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495/MetroWest
Development Compact
Plan
MAPC worked with the Patrick
Administration and partners to engage the
region’s cit...
OUTREACH and
PLANNING
in Quincy’s Asian
Communities
MAPC WORKED WITH THE
CITY OF QUINCY AND THE ASIAN
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMEN...
PLANNING
NETWORK
PEDESTRIAN
& BICYCLE
MAPC WORKED WITH 13 COMMUNITIES
ON FOUR “CLUSTER” PLANS
This effort encourages the i...
BOLTON
Mixed Use
Village Overlay
Bolton Zoning Working Group
We can do better
at the interchange of I-495
and MA Route 117...
DRAW 7
DRAWING A VISION
f o r
GROUNDWORK SOMERVILLE WORKED
WITH MAPC, UEP STUDENTS FROM TUFTS,
AND MANY MYSTIC RIVER COMMU...
PLAN
DOWNTOWN
MALDEN
MAPC DEVELOPED A COLLECTION OF
CLEAN ENERGY PROJECT “RECIPES” that
support and guide stakeholders thr...
FAIR HOUSING TOOLKIT
MAPC WORKED WITH THE FAIR HOUSING CAUCUS AND A
CONSULTANT TO DEVELOP A FAIR HOUSING TOOLKIT to bring ...
Coming summer 2015…
Boston’s newest Greenway
MAPC worked with the 10 member Fairmount
GreenwayTrask Force (FGTF) on creati...
FAIRHOUSING and
EQUITY
ASSESSMENT
for Metropolitan Boston
MAPC WORKED WITH THE
CITIZENS’ HOUSING AND PLANNING
ASSOCIATION ...
ILEAD
Institute on
Leadership in
Equity &
Development
What came of it?
155 participants trained
5 Place Based Trainings
7 ...
The City of Chelsea, Mystic River Watershed
Association (MyRWA), Charles River
Watershed Association, and Chelsea
Collabor...
PLAN
DOWNTOWN
MALDEN
MAPC WORKED WITH THE HARVARD
GRADUATE SCHOOL OF DESIGN AND
THE CITY OF MALDEN
to develop a blueprint ...
PLANNING
and
ZONING
Millis Village
MAPC WORKED WITH THE TOWN OF MILLIS
MASTER PLAN COMMITTEE TO:
• undertake a market anal...
SALEM POINT
VISION + ACTION
THE SALEM POINT VISION AND ACTION
PLAN EMPOWERED RESIDENTS
to create their own community visio...
TRANSPORTATION
POLICY WORK
Transportation Funding
• Five transportation finance forums attended by more than 800
people
• ...
POLICY WORK
Zoning Reform
• Streamlined zoning reform bill
filed with 38 cosponsors
• The bill provides needed tools to ci...
Route 9 MetroWest Smart
Growth Plan
Funding provided by the MetroBoston Consortium for Sustainable Communities with a gran...
The policy agenda is a road map to move us
away from existing inequities and towards the
vision the region’s residents wan...
Managing Neighborhood Change
SOMERVILLE
MAPC WORKED WITH THE
CITY OF SOMERVILLE, SOMERVILLE
COMMUNITY CORPORATION,
SOMERVI...
Regional
Transit-
Oriented
Development
Goals and Finance
MAPC WORKED WITH THE LISC
BOSTON, CLF VENTURES, MA
ASSOCIATION OF...
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MAPC's Sustainable Communities Regional Planning Grant Project Posters

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Project posters describing some of the projects completed under the MAPC's Sustainable Communities Regional Planning Grant. The posters were displayed at the final meeting of the Sustainable Communities Consortium on May 21, 2014, Boston, Massachusetts.

