www.transamericanalliance.org

“DIRECT DEMOCRACY” ENHANCES COUNTRIES’ SOCIO-ECONOMIC STANDING

More than two-dozen countri...
Despite the unparalleled historical prosperity of the United States, the fact is there has been
steady erosion in our coun...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Fast Facts on "Participatory Direct Democracy"

1,913

Published on

More than two-dozen countries around the world have held “national electorate referendums” as some form of “Direct Democracy” since the mid-1800s. But do you know how many times the United States of America has held national referendums to solicit its voters over the last 220-plus years? Well, let us provide the quick answer: There is no historical precedence.

Judging from empirical research conducted by World Economic Forum and the United Nations, it is readily apparent that various forms of “Direct Democracy” (such as national referendums, ballot measures, etc.) have had some degree of translatable, beneficial impact on key European and Asian countries’ standard of living and economic competitiveness measurements.

The prospect of holding "National Electorate Referendums," while presenting potential logistical and cost challenges, is only proposed as option for TANC to call and only if Congress and the President did not "ultimately accede to the will of the people" on TANC-authored/sponsored domestic soci-economic reform legislation. Actually, this is the just the second prong of a blueprint for "Participatory Direct Democracy" -- the primary platform is an "Electorate Legislative Consortium" made up of a "rotating pool" of nonelected/nonpartisan American citizens who would solicit all key societal segments and craft reform legislation on a truly "consensus" basis...featuring "America's Best & Brightest" from key college academic circles as well.

Please also see our "Roadmap to Direct Democracy" presentation here on SlideShare or at http://www.transamericanalliance.org/19.html.

Thank you,

Michael A. Freeman, Executive Director
Trans-American Alliance for a National Consensus (TANC)
Email: ThinkTANC@transamericanalliance.org

Published in: News & Politics
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,913
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Fast Facts on "Participatory Direct Democracy"

  1. 1. www.transamericanalliance.org “DIRECT DEMOCRACY” ENHANCES COUNTRIES’ SOCIO-ECONOMIC STANDING More than two-dozen countries around the world have held “national electorate referendums” as some form of “Direct Democracy” since the mid-1800s. But do you know how many times the United States of America has held national referendums to solicit its voters over the last 220-plus years? Well, let us provide the quick answer: There is no historical precedence. Judging from empirical research conducted by World Economic Forum and the United Nations, it is readily apparent that various forms of “Direct Democracy” (such as national referendums, ballot measures, etc.) have had some degree of translatable, beneficial impact on key European and Asian countries’ standard of living and economic competitiveness measurements. Here are some fast facts: • The case for “Direct Democracy” is perhaps best illustrated by Switzerland, which, according to the Centre for Research on Direct Democracy (C2D), has held over 450 national electorate referendums since 1848 — making it one of the most affluent, stable countries in Western Europe and the world. • According to The World Economic Forum's 2007-08 Global Competitiveness Report, Switzerland ranks as the second-most competitive economy in the world — behind the United States — despite the fact it is merely 2% of America’s population (7.5 million people) and half of 1 percent of our country’s land mass (41,000 kilometers). • As great as our country is nourishing and supporting business innovation, there is a huge disconnect in the lowering of America’s Standard of Living scores, which had the U.S. slipping four slots to be the 12th-ranked country in the United Nation’s 2007-08 Human Development Index (HDI) report. (The HDI measure encompasses such criteria as life expectancy, literacy and school enrollment levels, and gross domestic product and purchasing power of an industrialized nation.) • The other six other nations atop the HDI report — Iceland (6 national referendums), Norway (6), Australia (49), Ireland (29) and Sweden (10) — have all held national referendums since the turn of the 20th Century. In fact, since the HDI measure began in 1988, the United States has never held the top ranking while Canada earned the top slot 10 times, followed by Norway (6 times), Japan (2), and once each for Iceland and Switzerland.
  2. 2. Despite the unparalleled historical prosperity of the United States, the fact is there has been steady erosion in our country’s’ “Standard of Living” scores, which may mean it is about time for some form of participatory, “Direct Democracy” in America. #######

×