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Audience Research in a Web 2.0 world
 

Audience Research in a Web 2.0 world

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Workshop given at New Zealand Digital Forum Conference 28/11/08, Auckland

Workshop given at New Zealand Digital Forum Conference 28/11/08, Auckland

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    Audience Research in a Web 2.0 world Audience Research in a Web 2.0 world Presentation Transcript

    • Doing audience research in a Web 2.0 world Dr Lynda Kelly, Australian Museum
      • What is audience research?
      • How is it done?
      • What has it told us?
      • How do we use it?
      Coverage
    •  
      • Gilman: 1916
      • Robinson & Melton: 1930-1940s
      • Alt, Shaw, Griggs: 1970-1980s
      • Screven, Hood: 1980-1990s
      • Falk & Dierking: 1990-2004
      • Hein, 1998
      • Museum Learning Collaborative: 2000 
      • Web 2.0 & Evaluation: Kelly & Russo, 2007; 2008
      • Website Analytics: Chan, 2008
      Development of audience research
      • Purpose of audience research:
        • Who uses audience research
        • What have they done
        • What have they used it for
        • Feedback/questions
      Exercise 1
      • It gives us data about:
        • leisure patterns: who , where, why
        • demographics
        • what people want from a visit
        • what they do when they visit
        • prior interests and knowledge
        • satisfaction
        • what they learn and take away
      Why do audience research?
      • Find out visitor mix:
        • locals, tourists (Austn, O/s), age, social grouping
      • Visiting patterns:
        • weekdays, weekends, seasonal
        • helps to plan programs, opening hours, pages
      • Track advertising and marketing
      • For use in:
        • promotion and marketing
        • grant applications
        • grant acquittals
        • decision making
        • programming
        • improvements and change
        • seeking funding (e.g. Councils, Ministry, Federal agencies, others)
      • Before embarking on anything there are a number of questions we need to ask…
      Doing audience research
      • What information do we already have?
      • What are the gaps in our information?
      • Who will use the information?
      • What will the information be used for?
      • What will be the consequences if we don’t get the information?
      • Who do we need to get the information from?
      • How can we get the information?
      • What methods will we use?
      • How much will we invest : cost vs. benefit
      Then ask …
      • What does this mean for your institutions??
      Implications 1
      • Methods:
        • What types of audience research are you aware of/used?
        • How are you measuring visitation/online users
        • Feedback/questions
      Exercise 2
      • Structured surveys, questionnaires
      • Log files, analytics
      • Usually closed questions (e.g. yes/no, rating scales, agree/disagree)
      • Results often presented as percentages, frequency counts
      • Gives statistical measures :
        • extrapolate to general population
        • trend data : over time and across programs and/or venues
      Quantitative research
      • demographics
      • where else they visit/sites used
      • how they find out/how they got there
      • areas visited (physical/online)
      • satisfaction
      • what stood out
      • things they’d tell others
      • messages retained, meanings made
      Surveys
      • Focuses on people’s own recounts and meaning s ma de
      • Through :
        • in-depth interviews
        • case studies
        • observation/tracking
        • focus groups
        • community consultation
      • Results are interpretations
      Qualitative research
      • What research methods might be suitable?
      • How can it be done effectively and efficiently?
      Implications 2
      • Visitor Motivation:
        • Why do people visit museums/museum websites?
        • Who visits your institutions - profiles
      Exercise 3
      • 77% visit to experience something new
      • 71% visit for entertainment
      • 71% for learning
      • 70% for interests of children/family
      • 64% worthwhile leisure
      • 57% special events I must see or do
      • 56% recommended by others
      AM research found
      • How will you factor visitor motivation into programs and services?
      Implications 3
      • Visitor needs:
        • What do visitors want when they visit a museum?
      Exercise 4
      • People have strong views about what they want from a physical museum visit …
      Wants
      • Experiences that are :
        • hands-on, active
        • sensory
        • memorable, with something to take away
      • Learning that :
        • goes from familiar to unfamiliar concepts
        • is controlled by them
        • cater s for all levels and styles
        • is new
      They want
      • Exhibit s :
        • to touch and explore
        • not overloaded with words & information
        • that can get up close to
        • with staff there to answer questions
        • that are realistic
        • relaxing spaces to ‘take it all in’
        • that encourage talking/sharing amongst groups
      • AM research has found that visitors have specific interests and information needs about collection items
      Collections
      • What is it made of?
      • How is it used?
      • What is it used for?
      • How often is it used?
      • What is the symbolism of it?
      • How old is it?
      • Is it still used today? If not, what is?
      • Who were/are the people and what are their stories?
      Anthropology collections
      • What is it?
        • scientific name
        • everyday name/description
      • Where did it come from:
        • and when was it found
        • distribution
      • The ‘museum’ things:
        • how is it preserved
        • why is it in a museum? what is it used for?
      • What is it related to that’s familiar to me?
      Natural history collections
      • How will you factor these needs into programming both physical and online?
      Implications 4
      • Visitor behaviour:
        • What have you noticed about how visitors behave in your institutions?
        • How are visitors navigating your sites?
        • What data do you have to support this?
      Exercise 5
    •  
      • Include in planning
      • Involve in data gathering
      • Work through findings
      • Debriefs
      • Use consultants
      • Communication systems
      Staff ‘buy-in’
    •  
    •  
      • Imagine:
        • Listening to young children in museum environments
      • Museum 3.0:
        • providing excellent physical and virtual museum experiences for young people
      Communicating results
      • Web 2.0:
        • YouTube
        • Facebook
        • Flickr
        • Two-way interaction
        • Equal relationship
      • Visitor voice
      Visitor voice
    •  
    •  
      • To fulfil its complete purpose as a show, a museum must do the needful in both ways. It must arrange it contents so that they can be looked at; but also help its average visitors to know what they mean. It must at once install its contents and see to their interpretation.
      Gilman, 1918
      • All audiences want …
        • Respect for them as individuals
        • Choice
        • Welcoming atmosphere from trained, aware, friendly, knowledgeable staff:
          • both front & back of house
        • See themselves reflected in programs, exhibitions, collections & staffing:
          • the “work” of the museum
        • Active & varied learning experiences:
          • group-based & individual
        • Involvement
        • A contemporary experience:
          • in communication & interpretation modes
          • content/issues that are relevant & current
    • http.//www.australianmuseum.net.au/amarc/ http://amarclk.blogspot.com/
    •