participated Foundry Skills Tool Making Skills Factory subsidy 30% of Employers Training
  • 109. Apprentice Wage Subsidy Skills Factory Apprentice Wage Subsidies 21-Nov-13 for Engineering Apprenticeships in Black Country High Value Manufacturing Companies. Level 2 Performing Engineering Operations Apprenticeship Subsidie Age Minimum rate 16 - 17 (per hour) Skills Factory subsidy 18 - 20 21 + £3.72 £5.03 £6.31 £1,000 £1,250 £1,500 Conditions:1. SF wage subsidy only paid to companies who have not taken on a new apprentice in the last 12 months. SF wage subsidy will be in addition to the AGE grant (subject to eligibility criteria). 2. One level 2 apprentice subsidy per company. Paid after 13 weeks. 3. SF subsidy is conditional on a minimum hourly rate being paid to the apprentice over a minimum of a 35 hour week. Level 3 Engineering Apprenticeship SubsidiesNew for 2014 Age Minimum rate 16 - 17 (per hour) Skills Factory subsidy 18 - 20 21 + £3.72 £5.03 £6.31 £1,250 £1,250 £1,250 Conditions:1. SF wage subsidy paid to companies commencing a Level 3 Engineering apprentice after Jan 1st 2014.. (no restriction on previous history of apprenticeship starts) 2. One level 3 subsidy per company. Paid after 13 weeks. 3. SF subsidy is conditional on a minimum hourly rate being paid to the apprentice over a minimum of a 35 hour week. Enquire via
  • 110. SKILLS FACTORY : Apprenticeships Results to date :18 Black Country SME‟s have received Subsidy “We have taken an apprentice for the 1st time to support our future growth. The Skills Factory Subsidy really helps a small business in the early stages of the apprenticeship to offset the training costs and lack of output.” Paul Reeves – Partner 3DT Tooling Ltd 1st Subsidised Apprentice 3DT Tooling Ltd
  • 111. SKILLS FACTORY : Schools Aim Increase the number of people wishing to consider hvm as a career choice Activities :- Engagements with schools (both staff & pupils) Skills Challenge Teacher Industry Placement days Careers Fairs Visits to Industry Work Placements Skills Factory Schools Challenge 7th November 12 Schools – 100 pupils – 11 employers
  • 112. CONTACT DETAILS: www. BlackCountrySkillsFactory.co.uk PROJECT DIRECTOR Colin Parker - 07944 268709 Colin_Parker@blackcountryconsortium.co.uk
  • 113. Panel and Plenary Session – Q & A from floor on the inputs above followed by summing up Slides and related information will be available on the BCPL website www.bcpl.org.uk Thank you