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Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
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Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
Game AI For the Masses
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Game AI For the Masses
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Game AI For the Masses

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This version of the Game AI for the Masses talk was given at University of West of Scotland in November '12.

This version of the Game AI for the Masses talk was given at University of West of Scotland in November '12.

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  • \n
  • BSc(Hons), MSc, MRes in AI.\nFounder of Robot Overlord Games\nThree-time IGDA Scholar\nChair of the IGDA’s Special Interest Group on AI\nDirector for IGDA Scotland\nWriter for AltDevBlogADay.com, IGDA Perspectives, Gamasutra and others\nAssistant editor “Collected Wisdom of Game AI Professionals”\nCo-organiser for AltDev Conference family\n(Occasional) PhD student in AI for Games\n
  • BSc(Hons), MSc, MRes in AI.\nFounder of Robot Overlord Games\nThree-time IGDA Scholar\nChair of the IGDA’s Special Interest Group on AI\nDirector for IGDA Scotland\nWriter for AltDevBlogADay.com, IGDA Perspectives, Gamasutra and others\nAssistant editor “Collected Wisdom of Game AI Professionals”\nCo-organiser for AltDev Conference family\n(Occasional) PhD student in AI for Games\n
  • BSc(Hons), MSc, MRes in AI.\nFounder of Robot Overlord Games\nThree-time IGDA Scholar\nChair of the IGDA’s Special Interest Group on AI\nDirector for IGDA Scotland\nWriter for AltDevBlogADay.com, IGDA Perspectives, Gamasutra and others\nAssistant editor “Collected Wisdom of Game AI Professionals”\nCo-organiser for AltDev Conference family\n(Occasional) PhD student in AI for Games\n
  • BSc(Hons), MSc, MRes in AI.\nFounder of Robot Overlord Games\nThree-time IGDA Scholar\nChair of the IGDA’s Special Interest Group on AI\nDirector for IGDA Scotland\nWriter for AltDevBlogADay.com, IGDA Perspectives, Gamasutra and others\nAssistant editor “Collected Wisdom of Game AI Professionals”\nCo-organiser for AltDev Conference family\n(Occasional) PhD student in AI for Games\n
  • BSc(Hons), MSc, MRes in AI.\nFounder of Robot Overlord Games\nThree-time IGDA Scholar\nChair of the IGDA’s Special Interest Group on AI\nDirector for IGDA Scotland\nWriter for AltDevBlogADay.com, IGDA Perspectives, Gamasutra and others\nAssistant editor “Collected Wisdom of Game AI Professionals”\nCo-organiser for AltDev Conference family\n(Occasional) PhD student in AI for Games\n
  • BSc(Hons), MSc, MRes in AI.\nFounder of Robot Overlord Games\nThree-time IGDA Scholar\nChair of the IGDA’s Special Interest Group on AI\nDirector for IGDA Scotland\nWriter for AltDevBlogADay.com, IGDA Perspectives, Gamasutra and others\nAssistant editor “Collected Wisdom of Game AI Professionals”\nCo-organiser for AltDev Conference family\n(Occasional) PhD student in AI for Games\n
  • BSc(Hons), MSc, MRes in AI.\nFounder of Robot Overlord Games\nThree-time IGDA Scholar\nChair of the IGDA’s Special Interest Group on AI\nDirector for IGDA Scotland\nWriter for AltDevBlogADay.com, IGDA Perspectives, Gamasutra and others\nAssistant editor “Collected Wisdom of Game AI Professionals”\nCo-organiser for AltDev Conference family\n(Occasional) PhD student in AI for Games\n
  • BSc(Hons), MSc, MRes in AI.\nFounder of Robot Overlord Games\nThree-time IGDA Scholar\nChair of the IGDA’s Special Interest Group on AI\nDirector for IGDA Scotland\nWriter for AltDevBlogADay.com, IGDA Perspectives, Gamasutra and others\nAssistant editor “Collected Wisdom of Game AI Professionals”\nCo-organiser for AltDev Conference family\n(Occasional) PhD student in AI for Games\n
  • BSc(Hons), MSc, MRes in AI.\nFounder of Robot Overlord Games\nThree-time IGDA Scholar\nChair of the IGDA’s Special Interest Group on AI\nDirector for IGDA Scotland\nWriter for AltDevBlogADay.com, IGDA Perspectives, Gamasutra and others\nAssistant editor “Collected Wisdom of Game AI Professionals”\nCo-organiser for AltDev Conference family\n(Occasional) PhD student in AI for Games\n
