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Go-Kart Safety

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Go-karting is an American invention that has become popular all over the world. But it can be quite dangerous without proper safety. Learn what you can do to protect yourself.

Go-karting is an American invention that has become popular all over the world. But it can be quite dangerous without proper safety. Learn what you can do to protect yourself.

Published in: Sports, Automotive, Business

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  • 1. GO-KART SAFETY
  • 2. 1956 - first racing go kart built by California native Art Ingels. 1958 - the Go-Kart Manufacturing Co. was the first kart manufacturer. 1959 – McCulloch produced kart engines. It’s first was the McCulloch MC-10, a modified chainsaw 2-stroke engine. Source: go-kartblog.blogspot.com
  • 3. Ingels first kart, Kart One The MC-10, adapted from a chainsaw motor. Art Ingels in an undated photo Source: vintagekarts.com
  • 4. Today’s go-karts use two types of engines: the 2-stroke and the 4-stroke. Most 2-strokes are manufactured in Italy, by such companies as IAME, Birel, Tony Kart, and CRG. 4-strokes are used in kart racing and recreational go-karting and adapted from the lawnmower engine. Source: gokartusa.com
  • 5. Combustion: ignited charge pushes down on the piston crown (or top). Fresh charge is drawn in through carburetor into the crankcase via Inlet Port I. Exhaustion: exhaust Port E allows gases to discharge. Piston puts pressure on fuel air mixture in crankcase. Charging: first stroke is finished. Port E is fully open and inlet Port P is open to allow fuel air mixture to enter space above the piston. Fuel air mixture sweeps out exhaust gases. Compression: piston moves up and covers all ports. Charge is compressed and creates vacuum. Piston final upward stroke creates ignition. Source: roymech.co.uk
  • 6. Spark Ignition Cycle: Charging stroke: piston moves to let air-fuel into the cylinder; inlet valve is closed Compression stroke: piston compresses air-fuel; compressed air-fuel is ignited Working/Power: piston is driven out by ignited mixture; exhaust valve is opened Exhaust Stroke: products of combustion are driven out Compression Ignition Cycle: Charging Stroke: piston moves to let air into cylinder; inlet valve is closed Compression stroke: piston compresses mixture; fuel is injected into compressed air; spontaneous combustion occurs Working/Power stroke: products of combustion drive piston out; exhaust valve is opened Exhaust Stroke: products of combustion are driven out Source: roymech.co.uk
  • 7. Karts are considered safe and unassuming because of their size Earliest go-karts traveled at around 7-10mph. Today’s go-karts can reach up to 70mph! Go-kart accidents largely go unreported since they aren’t too serious. BUT ACCIDENTS STILL HAPPEN
  • 8. Helmets help to prevent injury to one of the most important parts of your body: the brain. Helmets are non-negotiable Helmets can deflect airborne objects, sometimes pieces from a wrecked kart. When a go-kart flips, a helmet cushions the blow once momentum takes over.
  • 9. Source: southbayriders.com/forums Source: flickr.com Source: blog.ironhorsehelmets.com
  • 10. Secure your harness and seatbelt so you’re not thrown out of in the event of a roll Go-karts are light and fast so tipping is not uncommon during a collision Seatbelts make sure you don’t catch any air and get to flying like a bird
  • 11. Source: towardszerodeathsdc.com
  • 12. Race at a speed that suits you. “Fast” is too fast for some people. Slow down. Start slow when navigating a new track. Speed up as you get more comfortable with the layout and the tricky corners in the track
  • 13. Side impact hits Sudden flipping Whiplash Head-on collision Burns Entanglement Source: bustbubble.com
  • 14. Keep an eye out for: Loose screws and bolts Tires with low or high pressure Leaks of any kind Frame integrity Test brakes and steering If something feels off or handling feels wrong, pull off the track and examine the kart.
  • 15. Wear clothes with padding or rent fire-retardant jumpsuits made for racing. Never wear shorts when driving a go-kart, no matter how good you look in them. One of these guys is race-ready and it’s not the blonde. Source: examiner.com
  • 16. Every new driver should know how to handle a go-kart; go-karts are so fast, a kneejerk reaction can cause an accident. Practice responsible driving. Don’t try to impress your friends or try to make them laugh by pretending to be drunk. Stop the kart if you sense danger. Don’t try to be a hero.
  • 17. MB2 Raceway is L.A. and Ventura County's only indoor karting facilities. We provide a high speed race simulation with a challenging road course that is fun for all skill levels. Once you have experienced MB2 Raceway you will know why indoor karting is the fastest-growing sport in the United States. Our high-performance electric European karts are capable of speeds of up to 45 mph. Combine that with being only a couple inches off the ground on our ¼ mile road course and you're getting a racing experience that will get your heart pumping! We also have junior karts for kids, and you only need to be 48" tall to race.