Ms3 development

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Ms3 development

  1. 1. MS3 Research Essay Moving Forward
  2. 2. • Learning objectives: to learn how to write a more developed draft of the research essay• Learning outcomes: to have clear set of new objectives to complete in preparation for the submission of a 2nd draft • EBI: you have started a 2nd draft and use the appropriate referencing for your secondary sources
  3. 3. What do the exam board want to see?• A clearly defined focus of study• Demonstration of independent research skills• The ability to evaluate the validity of research and apply it to your study
  4. 4. Starter• Create a spider diagram using the ‘research skills’ as a staring point to asses what you have achieved in your research
  5. 5. What next?The new draft! A list of requirements…• 1400-1800 words in length.• Have a clear title which must feature the word genre, narrative or representation in the title.• A depth in your work that clearly differentiates it from Y12 ‘analytical’ work.• Have a range of primary and secondary resources which demonstrate research methods.• Media terminology.• A bibliography of lists referred to (these must be clear and accurate.
  6. 6. • Checklist Clear focus area approved by teacher• Secondary sources collated and edited/highlighted• Secondary resources included in the draft with appropriate referencing: – Web/print articles – Books/Google Scholar – Journals/magazines (web/print) – Related programmes/documentaries (YouTube, DVD ‘special editions’ etc.)• Primary research included in the draft with appropriate referencing: – Questionnaires (quantitative: likert and semantic differential models) with responses collated – Focus group (qualitative) with answers recorded – Close analysis of key elements of key texts• 1st draft submitted and feedback received• 2nd draft submitted and mark given• 3rd draft submitted where required
  7. 7. ReferencingWhat is the point?• To give credit to the concepts and ideas of other authors.• To provide the reader (often the marker/examiner of the assignment) with evidence of the breadth of your reading.• To enable those who read your work to locate the cited references easily.
  8. 8. Plagiarism• Plagiarism is passing off the work of others as your own. This constitutes academic theft and is a serious matter which is penalised in assignment marking.• Making a clear reference will help you avoid this.
  9. 9. Footnotes• First reference: Author, title (underlined, or italics if available), place of publication, publisher, date, page reference.• Example: J. K. Nyerere, Freedom and Unity: A Selection from Writings and Speeches, 1952-65 (Nairobi: Oxford University Press, 1967) p.196.• Subsequent references: Author (surname only unless ambiguous), abbreviated title (underlined, or italics if available), page reference.• Example: Nyerere, Freedom and Unity, p. 50.
  10. 10. Referencing filmTitle. Year of release. [Medium]. Director. Country of origin: Film studio.ExampleMacbeth, 1948. [Film]. Directed by Orson Wells. USA: Republic Pictures.
  11. 11. Referencing TV broadcastsSeries title and episode name and number if relevant, Year of broadcast. [Medium] Broadcasting organisation and Channel, date and time of transmission.ExampleLittle Britain, 2006. [TV programme] BBC, BBC2, 30 January 2006 20.00.
  12. 12. Books (‘Google Scholar’ scans)When making reference to an author’s work in your text, their name is followed by the year of publication of their work, and page reference, in brackets (parentheses) and forms part of the sentence.Example:• Cormack (1994, pp.32-33) states that when writing for a professional readership, writers invariably make reference to already published works.• In general, when writing for a professional publication, it is good practice to make reference to other relevant published work. This view has been supported in the work of Cormack (1994, pp.32-33).
  13. 13. If you make reference to a work or piece of research without mentioning the author in the text then both the author’s name and publication year are placed at the relevant point in the sentence or at the end of the sentence in brackets:Making reference to published work appears to be characteristic of writing for a professional audience (Cormack, 1994).
  14. 14. Magazines and journals• For journal articles the required elements for a references are:Author, Initials., Year. Title of article. Full Title of Journal, Volume number (Issue/Part number), Page numbers.ExamplesBoughton, J.M., 2002. The Bretton Woods proposal: an in depth look. Political Science Quarterly, 42 (6), pp.564-78.Perry, C., 2001. What health care assistants know about clean hands. Nursing Times, 25 May, 97(22), pp.63-64.
  15. 15. WebsitesAuthorship or Source, Year. Title of web document or web page. [Medium](date of update)ExampleAvailable at: include web site address/URL(Uniform Resource Locator) and additional details such as access or routing from the home page of the source.[Accessed date].
  16. 16. On-line journalsFor journal articles from an electronic source the required elements for a reference are:• Author, Initials., Year. Title of article. Full Title of Journal, [type of medium] Volume number (Issue/Part number), Page numbers if availalble.• Available at: include web site address/URL(Uniform Resource Locator) and additional details of access, such as the routing from the home page of the source. [Accessed date].ExampleBoughton, J.M., 2002. The Bretton Woods proposal: an in depth look. Political Science Quarterly, [e-journal] 42 (6). Abstract only.Available at:BlackwellScienceSynergydatabasehttp://www.pol.upenn/articles, Blackwell Science Synergy[Accessed 12 June 2005].
  17. 17. Newspapers• For newspaper articles the required elements for a reference are:Author, Initials., Year. Title of article. Full Title of Newspaper,Day and month before page number and column line.ExampleSlapper, G., 2005. Corporate manslaughter: new issues for lawyers. The Times, 3 Sep. p. 4b.
  18. 18. For newspaper articles found in online newspapers, the required elements for a reference are:Author or corporate author, Year. Title of document or page. Name of newspaper, [type of medium] additional date information.Available at: include web site address/URL(Uniform Resource Locator) and additional details of access, such as the routing from the home page of the source.[Accessed date].ExampleChittenden, M., Rogers, L. & Smith, D., 2003. Focus: ‘Targetitis ails NHS. Times Online, [internet] 1 June.Available at: http://www.timesonline.co.uk/printFriendly/0,,11- 1506-669.html[Accessed 17 March 2005]. N.B. the URL should be underlined

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