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Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013
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Build your brain and health with motor movement and thinking skills ~ 2013

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This 6 hr talk integrates research in neuroscience with that in PE, OT, SLT, child development, education and more to introduce neuro-cognitive interventions to clinicians nationwide. For training …

This 6 hr talk integrates research in neuroscience with that in PE, OT, SLT, child development, education and more to introduce neuro-cognitive interventions to clinicians nationwide. For training dates see www.lynnekenney.com

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  • Do you know this child?
  • We used to think that very bright children’s executive skills should also be advanced but research has not supported this.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Brain-Based Interventions 2013 Lynne Kenney, PsyD www.lynnekenney.com @drlynnekenney
    • 2. Becoming A Brain-Based Clinician
    • 3. What is a Brain-Based Intervention?  An intervention that engages cognitive or motor parts of the brain  One that increases neuronal communication  One that builds skill sets  One that increases collaborative parenting strategies
    • 4. Neuroscience in Psychology
    • 5. Books on Brain Development Brain Facts – Society for Neuroscience  The Brain That Changes Itself ~ Norman Doidge, MD  The Woman Who Changed Her Brain ~ Barbara Arrowsmith-Young  Brain School ~ Howard Eaton  The Whole Brain Child ~ Dan Siegel, MD  How To Reach and Teach Children with Challenging Behavior ~ Otten & Tuttle  Smart But Scattered ~ Dawson & Guare
    • 6. Neuroscience + Cognitive/Dev Psych + OT + PE
    • 7. Today’s Landscape       ADHD and EF Learning Disabilities and EF Social Skills and EF Teaching skills sets across diagnoses Play Math (STM, WM, VSM, M2T) Motor Intelligence Therapy
    • 8. What does executive dysfunction “look like”  Child completes work but “forgets” to hand it in  Child has difficulty transitioning from one situation or task to another  Child doesn’t seem to catch “careless” errors  Child needs more external support and reminders than peers  Child can’t seem to keep track of directions, possessions, and assignments  Child is very inconsistent in her performance
    • 9. What is Executive Functioning (EF)?  An umbrella term covering related yet distinct skills  Refers to mental control/selfregulatory processes  Can be understood as Cognitive and Limbic
    • 10. McCloskey 23 Self-Regulation Executive Functions Organize Perceive Initiate Modulate Gauge Focus/Select Sustain Stop/Interrupt Flexible/Shift Inhibit Foresee Generate Associate Balance Store Retrieve Pace Time
    • 11. EF Domains         (Kenney, 2012) Attention, focus, distractibility Cognitive control, shift and flexibility Memory, input, manipulation, output Emotional regulation and modulation Problem solving, decision making Impulse control and management Organization, planning, and time management Motor management planning, pacing, initiation, maintaining, stopping
    • 12. I. Executive Functions include the ability to:  Survey and preview  Plan, organize, sequence, initiate and execute tasks  Hold, manipulate and retrieve memory  Shift focus, sustain attention, tolerate and adapt to changes in expectations  Stop, think, decide, respond
    • 13. II. Executive Functions include the ability to:  Conduct visual-spatial mental operations  Track information and activities in working memory  Perceive, read, interpret and respond to social situations  Regulate and manage emotions  Evaluate, plan and manage time  Use language to facilitate communication within relationships  Reason, evaluate choices and make decisions
    • 14. Don’t All Kids have Executive Dysfunction?  EF follows a developmental course as do all cognitive and social-emotional skills  We all have domains in which we could improve  EFD interferes with daily adaptive living skills
    • 15. Good Books on EF
    • 16. Twitter ~ The Research Playground BRAIN DEVELOPMENT         @davidnowell @drbethkids @all4mychild @braininsights @viviensabel @drmarty01 @DrEscotet @TheTeenDoc
    • 17. Enhancing Executive Function with skill set development Where we are heading: Improving Neuronal Connections Knowing the different between a skill deficit and willful non-compliance Strategies to build brain connections
    • 18. Your Brain is Like A Placemat  Insulted? Don’t be.  A placemat is a good thing.  Connect the dots.