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Transcript of "MAPC's Sustainable Communities Regional Planning Grant Project Posters"

  1. 1. 495/MetroWest Development Compact Plan MAPC worked with the Patrick Administration and partners to engage the region’s cities and towns, residents, and public and private sector organizations to develop a comprehensive land use and development plan. The plan: • Establishes community-based priorities along the I-495 corridor; • Integrates those priorities into regional and state development and preservation plans; and • Provides a direction for public investments that conserve the intrinsic qualities of the corridor while capitalizing on its economic strengths. Outcomesand Related Work • Identification of local, regional, and state priority locations for future development and preservation • Local zoning and regulatory updates in Regional Priority Development Areas in Millis, Bolton, and Medway • State agencies are directing investments to identified priority areas • Priority area mapping continues in North Suburban and Metro North regions 60 Temple Place | Boston, MA 01112 | 617.933.0700 The 495/MetroWest Development Compact provides a shared framework for state, regional, and local strategies for development and land preservation as well as transportation and other infrastructure investments for 37 municipalities in and around the MetroWest region. Funding provided by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Executive Office of Housing and Economic Development, the Metropolitan Area Planning Council, and the Metro Boston Consortium for Sustainable Communities with a grant from US HUD
  2. 2. OUTREACH and PLANNING in Quincy’s Asian Communities MAPC WORKED WITH THE CITY OF QUINCY AND THE ASIAN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION to assess community needs, develop an Asian Community Engagement Task Force, and launch a Community PlanIt workshop in Quincy. The effort engaged the Asian community in planning activities and city affairs. Outcomes: • Renewed the city’s focus on transit-oriented development opportunities around the Wollaston T station. • Improved data analysis for other city housing and planning efforts, including programming of federal Community Development Block Grant and HOME funds. • Efforts led to the creation of a city Asian American Civic Engagement Task Force. 60 Temple Place Boston, MA 02111 | 617.933.0700 A civic engagement and outreach strategy will help the city to identify local leaders, build capacity to effectively engage in the planning process, and ensure that the Asian American voice is included in development activities. Funding provided by the MetroBoston Consortium for Sustainable Communities with a grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
  3. 3. PLANNING NETWORK PEDESTRIAN & BICYCLE MAPC WORKED WITH 13 COMMUNITIES ON FOUR “CLUSTER” PLANS This effort encourages the implementation of pedestrian and bicycle accommodation at the local level and to create networks for safe non-vehicular travel. Rather than small-scale planning of individual neighborhoods, large-scale planning of “clusters” of multiple communities allows for greater regional impacts, establishing regional priorities, and a significant increase in potential users. An additional goal of the planning effort was to provide safe access to major pedestrian and bicycle destinations, including the Assabet River Rail Trail, the Dedham Rail Trail, and the Northern Strand Community Trail. Access to major employment centers, local schools, and parks were also prioritized. Outcomes • 5 miles of bicycle lanes installed, and 135 additional miles planned • Bicycle lanes added to local roadways in Hudson, Revere, and Quincy • Short-term, low cost plans finalized for 13 MAPC communities • Plans encouraged communities to look beyond community borders and work with neighboring communities to implement bicycle and pedestrian facilities and improvements • Better access to schools, parks, downtowns, residential and office areas • Communities now more aware of the importance of providing safe options for non-vehicular travel 60 Temple Place Boston, MA 02111 | 617.933.0700 Funding provided by the MetroBoston Consortium for Sustainable Communities with a grant from US HUD Quincy Hudson Stow Maynard Marlborough Chelsea Everett Revere Malden Saugus Lynn Dedham Westwood
