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Work teams report
Work teams report
Work teams report
Work teams report
Work teams report
Work teams report
Work teams report
Work teams report
Work teams report
Work teams report
Work teams report
Work teams report
Work teams report
Work teams report
Work teams report
Work teams report
Work teams report
Work teams report
Work teams report
Work teams report
Work teams report
Work teams report
Work teams report
Work teams report
Work teams report
Work teams report
Work teams report
Work teams report
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Work teams report

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This is a report I created for my Graduate Certificate in Business (Administration) where I used a real functioning team working on a project. The team consisted of company staff and those of a …

This is a report I created for my Graduate Certificate in Business (Administration) where I used a real functioning team working on a project. The team consisted of company staff and those of a consulting firm employed for this project. The report was adopted by my employer.

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  • 1. Work Teams Organisational Functions & Dynamics April 2011 Author: Lynden Riley
  • 2. 2 Table of Contents Abstract.........................................................................................................................................................3 Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................3 Methodology.................................................................................................................................................3 Analysis .........................................................................................................................................................4 4.1 Identify the members of your team................................................................................................4 4.2 Identify how your team interacts with the wider organisation and the team goals........................4 4.3 Assess your team members in relation to their work style and analyse if they have the necessary skills to achieve the team goals. ....................................................................................................5 4.4 Analyse your team’s performance against the creating effective team’s article, against the following criteria. ..........................................................................................................................7 a) Mutual Trust..................................................................................................................................7 b) Unified Commitment.....................................................................................................................8 c) Good Communication....................................................................................................................9 d) Negotiating Skills .........................................................................................................................11 e) Appropriate Leadership...............................................................................................................12 f) Internal Support ..........................................................................................................................13 g) External Support..........................................................................................................................14 4.5 Identify the key strengths of your team.......................................................................................15 4.6 Identify weaknesses in your team................................................................................................16 4.7 Identify areas for improvement ...................................................................................................16 Conclusions .................................................................................................................................................17 Key Learning Points.....................................................................................................................................18 List of References........................................................................................................................................19 Appendix 1 – Team Structure .................................................................................................................20 Appendix 2 – Company Matrix Chart – Organisation Staff Headcount..................................................21 Appendix 3 – Team Management Wheel ...............................................................................................22 Appendix 4 – Team Performance Survey................................................................................................23 Appendix 5 – Team Performance Survey Results ...................................................................................28
  • 3. 3 Abstract The following report provides an analysis of the performance of the Project Fundación team. This report looks at the team with respect to the organisation as a whole, then using results of surveys completed by team members, allowing an analysis of the team and individuals. This was achieved by defining members work preferences and roles, comparing the team to the 7 characteristics of effect teams as defined in Foundations Management (Robbins et. el.). The report will outline the team’s strengths and weaknesses and highlights the areas in which the team could improve its performance. Introduction “Coming together is a beginning. Keeping together is progress. Working together is success.” (Henry Ford). This report aims to assess the team in relation to their work styles by using Team Management theories and their performance against 7 characteristics of effective teams. These results show where the team excel and where the areas of improvement exist, thus empowering working success! Methodology To compile the research data, team members completed an on-line survey covering the 7 elements of effective teams (Appendix 4). Once the responses were received, the results were tabled, with each answer being allocated a point value and then averaged (Appendix 5). Members then completed a survey on work preferences using the RIDO scales, which allowed allocation of roles to each member using the Team Management Wheel (Appendix 3). Due to the participants partially completing the Team Management Index, the results are indicative of their performances. In order to substantiate the results from the data collected, I reviewed relevant articles, websites and publications along with discussions with the project team leaders.