    • 19. How do Neurons Connect? The electrical signals (nerve impulses) carried by neurons are passed on to other neurons at junctions called synapses. The signal may be directly transferred at electrical synapses or, if there is no physical link between adjacent neurons, the signal is carried across the gap by chemicals called neurotransmitters. By using neurotransmitters, the nervous system can alter the way a message is passed on. Each neuron communicates with many others and this contributes to the amazing complexity of the brain. www.sciencemuseum.org.uk
    • 20. What is The Synapse?  When a nerve impulse reaches the synapse at the end of a neuron, it cannot pass directly to the next one. Instead, it triggers the neuron to release a chemical neurotransmitter. The neurotransmitter drifts across the gap between the two neurons. On reaching the other side, it fits into a tailor-made receptor on the surface of the target neuron, like a key in a lock. This docking process converts the chemical signal back into an electrical nerve impulse. www.sciencemuseum.org.uk
    • 21. Neurotransmitters  Your brain uses over 50 different neurotransmitter chemicals. Although electrical signaling between neurons is quicker and more energy efficient, chemical signaling is far more versatile. The signals carried by some neurotransmitters excite the target cell while others dampen down their activity, depending on the type of neurotransmitter released at the synapse and the receptors they reach. This is what sharpens the contrast between light and dark in the eye, for example. www.sciencemuseum.org.uk
    • 22. Connections  Neurons can connect with up to a hundred thousand other cells. This number of connections is a truly enormous number: 10 thousand trillion.  One neuron can have as many as 100,000 dendrites.  In a human, there are more than 125 trillion synapses just in the cerebral cortex alone
    • 23. How Do We Build Brain Connections?  Exposure  Experience  Doing, thinking, mirroring  Practice ~ and a lot of it www.unc.edu
    • 24. Pruning  In a human fetus, almost a trillion neurons are produced. During the last month, they are produced at the unbelievable rate of 250,000 per second. Eighty-to-hundred billion of these neurons will be utilized by experience and become permanent, while the other 900 billion will be pruned – that is, carefully dismantled with the material recycled by the brain’s unique immune system. jonlieffmd.com
    • 25. Brain Training  Some programs include Luminosity, Captain’s Log, COGMED, MC2, Brain Gym and Brain Builder. If the child or adult has not had a neuropsychological or executive function evaluation that may be a first step.  Exercise is brain training. Activities that involve motor control and thinking at the same time build brain connections. Some activities to consider include: XBox Dance Dance Revolution, karate, double dutch jump rope, yoga, hacky sac, swimming and tennis. Getting up, out and moving in any way possible is good for everyone.  Preventing brain loss: Cognitive-motor exercises, working memory, nutrition, exercise
    • 26. Executive Function and Education        EF and intelligence Twice Gifted Disorganized students Homework interventions Task Analysis Skill-set development Multi-sensory interventions (MIT)
    • 27. NOVELTY  Only four to eight minutes of pure factual lecture can be tolerated before the brain seeks other stimuli, either internal (e.g., daydreaming) or external (Who is that walking down the hall?). If the teacher is not providing that novelty, the brain will go elsewhere. Bruce Perry, PhD
    • 28. Teaching with Visual Aides and Movement  50 % of children are kinesthetic learners so why not begin with touch?  Visual learners learn by watching. 40% of learners are in this category.  Only 10 percent of secondary students learn best auditorily, but 80 percent of instructional delivery is auditory.
    • 29. JP Das Prep & Cogent
    • 30. EF and Intelligence Developed by Frederic Perez-Alvarez & Carme Timoneda-Gallart, neuroscientists and authors of A Better Look at Intelligence from Girona Spain, FUNDI is designed to teach children, parents and their teachers about critical aspects of metacognition and executive function. Applying PASS theory developed by JP DAS, the producers of these valuable films seek to help children learn about their cognitive processes in a manner to which children understand and relate.
    • 31. Television
    • 32. Flashlight
    • 33. Parrot
    • 34. Conductor
    • 35. Evidence That Enhances Learning  1. Frequency and recency of neuron synapses increase memory Increase frequency through practice and maintain fluency through use  2. Emotions strengthen memory Appeal to and engage emotions while learning  3. Learning causes changes to the physical structure of the brain Allowing children to teach increases their ability to learn throughout their lives  4. Memories are stored in multiple parts of the brain Engage all senses when learning  5. Our brains are programmed to focus on new and unusual inputs Learning should tap into the brain’s natural curiosity and intrinsic motivation Sources: Donald J. Ford, Ph.D., C.P.T., Carl Haywood, PhD
    • 36. Hello Remembering…  Most people forget newly learned concepts after a day.  Re-learning forgotten concepts is easier than learning new ones. This is even true years after something is forgotten.  Over-learning typically occurs during motor learning this repetitive form of learning reinforces information and requires high levels of brain organization.