  • BSc(Hons), MSc, MRes in AI.\nFounder of Robot Overlord Games\nThree-time IGDA Scholar\nChair of the IGDA’s Special Interest Group on AI\nDirector for IGDA Scotland\nWriter for AltDevBlogADay.com, IGDA Perspectives, Gamasutra and others\nAssistant editor “Collected Wisdom of Game AI Professionals”\nCo-organiser for AltDev Conference family\n(Occasional) PhD student in AI for Games\n
  • BSc(Hons), MSc, MRes in AI.\nFounder of Robot Overlord Games\nThree-time IGDA Scholar\nChair of the IGDA’s Special Interest Group on AI\nDirector for IGDA Scotland\nWriter for AltDevBlogADay.com, IGDA Perspectives, Gamasutra and others\nAssistant editor “Collected Wisdom of Game AI Professionals”\nCo-organiser for AltDev Conference family\n(Occasional) PhD student in AI for Games\n
  • BSc(Hons), MSc, MRes in AI.\nFounder of Robot Overlord Games\nThree-time IGDA Scholar\nChair of the IGDA’s Special Interest Group on AI\nDirector for IGDA Scotland\nWriter for AltDevBlogADay.com, IGDA Perspectives, Gamasutra and others\nAssistant editor “Collected Wisdom of Game AI Professionals”\nCo-organiser for AltDev Conference family\n(Occasional) PhD student in AI for Games\n
  • BSc(Hons), MSc, MRes in AI.\nFounder of Robot Overlord Games\nThree-time IGDA Scholar\nChair of the IGDA’s Special Interest Group on AI\nDirector for IGDA Scotland\nWriter for AltDevBlogADay.com, IGDA Perspectives, Gamasutra and others\nAssistant editor “Collected Wisdom of Game AI Professionals”\nCo-organiser for AltDev Conference family\n(Occasional) PhD student in AI for Games\n
  • BSc(Hons), MSc, MRes in AI.\nFounder of Robot Overlord Games\nThree-time IGDA Scholar\nChair of the IGDA’s Special Interest Group on AI\nDirector for IGDA Scotland\nWriter for AltDevBlogADay.com, IGDA Perspectives, Gamasutra and others\nAssistant editor “Collected Wisdom of Game AI Professionals”\nCo-organiser for AltDev Conference family\n(Occasional) PhD student in AI for Games\n
  • BSc(Hons), MSc, MRes in AI.\nFounder of Robot Overlord Games\nThree-time IGDA Scholar\nChair of the IGDA’s Special Interest Group on AI\nDirector for IGDA Scotland\nWriter for AltDevBlogADay.com, IGDA Perspectives, Gamasutra and others\nAssistant editor “Collected Wisdom of Game AI Professionals”\nCo-organiser for AltDev Conference family\n(Occasional) PhD student in AI for Games\n
  • BSc(Hons), MSc, MRes in AI.\nFounder of Robot Overlord Games\nThree-time IGDA Scholar\nChair of the IGDA’s Special Interest Group on AI\nDirector for IGDA Scotland\nWriter for AltDevBlogADay.com, IGDA Perspectives, Gamasutra and others\nAssistant editor “Collected Wisdom of Game AI Professionals”\nCo-organiser for AltDev Conference family\n(Occasional) PhD student in AI for Games\n
  • BSc(Hons), MSc, MRes in AI.\nFounder of Robot Overlord Games\nThree-time IGDA Scholar\nChair of the IGDA’s Special Interest Group on AI\nDirector for IGDA Scotland\nWriter for AltDevBlogADay.com, IGDA Perspectives, Gamasutra and others\nAssistant editor “Collected Wisdom of Game AI Professionals”\nCo-organiser for AltDev Conference family\n(Occasional) PhD student in AI for Games\n
  • 6 countries\ncoming up for 20 talks - MIT, Casual Connect, Konsoll\nFocus on AI\nWhat it really is - what it can do for games\n
  • I’ve been interested in game AI since I was 13 when I first played creatures. \n
  • I’ve been interested in game AI since I was 13 when I first played creatures. \n
  • I’ve been interested in game AI since I was 13 when I first played creatures. \n
  • I’ve been interested in game AI since I was 13 when I first played creatures. \n
  • I’ve been interested in game AI since I was 13 when I first played creatures. \n
  • I’ve been interested in game AI since I was 13 when I first played creatures. \n
  • I’ve been interested in game AI since I was 13 when I first played creatures. \n
  • I’ve been interested in game AI since I was 13 when I first played creatures. \n
  • I’ve been interested in game AI since I was 13 when I first played creatures. \n
  • A lot of time when people hear AI they think of\n(1st image)\nAI is the applied science of decisions - applied Game Theory\nAny time a computer has to make a decision, it is using “AI” to do that.\n(2nd image)\nIt doesn’t necessarily make the best decisions\n(3rd image)\nBut neither do people\n\nIf it is using good AI, it will make good decisions\nBut whether the decisions are good is not whether it is AI or not\n
