MAPC sPARKing New Ideas Parking Symposium: Presentation by Tom Daniel
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  • 1. Parking Management: The Salem Experience Tom Daniel, AICP City of Gloucester sPARKing New Ideas, April 8, 2014
  • 2. Downtown Parking in Zoning Code • 1980’s had high vacancy and little vibrancy • To facilitate downtown residential development, ordinance changed – 1 space required for existing buildings • can be on site or in a facility within 1,000 ft. – 1.5 spaces required on site for new construction • No spaces required for commercial uses
  • 3. • Public Parking - Off-street - Two garages (914 and 207 spaces, 1,121 total) - 10 parking lots (38-123 spaces, 728 total) - On-street - Metered (331 spaces) - Time limit (38 spaces) - Resident Only (50 spaces) - Unregulated (42 spaces) • Private Parking (2,500 spaces) • 2010: first pay stations installed
  • 4. Parking Study • In response to redevelopment question • Goals of study: - Develop a comprehensive approach to managing parking - Have greater efficiency in parking management to improve availability for residents, customers, employees, and visitors - Balance parking needs of different users to allow for economic development in downtown • Did not address all parking issues: - e.g., snow emergencies, citywide residential parking
  • 5. Public Process: Working Group - Destination Salem (Tourism Office) - Downtown Business Owners - Downtown Developer - Downtown Residents - Salem Chamber of Commerce - Salem Department of Planning and Community Development - Salem Main Streets - Salem Parking Board - Salem Parking Department - Salem Police Department - Salem Redevelopment Authority - The Salem Partnership (Public/Private Group)
  • 6. Public Process • Public workshops • Survey • Stakeholder interviews • Report submitted to City Council July 2010 • Additional outreach prior to Sept 2010 City Council action - NIAC, Chamber of Commerce, Parking Board
  • 7. Public Process • Outreach September 2010-April 2011 - Large employers/users: District Attorney, National Park Service, PEM, Salem Five, YMCA - Small employers and residents - Presentations: Salem Partnership (with Destination Salem), Salem Rotary, Salem Chamber of Commerce, Salem Main Streets, Salem Parking Board, NIAC • City Councilor Briefings (March-June 2011) • City Council Presentations April, May, June 2011 • Additional Downtown Stakeholder Presentations (April-June 2011) • Newspaper articles and editorials • 30 public workshops, presentations, or meetings
  • 8. There’s no parking downtown! I always find parking downtown. I’ll walk 15 minutes if it’ll save me a buck. I don’t care what it costs to park. I pay Salem property taxes so I should be able to park for free. I feed the meter, but not in front of my business. I buy passes for my employees so they’re not at customer spaces out front. I’m willing to risk a $15 ticket for convenience.
  • 9. R R M M P
  • 10. Convenience and location matter most.
  • 11. What is the most important consideration for you in choosing where to park in Salem? - 76% said ease of finding a space and location - 10% said price
  • 12. Even at peak weekday time, there is parking available.
  • 13. Parking availability is unbalanced.
  • 14. On-street regulations are confusing.
  • 15. Ruane Judicial Center NPS Visitor Center Post Office Waterfront Garage
  • 16. Pricing is unbalanced.
  • 17. On-street availability is key. City Council adopted policy objective for the parking system to operate at 15% on-street availability per block face.
  • 18. Objective Have 1 out 8 on-street spaces open to create a better experience for customers, residents, and visitors Key Methods - Use relative pricing - Provide additional options Additional Anticipated Outcomes - Simplified regulation - Reduced employee meter-feeding
  • 19. Recommendations from the Parking Study Working Group for City Council Action
  • 20. 1. Address Existing Concerns - Eliminate conflicting signage - Improve pay station kiosk interface - Improve exiting for pass holders at Downtown Garage - Install signage identifying Crombie Street and One Salem Green lots - Remove accessibility barriers - Install signage to intercept courthouse users - Work with Office of the Jury Commissioner to provide parking (and other) information
  • 21. 2. Implement Relative Pricing - High demand areas are priced more than low demand areas - On-street is priced more than off-street
  • 22. 2. Implement Relative Pricing On-Street Meters Formerly Currently - Zone 1 $0.50 $1.50 - Zone 2 $0.50 $0.75 - Zone 3 $0.50 $0.50 Parking Garages Formerly Currently - Downtown $1.50 $0.75 - Waterfront $1.50 $0.25
  • 23. 2. Implement Relative Pricing Parking Lots Formerly Currently Church Street West $1.50 $1.00 Church Street East $0.50 $1.00 Salem Green $0.50 $1.00 Sewall Street $0.50 $0.75 Front Street $0.50 $0.75 Klop Alley $0.50 $0.75 Crombie Street $0.50 $0.50 Riley Plaza East $0.50 $0.50 Riley Plaza West $0.00 $0.50 Bridge Street $2.00/day $4.00/day
  • 24. Relative Pricing Ruane Judicial Center NPS Visitor Center Post Office Waterfront Garage
  • 25. 3. Revise Existing Pass Program and Add Low Cost Option - Revise Pricing - $65/month for Downtown Garage (a $5/month increase) - $25/month for Waterfront Garage (a $35/month decrease ) - Note: Annual pass for garages now a 10% discount instead of 31% discount - Add New Low Cost Monthly Pass Area - $25/month for on-street zones and one lot - Establish Maximum Number of Passes - 75% of parking supply in a specific parking asset
  • 26. 4. Extend Time Limits - Four-hour time limit on-street and in lots - Limited exceptions: - On-street spaces by the post office proposed to stay 30 minutes - Church Street West lot (original pay station lot) to remain unlimited
  • 27. 5. Revise Enforcement Hours and Fines - On-Street: 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM (Mon-Sat) - Lots: 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM (Mon-Sat) - Parking ticket increase from $15 to $25 6. Increase Weekday On-Street Supply 7. Increase Availability of Convenience Parking in Downtown Garage
  • 28. 8. Increase Off-Street Supply 9. Implement New Governance Model 10. Establish Parking and Transportation Fund 11. Develop and Implement Communications and Information Plan
  • 29. How did it go?
  • 30. Implementation • Implementation Team - Dedicated group - Knowledge gaps and organizational challenges - Be aware of reporting structures - Include hearing officer and meter control staff early in process - Culture and systems shifts - Problem-solving approach - Electronic-based data vs. paper-based data
  • 31. Implementation • All Technology is not Equal • New Technology Brings Its Own Issues
  • 32. Implementation • Timing is Everything - The Steve’s Market Kerfuffle (a/k/a the meter vs. the loaf of bread)
  • 33. Implementation • A Good Communications Plan Matters (and you don’t need any new technology to do this!)
  • 34. Implementation • Don’t like - paying for what had been free - paying more for annual pass (10% discount vs. 31% discount) - the new enforcement hours (because I got a ticket) • Love - the low cost of Waterfront Garage - the monthly zone (except if I used to park there for free) - the smart meters and want more - the brochures and website
  • 35. Implementation • Met City Council objective of one space open per block in most areas • Increased utilization in Waterfront Garage and Crombie Street Lot • Decreased number of tickets issued
  • 36. Summary • Data is essential • Educate, outreach, and partnership from start • Package policy changes • Make sure technology is right for you • Remember low tech • Implement swiftly • Manage the system: evaluate, adjust, and resist pressure to make changes before system fully balanced
  • 37. Tom Daniel, AICP Community Development Director City of Gloucester 978 281-9781 tdaniel@gloucester-ma.gov