A Market Landscape/Taxonomy/Segmentation Model for Cloud Computing Rev 1 (0.92)

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This presentation from Lustratus REPAMA presents a market segmentation model/taxonomy for cloud computing. It includes the infrastructure as a services, platform as a service and software as a service models as well as the more traditional cloud software and professional services markets. It is circulated for review and feedback can be recorded at http://www.lustratusrepama.com/repama-blog.

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  • Draft NIST Working Definition of Cloud ComputingAuthors: Peter Mell and Tim Grance8-21-09 National Institute of Standards and Technology, Information Technology Laboratory Note 1: Cloud computing is still an evolving paradigm. Its definitions, use cases, underlying technologies, issues, risks, and benefits will be refined in a spirited debate by the public and private sectors. These definitions, attributes, and characteristics will evolve and change over time. Note 2: The cloud computing industry represents a large ecosystem of many models, vendors, and market niches. This definition attempts to encompass all of the various cloud approaches.Definition of Cloud Computing: Cloud computing is a model for enabling convenient, on-demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources (e.g., networks, servers, storage, applications, and services) that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or service provider interaction. This cloud model promotes availability and is composed of five essential characteristics, three service models, and four deployment models. Essential Characteristics:On-demand self-service. A consumer can unilaterally provision computing capabilities, such as server time and network storage, as needed automatically without requiring human interaction with each service’s provider. Broad network access. Capabilities are available over the network and accessed through standard mechanisms that promote use by heterogeneous thin or thick client platforms (e.g., mobile phones, laptops, and PDAs).Resource pooling. The provider’s computing resources are pooled to serve multiple consumers using a multi-tenant model, with different physical and virtual resources dynamically assigned and reassigned according to consumer demand. There is a sense of location independence in that the customer generally has no control or knowledge over the exact location of the provided resources but may be able to specify location at a higher level of abstraction (e.g., country, state, or datacenter). Examples of resources include storage, processing, memory, network bandwidth, and virtual machines.Rapid elasticity. Capabilities can be rapidly and elastically provisioned, in some cases automatically, to quickly scale out and rapidly released to quickly scale in. To the consumer, the capabilities available for provisioning often appear to be unlimited and can be purchased in any quantity at any time.Measured Service. Cloud systems automatically control and optimize resource use by leveraging a metering capability at some level of abstraction appropriate to the type of service (e.g., storage, processing, bandwidth, and active user accounts). Resource usage can be monitored, controlled, and reported providing transparency for both the provider and consumer of the utilized service. Service Models:Cloud Software as a Service (SaaS). The capability provided to the consumer is to use the provider’s applications running on a cloud infrastructure. The applications are accessible from various client devices through a thin client interface such as a web browser (e.g., web-based email). The consumer does not manage or control the underlying cloud infrastructure including network, servers, operating systems, storage, or even individual application capabilities, with the possible exception of limited user-specific application configuration settings.Cloud Platform as a Service (PaaS). The capability provided to the consumer is to deploy onto the cloud infrastructure consumer-created or acquired applications created using programming languages and tools supported by the provider. The consumer does not manage or control the underlying cloud infrastructure including network, servers, operating systems, or storage, but has control over the deployed applications and possibly application hosting environment configurations.Cloud Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS). The capability provided to the consumer is to provision processing, storage, networks, and other fundamental computing resources where the consumer is able to deploy and run arbitrary software, which can include operating systems and applications. The consumer does not manage or control the underlying cloud infrastructure but has control over operating systems, storage, deployed applications, and possibly limited control of select networking components (e.g., host firewalls). Deployment Models:Private cloud. The cloud infrastructure is operated solely for an organization. It may be managed by the organization or a third party and may exist on premise or off premise.Community cloud. The cloud infrastructure is shared by several organizations and supports a specific community that has shared concerns (e.g., mission, security requirements, policy, and compliance considerations). It may be managed by the organizations or a third party and may exist on premise or off premise.Public cloud. The cloud infrastructure is made available to the general public or a large industry group and is owned by an organization selling cloud services.Hybrid cloud. The cloud infrastructure is a composition of two or more clouds (private, community, or public) that remain unique entities but are bound together by standardized or proprietary technology that enables data and application portability (e.g., cloud bursting for load-balancing between clouds). Note: Cloud software takes full advantage of the cloud paradigm by being service oriented with a focus on statelessness, low coupling, modularity, and semantic interoperability.Below are the changes from draft version 14:1. Changed "Deliver Models" to "Service Models" to avoid confusion of terminology with the "Deployment Models"2. Removed location independence from the title of an essential characteristic and moved it within the description 3. Change reference to scaling within rapid elasticity section from "up" and "down" to "in and out"4. Removed "load balancers" list of example IaaS networking components over which a consumer might exert some control/customization5. Moved note on cloud software to end of definition 
