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Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
Xmas dust presentation
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Xmas dust presentation

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Talk by Frances Bailey HM Construction Inspector to MCSA on 11th dec 2013

Talk by Frances Bailey HM Construction Inspector to MCSA on 11th dec 2013

Published in: Education, Health & Medicine
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Transcript

  • 1. Health and Safety Health and Safety Executive Executive Management of Health Risks in Construction Frances Bailey Construction Inspector HSE Nottingham
  • 2. Managing Health Risks in Construction Aim of this session: • Raise awareness of occupational health risks • Focus on construction dust • Outline control measures • Explain HSE priorities • Signpost further information
  • 3. So… safety…. Vs.
  • 4. Deaths from ill-health
  • 5. Construction Division Workplan Aim to treat health like safety: • Target Directors, Managers, CDM Coordinators, PCs and Contractors Focus on most common health risks: • Respiratory risks, manual handling, noise, vibration & skin exposure • Proper welfare provision as a control measure
  • 6. Construction Division Workplan • Respiratory risk a top 5 HSE Inspection Topic • Others are: – Work at Height – Welfare – Good Order – Asbestos
  • 7. Construction Division Workplan This years HSE visit priorities include: • • • • Asbestos Construction dust Other respiratory risk Valley tile cutting
  • 8. “It’s only dust you know!”
  • 9. How can it harm me? Airways: – Inhalable – Respirable • Different dusts affect the airways in different ways
  • 10. How can it harm me? Construction dust can cause serious lung diseases: • • • • • Lung Cancer Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Pneumoconiosis (including silicosis) Asthma: Occupational and Work Aggravated Reduced lung function
  • 11. How can it harm me? • Over 50% of new cancer case are in construction workers
  • 12. How can it harm me? • • • Few develop quickly – acute silicosis • By the time you notice it may be too late to do anything about it Most take a long time – years Regularly breathing small amounts adds up over the years > Important to control every single exposure
  • 13. How can it harm me? Statistics are imprecise: • • 500+ silica related deaths in 2004 – 10 a week • Construction workers 2-3 times greater risk of COPD • Other research backs up link between construction work and lung disease • Reduced quality of life and shorter working life Silica is the second most important cause of occupational lung cancer after asbestos
  • 14. How Much is a Problem?
  • 15. How much dust is a problem? • Depends upon – Amount of dust – Size of the dust particles – Type of dust
  • 16. How Much is a Problem? COSHH sets WEL for dust: General Dust • • 10 mg.m-3 (inhalable) 4 mg.m-3 (respirable) Respirable Silica • 0.1 mg.m-3 (8-hour TWA)
  • 17. How much dust is a problem?
  • 18. Silica High Risk Tasks • Some Tasks ALWAYS produce very high levels: – Cut-off saws – Grinders – Chasers – Grit Blasting
  • 19. Control Duty Re 7(1) COSHH requires: • Prevent exposure to employees where reasonably practicable: – Overriding duty – Do this by substitution – Eliminates or reduces risk – Links in with designer duty under CDM
  • 20. Control Duty • • Employer duty • • • First duty to prevent exposure • Control proportionate to the risks Principal Contractor will have a role in certain circumstances Otherwise adequately control RPE is an additional back up measure / not an alternative unless not reasonably practicable
  • 21. Elimination • • Work Processes Design out dusty process
  • 22. Control at Source • Water Suppression
  • 23. Control at Source • On-Tool Extraction
  • 24. Hilti DRS improves customer productivity Tool Lifetime Inhalable Dust [mg/m3] up to -9 9% no DRS o pt u % 60 + no DRS [mg/m 3] to -9 9% no DRS Worker Protection up up 0 +2 to % no DRS Cleaning Effort Consumable Lifetime* Respirable Dust up Application Speed 0% +2 to no DRS Longer Lifetime up to – 15 kg /h no DRS Labour Time Savings Results may differ based on operator technique, specific application, and tool/accessory condition. The need for additional measures must be evaluated by the responsible health and safety personnel on site.
  • 25. RPE • • Controls are not 100% effective RPE is still needed for high risk tasks – Silica – Wood – High levels of low toxicity dust Face fit testing will be required
  • 26. FFP3 - Disposable Manufacturer product no. European Standard Class of Respirator: FFP3 Conformity mark & Notified Body
  • 27. Facial hair - stubble One day stubble Few days stubble Face mask Face mask stubble Wearer’s face Short hairs act like stilts and hold the mask away from the face Wearer’s face Longer hairs tend to lay flatter than short hair
  • 28. Worker Involvement • • Training is key Engagement http://www.hse.gov.uk/construction/lwit/index.htm
  • 29. Health and Safety Executive RPE – Employee Toolbox talk • Health and Safety Executive
  • 30. So why don't you? • • • • “I don’t think I need it” • • • • “I get too hot and uncomfortable” “It’s only a quick job” “My mate never wears it and is never ill” “I don’t like having to shave every day” “I can't breathe properly” “It makes it awkward to work” “It interferes with my other PPE”
  • 31. How do I fit my mask correctly? For Filtering Facepiece FFP Disposable mask) • • Clean shaven at start of shift Always check the fit before every use: – – – • Fit around the nose – adjust nose clip where applicable Fit around the chin The position of straps Carry out a “fit-check” (Images – probable changes of images to match leaflet in cartoon format accounting for diversity)
  • 32. COSHH General • Main duty on those that ‘control and own risk’ – Likely to be subcontractor • PC will have responsibility in some circumstances: – Co-ordination over water provision – ‘Person in control’ – Plan, manage and monitor construction phase – under CDM Not COSHH • Where a PC has appointed a competent contractor, they are not required to undertake detailed supervision
  • 33. Dust: Enforcement Increasing levels of enforcement: • • • • • • 13 Notices in 2008 – 2009 c.100 Notices issued in 2009 – 2010 c.100 notices issued again in 2010 -11 Continued WWT promotion Growing industry awareness SME’s remain a challenge
  • 34. Enforcement for dust Typical enforcement action: • PN for dry grit blasting, may prosecute if using sand • • • • PN for dry cutting, no water available IN for face fit testing IN for COSHH assessment dust IN for training/competence
  • 35. Construction Dust Partnership
  • 36. Summary • • • • • • Treat Health like Safety Construction dust; wood, silica etc Cancer, silicosis, COPD, asthma You have a duty to control exposure Regulations, guidance, advice HSE will take enforcement action
  • 37. Further information • • • • • • HSE website New COSHH ACOP (6th edition) Silica sheet CIS36 Dust control on cut off saws CIS54 Using cut off saws Indg461 Industry guidance tile cutting
  • 38. Silicosis video • • • Not a new hazard • Isn’t it about time we sorted this out in the 21st Century? Not a new illness Not new control measures
  • 39. Fee For Intervention • Duty holder leaflet
  • 40. Fee For Intervention • • • • • • Introduced 1st October 2012 FFI to be reviewed one year on Legacy work no fee Certain Regs no fee eg Fire Material Breach triggers fee NoC Notification of Contravention
  • 41. Fee For Intervention • • • • • Site and office time charged until resolved Invoices – every 2 months FFI queries handled centrally Investigations may trigger FFI Multi Duty Holders and FFI – who pays?
  • 42. Fee For Intervention To avoid a large fee: • • • Good compliance in the first place And/or promptly rectify matters Cooperate and communicate with HSE
  • 43. Thank you & Merry Christmas

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