  4. 4. BOLTON Mixed Use Village Overlay Bolton Zoning Working Group We can do better at the interchange of I-495 and MA Route 117 than big box retail and huge signs” Funding provided by the MetroBoston Consortium for Sustainable Communities with a grant from US HUD Current Zoning Illustrative Site Layout Mixed Use Illustrative Site LayoutMixed Use Illustrative Street View Existing Zoning Illustrative Street View Outcome: Village Mixed Use Overlay Zoning passed unanimously at Town Meeting on May 5 MAPC USED SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY FUNDS TO HELP BOLTON VISUALIZE what might be built if the town adopted the draft Mixed Use Village Overlay. Renderings of what development could look like under the existing zoning contrasted sharply with what would be possible utilizing the Overlay. Current Zoning (above): one building per lot, mixed use not permitted, set parking requirements Overlay Zoning (below): Multiple buildings per lot, mix of uses allowed, housing is mandatory; reduced setbacks, flexible parking requirements,10% lot coverage 60 Temple Place Boston, MA 02111 | 617.933.0700
  5. 5. DRAW 7 DRAWING A VISION f o r GROUNDWORK SOMERVILLE WORKED WITH MAPC, UEP STUDENTS FROM TUFTS, AND MANY MYSTIC RIVER COMMUNITIES AND ORGANIZATIONS to develop a comprehensive set of recommendations for the redesign of Draw 7 Park. The recommendations were based on community input, and were focused on racial and health equity. The team engaged residents from Somerville, Medford, Malden, Everett, and Charlestown through interviews, community meetings, interactive mapping, and online surveys to generate a plan representing the public’s values, needs and wishes for the future of Draw 7. Ideas ranged from an urban wild to a turf sports complex with a retractable dome. The ultimate recommendations help serve the region’s needs and wants, and improve on Draw 7’s existing potential without eliminating the wild character held dear by many. Outcomes: • Design for a revitalized Draw 7 Park presented to and approved by DCR • Walk to the River Route mapped out from Sullivan Station to the Park • Increased attention on an underutilized area, soon to be a regional focus at Assembly Square • Continuing collaboration between Groundwork, MAPC, City of Somerville and DCR to fund construction drawings and make the project shovel ready 60 Temple Place Boston, MA 02111 | 617.933.0700 Park User Interviews “It’s not pretty, but it’s peaceful.” Funding provided by the MetroBoston Consortium for Sustainable Communities with a grant from US HUD PARK “Always like a family; everyone knows each other.” “A diamond in the rough.”
  6. 6. PLAN DOWNTOWN MALDEN MAPC DEVELOPED A COLLECTION OF CLEAN ENERGY PROJECT “RECIPES” that support and guide stakeholders through the planning and implementation process, using best practices, case studies and model documentation, and that are tailored to small cities and towns. The Toolkit content draws from MAPC’s local energy planning and technical assistance experience, as well as success stories from across the country. The “recipes” include step-by-step instructions, prerequisite “ingredients,” and cover renewable energy and energy efficiency strategies for residential, commercial, and municipal sectors. OUTCOME: 38 Toolkit “recipes,” including infrastructure projects such as community solar and energy efficiency retrofits, behavior-based education programs, and financing strategies. The toolkit has already been viewed multiple times: web traffic on the MAPC Clean Energy page has increased 56% since the Toolkit was made available. 60 Temple Place Boston, MA 02111 | 617.933.0700 Funding provided by the MetroBoston Consortium for Sustainable Communities with a grant from US HUD Education & Outreach Efficiency in Municipal Buildings Funding Sources & Financing Mechanisms Staffing & Volunteers Municipal Light Plants Municipal Renewable Energy Supply Contracts Municipal Procurement Planning for Energy Action Clean Energy 101
  7. 7. FAIR HOUSING TOOLKIT MAPC WORKED WITH THE FAIR HOUSING CAUCUS AND A CONSULTANT TO DEVELOP A FAIR HOUSING TOOLKIT to bring together available resources to help appointed and elected leaders, municipal planning, housing and development officials, developers, citizen board members, and other volunteers understand how to affirmatively further fair housing. The toolkit includes information on: Civic Engagement; Master Plans and Assessment of Fair Housing; Zoning to Affirmatively Further Fair Housing; Affirmative Marketing; Disparate Impact; Language Assessment and Services; Accessibility for People with Disabilities: Zoning for Group Homes; Increasing Accessible Housing through Visitability and Design Standards; Accessibility for People with Disabilities: Scoping and Coverage; and Fair Housing Resources. The Toolkit also provides: Fair Housing Case Law; Relevant Fair Housing Terms; and Fair Housing Laws, Regulations and Executive Orders. OUTCOMES: 1. Created fair housing training curriculum for municipal officials and developers. 2. Provided trainings for professional planners, citizen planners, and housing officials, including the Citizen Planner Training Collaborative Conference and the Massachusetts Housing Institute. 3. Shared toolkit information during development of a Fair Housing Plan for the South Shore HOME Consortium. 4. Working with the MA Department of Housing and Community Development to provide a half-day training in Fall 2014. 60 Temple Place Boston, MA 02111 | 617.933.0700 Funding provided by the MetroBoston Consortium for Sustainable Communities with a grant from US HUD
