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WATS 8 (1-50) Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics
 

WATS 8 (1-50) Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics

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The WATS approach to assessment was developed as part of an LTSN Engineering Mini-Project, funded at the University of Hertfordshire which aimed to develop a set of 'student unique' tutorial sheets to ...

The WATS approach to assessment was developed as part of an LTSN Engineering Mini-Project, funded at the University of Hertfordshire which aimed to develop a set of 'student unique' tutorial sheets to actively encourage and improve student participation within a first year first ‘fluid mechanics and thermodynamics’ module. Please see the accompanying Mini-Project Report “Improving student success and retention through greater participation and tackling student-unique tutorial sheets” for more information.
The WATS cover core Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics topics at first year undergraduate level. 11 tutorial sheets and their worked solutions are provided here for you to utilise in your teaching. The variables within each question can be altered so that each student answers the same question but will need to produce a unique solution.

What follows is a set of STUDENT UNIQUE SHEETS for WATS 8.

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    WATS 8 (1-50) Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics WATS 8 (1-50) Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics Document Transcript

    • Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheets,<br />Student Sheets: WATS 8.<br />The WATS approach to assessment was developed as part of an LTSN Engineering Mini-Project, funded at the University of Hertfordshire which aimed to develop a set of 'student unique' tutorial sheets to actively encourage and improve student participation within a first year first ‘fluid mechanics and thermodynamics’ module. Please see the accompanying Mini-Project Report “Improving student success and retention through greater participation and tackling student-unique tutorial sheets” for more information.<br />The WATS cover core Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics topics at first year undergraduate level. 11 tutorial sheets and their worked solutions are provided here for you to utilise in your teaching. The variables within each question can be altered so that each student answers the same question but will need to produce a unique solution.<br />FURTHER INFORMATION<br />Please see http://tinyurl.com/2wf2lfh to access the WATS Random Factor Generating Wizard. <br />There are also explanatory videos on how to use the Wizard and how to implement WATS available at http://www.youtube.com/user/MBRBLU#p/u/7/0wgC4wy1cV0 and http://www.youtube.com/user/MBRBLU#p/u/6/MGpueiPHpqk.<br />For more information on WATS, its use and impact on students please contact Mark Russell, School of Aerospace, Automotive and Design Engineering at University of Hertfordshire.<br /> <br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number1Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.91 flows through a pipe of diameter 100 mm at 0.19 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 33mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 10° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 57° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 79° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 9 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 34° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 225 mm diameter and the outlet is 90 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 4.60 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.96. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number2Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.86 flows through a pipe of diameter 85 mm at 0.18 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 46mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 21° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 63° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 85° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 5 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 58° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 280 mm diameter and the outlet is 65 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 2.90 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.92. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number3Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.95 flows through a pipe of diameter 80 mm at 0.30 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 29mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 18° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 44° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 85° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 7 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 70° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 165 mm diameter and the outlet is 125 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 1.80 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.85. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number4Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.95 flows through a pipe of diameter 125 mm at 0.14 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 66mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 21° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 55° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 81° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 6 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 12° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 190 mm diameter and the outlet is 75 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 3.70 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.82. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number5Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.94 flows through a pipe of diameter 90 mm at 0.29 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 26mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 27° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 54° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 78° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 15 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 39° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 270 mm diameter and the outlet is 75 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 1.90 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.80. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number6Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.88 flows through a pipe of diameter 110 mm at 0.47 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 72mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 20° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 56° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 78° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 10 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 37° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 275 mm diameter and the outlet is 60 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 3.70 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.78. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number7Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.96 flows through a pipe of diameter 105 mm at 0.41 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 44mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 7° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 46° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 68° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 4 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 13° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 195 mm diameter and the outlet is 75 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 3.80 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.86. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number8Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.99 flows through a pipe of diameter 130 mm at 0.21 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 69mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 19° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 59° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 74° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 9 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 38° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 300 mm diameter and the outlet is 70 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 2.10 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.90. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number9Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.81 flows through a pipe of diameter 135 mm at 0.25 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 65mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 25° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 36° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 77° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 6 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 38° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 220 mm diameter and the outlet is 70 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 3.70 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.76. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number10Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.87 flows through a pipe of diameter 85 mm at 0.08 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 36mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 33° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 48° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 80° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 10 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 51° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 165 mm diameter and the outlet is 140 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 2.00 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.79. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number11Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.95 flows through a pipe of diameter 85 mm at 0.10 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 70mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 4° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 56° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 64° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 3 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 38° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 290 mm diameter and the outlet is 115 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 1.40 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.88. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number12Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.92 flows through a pipe of diameter 90 mm at 0.34 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 58mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 26° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 44° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 71° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 9 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 78° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 175 mm diameter and the outlet is 105 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 2.00 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.76. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number13Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.86 flows through a pipe of diameter 140 mm at 0.33 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 26mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 11° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 38° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 78° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 7 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 22° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 185 mm diameter and the outlet is 130 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 4.30 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.96. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number14Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.93 flows through a pipe of diameter 130 mm at 0.39 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 35mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 6° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 52° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 80° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 14 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 25° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 270 mm diameter and the outlet is 50 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 3.30 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.83. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number15Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.86 flows through a pipe of diameter 95 mm at 0.05 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 47mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 27° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 46° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 84° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 3 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 20° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 245 mm diameter and the outlet is 65 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 4.00 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.87. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number16Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.96 flows through a pipe of diameter 135 mm at 0.29 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 39mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 26° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 40° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 64° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 11 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 68° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 230 mm diameter and the outlet is 140 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 3.70 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.82. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number17Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 1.00 flows through a pipe of diameter 135 mm at 0.21 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 67mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 17° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 60° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 79° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 15 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 41° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 260 mm diameter and the outlet is 130 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 1.60 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.99. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number18Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.85 flows through a pipe of diameter 110 mm at 0.08 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 42mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 23° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 37° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 79° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 11 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 56° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 205 mm diameter and the outlet is 130 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 3.00 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.91. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number19Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 1.00 flows through a pipe of diameter 135 mm at 0.50 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 67mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 8° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 47° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 69° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 15 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 50° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 160 mm diameter and the outlet is 120 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 2.10 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.83. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number20Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.91 flows through a pipe of diameter 90 mm at 0.14 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 54mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 22° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 42° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 66° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 4 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 61° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 230 mm diameter and the outlet is 80 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 2.30 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.93. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number21Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 1.00 flows through a pipe of diameter 100 mm at 0.24 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 71mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 26° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 52° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 84° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 7 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 28° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 290 mm diameter and the outlet is 140 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 2.40 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.77. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number22Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.80 flows through a pipe of diameter 100 mm at 0.23 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 26mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 14° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 55° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 79° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 4 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 24° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 205 mm diameter and the outlet is 75 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 4.20 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.78. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number23Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.82 flows through a pipe of diameter 105 mm at 0.47 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 54mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 13° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 50° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 68° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 7 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 52° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 235 mm diameter and the outlet is 65 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 3.70 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.86. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number24Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.96 flows through a pipe of diameter 80 mm at 0.10 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 56mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 26° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 51° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 68° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 5 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 57° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 270 mm diameter and the outlet is 55 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 1.60 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.76. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number25Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.81 flows through a pipe of diameter 90 mm at 0.18 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 60mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 15° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 48° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 71° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 8 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 43° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 235 mm diameter and the outlet is 130 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 1.20 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.91. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number26Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.88 flows through a pipe of diameter 145 mm at 0.20 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 28mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 14° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 58° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 67° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 13 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 55° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 250 mm diameter and the outlet is 65 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 3.80 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.75. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number27Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.99 flows through a pipe of diameter 140 mm at 0.04 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 35mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 24° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 46° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 83° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 12 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 22° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 220 mm diameter and the outlet is 70 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 2.00 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.88. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number28Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.88 flows through a pipe of diameter 135 mm at 0.19 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 34mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 9° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 59° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 79° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 14 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 34° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 250 mm diameter and the outlet is 50 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 4.00 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.86. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number29Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.83 flows through a pipe of diameter 95 mm at 0.44 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 70mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 31° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 62° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 73° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 7 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 29° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 260 mm diameter and the outlet is 110 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 1.50 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.87. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number30Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.93 flows through a pipe of diameter 125 mm at 0.30 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 38mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 26° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 53° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 75° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 7 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 59° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 175 mm diameter and the outlet is 115 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 2.80 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.94. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number31Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.88 flows through a pipe of diameter 100 mm at 0.04 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 62mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 7° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 46° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 86° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 6 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 68° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 265 mm diameter and the outlet is 70 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 3.60 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.92. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number32Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.87 flows through a pipe of diameter 85 mm at 0.08 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 33mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 10° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 34° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 67° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 10 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 54° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 255 mm diameter and the outlet is 95 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 1.30 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.88. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number33Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.84 flows through a pipe of diameter 95 mm at 0.38 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 31mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 26° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 44° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 71° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 8 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 59° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 210 mm diameter and the outlet is 50 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 2.40 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.82. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number34Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.92 flows through a pipe of diameter 115 mm at 0.08 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 67mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 6° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 61° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 77° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 12 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 49° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 185 mm diameter and the outlet is 80 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 3.50 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.79. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number35Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.89 flows through a pipe of diameter 95 mm at 0.35 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 48mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 23° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 62° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 73° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 3 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 25° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 220 mm diameter and the outlet is 110 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 4.20 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.80. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number36Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.85 flows through a pipe of diameter 100 mm at 0.26 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 36mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 28° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 53° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 84° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 4 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 20° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 170 mm diameter and the outlet is 90 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 3.40 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.87. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number37Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.88 flows through a pipe of diameter 105 mm at 0.49 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 38mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 22° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 41° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 77° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 15 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 16° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 270 mm diameter and the outlet is 70 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 4.00 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.99. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number38Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.98 flows through a pipe of diameter 105 mm at 0.04 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 28mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 30° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 44° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 70° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 3 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 34° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 165 mm diameter and the outlet is 95 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 4.60 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.98. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number39Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.93 flows through a pipe of diameter 125 mm at 0.17 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 29mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 28° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 63° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 75° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 3 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 45° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 180 mm diameter and the outlet is 95 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 1.40 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.97. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number40Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.82 flows through a pipe of diameter 145 mm at 0.34 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 38mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 7° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 52° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 72° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 9 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 56° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 215 mm diameter and the outlet is 130 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 1.70 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.93. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number41Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.94 flows through a pipe of diameter 115 mm at 0.20 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 28mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 5° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 38° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 77° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 7 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 52° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 295 mm diameter and the outlet is 70 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 2.10 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.84. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number42Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.97 flows through a pipe of diameter 120 mm at 0.44 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 49mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 7° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 62° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 81° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 10 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 55° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 235 mm diameter and the outlet is 60 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 2.20 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.84. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number43Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.91 flows through a pipe of diameter 110 mm at 0.21 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 47mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 13° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 51° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 80° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 15 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 80° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 240 mm diameter and the outlet is 125 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 4.90 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.91. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number44Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.89 flows through a pipe of diameter 95 mm at 0.28 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 65mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 5° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 47° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 81° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 13 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 58° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 265 mm diameter and the outlet is 110 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 1.80 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.86. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number45Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.90 flows through a pipe of diameter 140 mm at 0.07 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 53mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 31° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 58° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 87° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 15 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 63° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 210 mm diameter and the outlet is 75 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 1.40 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.90. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number46Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.89 flows through a pipe of diameter 105 mm at 0.01 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 64mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 24° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 59° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 72° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 12 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 11° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 195 mm diameter and the outlet is 50 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 4.20 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.89. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number47Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.88 flows through a pipe of diameter 95 mm at 0.46 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 73mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 15° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 45° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 65° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 8 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 47° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 290 mm diameter and the outlet is 80 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 3.40 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.98. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number48Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.81 flows through a pipe of diameter 130 mm at 0.12 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 58mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 23° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 59° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 75° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 14 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 76° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 225 mm diameter and the outlet is 125 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 2.50 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.96. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number49Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 1.00 flows through a pipe of diameter 120 mm at 0.10 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 61mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 32° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 61° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 72° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 9 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 73° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 190 mm diameter and the outlet is 110 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 2.10 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.90. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics.<br />Weekly Assessed Tutorial Sheet 8.<br />Student Number50Print your nameHand out dateHand in date<br />Q1a). A fluid of relative density 0.88 flows through a pipe of diameter 115 mm at 0.19 m/s. After passing through a gradual reducer the fluid leaves a 73mm diameter pipe and discharges onto a stationary surface. Assuming that the surface slopes at an angle of ‘A’ degrees from the horizontal plane, as shown below, and that the surface somehow acts as a vane in that the fluid is deflected along its surface - calculate the forces acting on the surface for the angles shown in the answer boxes. You may assume that friction effects are negligible.<br />Figure Q1a. Definition of angle ‘A’ for the inclined surface.<br />i) A = 90° (X force) (N) [5dp](1 Mark)ii) A = 31° (net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)iii) A = 51° (Net force) (N) [5dp](2 Mark)iv) A = 79° (Net force) (N)[5dp] (2 Mark)<br />Q2. 8 l/s flows through a contracting elbow which has an angle, ‘A’ of 40° i.e. as shown in figure Q2. Assume the inlet to the bend is 215 mm diameter and the outlet is 95 mm diameter and that the pipe lies in the horizontal plane. The static pressure at the pipe inlet is 4.60 Bar and the fluids specific gravity is 0.79. Calculate the net force and the direction of the force acting on the bend. <br /> i) Net force (N) [5dp](3 Mark)ii) Direction of force.(As measured anti-clockwise from the top of the horizontal plane. i.e. AS SHOWN in all above examples. [1dp] (1 Mark)Figure Q2. Sketch of bend.<br />Credits<br />This resource was created by the University of Hertfordshire and released as an open educational resource through the Open Engineering Resources project of the HE Academy Engineering Subject Centre. The Open Engineering Resources project was funded by HEFCE and part of the JISC/HE Academy UKOER programme.<br />© University of Hertfordshire 2009<br />This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 License. <br />The name of the University of Hertfordshire, UH and the UH logo are the name and registered marks of the University of Hertfordshire. To the fullest extent permitted by law the University of Hertfordshire reserves all its rights in its name and marks which may not be used except with its written permission.<br />The JISC logo is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales Licence.  All reproductions must comply with the terms of that licence.<br />The HEA logo is owned by the Higher Education Academy Limited may be freely distributed and copied for educational purposes only, provided that appropriate acknowledgement is given to the Higher Education Academy as the copyright holder and original publisher.<br />