  • 4. 4 Analysis 4.1 Identify the members of your team. Robbins et al. (2009, p430) identify a work team as…’groups whose members work intensely on a specific common goal, using their positive synergy, individual and mutual accountability, and complementary skills’. The Project Fundación team consists of staff from the company’s Melbourne and Chile offices combined with external contractors. The team consists of 20 core members: 8 Melbourne staff, 2 seconded from the Chile office and 10 contractor staff. All of these team members interact with the company’s Brazilian office. The team organisation chart can be found in Appendix 1. Seconded staff members have mainly been employed within the company for some years, whilst the consultancy staff members have only been associated with the project team for 2 months. 4.2 Identify how your team interacts with the wider organisation and the team goals. The organisation is spread across 3 countries: Australia, Chile and Brazil. This requires the team to work through time zones, cultural requirements and differences. The team has been created specifically for this project only. As such, they can at times have limited interaction with the wider organisation. This interaction generally occurs when there is a need for more specialised advice and is performed via e-mail or face to face discussions. Due to their objectives being one of a financial function, the team work under the banner of the Finance Department within the organisation. Team leaders for this project team have presented to all staff to ensure everyone is aware of the team goals, and the timeframes within which the team are to deliver. Constant communication are issued to staff such as update newsletters which are sent out on a monthly basis, along with a dedicated intranet web site showing timeframes, organisation chart of the team and relevant documents regarding the project.
  • 5. 5 The organisation values the experience of the team’s members, both from the consultant’s workforce to the company’s own internal staff. Members of the company who have been seconded from other teams and countries are held in high regard for their skill sets, professionalism and previous ability to perform and deliver within time constraints. If the team require other expert advice, they are able to call upon the expertise of other members of the company along with the larger resources of the contractor. Appendix 2 shows the team within the organisation. All members have received documented information on their goals and are consulted when changes are required to their roles. 4.3 Assess your team members in relation to their work style and analyse if they have the necessary skills to achieve the team goals. Using RIDO scales (Relationships, Information, Decisions, Organisation), the team members plotted where they felt their work preferences lie. The RIDO scale used is the basis for Margerison McCann’s Team Management Profile system, allowing the results to be mapped to the Margerison-McCann Team Management Wheel (Appendix 3, Figure 8) to illustrate the roles within the team (Appendix 3, Figure 9). Margerison McCann (1995 p38) state that ‘if a team is to be successful two ideal conditions have to be met: • the team must be well balanced with respect to role preferences on the Team Management Wheel • the team must be well linked.’ According to the above criteria, the results show that not all the roles necessary for a successful team have been filled. Of the 20 core team members, only 11 responded to the survey with one of those responses plotted in the middle of each scale, therefore not committing to any preferences.
  • 6. 6 No team members mapped to the Explorer/Promoter. As this team has been created as a business requirement, there is no need for a Promoter. A Promoters role is to obtain resources required to get the project off the ground and to influence management into moving this project from a concept stage to reality. As this project has been in the business plan of the organisation for some years, this role is redundant. Within the Assessor/Developer portion of the wheel, 3 team members (TM 6, 7 & 8), all being members of the company staff. All enjoy the opportunity of working in a project area where they have the ability to take on board ideas and incorporate these into the working development plan for the project completion. They enjoy analysing different approaches to problems presented to them. The team have two Thruster/Organisers (TM 9 & 10) being made up of one staff member and one contractor staff. This gives a nice balance to team by having a member of both the staff and contractors who enjoy making things happen. Both are strong personalities who are not fazed by meeting challenges and conflict head-on. They ensure their respective teams are clear on what is expected and what their individual roles require. Both are task orientated which can sometimes lead them to be more focused on achieving the task than considering staff’s feelings. 4 members were identified as Concluder/Producers (TM 2, 3, 4 & 5). These team members are practical, patient and structured people. They are the members who can be relied upon to work quickly, predicably and reliably. Team member 1 acts within the Controller/Inspector section. This is not surprising due to TM1 being one of the Project Managers. Being the main delegator of work and point of contact with the wider firm, he is also the primary linker in the team. His role requires him to also control and inspect the output of the team. No other members mapped to the Controller/Inspector, the Upholder/Maintainer or the Reporter/Advisor sections of the wheel. Although no one scored within these two roles, the functions are performed by the Project Managers. They ensure that the processes are regularly assessed and any adjustments needed are put in place and that the team as a whole is effective. These two gentlemen both have strong personal values and principles