  • A lot of time when people hear AI they think of\n(1st image)\nAI is the applied science of decisions - applied Game Theory\nAny time a computer has to make a decision, it is using “AI” to do that.\n(2nd image)\nIt doesn’t necessarily make the best decisions\n(3rd image)\nBut neither do people\n\nIf it is using good AI, it will make good decisions\nBut whether the decisions are good is not whether it is AI or not\n
  • A lot of time when people hear AI they think of\n(1st image)\nAI is the applied science of decisions - applied Game Theory\nAny time a computer has to make a decision, it is using “AI” to do that.\n(2nd image)\nIt doesn’t necessarily make the best decisions\n(3rd image)\nBut neither do people\n\nIf it is using good AI, it will make good decisions\nBut whether the decisions are good is not whether it is AI or not\n
  • In games, physics is as realistic as it’s going to get\nGraphics are increasingly diminishing returns\nMore and more effort, for less and less improvement\n\n
  • Battlefield 3 from EA / DICE\nE.g. Frostbite 2 - massive effort, but how much better is it really?\nAI is an area there is still space for much improvement!\n
  • AI is normally seen in the enemies we face\n<click>\nNPC soldiers / aliens are the most common\nIn RTS games, the enemy “general” works using AI\n<click>\nEach unit might also be intelligent\nPathfinding\nReaction to attack\n\n\n
  • AI is normally seen in the enemies we face\n<click>\nNPC soldiers / aliens are the most common\nIn RTS games, the enemy “general” works using AI\n<click>\nEach unit might also be intelligent\nPathfinding\nReaction to attack\n\n\n
  • AI is normally seen in the enemies we face\n<click>\nNPC soldiers / aliens are the most common\nIn RTS games, the enemy “general” works using AI\n<click>\nEach unit might also be intelligent\nPathfinding\nReaction to attack\n\n\n
  • AI is normally seen in the enemies we face\n<click>\nNPC soldiers / aliens are the most common\nIn RTS games, the enemy “general” works using AI\n<click>\nEach unit might also be intelligent\nPathfinding\nReaction to attack\n\n\n
  • First and foremost, AI has the single worst spokesman of all time\n(1st image)\nDecades of robo-sploitation have reinforced that AI is evil\n\nFor AI, there are very few middleware solutions, and no generally applicable ones.\nYou need to have some sort of grounding in “knowledge representation” and algorithms, and things learnt in a CS degree are only tangentially useful\n(2nd image)\n\nWhen we talk about AI in science, we want to make the best decision possible\nShortest path from A to B\nCheapest manufacturing processes\nMost efficient schedule to do jobs\n\nIf we apply this logic to games, we always want to beat the player\nTry to think better, react faster than the player\nFor most video games, if we want to destroy the player simply be better than they are: move faster, have more health, bigger guns etc.\n
  • First and foremost, AI has the single worst spokesman of all time\n(1st image)\nDecades of robo-sploitation have reinforced that AI is evil\n\nFor AI, there are very few middleware solutions, and no generally applicable ones.\nYou need to have some sort of grounding in “knowledge representation” and algorithms, and things learnt in a CS degree are only tangentially useful\n(2nd image)\n\nWhen we talk about AI in science, we want to make the best decision possible\nShortest path from A to B\nCheapest manufacturing processes\nMost efficient schedule to do jobs\n\nIf we apply this logic to games, we always want to beat the player\nTry to think better, react faster than the player\nFor most video games, if we want to destroy the player simply be better than they are: move faster, have more health, bigger guns etc.\n
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  • A classic example of this “losing with style”\nWe could coordinate the thugs, using small unit tactics, communication, reasoning etc.\nMake use of existing “scientific” AI techniques to make very intelligent thugs\nThe point of the game isn’t to make AI that can beat Batman\nThe point is to let the player *BE* Batman\n\nHow smarts are thugs in real life?\nWe need to match that level of sophistication\nModel the “real world”, rather than create super-thugs.\nSame with soldiers\nMost soldiers aren’t tactical geniuses like Sun Tzu\nThey also aren’t super soldiers like Rambo\n