    • 37. What Needs To Change?  1. We move to learn, we play to behave (provide opportunity for creativity and critical thinking)  2. Multi-modal sensory learning strategies  3. Rhythmic daily movement  4. Make children the teachers/mentors  5. Instruct less, interact more
    • 38. Disorganized Students
    • 39. Thinking Skill Domains         Organization Planning Systems and methods (Parrot) Initiation Attention to detail Finding the data Problem solving Explaining one’s answer
    • 40. What every student needs to know ~ How to…  Plan  Initiate  Execute  Review  Revise  Turn In
    • 41. SOAR ~ Susan Kruger           Reading comprehension Critical thinking Active learning Written expression Time management Organization Active listening Attention to detail Learning strategies Independence
    • 42. Handwriting Without Tears
    • 43. EF Management     Calendars, planners and schedules Routines and daily activities Task Lists Project Management  SYSTEMS: Digital, paper, post-it notes, planners, mobiles tools Cozi.com, myjobchart.com, famzoo.com
    • 44. IN CLASS  Listening alone is not enough Stanford, Cornell)  Note Taking Skills Matter  Modified Cornell Method  Remaining alert  Remaining active  Transferring information  Summarizing (Columbia,
    • 45. Modified Cornell Method
    • 46. AT HOME  Actively use a planner  Thrive in your homework setting (snacks, distractions, tools)  Initiate, execute and complete one task at a time  Establish time-frames for discrete tasks (chunking)  Review, revise, summarize
    • 47. Tips For Parents Check the website Check the backpack Support the homework system Talk about the homework process for today  Help child manage time and tasks  Be available to help    
    • 48. Test Preparation  Be visual (Cornell, notecards, teaching content to others)  Sleep, eat and have a + mindset  Arrive early  Bring all needed materials  Stress relievers  Read questions carefully, show your work
    • 49. Calendars and Planners  Weekly and daily calendars  Reviewing next weeks assignments on Sunday  Transferring working onto a marker board or EF action plan
    • 50. Planning/Time Management  Use timers (auditory, visual)  Use alarms  Estimate amount of time needed for a task and then write down actual time  Sarah Ward ~ cognitiveconnectionstherapy.com
    • 51. Manage The Work Space  What does your space look like? How functional is it?          How organized is your study space? Does your student have all the items he needs? Does your student have the ability to use multi-sensory transfer skills? Describe the study space setting, could you work there? Is there an adult near-by? Do you have a time set aside? Are you working in 15 min increments or those suitable to your child? Do you have prompts or cues? Is your workspace portable or stationary?
    • 52. Go Multi-Sensory        Encourage transfer skills Use video, audio and tactile strategies Use marker boards Use quad bulletin board Draw and doodle Vary the types of paper available Plain, graph, wide ruled, narrow ruled
    • 53. Building Routines and Habits       Overlearning and automaticity Motor movement Systems and routines Habit replacement Visual cues Secret signals
    • 54. Talking with Students about their Study Styles     Emphasize strengths Keep it short and simple! Use visuals Discuss weaknesses as hypotheses (it seems that you lose track of your ideas when you are writing...is that true?)  Instill hope as you describe interventions  Collaborate, collaborate more…
    • 55. There are no BUT’s here  Help the student feel valued  Let the student have some control in the discussion and plan  Ask questions without making assumptions  The relationship is the agent of change
    • 56. Organizing The Disorganized Student  Determine “Help Me” domain listening, attending, focus, note taking, impulse control, transferring data, input, output, audition, vision, organization, previewing, planning, execution, time-management  Identify needed skill-set  Make a plan  Execute, monitor, review plan
    • 57. Skill Set Tracking
    • 58. Prioritization  The modified Sullivan technique for prioritizing, planning and execution A B C  48 hrs
    • 59. Cognitive Flexibility  Social stories  Social skills training (individual, dyad, group)  Positive reinforcement for managing a change or generating a new way of responding (reinforce new habits)
    • 60. Gifted Talented ~ 2 E
    • 61. EF and Reading  Efficient EF is essential to reading comprehension- need to adjust reading rate to level of difficulty of material and monitor as one reads
    • 62. EF and Math  Word problems require the ability to ignore extraneous information, sequence steps, and monitor one’s work  Many kids with executive dysfunction make “careless” computation errors and use inefficient procedures
    • 63. EF and Writing  Writing is the most complex task we ask students to master. It involves:  keeping track of directions  physical act of writing  using correct mechanics (spelling, punctuation, and capitalization)  creating complex sentences  transferring ideas into written form  deciding on main ideas, details, flow of ideas
    • 64. Interventions         Proper diagnosis Behavioral skill building Academic support Medication Brain Training An organized home environment Access to competent parental figures Nourishment
    • 65. Data Based Treatment Planning  Do you have a brief neuropsych eval to assess IQ and executive function?  Do you see an OT for sensory issues?  Do you improve food and nutrition?  Do you look into amino acids to impact neurotransmitters?  Do you do brain training?  What behavioral interventions do you consider?  Is it time for a medication trial?