  • 7. 7 and are the prime decision makers of the project team. They support all members, giving guidance where needed. Also the Change Management & Training Coordinator plays a major role in ensuring the team standards are being met and if required, she will ensure proper training of staff as needed to keep the team and its objectives on track. Her role is to continuously assist with any matters to ensure the team and the organisation remains satisfied. True to the Controller/Inspector profile, she is often seen working quietly on a number of detailed tasks. Due to the nature of the team, it is not surprising that the majority of the members are all sited to the one side of the wheel. Although some members currently are covering the roles that are not necessary a preference in their work style, it is a part of their job requirements and therefore is not to be neglected. Margerison’s (2002 p136) notion that ‘whatever your work preferences, you can develop skills in many areas and contribute to all aspects of team work’. 4.4 Analyse your team’s performance against the creating effective team’s article, against the following criteria. Please refer to Appendix 4 for survey questions and Appendix 5 for results showing the weighting system used and the results for each section. a) Mutual Trust Regarding mutual trust within the team, responses to three questions regarding the team’s commitment, confidence, support and behaviour, showed the majority being Agree to Undecided (Figure 1). The team is emotionally supportive of each other, but at time the pressures of time constraints can have an impact. Best endeavours are being made by individuals to honour team commitments but at times, people are missing timeframes due to work loads. As all members of the team understand and are at times in a similar position, the team still have faith in one another and there are no issues with confidences in other’s abilities, character and integrity. Members roles are quite structured therefore they are not required to take risks. Due to the nature of the project, work streams tend to still work in silos with each
  • 8. 8 having specific issues to manage hence the undecided scores. More can be done to ensure cross-functional issues are commonly understood. Figure 1: Scores for Mutual Trust b) Unified Commitment In relation to unified commitment, the team responded to two questions regarding belonging and commitment to goals above personal agendas, with the result being Agree followed by Strongly Agree with Undecided being the lowest score (Figure 2). The majority of the team feel a strong sense of belonging and are motivated by a common purpose without personal agendas. Those in the strongly agree category were members of the contractor’s team who’s commitment is to produce results then move onto another contract, therefore are focused on achieving the goals. Those members who were undecided were themselves committed to the team goals but felt that due to some members not being able to work full time on the project, could possibly hamper the team success, thus questioning the commitment of these staff toward the team goals. It is the personal commitment of each team member to the team goals and to one another that sets high performance teams apart. According to Tyson (1998 p102) ‘A group goal is more than a summation of the goals of all the group members. It is a goal that is desired by enough members to motivate them to work collaboratively towards its achievement’. Once the company employs more staff, those members of the team who are still Strongly Disagree, 0 Disagree, 0 Undecided, 10 Agree, 32 Strongly Agree, 0
  • 9. 9 performing other duties will be given the freedom to commit fully to the team and thus finally allowing a feeling of unified commitment. Whilst there are many milestones and target dates for various team members to reach, the Project Managers constantly explore new ways to making the goals and deadlines common across the whole team and well understood by all. Members commented that they had regular team meetings and updates, with constant updates from and access to Project Managers which gave them the feeling of belonging. Figure 2: Scores for Unified Commitment c) Good Communication The team responded to three questions regarding the team’s communication effectiveness, frequency & productiveness, and feedback on communications with external parties, with the majority choosing Agree and Undecided with one member selecting Disagree regarding the external parties’ question (Figure 3) and one strongly agreeing. The majority of team members expressed that they were quite happy with the frequency and quality of feedback given by other members of the team and from people within the organisation. Regular team meetings are held and one on one session with Project Managers assists with frequent and productive individual feedback. Strongly Disagree, 0 Disagree, 0 Undecided, 5 Agree, 18 Strongly Agree, 5
  • 10. 10 The Project Managers have developed an internal website showing the wider organisation what is happening and team members have access on this site to all documentation being created on this project. The site communicates the timeframes and scope of the project and is updated constantly. Also key members have presented updates to the wider organisation at specially generated morning teas. Robbins et al. (2009, p450) state that ‘Good communication is also characterised by a healthy dose of feedback from team members and managers’. Management are aware that it can be hard to know if this has had the right impact and plan to follow up with a survey. Those who were undecided could not commit to the effective and consistent communication within the team. This could be caused by members feeling that they don’t have much time allocated within their meetings for them to communicate everything they wish to convey. ‘Generally speaking, as groups increase in size... communication difficulties increase as information-sharing becomes more mechanical, the time each member has to talk decreases, decision making becomes more autocratic and a more elaborate or bureaucratic structure begins to arise’ (Tyson, p41). Figure 3: Scores for Good Communication Strongly Disagree, 0 Disagree, 1 Undecided, 11 Agree, 29 Strongly Agree, 1