  8. 8. Coming summer 2015… Boston’s newest Greenway MAPC worked with the 10 member Fairmount GreenwayTrask Force (FGTF) on creating an implementation plan for the neighborway + doing visioning for new types of open space. Accomplishments • Selected five priority parcels • Identified long-term ownership strategies for the Fairmont Greenway parcels • Completed schematic designs for the food forest onWashington St in Four Corners • Finalized the Fairmount Greenway route alignment • Finished Implementation Plan for the Fairmount Greenway neighborway pilot segments • Installing signs + sharrows with the City of Boston, summer 2015 • Received designation for two parcels 60 Temple Place | Boston, MA 02111 | 617.933.0700 Funding provided by the MetroBoston Consortium for Sustainable Communities with a grant from US HUD Fairmount Greenway Task Force Members •02136 AllThings Hyde Park •Boston NaturalAreas Network •Codman Square NDC •Dorchester Bay EDC •Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative •Greater Four Corners Action Coalition •Mattapan Food + Fitness Coalition •Project RIGHT •Quincy Geneva Housing Corporation •Southwest Boston CDC Ballou Pilot Segment (Dorchester) Bike Tour (2013) Planting day (Mattapan) Priority Parcel (Dorchester) Community Garden (Mattapan)
  9. 9. FAIRHOUSING and EQUITY ASSESSMENT for Metropolitan Boston MAPC WORKED WITH THE CITIZENS’ HOUSING AND PLANNING ASSOCIATION AND A REGIONAL HOUSING ADVISORY COMMITTEE to develop a Fair Housing and Equity Assessment for Metropolitan Boston. The Regional Housing Plan provided a detailed housing and demographic profile of the MAPC region, describing the current and emerging residential landscape and the factors that have influenced it. The FHEA focuses on how these demographic shifts and changing housing patterns have affected – and are likely to affect – classes of people protected by civil rights laws. Early Outcomes: • Coordination and outreach with the Massachusetts Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) on a fair housing forum for fall 2014. • MAPC representation on the Opportunity Areas Working Group convened by DHCD • Creation and early dissemination of a model Fair Housing Toolkit • Completion of a Fair Housing Plan for the South Shore HOME Consortium which includes the city of Quincy and the towns of Braintree, Holbrook, Milton, and Weymouth. 60 Temple Place Boston, MA 02111 | 617.933.0700 Lisa Sturtevant, PhD, Executive Director Center for Housing Policy, National Housing Conference There is so much interest in how regions are successfully implementing Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing strategies, MAPC’s information and voice on this topic is incredibly timely. Funding provided by the MetroBoston Consortium for Sustainable Communities with a grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
  10. 10. ILEAD Institute on Leadership in Equity & Development What came of it? 155 participants trained 5 Place Based Trainings 7 Host Organizations 2 Trainings of Trainers 6 Different Languages Best of all people felt welcomed, heard & empowered! 60 Temple Place Boston, MA 02111 | 617.933.0700 ILEAD Participant “It was fun! I learned a lot, met people in my neighborhood and feel like I know more about planning in my community.” Funding provided by the MetroBoston Consortium for Sustainable Communities with a grant from US HUD Have you ever sat down with your neighbors to discuss issues of equity, how local planning is done and how you can get the most out of development in your City or Town? Well…people in Dorchester, Lynn, Quincy, Roxbury & Somerville did! The Institute on Leadership in Equity and Development (ILEAD) is a training that educates potential and existing leaders in communities traditionally underserved by planning on sustainable and equitable development. The interactive sessions and activities equip people with the tools needed to become powerful advocates within their community.