    • 66. Data Based Treatment Planning
    • 67. HOW TO HELP Accommodations Strategies Skill Building
    • 68. At Home ~ The Family Coach Method       Stay out of The Discipline Trap Establish routines and rhythm Clarify the family culture Collaborate on behavioral expectations Build a pond for better behavior Focus on what works
    • 69. Three Tiers For In-Home Interventions
    • 70. Intervention Pyramid  Medication  Neurotransmitters  Food/Nutrition Developmental, Behavioral, Learning Interventions
    • 71. Damage Control       Using Previewing Planning Problem Solving Collaborating And BLOOM LANGUAGE
    • 72. Skill Deficits vs Willful Noncompliance  The 80/20 rule  A skill deficit is when the task demands exceed the skill level  Are the expectations clearly understood?  Chunk  Be detailed  Model role play, practice
    • 73. Is this a skill deficit? Can he do it? If yes, expect it If no, teach it
    • 74. Case Example  Sammy and his “falling off” chair.
    • 75. Freedomland
    • 76. EF and Behavioral Change         Visualizing and verbalizing Role Play Social Stories The Beginning, Middle & End Going Full Circle See, say, play, touch, build Mentoring others Motor movement
    • 77. Cognitive Skills
    • 78. Let’s Start Building       J.P Das Suzy Koontz suzykoontz.com Jean Blaydes Madigan abllab.com SparkPE Eric Jensen www.jensenlearning.com Gil Connell @movingsmartnow
    • 79. Breaking Down Skill Sets I Listening         I I I I I I I I chose not to speak established eye contact listened to someone speaking nodded my head to show I was listening repeated back what I heard, when asked asked a question when I did not understand remembered instructions followed the instructions
    • 80. Breaking Down Skill Sets II Listening         I I I I I I I I chose not to speak established eye contact listened to someone speaking nodded my head to show I was listening repeated back what I heard, when asked asked a question when I did not understand remembered instructions followed the instructions
    • 81. Breaking Down Skill Sets III For The Parent         I I I I I I I I defined an expected behavior named the expected behavior chose my behavior, thinking it through practiced ready, steady, act practiced “I have a choice” thought about the next step spoke the sequence of my actions wrote the sequence of my actions
    • 82. Impulsivity          Waiting one’s turn Refraining from touching others Keeping one’s hands to self Not grabbing without permission Keeping one’s body still Thinking before you act Managing oral-motor movements Verbalization, waiting one’s turn Speaking in turn
    • 83. Helping children “do as expected” takes previewing and planning  1. Tell the children what is about to happen. “We are going outside to play. We will quietly get in line, stand helicopter distance from one another and keep our voices quiet.”  2. Tell them what they can do with their hands and their bodies. “While you are on the playground, keep your hands to yourself as you run, jump and play.”  3. Tell them how they will know the activity is over. “When you hear our ‘secret signal’, you will line up at the red door and we will slowly walk back inside.”
    • 84. Self-Regulation
    • 85. Calming Resources SEL www.kimochis.com Physical Movement www.sparkpe.org Repetitive Movement balavisx.com Rhythmic Breathing Take Five Music/Stories Listening www.stressfreekids.com  Art Drawing Mandalas  Listen to a Raisin – Meditate  Vision Therapy     
    • 86. Me Moves
    • 87. Anger Mountain
    • 88. Polyspot Stories
    • 89. The Caveman and The Thinker Your Child’s Two-Part Brain The Defensive Brain Collaboration Works Calm the caveman to engage the thinker
    • 90. We Calm Down To Think  Teach relaxation breathing and self-talk  Allow for a break (including a physical place to calm down) when child encounters a change  Provide warnings (signals) prior to transitions – they can be visual, touch, or verbal  @stressfreekids Lori Lite
    • 91. Subcortical Structures  Sensory Integration, Sensory Processing, and Sensory Modulation Disorders: Putative Functional Neuroanatomic Underpinnings Leonard F. Koziol & Deborah Ely Budding & Dana Chidekel Cerebellum. 2011 Dec;10(4):770-92.