  • 11. 11 d) Negotiating Skills Regarding negotiating skills, the team responded to two questions regarding the team’s reviewing performance and considering all views and effectiveness in confronting and reconciling differences, with the result being Agree and Undecided (Figure 4). One member selecting Disagree on the effective and flexible confrontation and reconciling of differences whilst another selected Disagree on the regularly reviews performance to ensure all views are considered and adjustments made as required. Robbins et al. (2009 p451) states ‘Effective teams tend to be flexible and are continually making adjustments as to who does what. This flexibility requires team members to possess negotiating skills’. Project Managers have changed the timeline recently to allow for clear clashes of deadlines due to members negotiations. Extra resources have been assigned when bottlenecks occur and action is taken when people voice concerns. Management feel that the teams are effective in confronting and reconciling any differences. Due to the two negative scores given, management could look at implementing training of members on conflict resolution to enable all staff members to feel they have the ability to confront and reconcile differences. Clark (2004 p3 of 3) citing Rummier and Brache (1990) states that ‘if you want to understand the way work gets done, to improve the way work gets done , and to manage the way work gets done, processes should be the focus of your attention and actions.’ Without assessing existing processes, reviewing performance and implementing new processes if needed, the team will struggle to meet goals. Management may need to stress to team members the reasons for the adjustments and ensure all members are on board by allowing each member to voice their opinion.
  • 12. 12 Figure 4: Scores for Negotiating Skills e) Appropriate Leadership Regarding appropriate leadership, the team responded to two questions regarding the team leaders’ motivational effectiveness, empowerment and encouragement, with the result being Agree and Strongly Agree (Figure 5). ‘Leadership is the art of influencing people so that the group is moved one step closer to its goal’ (Tyson, p90). The results strongly show that the team overall feel the Project Managers empower and encourages all members to express their views and are effective in coaching and mentoring the group. Only two members were undecided being only involved with the project for a few weeks. Having two Project Manager assists with the members being able discuss issues with management as at least one of the Managers is available at most times. The Project Managers with this team enjoy being facilitators who guide and support members to achieve not only the project goals but to also ensure individuals gain greater skills and abilities whist working within this team. By having two leaders allows the realisation of flexibility and versatility of the leadership team in constantly shifting situations. The distributed-functions theory (Johnson and Johnson, 1994, p 187-9), as sited in Tyson (1998, p92) states, ‘that the leadership function may be and indeed should be fulfilled by different members performing a variety Strongly Disagree, 0 Disagree, 2 Undecided, 7 Agree, 17 Strongly Agree, 2
  • 13. 13 of relevant behaviours. More explicitly, it advocates that any member may take a leading role if they have the information, style or skills appropriate to the situation.’ Figure 5: Scores for Appropriate Leadership f) Internal Support Regarding internal support, the team responded to three questions regarding the organisations support, appropriate training and the development of performance tools, with the result showing a high number of members choosing to Agree and Undecided (Figure 6). One team member disagreed with the provision of adequate training and another disagreed with the development of performance evaluation tools that are adequate and appropriate. Robbins et al. (2009, p451) state that ‘Internally, the team should have a sound infrastructure, which means having proper training, a clear and reasonable measurement system that team members can use to evaluate their overall performance, an incentive program that recognises and rewards team activities, and a supportive human resource system.’ The internal organisation is currently facing a difficult time with constant staffing changes but is doing all that it can to actively support the project, including globally manoeuvring staff to assist with this team. Strongly Disagree, 0 Disagree, 0 Undecided, 2 Agree, 19 Strongly Agree, 7
  • 14. 14 Induction training is given to all new staff, even those from the contractor’s team. Technical training sessions are also given at different intervals along the way when the need arises. Management may need to monitor members to ensure that everyone feels they have been adequately trained to be skilled enough to continue being flexible in these roles. The two Project Managers have installed several tracking tools to show progress. They are aware that they need to ensure there is a manageable timeline so that targets are achievable therefore allowing morale to stay positive and for members to continue feeling a sense of achievement. Figure 6: Scores for Internal Support g) External Support Regarding external support, the team responded to two questions regarding the team being provided with appropriate resources and given the necessary freedom from day to day activities to attend to their team’s responsibilities, with the result being Agree and Undecided (Figure 7). Two team members disagreed (one strongly disagreed) with the team being given the necessary freedom from day to day activities to attend to the team responsibilities. Strongly Disagree, 0 Disagree, 2 Undecided, 9 Agree, 30 Strongly Agree, 1
