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CNFJ/RJ Region Highlights
CNFJ/RJ Region Highlights
CNFJ/RJ Region Highlights
CNFJ/RJ Region Highlights
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CNFJ/RJ Region Highlights

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A by-weekly look around the region.

A by-weekly look around the region.

Published in: News & Politics
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  • 1. DiegoGarciaHeatsUpwithFirst-RateFireFightingTraining Master-At-ArmsEnjoyDogDaysofSummerinDiegoGarcia Published by Public Affiars Office Commander, Naval Force Japan/Navy Region Japan 81-315-243-7615 http://www.cnic.navy.mil/regions/cnrj.html By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Caine Storino DIEGO GARCIA, British Indian Ocean Territory (July 18,2013) Master-at-Arms (MA’s) Canine Handlers assigned to U.S. Navy Support Facility (NAVSUPPFAC) Diego Garcia Security Department conduct Military Working Dog (MWD) training. The MWD’s aboard NAVSUPPFAC are trained for Explosive Detection, said Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Scyler Livelsburger a canine handler assigned to NAVSUPPFAC. “The training that was conducted was to build up the dogs (prey drive) urge to hunt and find personnel,” said Livelsburger. “Also it was to build the dogs bite drive for when encountering hard targets.” MWD’s are vital to the Navy due to their many life saving skills which include explosive detection, narcotics DIEGO GARCIA, British Indian Ocean Territory (July 15, 2013) - Department of Defense, Contracted Fire fighters assigned to G4S Parsons Pacific, LLC fight a sunrise fire on a Mobile Aircraft Fire Training Device during a live-fire training exercise at the Air Terminal airstrip July 15, 2013. The fire fighters trained with the Mobile Aircraft Fire Training Device enabling them to meet Department of Defense and National Fire Protection Association certification and proficiency training requirements and remain mission ready while deployed to Navy Support Facility Diego Garcia. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Caine Storino) Page 1 Volume 1 Issue 2 detection and being an enemy deterrent. “They are very important to the Navy because we are a world wide deployable force,” said Livelsburger. “We get attached with joint forces around the world for explosive detection and narcotics detection. With us being (Department of Defense) trained we are utilized for customs and border protection in the states and abroad OCONUS locations. It is also a big physical determent towards personnel who try to harm Navy installations.” For Livelsburger, his dog Chucky is not just another tool for him to use. He is a partner and a friend. “I have a huge soft spot in my heart for my dog, he is definitely more than a tool to me; he is my partner,” said Livelsburger. “I’m with him 15-16 hours a day everyday and we mesh well together. He makes my worse days brighter; he is definitely a motivating factor to come to work everyday and hit it hard. All in all, he’s my best friend and an essential part to my life as a Master-at-Arms and Dog Handler.”
  • 2. USSPatriotandJMSDFSailorsParticipateinBilateralSportsDay OMINATO NAVAL BASE, Japan (July 24, 2013) Sailors from both USS Patriot (MCM 7) and the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force pose together following a bilateral sports day on board Ominato Naval Base, July 24, 2013. JMSDF’s Commander, Minesweeping Division 1 invited U.S. and Japanese Sailors from mine countermeasures ships to participate in the sports day. The ships are in northern Japan operating in a bilateral mine exercise off the coast of northern Japan. After the sporting events Sailors from both teams bowed to their counterparts in a show of good sportsmanship. (U.S. Navy photo by Senior Mass Communication Specialist Daniel Sanford/Released) ‘NoZebras’RaiseAwarenesswithProfoundPerformanceinYokosuka By MC3 Everett Allen, NPASE Japan YOKOSUKA, Japan – Sailors assigned to various Fleet Activities Yokosuka (FLEACT) commands attended a live performance to raise awareness of sexual assault and prevention, July 26. The performance, titled No Zebras, No Excuses, was performed by graduates of Central Michigan University in front of more than 300 Sailors. “It’s all about keeping people safe,” said Richard Bronson, a performer for No Zebras. “It’s about ending sexual assault from the point of bystander intervention. We want to convey that we are all responsible for each other’s safety and that victims are not to blame.” According to performers, the zebra is the perfect icon for the program. ExplosiveOrdnanceDisposalTeamConductsFastRopeExerciseDuringTS2013 CORAL SEA (July 19, 2013) Sailors assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 5 conduct a fast rope exercise by dropping from an MH-60S Seahawk from the “Golden Falcons” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 12 onto the flight deck of the U.S. Navy’s forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73) during an exercise in support of Talisman Saber (TS) 2013. The TS exercise is a biennial training event aimed at improving Australian Defense Force (ADF) and U.S. combat readiness and interoperability as a Combined Joint Task Force. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Paolo Bayas/Released) Published by Public Affiars Office Commander, Naval Force Japan/Navy Region Japan 81-315-243-7615 http://www.cnic.navy.mil/regions/cnrj.html Page 2 “We based the name of our training on zebras in the wild,” said Christie Martin, a performer. “When a zebra is being attacked by a predator, the others zebras stand by. We’re addressing that mentality of standing by while someone else is being hurt, and we want to get those people to do something about it.” The production included acts that showcased several scenarios ranging from general to specific situations in which young Sailors may frequently find themselves. What sets this program apart from other sexual assault awareness programs is that the performers, all having at least five years of experience as victim advocates and drew from their own training to offer a more personal portrayal. “One of the main differences from other sexual assault awareness programs is that ‘No Zebras’ is a group of peers,” said Martin. “We’re able to relate to younger people in the ages between 17-24 years old. The training is based on our experience as advocates, so we can create something that’s realistic.” Between scenes, cast members asked questions with the young men and women in the audience. “I think the messages were very powerful and the cast didn’t hold back,” said Electrician’s Mate Fireman Teesha Wilson, assigned to USS Lassen (DDG 82). “They used profanity and made it very real. I could feel the intensity. There were some funny parts, but over all, the realism was profound and had a great impact.”
  • 3. Commander,FleetAirForwardHoldsChangeofCommandonNAFAtsugi Published by Public Affiars Office Commander, Naval Force Japan/Navy Region Japan 81-315-243-7615 http://www.cnic.navy.mil/regions/cnrj.html NAVAL AIR FACILITY ATSUGI, Japan (July 25, 2013)— Commander, Fleet Air Forward holds a change of command ceremony inside the Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 51 hangar on Naval Air Facility Atsugi. Rear Adm. Matthew J. Carter was relieved of command by Capt. Michael B. Parker during the ceremony. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Ryan G. Greene/Released) Commander,FleetActivitiesYokosukaParticipatesinKurihamaPrefecturePerryFestival NAVAL AIR FACILITY ATSUGI, Japan (July 25, 2013) –Rear Adm. Matthew J. Carter (left), Operations Specialist 2nd Class Darius Mitchell, Vice Adm. David H. Buss and Commander, Fleet Air Forward (CFAF) Commanding Officer Capt. Michael B. Parker cut a cake after the CFAF change of command ceremony in Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 51’s hangar on Naval Air Facility Atsugi. During the ceremony, Parker relieved Carter of command. (U.S. Navy photo by Personnel Specialist 3rd Class Vivian Blakely/ Released) KURIHAMA, Japan (July 13, 2013) – Traditional Japanese dancing is performed during a parade held as a part of the Kurihama Perry Festival in Kurihama Prefecture, July 13. The ceremony was held to celebrate the 160th anniversary of Commodore Matthew Perry’s landing in Kurihama. (U.S. Navy Photo by Greg Mitchell/RELEASED) KURIHAMA, Japan (July 13, 2013) – Commander, Fleet Activities (FLEACT), Yokosuka, Capt. David A. Owen, waves to the crowd during a parade held as a part of the 2013 Kurihama Perry Festival in Kurihama Prefecture, July 13. The ceremony was held to celebrate the 160th anniversary of Commodore Matthew Perry’s landing in Kurihama. (U.S. Navy Photo by Greg Mitchell/RELEASED)
  • 4. By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Brannon Deugan CAIRNS, Australia – Vice Adm. Robert L. Thomas Jr. relieved Vice Adm. Scott H. Swift as commander, U. S. 7th Fleet in a change of command ceremony on board the flagship USS Blue Ridge (LCC 19), July 31, 2013 in Cairns, Australia. “The allies, partners and friends of 7th Fleet should know that as the transition of command of the 7th Fleet occurs, our commitment to this region remains as strong today as it has throughout our 70 year history,” said Swift. “Vice Adm. Thomas takes command of a ready force comprised of the finest naval assets and people the Navy has to offer. Through his experienced leadership, that force will only get stronger.” U.S. Ambassador to Australia Jeffrey L. Bleich, keynote speaker, praised Swift for his outstanding leadership of the U.S. 7th Fleet during his tenure as commander. “Admiral Swift you have advanced this great tradition with dignity, with strength and with an ease that ensures us all that you’ll be right mate,” said Bleich. “The 7th Fleet, the alliance with Australia and the region are all stronger and better for your service and so am I, and so is each and every person that has had the privilege of serving with you.” Since Sept. 2011, Swift oversaw U.S. naval operations in the 7th Fleet area of responsibility, encompassing more than 48 million square miles of the Western Pacific Ocean and Indian Ocean. The area includes 35 maritime countries and the world’s five largest foreign armed forces - China, Russia, India, North Korea and Republic of Korea. Five of the seven U.S. Mutual Defense Treaties are with countries in the area - Republic of the Philippines, Australia and New Zealand, Republic of Korea, Japan and Thailand. “I am envious of those Sailors that will benefit from his leadership as he seizes the opportunities that lie ahead,” said Swift about Thomas taking command. Thomas assumed command of 7th Fleet following a tour as chief of staff, J5, on the Joint Staff, Pentagon, Washington, D.C. “It’s a privilege to return to 7th Fleet and serve with the finest Sailors in the Navy,” said Thomas. “The work we do and the relationships we build here provide security and stability to the entire region.” Swift’s next assignment will be as director, Navy Staff, N09B, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, Pentagon, Washington, D.C. There are over 45,000 sailors, 100 ships and submarines, and over 200 aircraft in the 7th Fleet. This includes forces operating from bases in Japan and Guam and rotationally-deployed forces based in the United States. Commander, U.S. 7th Fleet, is embarked aboard USS Blue Ridge (LCC 19), forward deployed to Yokosuka, Japan. The flagship commands and controls the fleet and fosters military-to-military relationships through scheduled port visits and military exercises. ViceAdm.RobertThomasJr.AssumesCommandofSeventhFleet Published by Public Affiars Office Commander, Naval Force Japan/Navy Region Japan 81-315-243-7615 http://www.cnic.navy.mil/regions/cnrj.html

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