  11. 11. The City of Chelsea, Mystic River Watershed Association (MyRWA), Charles River Watershed Association, and Chelsea Collaborative partnered to develop recommendations, conceptual designs, and community support for environmental improvements in a neighborhood in Chelsea, a densely developed and highly impervious Metro Boston community. • Identification of opportunities to incorporate low impact development (LID) stormwater treatment systems at six sites • Conceptual designs and modeled environmental improvements for all sites • Multiple sites submitted for grant funding MYSTIC Green Infrastructure Project Outcomes: 60 Temple Place | Boston, MA 02111 617.933.0700 Funding provided by the MetroBoston Consortium for Sustainable Communities with a grant from US HUD Existing Conditions Analysis Community Involvement Opportunities Analysis Purpose: Conceptual Design, Visualization, Recommendations
  12. 12. PLAN DOWNTOWN MALDEN MAPC WORKED WITH THE HARVARD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF DESIGN AND THE CITY OF MALDEN to develop a blueprint for action to revitalize downtown Malden and to assess the feasibility of a Chapter 40R smart growth housing district. A central focus of the plan included the relocation of the current City Hall and the redevelopment of the Government Center site, reconnecting a main commercial corridor to the Orange Line station. Harvard GSD students engaged over 1,000 residents and visitors, through a variety of innovative techniques, to gather ideas for the future of downtown. MAPC conducted the 40R study and outlined implementation steps for realizing the downtown plan. Outcomes • Developer selected through RFP process for Government Center redevelopment • $3 million MassWorks award from EOHED to demolish City Hall, setting the stage for mixed-use project that includes up to 500 new residential units • Malden has installed dozens of wayfinding signs, with artwork from Malden-born painter, Frank Stella • The Redevelopment Authority will conduct a parking study to develop strategies for how parking can support the broader downtown revitalization 60 Temple Place Boston, MA 02111 | 617.933.0700 Kevin Duffy Strategy and Business Development Officer City of Malden We received lots of feedback to help guide us in our decisions to renovate the Square and were able to develop a transformational plan of attack. Funding provided by the MetroBoston Consortium for Sustainable Communities with a grant from US HUD
  13. 13. PLANNING and ZONING Millis Village MAPC WORKED WITH THE TOWN OF MILLIS MASTER PLAN COMMITTEE TO: • undertake a market analysis for alternative future uses for the town center, • determine what elements of the existing zoning were impediments to redevelopment opportunities, • host a town-wide forum to provide information and to seek feedback on the future of the village center, • prepare visualizations of potential development that would be possible under alternative zoning, and • prepare new zoning that addressed town goals and market issues for submittal to Town Meeting, which approved the new zoning 5/12/14. 60 Temple Place Boston, MA 02111 | 617.933.0700 We received lots of feedback to help guide us in our decisions to renovate the Square and were able to develop a transformational plan of attack. Funding provided by the MetroBoston Consortium for Sustainable Communities with a grant from US HUD 9% 8% 6% 17% 19% 19% 8% 5% 6% 41% 34% 24% 18% 25% 34% 8% 9% 12% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 1990 2000 2010 Millis: Population Share by Age 1990, 2000, 2010 65 Plus 45-64 25-44 18-24 5-17 Under 5 yrs Source: U.S. Census. Table 14: Retail Gap Analysis Summary Millis Town Center, ½-mile radius 2-mile radius 5-mile radius Convenience Goods, Food Surplus in grocery stores, beer & wine, pharmacy, and florists. Leakage in specialty foods, cosmetics, optical, and other health & personal care. Surplus in food & beverage (except specialty foods), and florists. Leakage in health & personal care, and specialty foods. Leakage in supermarkets, florists, cosmetics & optical. Surplus in specialty food, beer & wine, and pharmacies. Entertainment (Restaurants, bars) Surplus of full service restaurants. Leakage in limited service restaurants and drinking establishments. Similar to Millis Town Center. Leakage in all types of eating and drinking establishments. Shopping Goods Surplus in home furnishings, hardware, and stationery & gifts. Leakage in furniture, electronics, apparel, sporting goods, books & music, and general merchandise. Surplus in home furnishings, computer & software, and hardware. Leakage in stationery & gifts, appliances, and other similar categories as Millis Town Center Surplus in music. Leakage in all other shopping goods categories.