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  • D&D defines a framework for how a world works\nAnything is possible, as defined by the framework\nPlayers may want to try to climb a wall, framework abstracts that as “acrobatics”\nPlayer wants to see if there’s a hidden door, this is a “dungeoneering” check\n\n
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  • Casual title based around risk/reward management\n"Millionaire" style lose-everything death penalty\nFacebook-based leaderboards\nIncreasing difficulty each level forces players to decide when to quit and log their score\nHand off to Heather after this one for a demo of the game\n
  • Casual title based around risk/reward management\n"Millionaire" style lose-everything death penalty\nFacebook-based leaderboards\nIncreasing difficulty each level forces players to decide when to quit and log their score\nHand off to Heather after this one for a demo of the game\n
  • Casual title based around risk/reward management\n"Millionaire" style lose-everything death penalty\nFacebook-based leaderboards\nIncreasing difficulty each level forces players to decide when to quit and log their score\nHand off to Heather after this one for a demo of the game\n
  • Casual title based around risk/reward management\n"Millionaire" style lose-everything death penalty\nFacebook-based leaderboards\nIncreasing difficulty each level forces players to decide when to quit and log their score\nHand off to Heather after this one for a demo of the game\n
  • Casual title based around risk/reward management\n"Millionaire" style lose-everything death penalty\nFacebook-based leaderboards\nIncreasing difficulty each level forces players to decide when to quit and log their score\nHand off to Heather after this one for a demo of the game\n
  • Casual title based around risk/reward management\n"Millionaire" style lose-everything death penalty\nFacebook-based leaderboards\nIncreasing difficulty each level forces players to decide when to quit and log their score\nHand off to Heather after this one for a demo of the game\n
  • Go play video\n
  • Creating mazes isn't overly hard\nBiggest challenge is tracking representation internally\nThis is not a code tutorial so skipping all of that!\nAll we really need to grow a maze is place appropriate pieces into the game world\nAnywhere that is a "road to nowhere" can have more maze tagged on.\nVery efficient approach\nGenerates some nice spaces, images are using 2D prototypes that Heather mentioned\n(1st image)\nIntended to create mazes of around 20 pieces, but scales well\nAround 30,000 it starts to chug and take a few seconds\n(2nd image)\n
  • Creating mazes isn't overly hard\nBiggest challenge is tracking representation internally\nThis is not a code tutorial so skipping all of that!\nAll we really need to grow a maze is place appropriate pieces into the game world\nAnywhere that is a "road to nowhere" can have more maze tagged on.\nVery efficient approach\nGenerates some nice spaces, images are using 2D prototypes that Heather mentioned\n(1st image)\nIntended to create mazes of around 20 pieces, but scales well\nAround 30,000 it starts to chug and take a few seconds\n(2nd image)\n
  • Creating mazes isn't overly hard\nBiggest challenge is tracking representation internally\nThis is not a code tutorial so skipping all of that!\nAll we really need to grow a maze is place appropriate pieces into the game world\nAnywhere that is a "road to nowhere" can have more maze tagged on.\nVery efficient approach\nGenerates some nice spaces, images are using 2D prototypes that Heather mentioned\n(1st image)\nIntended to create mazes of around 20 pieces, but scales well\nAround 30,000 it starts to chug and take a few seconds\n(2nd image)\n
  • Creating mazes isn't overly hard\nBiggest challenge is tracking representation internally\nThis is not a code tutorial so skipping all of that!\nAll we really need to grow a maze is place appropriate pieces into the game world\nAnywhere that is a "road to nowhere" can have more maze tagged on.\nVery efficient approach\nGenerates some nice spaces, images are using 2D prototypes that Heather mentioned\n(1st image)\nIntended to create mazes of around 20 pieces, but scales well\nAround 30,000 it starts to chug and take a few seconds\n(2nd image)\n