    • 92. Sensory Integration Dysfunction  There is considerable overlap between executive and sensory processing  Both are related to self-regulation  Many kids with sensory integration difficulties also have trouble with cognitive flexibility
    • 93. Oversensitivity       Olfactory – “ewe it smells” Gustation – “It’s gritty mama” Tactile – “Ouch! That hurts” Visual – “There is still light” Sound – “I need to get out of this car!” Motor - “Inside I am just shaking”  A learning story ~ 9 year old Jason There is still light!
    • 94. Twitter ~ The Research Playground INTERVENTION         @Inclusive_Class @marianne_russo @special-ism @movingsmartnow @micheleborba @talkingteenage @Kiboomu @kidlutions
    • 95. 5 Things About The Teen Brain You were afraid to ask, but need to know  Teen brain growth (neuronal connections) is in spurts and starts The Teen Years Explained: A Guide to Healthy Adolescent Development (Johns Hopkins University, 2009) by Clea McNeely and Jayne Blanchard  Go away! Wait, where are you going? (Separation and Independence)  Why so moody? The limbic interference relates to neuronal growth, hormonal changes and brain reorganization  Why so cliquey? Teens are herd animals…  What? Your brakes aren’t working? (Impulsivity and risk taking and the teenage brain)
    • 96. Teens and Tweenies  Teenage as a second language ~ Barbara R. Greenberg, & Jennifer A. Powell-Lunder  Get out of my life! But first will you take me and Cheryl to the mall ~ Anthony Wolf  Why do they act that way? ~ David Walsh
    • 97. Food Rules
    • 98. You are what you assimilate  Get back to real whole food  Consider amino acids neurogistics.com
    • 99. 5 Food Rules 1. 1 oz water per pound per day 2. If it does not rot or sprout do without 3. Consider 1-2 oz protein/fats every four hours for children 4. Consider 8-10 servings of color per day (1/2 cup per serving) 5. Eat when you are hungry, mostly plants
    • 100. SLEEP S = Similar bed-time schedule and routine nightly L = Light-off, dark, cool sleep environment E = Everything off, phone, TV, music E = Exercise, regularly at least 45 mins daily P = Preparation and planning
    • 101. Twitter ~ The Research Playground NUTRITION  @NutritionBlogs  @MelissaMcCreey  @childobesity (nourish interactive)     @ RMNutrition @eatingarainbow www.KidKritics.com www.pathways4health.org
    • 102. Field Trip!
    • 103. Play Math is a corticocerebellar math program that alternates fine and gross motor movement to teach children ages 6-12 fact families, factors and fractions (Kenney 2012)
    • 104. The Method       Mirror or Skip Count (Balls) Slide and Glide (Blocks) Over and Up (Blocks) How do numbers fit together? What makes a family? Advanced techniques
    • 105. Three things children taught me about how they learn math. We build brain connections with: a. Rhythm b. Fine and Gross Motor Movement c. Mentoring
    • 106. Audition and Rhythm  For younger kids who have trouble getting started with the morning or evening routine at home, use a song they like to guide them through  Before starting a seated task, engage in some gross motor activity (quick walk, throw a koosh ball, etc.)  Alex Doman ~ Healing At The Speed of Sound  @Kiboomu
    • 107. The Importance of Play
    • 108. We Teach EF Through Play        Decision making Inhibition Cognitive Flexibility Attention Focus Shift Creativity/Imagination
    • 109. Gill Connell ~ Play  PLAY: How it Shapes the Brain, Opens the Imagination, and Invigorates the Soul by Stuart Brown, M.D.  THE POWER OF PLAY: Learning What Comes Naturally by David Elkind, Ph.D.  PLAYFUL PARENTING by Lawrence J. Cohen, Ph.D.  A CHILD'S WORK – The Importance of Fantasy Play by Vivien Gussen Paley  THE ART OF ROUGHHOUSING by Anthony T. DeBenedet, M.D. and Lawrence J. Cohen, Ph.D.
    • 110. The Power of Hopscotch  HOPPING = MIDLINE DEVELOPMENT For children, hopping signals sophisticated advances in both physical coordination, balance, AND cognitive development. You see, as your child refines her physical coordination, she is also building essential neural pathways in the brain. It's those exact same pathways which will one day become the conduits for left/right brain thinking tasks such as creativity, reasoning, and selfregulation.     DON'T STEP ON THE LINE = BODY CONTROL STOP & START = BODY RHYTHM LEAPING = MUSCLE STRENGTH SPACES = SPATIAL AWARENESS movingsmartblog.blogspot.com
    • 111. Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Special Population

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