  14. 14. SALEM POINT VISION + ACTION THE SALEM POINT VISION AND ACTION PLAN EMPOWERED RESIDENTS to create their own community vision and to mobilize resources to ensure that the Point develops sustainability in its housing, land and environmental resources, and its economy. Together, the City of Salem, North Shore CDC, Point Neighborhood Association and Metropolitan Area Planning Council’s year-long visioning process generated interest among diverse residents in participating in a local planning process that resulted in an Action Plan to guide municipal priorities for local improvements. The partnership’s success continues to attract private and public investors to support the plan’s implementation. Outcomes: • 100 people attended two public meetings. • Using Community PlanIt, a web-based engagement game, 191 community members contributed ideas about their neighborhood. • 11 focus groups with neighborhood leaders and residents • $447,500 of additional funds committed to action items identified by residents. • Winner of the Working Cities Challenge grant for key partners to continue to oversee the plan’s implementation. Mayor Kimberley Driscoll City of Salem “The Point Neighborhood has tremendous assets. The planning process presents a great opportunity for residents, business owners, and others to actively participate in creating a common vision to strengthen the neighborhood.” Funding provided by the MetroBoston Consortium for Sustainable Communities with a grant from US HUD PLAN Creating a Vision Strengthening a Community 2013 - 2021 nscdc north shore community development coalition
  15. 15. TRANSPORTATION POLICY WORK Transportation Funding • Five transportation finance forums attended by more than 800 people • Generated 7,335 advocacy emails to legislators • “Fix the T” budget calculator website visited by 8,000+ users • Grew list of supporters from 0 to 3,000+ transportation advocates • Many partners including Transportation for Massachusetts, Massachusetts Municipal Association, A Better City, and regional, environmental, and grassroots organizations Transportation Finance Research • Drafted legislation that would allow municipalities to raise their own revenue for transportation through local or regional referenda • Wrote legislation to incentivize Complete Streets policies that includes capital funding • Organized a forum to promote the use of value-capture strategies Victories • Lawmakers prevented the most severe MBTA fare hikes by increasing financial support to the MBTA (2012) • Lawmakers dedicated an additional $600 million per year to transportation over the next five years. The bill included a Value Capture Commission (2013) • A Complete Streets program was adopted with $50 million authorization as part of Transportation Bond Bill (2014) 60 Temple Place Boston, MA 02111 | 617.933.0700 Funding provided by the MetroBoston Consortium for Sustainable Communities with a grant from US HUD Transportation Funding Advocacy Transportation Finance Research
  16. 16. POLICY WORK Zoning Reform • Streamlined zoning reform bill filed with 38 cosponsors • The bill provides needed tools to cities and towns to realize their development and preservation goals • Partners include the Massachusetts Smart Growth Alliance, the Zoning Reform Working Group, municipal officials, and planning, public health, and environmental organizations Sustainable Water Infrastructure • Seeks to address a $21 billion backlog in water infrastructure needs • Developed advocacy materials and press to highlight the need for increased investment in water infrastructure • Partners include environmental, business, and municipal organizations, through the Water Infrastructure Alliance, a group of organizations growing out of the Water Infrastructure Finance Commission. 60 Temple Place Boston, MA 02111 | 617.933.0700 Funding provided by the MetroBoston Consortium for Sustainable Communities with a grant from US HUD Zoning Reform Sustainable Water Infrastructure ZONING & WATER VICTORIES Water infrastructure legislation passed in the Senate (2013) Zoning reform legislation favorably reported out of committee (2014)
  17. 17. Route 9 MetroWest Smart Growth Plan Funding provided by the MetroBoston Consortium for Sustainable Communities with a grant from US HUD Landscaping Parcel Interconnectivity Health, Safety, Environment Growth without Gridlock Smart Growth Components Good Public Transit Compact and Walkable Buildings in Front, Parking Behind Pedestrian & Bicycle Friendly The MetroWest Regional Collaborative and the Metropolitan Area Planning Council worked with Southborough, Framingham, Natick and Wellesley on the Route 9 Smart Growth Plan. This plan for future development along the Route 9 corridor includes alternative designs and land uses for several smart growth opportunity areas. It includes, also, computer visualizations, traffic analyses, design guidelines and zoning recommendations. The Route 9 Smart Growth Plan focuses on the potential for compact, mixed-use (housing, office, and commercial) developments that are pedestrian and bicycle friendly.