  • A Market Landscape/Taxonomy/Segmentation Model for Cloud Computing Rev 1 (0.92)

    1. 1. Market Landscape REV 1<br />Cloud Computing <br />Danny Goodall<br />Lead Marketing Analyst<br />dannyg@lustratusrepama.com<br />September 2009<br />
    2. 2. Introduction<br />The definitions and segmentation contained in this document are the foundation for a series of Lustratus REPAMA competitive intelligence studies on the cloud computing market<br />This research is presented here in draft from and will change over time. Many of the definitions need to be ratified but the segmentation structure is close to complete<br />The segmentation is carried out from the perspective of the vendors’/service providers’ technical capability and is not a market segmentation based on market opportunity.<br />This material is made available for feedback and discussion and may be used freely for non-commercial use with attribution to Danny Goodall of Lustratus REPAMA. Please contact the author with any other usage requests<br />
    3. 3. Feedback<br />Future versions of this material will be released at http://www.lustratusrepama.com/repama-blog<br />Please leave any feedback you may have there or via email to dannyg@lustratusrepama.com<br />
    4. 4. Cloud Computing<br />Technology and product capability market segmentation<br />
    5. 5. Cloud Computing Definitions<br />“...a model for enabling convenient, on-demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources (e.g., networks, servers, storage, applications, and services) that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or service provider interaction”<br />Cloud Computing according to <br />Source: NIST - http://csrc.nist.gov/groups/SNS/cloud-computing/index.html<br />
    6. 6. Cloud Computing Definitions<br />Source: NIST - http://csrc.nist.gov/groups/SNS/cloud-computing/index.html<br />
    7. 7. The Cloud Computing Market - Technical Capability Segmentation<br />* These services have been arbitrarily grouped for layout purposes. There is no particular significance to this grouping.<br />
    8. 8. Implied Model Hierarchy<br />There is an implied hierarchy for the delivery of cloud services as shown in the diagram below. However this is not always the model for deployment.<br />For example, many platform service providers will not themselves procure infrastructure services from a third party but may instead provide their own infrastructure.<br />
    9. 9. Vendors And Service Providers<br />
    10. 10. Cloud Computing Market Landscape<br />The Cloud Computing market has quickly become crowded and complex. Before we are able to fully analyse the approaches that the different vendors take to the market, we must first arrive at a segmentation of the various technical offers.<br />
    11. 11. Infrastructure Services<br />Technical/product capability segmentation and example vendors/service providers<br />
    12. 12. Infrastructure Services<br />Infrastructure services provide building blocks that can be moulded to run different application servers, packaged applications, grids, etc., which can be used to host applications.<br />
    13. 13. Infrastructure ServicesStorage<br />Example Vendors/Providers<br />Working Definition<br />Storage services typically provide metered, on-demand storage of structure or un-structured data delivered as a service.<br />
    14. 14. Infrastructure ServicesCompute<br />Example Vendors/Providers<br />Working Definition<br />Compute services typically provide metered, on-demand execution of code fragments, services or applications delivered as a service.<br />
    15. 15. Infrastructure ServicesServices Management<br />Example Vendors/Providers<br />Working Definition<br />Services management services typically provide a layer of management that sits above the underlying infrastructure services providing aggregation, scaling, execution management, fault tolerance and security of the underlying infrastructure services <br />
    16. 16. Platform Services<br />Technical/product capability segmentation and example vendors/service providers<br />
    17. 17. Platform Services<br />Platform services offer a ready built infrastructure and application frameworks that can be used for building and running applications.<br />
    18. 18. Platform ServicesGeneral Purpose<br />Example Vendors/Providers<br />Working Definition<br />General purpose platform services provide metered, and/or on demand development tools, frameworks and/or execution environments that allow cloud-capable applications or application fragments to be built, deployed and managed.<br />
    19. 19. Platform ServicesBusiness Intelligence<br />Example Vendors/Providers<br />Working Definition<br />Business intelligence services provide metered, and/or on demand business intelligence and analytics capabilities that are delivered as a service and can be cloud-capable or cloud-aware in that their data sources may be cloud-based.<br />
    20. 20. Platform ServicesIntegration<br />Example Vendors/Providers<br />Working Definition<br />Integration services provide metered, and/or on demand connectivity, integration and process orchestration capabilities delivered as a service and can be cloud-capable or cloud-aware in that the systems they integrate can be cloud-based.<br />
    21. 21. Platform ServicesDevelopment and Testing<br />Example Vendors/Providers<br />Working Definition<br />Development and testing services provide metered, and/or on demand software development life-cycle management capabilities delivered as a service. They can be cloud-capable or cloud-aware in that the development projects may themselves be cloud-based.<br />
    22. 22. Platform ServicesDatabase<br />Example Vendors/Providers<br />Working Definition<br />Database services provide metered, and/or on demand structured data management services to application developers delivered as a service.<br />
    23. 23. Software Services<br />Technical/product capability segmentation and example vendors/service providers<br />
    24. 24. Software Services<br />Software services are applications or components that can be used as an end application or used as part of a custom solution<br />* These services have been arbitrarily grouped for layout purposes. There is no particular significance to this grouping.<br />