  • 15. 15 These two negative responses have been recorded from members of the company staff who are still performing previous roles due to resignations, thus not allowing them to stop attending other functions within the company that take time away from their duties on this project. Robbins et al. (2009, p451) states that ‘Externally, managers should provide the team with the resources needed to get the job done.’ The company is using its best efforts to release resources but for many reasons has been slow in coming. The staff member who chose to strongly disagree is currently performing three roles. Management needs to remain mindful of this commitment when goading the team towards achieving milestones to ensure they do not overstress this member. Figure 7: Scores for External Support 4.5 Identify the key strengths of your team • Overall, team members feel a sense of belonging and partnership with the organisation. When there is a deadline to meet, they pull together to complete the task. • Although not particularly well balanced with respect to the Team Management Wheel, they are willing and able to stretch themselves to fill some of the missing roles. • Having two Project Managers filling the role of linkers, adds greater strength. Strongly Disagree, 1 Disagree, 1 Undecided, 8 Agree, 16 Strongly Agree, 2
  • 16. 16 • This project is also allowing cultural diversity by involving members of its Chilean and Brazilian offices rather than dictating to them with how the system will be implemented, they now have a say and a feeling of ownership. • Wider organisation values the team members and is also learning from the project. 4.6 Identify weaknesses in your team • Many staff mapped to the Concluder/Producer role, whose strengths are in setting up the systems ensuring they are controlled and orderly. They may not like rapid change as it interferes with the systems they have developed. As the project can at times call for rapid change, these members could feel that they are not producing or delivering. • Some members still performing other duties and therefore frustration is building as they are unable to feel total commitment to the team. • Individual members are unable to take risks within their roles thus not allowing them to try different ways to achieve their goals. Processes can feel too mechanical for some members. 4.7 Identify areas for improvement • Increase informal interaction between team members and the organisation. • All members of the team to be 100% committed and not working on other projects. • Further training of members to allow for flexible changes. • External linking so that members know what is being relayed to and the effect their contribution has on the organisation.
  • 17. 17 Conclusions ‘A team is like a functioning organism. If one member is suffering, the whole team feels that pain.’ (Manzoni & Barsoux, 1998). The team share a sense of purpose and actively seek out contributions from the Project Managers and each other and offer support where they can. Deadlines and imposed goals are monitored and adjusted where needed using the input of staff. ‘The key point, then, is that a sense of choice tends to mobilize our energies, while demands and constraints tend to sap them.’ (Set-Up-to-Fail n.d.). Overall, they are a high performance team attaining their goals and learning new skills. ‘It is hard for subordinates to impress their bosses when they must work on unchallenging tasks, with no autonomy and limited resources; it is also hard for them to persist and maintain high standards when they receive little encouragement from their bosses.’ (Manzoni & Barsoux, 1998). In order to develop the team and improve its performance, time needs to be spent analysing the processes and the way work gets done, giving constructive feedback. Team members need to look objectively at the fields where their performance could be improved and together, find ways to improve these areas. It is equally important to look at the areas where performance is high and reinforce these aspects. ‘A week sense of relatedness means that ambiguous signals are more likely to be seen as controlling. This is especially the case with negative feedback where as Edward Decci points out: “It’s all in the how you do it”.’ (Set-Up-to-Fail n.d.) Team building activities could allow better understanding of each other’s strengths and build a greater sense of attachment to one another especially for those who feel ‘siloed’. ‘The need to feel connected with others is therefore centrally important for internalization of rules and procedures. While a controlling approach can be effective in getting people to act in a particular way, it is quite ineffective in promoting self-regulation.’ (Set-Up-to-Fail n.d.) Without this self analysis, the team will not be able to improve its performance and exceed expectations of the company, but of themselves. ‘There are two obvious costs of the set-up-to- fail syndrome: the emotional cost paid by the subordinate and the organisational cost associated with the company’s failure to get the best out of an employee.’ (Manzoni & Barsoux, 1998)
  • 18. 18 Key Learning Points 1. Surveying and analysing data and the importance this material plays for the Project Managers 2. Important to show your results in a way that anyone will be able to visually understand 3. Learnt more about the staff members who are involved in a project team 4. Continuous improvement in any team is a must to ensure commitment, trust and a sense of achievement.
