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Learners first blog presentation Presentation Transcript

  • 1. DIFFERENCES IN TEACHING SCIENCE IN THE UNITED STATES VERSUS OTHER COUNTRIES? LEARNERS FIRST BLOG PROJECT Bernadette Scheller
  • 2. WHAT SCIENCE TEACHING LOOKS LIKE: AN INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE 1 (1)Roth, K., and Garnier, H. December 2006/January 2007. What Science Teaching Looks Like: An International Perspective. Science in the Spotlight, Pages 16-23, Volume 64, Number 4. This article summarizes a study of teaching practices for 8 th grade science students in the following 5 countries: Czech Republic; Japan; Australia; Netherlands; and United States. The 4 countries were chosen to compare to the United States because they outperformed the United States I science achievement on the 1999 Trends in Mathematics and Science (TIMSS) assessment.
  • 3. WHAT SCIENCE TEACHING LOOKS LIKE: AN INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE 1 (1)Roth, K., and Garnier, H. December 2006/January 2007. What Science Teaching Looks Like: An International Perspective. Science in the Spotlight, Pages 16-23, Volume 64, Number 4. The Czech Republic…. Challenges students in theoretical science topics Engages students via classroom discussions. Calls on and grades students in the class to answer topic and off topic questions
  • 4. WHAT SCIENCE TEACHING LOOKS LIKE: AN INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE 1 (1)Roth, K., and Garnier, H. December 2006/January 2007. What Science Teaching Looks Like: An International Perspective. Science in the Spotlight, Pages 16-23, Volume 64, Number 4. Japan…. Teaches its students via inquiry-based methods Uses evidence to develop concepts Focuses on conceptual content rather than theoretical
  • 5. WHAT SCIENCE TEACHING LOOKS LIKE: AN INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE 1 (1)Roth, K., and Garnier, H. December 2006/January 2007. What Science Teaching Looks Like: An International Perspective. Science in the Spotlight, Pages 16-23, Volume 64, Number 4. Australia… Often ends lessons with “tentative conclusions” with a question for students to further ponder. Includes “real life” applications to their science lessons Teaches via activities such as games, puzzles, comedy and exciting demonstrations to keep students focused
  • 6. WHAT SCIENCE TEACHING LOOKS LIKE: AN INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE 1 (1)Roth, K., and Garnier, H. December 2006/January 2007. What Science Teaching Looks Like: An International Perspective. Science in the Spotlight, Pages 16-23, Volume 64, Number 4. Netherlands… Teach via independent learning Uses class discussions and short demonstrations/ lectures to supplement the “self-learn” strategy
  • 7. WHAT SCIENCE TEACHING LOOKS LIKE: AN INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE 1 (1)Roth, K., and Garnier, H. December 2006/January 2007. What Science Teaching Looks Like: An International Perspective. Science in the Spotlight, Pages 16-23, Volume 64, Number 4. United States… Poorly connects content with real life issues (does not make the lessons pertinent to the students) Uses hands on activities, independent learning, and classroom discussions as teaching methods
  • 8. WHAT SCIENCE TEACHING LOOKS LIKE: AN INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE 1 Reflections…. The lessons MUST be pertinent to the student, not only to engage the students, but the provide a foundation for continual learning. To be successful in achieving scientific academic excellence, scientific inquiry and activities must be linked to the content or purpose of the lesson and to real-life scenarios.
  • 9. WHY DO FINLAND’S SCHOOLS GET THE BEST RESULTS?
    • The students are taught by the same teacher for many years. The teacher really gets to know the child. In the video the teacher refers to herself as the child’s “school mother.”
    • The students learn multiple languages at an early age (often 3 to 4 languages).
    • The students learn via “team games.” The teaching methods include whole class activities where the students and teachers are standing and participating.
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/world_news_america/8601207.stm
  • 10.
    • Finnish students RELAX…they start their school day by taking off their shoes, and wear their socks.
    • They also call their teachers by their first name.
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/world_news_america/8601207.stm WHY DO FINLAND’S SCHOOLS GET THE BEST RESULTS?
