Understanding  PTSD  in  Children
  
  
Causes  of  PTSD:  Any  dangerous  or  life  threatening  event.  
  (Including  a...
Optimal  Arousal  in  the  Class  Room    
1.  A  child  needs  to  be  awake  and  focused  enough  to  learn.  If  they ...
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The effects Childhood Trauma and PTSD on Education and Learning (Guide to Classroom Management)

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This hand out explores how PTSD effects children, their learning and their relationship with educators. It offers practical tools for educators to aid a student with trauma it learning. It is based of DSM-IV diagnosis.

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Transcript of "The effects Childhood Trauma and PTSD on Education and Learning (Guide to Classroom Management) "

  1. 1. Understanding  PTSD  in  Children     Causes  of  PTSD:  Any  dangerous  or  life  threatening  event.    (Including  assault,  rape,  sexual  abuse,  domestic  violence,     witnessing  violence,  war,  natural  disasters).       Symptoms  of  PTSD:  (Three  categories)    Upsetting  intrusive  thoughts,  memories   or  images  of  the  event,  feeling  as  if  one  were  reliving  the  event.  These   thoughts  can  distract  a  child  from  class  work.   A  state  of  increased  psychological  and     physiological  arousal.  The  child  can  be  easily  startled,  triggered  to   anger,  respond  to  even  small  threats  with  intense  fear  or  anger.  When  a   child  is  in  hyperarousal  they  have  trouble  learning,     tolerating  feedback  and  can  be  highly  irritable.       Loss  of  interest  in  life  and  pleasure;;   Feelings  of  “deadness”  or  “numbness”  and  distance  from     relationships.  The  child  can  feel  like  life  is  hopeless  and  doing  school   -­ nected  with  their  teacher.   Effects  on  Education   Children  with  PTSD  Display:  Disruptions  in  Attention,  Concentration,   connect  their  behaviors  with  outcomes.     Children  Display:  “Externalizing  behaviors.”  These  behaviors  can     negatively  impact  the  relationships  between  the  child  and  authority   -­ activity,  Aggressive  behaviors,  Impulsivity,  and  in  teens  Delinquency.     Critical  Concepts  in  Working   with  Kids  with  PTSD (Sooth  your  self  before  talking  to  the   child.  Kids  with  PTSD  are  sensitive  to   their  care  provider’s  emotions).    #2  -­  Use  positive  emotions  to  support   mastery  and  distress  tolerance     (Positive  emotions  reduce  stress,     increase  how  quickly  a  student  can  reduce   hyperarousal  and  control  their  behavior.) (Learning  can  be  stressful,  and  requires   a  child  to  tolerate  the  frustration  of  mak-­ ing  mistakes.  As  educators  you  can  provide   scaffolding  for  a  child’s  inability  to  regulate   emotions  with  your  ability  to  tolerate  and   normalize  their  mistakes.) #4  The  Attitude      Stay  calm  wear  the  poker  face. Stick  to  the  rules  while  remaining   kind  and  supportive.  Accept  the  child  fully     not  the  actions.  Your  empathy  helps  the  child   grow  empathy  for  others Enjoyment  is  key   for  a  child  with  trauma.  Curiosity  is  the   Hallmark  of  safety. Four  Skills  to  Work  w/  Children  w/  PTSD  Use  “The  attitude”  when  the  child  is   reaching  the  peak  of  their  ability  to  tolerate  a  task.   What  goes  up  must  come  down.  Don’t  act   until  both  you  and  the  child  are  calm.  This  will  insure  that  the  child  will  be   able  to  think  and  reason  about  their  behaviors. Step  1  -­  Validate  and  reassure  the  child,     Step  2  -­  Provide  the  feedback  about  the  child’s    behavior  in  a  neutral  manor   and  Step  3  -­  Validate  the  child  and  their  ability  to  handel    feedback  well.       calmly  your  request  and  validating  the  child.       1. Triggers are reminders of a traumatic event. 2. They can cause a child to flood with negative feelings. 3. Triggers can be nearly anything... A body posture, a vocal tone, a color, a sound, a smell. 4. Sometimes a child will be triggered and not know why they feel so scared or angry.
  2. 2. Optimal  Arousal  in  the  Class  Room     1.  A  child  needs  to  be  awake  and  focused  enough  to  learn.  If  they  are          “underaroused”  they  are  board  and  will  not  learn.     2.  There  is  an  optimal  zone  of  learning...  The  goldilocks  principal:  Not  too  relaxed,  not  too  excited...Just  right!       3.  Once  a  child  passes  the  optimal  arousal  level  the  child’s  front  brain  goes  off  line            and  they  begin  to  act  from  their  reptilian  brain.  At  this  point  they  are  only            focused  on  if  a  person  is  dangerous  or  safe.   4.  When  a  child  is  past  their  optimal  arousal  level  reasoning  will  not  work.  They            need  to  have  time  to  calm  down  before  their  ability  to  reason  will  be            available  again.   5.  You  can  help  in  many  ways  to  support  the  child  to  return  to  rest.   Understanding  Co-­Regulation     in  the  Classroom   Co-­regulation  is  regulation  of  emotions  through  the   interaction  with  another  person  or  animal. 1.  Teachers  emotions  effect  the  emotions  of  the            children  they  work  with.   2.  Students  emotions  effect  the  emotions  of  the            teachers  they  are  in  the  class  with.   3.  Soothing  yourself...  Sooths  the  class.... 4.  Key  ways  to  effect  a  child’s  emotions   a.  Body  language.  Choose  a  strong  but  non-­                              threatening  posture  that  communicates  that              the  child  is  safe.       b.  Vocal  tone.  Choose  an  appropriate  vocal                              tone.  Watch  the  impact  of  the  tone.  Change              your  tone  to  get  the  desired  impact.         Broaden  and  Build  Hypothesis Role  of  Positive  Emotions  in  Resilience 1.  Negative  emotions  are  aimed  at  removing  a            threat  in  the  short-­term.   2.  Positive  emotions  help  build  long-­term            strengths,  learn  new  skills  and  information.       3.  Positive  emotions  can  “undo”  the  impact  of        Negative  emotions.   4.  Children  with  PTSD  have  a  lack  of  positive          Emotions  (anhadonia)  and  more  negative            emotions.   5.  Children  thrive  at  an  11  -­  1  positive  to            negative  emotion  ratio.   6.  Positive  emotions  are  relatively  easy  to  evoke!  

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