  18. 18. The policy agenda is a road map to move us away from existing inequities and towards the vision the region’s residents want to pass along to their children and grandchildren. State of Equity Policy Agenda The policy agenda provides strategies to reduce these disparities. They fall into three categories: Invest in places, to ensure that all residents, regardless of race or class, have the ability to live in areas of opportunity, however they might choose to define that opportunity. Invest in people, according to need and regardless of where they might live. Build more equitable public systems, to ensure that all decision-making processes and investments are made with the interests of the region’s historically underserved populations in mind. Release Event! July 11, 2014 Join Angela Glover Blackwell, founder and CEO of Policy Link, at the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice at Harvard Law School for the release of the Policy Agenda. Funding provided by the Metro Boston Consortium for Sustainable Communities with a grant from US HUD and the Barr Foundation • 20% of Blacks/African Americans live in poverty compared to 6% of Whites • About half of renters pay more than 30% of their income on rent • Nearly 75% of Black/African American and Latino students attend high-poverty schools, while just over 10% of Whites do Our region is growing more diverse… …but we are growing less equal.
  19. 19. Managing Neighborhood Change SOMERVILLE MAPC WORKED WITH THE CITY OF SOMERVILLE, SOMERVILLE COMMUNITY CORPORATION, SOMERVILLE TRANSPORTATION EQUITY PARTNERSHIP, FRIENDS OF THE COMMUNITY PATH, AND OTHER PARTNERS to catalyze and support development and preservation in transformational areas of the city, while helping to manage change and stabilize neighborhoods in ways that advance equity and long-term sustainability. The primary work focused on developing anti-displacement strategies for the city and its partners and drafting a community benefits/ metrics report to advance the community path. 60 Temple Place Boston, MA 02111 | 617.933.0700 Funding provided by the MetroBoston Consortium for Sustainable Communities with a grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Learning about housing issues has led to deeper understanding of the interrelationship between housing and other issues in Somerville and the need to bring greater awareness of and advocate for housing. Ellin Reisner, Somerville Transportation Equity Partnership This body of data answers long-standing questions and it’s incredibly gratifying to have the knowledge. Meridith Levy, Somerville Community Corporation Outcomes: • The City is securing funding for affordable housing development and programs, including acquiring property adjacent to the Green Line extension route • The City and partners are advancing workforce development strategies to connect Somerville residents to local jobs and ensuring that residents have the skills and preparation to succeed. • MassDOT is providing full funding for the Somerville Community Path as part of the Green Line Extension project.
  20. 20. Regional Transit- Oriented Development Goals and Finance MAPC WORKED WITH THE LISC BOSTON, CLF VENTURES, MA ASSOCIATION OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATIONS, MA HOUSING INVESTMENT CORPORATION, funders, and statewide organizations to 1) gain agreement on regional transit-oriented development goals and an understanding of the capacity for housing and economic growth in station areas throughout the region, 2) hold a convening to learn from other regions’ successes in developing TOD funds, 3) prepare a TOD finance gap analysis to determine impediments to TOD, and 4) hold a final TOD summit to announce the launch of two new TOD funds available to communities in Massachusetts. Outcomes: • Helped advance the development of The Accelerator fund by LISC Boston. • Helped advance the development of the Health Neighborhoods Equity Fund by CLF Ventures. • Helped secure $1 million for each fund from the MA Executive Office of Housing and Economic Development. • Growing Station Areas spurred four additional station area studies in Beverly, Gloucester, Melrose, and Quincy. 60 Temple Place Boston, MA 02111 | 617.933.0700 Funding provided by the MetroBoston Consortium for Sustainable Communities with a grant from US HUD, Ford Foundation, Barr Foundation, Hyams Foundation, and The Boston Foundation

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