    25. 25. Software ServicesBilling<br />Example Vendors/Providers<br />Working Definition<br />Software services provide metered and/or on-demand access to specialised business-level applications, typically accessed by end-users and are delivered as a service.<br />
    26. 26. Software ServicesFinancials<br />Example Vendors/Providers<br />Working Definition<br />Software services provide metered and/or on-demand access to specialised business-level applications, typically accessed by end-users and are delivered as a service.<br />
    27. 27. Software ServicesLegal<br />Example Vendors/Providers<br />Working Definition<br />Software services provide metered and/or on-demand access to specialised business-level applications, typically accessed by end-users and are delivered as a service.<br />
    28. 28. Software ServicesHuman Resources<br />Example Vendors/Providers<br />Working Definition<br />Software services provide metered and/or on-demand access to specialised business-level applications, typically accessed by end-users and are delivered as a service.<br />
    29. 29. Software ServicesSales<br />Example Vendors/Providers<br />Working Definition<br />Software services provide metered and/or on-demand access to specialised business-level applications, typically accessed by end-users and are delivered as a service.<br />
    30. 30. Software ServicesCRM<br />Example Vendors/Providers<br />Working Definition<br />Software services provide metered and/or on-demand access to specialised business-level applications, typically accessed by end-users and are delivered as a service.<br />
    31. 31. Software ServicesDesktop Productivity<br />Example Vendors/Providers<br />Working Definition<br />Software services provide metered and/or on-demand access to specialised business-level applications, typically accessed by end-users and are delivered as a service.<br />
    32. 32. Software ServicesContent Management<br />Example Vendors/Providers<br />Working Definition<br />Software services provide metered and/or on-demand access to specialised business-level applications, typically accessed by end-users and are delivered as a service.<br />
    33. 33. Software ServicesBackup & Recovery<br />Example Vendors/Providers<br />Working Definition<br />Software services provide metered and/or on-demand access to specialised business-level applications, typically accessed by end-users and are delivered as a service.<br />
    34. 34. Software ServicesDocument Management<br />Example Vendors/Providers<br />Working Definition<br />Software services provide metered and/or on-demand access to specialised business-level applications, typically accessed by end-users and are delivered as a service.<br />
    35. 35. Software ServicesCollaboration<br />Example Vendors/Providers<br />Working Definition<br />Software services provide metered and/or on-demand access to specialised business-level applications, typically accessed by end-users and are delivered as a service.<br />
    36. 36. Software ServicesSocial Networks<br />Example Vendors/Providers<br />Working Definition<br />Software services provide metered and/or on-demand access to specialised business-level applications, typically accessed by end-users and are delivered as a service.<br />
    37. 37. Cloud Software<br />Technical/product capability segmentation and example vendors/service providers<br />
    38. 38. Cloud Software<br />Cloud software is off-the-shelf software that can be used to create an internal cloud or in some cases can be used to customize infrastructure services to mould a custom cloud solution.<br />*Cloud management is further segmented into Application Services Management <br />
    39. 39. Cloud SoftwareData<br />Example Vendors/Providers<br />Working Definition<br />Data management cloud software typically provides database-like functionality that can be deployed within a cloud-enabled architecture possessing some of the following attributes: massively distributed, parallel data processing, massively scalable, clustered, cached and/or replicated.<br />
    40. 40. Cloud SoftwareCompute<br />Example Vendors/Providers<br />Working Definition<br />Compute cloud software allows a virtual environment to be built into which applications or application fragments can be deployed and executed. This is typically achieved by adding a management abstraction layer across a massively distributed network of hardware<br />
    41. 41. Cloud Software Cloud Management<br />Example Vendors/Providers<br />Working Definition<br />Cloud management software allows enterprises and service providers to manage the components of their virtual cloud infrastructure. These elements may include network, compute, storage or applications*. Management capabilities may include provisioning, starting, stopping, monitoring, moving, scaling or securing a service within public, private or hybrid clouds<br />* Application service management is treated as a separate segment later in this presentation<br />
    42. 42. Cloud Software Application Services Mgmt.<br />Example Vendors/Providers<br />Working Definition<br />A subset of the cloud management segment , application services management software provides automated management of the lifecycle of application services including provisioning, starting, stopping, moving, monitoring , scaling and billing.<br />
    43. 43. Cloud Software Appliances<br />Example Vendors/Providers<br />Working Definition<br />Appliances provide hardware-based acceleration support services for various cloud functions<br />* I need confirmation that these are in fact ‘appliances’<br />
    44. 44. Cloud Software File Storage<br />Example Vendors/Providers<br />Working Definition<br />File storage cloud software provides enterprises that are building internal clouds or providers that are building external clouds with massively scalable file storage capability.<br />
    45. 45. Professional Services<br />
    46. 46. Professional Services<br />Professional services are the human-delivered skills that organisations consume in order to plan, build, deploy, maintain and support a cloud computing infrastructure<br />
    47. 47. Acknowledgements<br />Lustratus REPAMA would like to acknowledge that much of the high-level work on market taxonomy is derived from work carried out by Brad Buck of OpenCrowd and Peter Laird of Tendril Inc. <br />Working definitions for cloud computing come from the work of Peter Mell and Tim Grance of NIST.<br />
    48. 48.
    49. 49. Revision History<br />

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