  • 19. 19 List of References Clark, D. (2004). Process level http://www.nwlink.com/~ donclark/performance/process.html (accessed 7/4/2011) Manzoni, J.F. & Barsoux, J.L. (1998). The Set-Up-to-Fail Syndrome, Harvard Business Review, Vol 76(2):p 101-11, accessed 7/4/2011from ProQuest Central Full Text Database, ISSN: 0017- 8012 Margerison, C. & McCann, D. (1995). Team Management, Management Books 2000 Ltd.: UK Margerison, C. (2002). Team Leadership. Thomson: London Robbins, S., Bergman, R., Stagg, I., and Coulter, M. (2009). Foundations of Management 3, Pearson Education Australia: Australia Set-Up-to-Fail (n.d.) Appendix 2: What Self-Determination Theory tells managers http://www.set-up-to-fail.net/pdf/self-determination.pdf (accessed 11/4/11) Team Management Systems (n.d.). The Concepts: Work Preferences. Digital image. http://www.tms.com.au/tms07.html (accessed 7/4/2011) Tyson, T. (1998). Working with Groups, Macmillan Publishers Australia Pty Ltd: Australia
  • 20. APPENDICES 20 Appendix 1 – Team Structure Developer
  • 21. APPENDICES 21 Appendix 2 – Company Matrix Chart – Organisation Staff Headcount
  • 22. APPENDICES 22 Appendix 3 – Team Management Wheel Explorer/Promoter Assessor/Developer TM6 TM7 TM8 Thruster/Organiser TM9 TM10 Concluder/Producer TM2 TM3 TM4 TM5 Controller/Inspector Possible TM1 Upholder/Maintainer Reporter/Adviser Creator/Innovator TM1 Figure 8 – Team Management Wheel Figure 9 – Results of RIDO Mapping
  • 23. APPENDICES 23 Appendix 4 – Team Performance Survey The below categories represent 7 categories of creating effective teams. Please indicate how effective you feel the team is against these criteria. Where possible, please add any comments you may have to elaborate on the reasons for your answer as your input is valuable. 1. Unified Commitment: Do you feel you belong to the team? * Strongly Disagree Disagree Undecided Agree Strongly Agree Comments Is the team committed to group goals above and beyond personal goals and agendas? * Strongly Disagree Disagree Undecided Agree Strongly Agree Comments: 2. Mutual Trust: Do you have faith in other team members to honour commitments and maintain confidences? * Strongly Disagree Disagree Undecided Agree Strongly Agree Comments: Do you feel team members are supportive of each other? * Strongly Disagree Disagree Undecided Agree Strongly Agree Comments: Do you feel other members of the team behave consistently and predictably? * Strongly Disagree Disagree Undecided Agree Strongly Agree
  • 24. APPENDICES 24 Comments: 3. Clear Goals: I understand the teams goals/objectives and how they fit into the organisations overall business? * Strongly Disagree Disagree Undecided Agree Strongly Agree Comments: Expectations and goals have been clearly explained and I understand what is expected of me. * Strongly Disagree Disagree Undecided Agree Strongly Agree Comments: I understand how the team will work together to achieve our goals. * Strongly Disagree Disagree Undecided Agree Strongly Agree Comments: 4. Good Communication: I feel communication in the team is effective and consistent. * Strongly Disagree Disagree Undecided Agree Strongly Agree Comments: Team members provide one another with frequent and productive feedback. * Strongly Disagree Disagree Undecided Agree Strongly Agree