      • The teachers must all have a Masters degree.
    • The classes consist of 3 teachers. There is always a teacher to help the students who need extra help.
  • 11. T he country’s culture for excellence in education begins at home. Parents have a large impact on their student’s academic achievement. In Finland, the schools get great support from parents who value education and promote learning at home. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/world_news_america/8601207.stm WHY DO FINLAND’S SCHOOLS GET THE BEST RESULTS? The teaching philosophy is based on trust. The teachers trust the students and the students trust the teachers.
  • 12. http://wilsoncenter.org/ondemand/index.cfm?fuseaction=media.play&mediaid=5B039C90-0FBC-3AE3-91CD4F2D9AB55840 MATH AND SCIENCE TEACHING IN NORTHEAST ASIA: DO THEY DO IT BETTER? Vivien Steward of the Asia Society says: China has a ministry of education with clear national standards in science and math. The textbooks, teachers’ lesson plans and professional development all align to the national standards. Academic focus is more ingrained in the culture of the Chinese people than in the United States. There is no social aspect in Chinese schools with no extracurricular activities or sports to distract the students. China’s core curriculum of algebra, geometry, biology, chemistry and physics is mandatory. Most of China’s teachers have math and science backgrounds, even at the elementary school level.
  • 13. http://wilsoncenter.org/ondemand/index.cfm?fuseaction=media.play&mediaid=5B039C90-0FBC-3AE3-91CD4F2D9AB55840 MATH AND SCIENCE TEACHING IN NORTHEAST ASIA: DO THEY DO IT BETTER? Tadanobu Watanabe , associate professor of mathematics education at Kennesaw State University says: There are two types of “national” educational controls in Japan: (1) Administration of Education (establishes the National Course of Studies, which covers all subjects with 6 books), and (2) the Minister of Education (the entity that approves textbooks). The Japanese textbooks are aligned with the standards, and are small and concise. Rather than using technology, an important part of Japanese learning is for students to come to the chalkboard to present their solutions.
  • 14. http://wilsoncenter.org/ondemand/index.cfm?fuseaction=media.play&mediaid=5B039C90-0FBC-3AE3-91CD4F2D9AB55840 MATH AND SCIENCE TEACHING IN NORTHEAST ASIA: DO THEY DO IT BETTER? Hyunjoon Park , Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania says: Korea’s academic success is a result of highly standardized system with a core curriculum and concise textbooks. In Korea, there is no differentiation of students up to the middle school level. All students of all levels, regardless of their academic abilities sit in the same classrooms and study from the same text book. High school students are divided into vocational (approximately 30% of the students) and academic (approximately 70% of the students).
  • 15. http://wilsoncenter.org/ondemand/index.cfm?fuseaction=media.play&mediaid=5B039C90-0FBC-3AE3-91CD4F2D9AB55840 MATH AND SCIENCE TEACHING IN NORTHEAST ASIA: DO THEY DO IT BETTER? Raymond Simon , United States Deputy Secretary of Education says: The culture in the United States accepts that it is OK when people say that they are no good in math… there is no stigma like there is when adults say they can’t read.
    • We need the following in the United States for academic success for our students:
    • High expectations for kids and a culture that values strong education; and
    • Respect and support for teachers
    We have convinced ourselves that some students will never achieve academic excellence in math and science
  • 16. http://wilsoncenter.org/ondemand/index.cfm?fuseaction=media.play&mediaid=5B039C90-0FBC-3AE3-91CD4F2D9AB55840 MATH AND SCIENCE TEACHING IN NORTHEAST ASIA: DO THEY DO IT BETTER? The key to teaching students math and science is curriculum standardization and having well-educated, prepared teachers who are valued and supported. The bottom line……..
  • 17. SUMMARY Students in other countries are not more intelligent than students in the United States……. They are just taught smarter. The key to academic success is having clear, standardized goals for learning and providing tools (i.e. textbooks, and other aides) that are in alignment with theses goals. Furthermore, the students must be provided access to intelligent, highly qualified teachers to facilitate learning of the established academic standards.