  • 25. APPENDICES 25 Comments: My team is given feedback on communications with external parties (such as presentations, discussions with management/Board) * Strongly Disagree Disagree Undecided Agree Strongly Agree Comments: 5. Negotiating Skills: My team regularly reviews performance to ensure all views are considered and adjustments made as required. Strongly Disagree Disagree Undecided Agree Strongly Agree Comments: My team is effective and flexible in confronting and reconciling differences. * Strongly Disagree Disagree Undecided Agree Strongly Agree Comments: 6. Relevant Skills: I feel my team have the necessary technical and interpersonal skills to achieve the desired goals required. * Strongly Disagree Disagree Undecided Agree Strongly Agree Comments: I feel that I have all the necessary skills required to perform my role so as to achieve the desired goals. * Strongly Disagree Disagree Undecided Agree Strongly Agree
  • 26. APPENDICES 26 Comments: 7. Appropriate Leadership: I feel that our team leader motivates & coaches my team effectively, especially through difficult situations. * Strongly Disagree Disagree Undecided Agree Strongly Agree Comments: I feel our team leader empowers and encourages us to express & accept dissenting views and opinions. * Strongly Disagree Disagree Undecided Agree Strongly Agree Comments: 8. Internal Support: I feel the organisation provides a supportive climate. * Strongly Disagree Disagree Undecided Agree Strongly Agree Comments: Our team has been provided appropriate training. * Strongly Disagree Disagree Undecided Agree Strongly Agree Comments: My team have developed performance evaluation tools that are adequate and appropriate. * Strongly Disagree Disagree Undecided Agree Strongly Agree
  • 27. APPENDICES 27 Comments: 9. External Support: We are provided with appropriate resources. * Strongly Disagree Disagree Undecided Agree Strongly Agree Comments: I feel our team is given the necessary freedom from day to day activities to attend to my teams responsibilities (i.e. I'm not attending other functions within the company that take time away from my duties on the project). * Strongly Disagree Disagree Undecided Agree Strongly Agree Comments: Finished
  • 28. 28 Appendix 5 – Team Performance Survey Results Q TM1 TM2 TM3 TM4 TM5 TM6 TM7 TM8 TM9 TM10 TM11 TM12 TM13 TM14 Average Improvement Required ? Section Average Improvement Required ? 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 4 2 4 3 4 3.21 N 3 N 2 2 3 3 3 3 2 3 4 2 3 2 3 3 3 2.78 N 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 2.85 N 2.76 N4 2 2 3 2 3 3 2 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 2.64 Y 5 3 2 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 2.78 N 6 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 4 3 3 2 3 4 4 3.07 N 3 N7 4 2 3 3 2 3 3 4 3 4 2 3 2 4 3 N 8 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 2 3 3 3 2.92 N 9 3 2 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 2.78 N 2.71 Possible10 2 2 3 2 3 2 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 2.64 Y 11 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 2 2 3 2 3 3 4 2.71 N 12 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 4 2 1 3 4 2.78 N 2.68 Y 13 1 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 2.57 Y 14 2 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 2 4 4 4 3.14 N 3.07 N 15 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 2 3 4 3 3 N 16 3 3 4 3 4 3 3 4 3 4 2 3 3 3 3.21 N 3.18 N 17 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 4 2 3 3 4 3.14 N 18 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 2.92 N 2.71 Possible19 3 1 3 4 3 3 2 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 2.78 N 20 3 2 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 3 2 1 3 3 2.42 Y 21 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 4 2 2.78 N 2.60 Y 22 3 1 3 3 0 2 3 3 3 3 2 4 2 2 2.42 Y Strongly Disagree 0 Disagree 1 Undecided 2 Agree 3 Strongly Agree 4 Questions Team Members Questions Weighting Improvement Score = 2.7 (+) No Improvement needed – considered that any improvements will occur naturally as the teams goals progress

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