  • Creating mazes isn't overly hard\nBiggest challenge is tracking representation internally\nThis is not a code tutorial so skipping all of that!\nAll we really need to grow a maze is place appropriate pieces into the game world\nAnywhere that is a "road to nowhere" can have more maze tagged on.\nVery efficient approach\nGenerates some nice spaces, images are using 2D prototypes that Heather mentioned\n(1st image)\nIntended to create mazes of around 20 pieces, but scales well\nAround 30,000 it starts to chug and take a few seconds\n(2nd image)\n
  • Creating mazes isn't overly hard\nBiggest challenge is tracking representation internally\nThis is not a code tutorial so skipping all of that!\nAll we really need to grow a maze is place appropriate pieces into the game world\nAnywhere that is a "road to nowhere" can have more maze tagged on.\nVery efficient approach\nGenerates some nice spaces, images are using 2D prototypes that Heather mentioned\n(1st image)\nIntended to create mazes of around 20 pieces, but scales well\nAround 30,000 it starts to chug and take a few seconds\n(2nd image)\n
  • Creating mazes isn't overly hard\nBiggest challenge is tracking representation internally\nThis is not a code tutorial so skipping all of that!\nAll we really need to grow a maze is place appropriate pieces into the game world\nAnywhere that is a "road to nowhere" can have more maze tagged on.\nVery efficient approach\nGenerates some nice spaces, images are using 2D prototypes that Heather mentioned\n(1st image)\nIntended to create mazes of around 20 pieces, but scales well\nAround 30,000 it starts to chug and take a few seconds\n(2nd image)\n
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  • Randomly chose a terminator piece for the maze\n
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  • This is one shows that we are aware there is a piece to the North that doesn't have a corresponding Southerly connection, so the piece selected at random cannot have a North connection\n
  • Likewise here, it cannot have a north pipe\n
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  • This one /must/ have a north connection to keep the maze complete\n
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  • End Capping\n
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  • One end-cap is replaced with the end room asset\n
  • The algorithm implicitly produces "fully connected" mazes.\nWe use some simple checks to validate the mazes produced are interesting\nNumber of dead-ends placed in the maze\nDistance from start to end\nNumber of pieces that have been placed\nIf any of these checks fail, the maze is rejected and a new one generated\n
  • The algorithm implicitly produces "fully connected" mazes.\nWe use some simple checks to validate the mazes produced are interesting\nNumber of dead-ends placed in the maze\nDistance from start to end\nNumber of pieces that have been placed\nIf any of these checks fail, the maze is rejected and a new one generated\n
  • The algorithm implicitly produces "fully connected" mazes.\nWe use some simple checks to validate the mazes produced are interesting\nNumber of dead-ends placed in the maze\nDistance from start to end\nNumber of pieces that have been placed\nIf any of these checks fail, the maze is rejected and a new one generated\n
  • The algorithm implicitly produces "fully connected" mazes.\nWe use some simple checks to validate the mazes produced are interesting\nNumber of dead-ends placed in the maze\nDistance from start to end\nNumber of pieces that have been placed\nIf any of these checks fail, the maze is rejected and a new one generated\n
  • The algorithm implicitly produces "fully connected" mazes.\nWe use some simple checks to validate the mazes produced are interesting\nNumber of dead-ends placed in the maze\nDistance from start to end\nNumber of pieces that have been placed\nIf any of these checks fail, the maze is rejected and a new one generated\n
  • Frequent question\nEssentially boils down to P vs NP\nVerification is a very simple process\nGuiding generation is way more complex\nDo we solve the simple problem multiple times, or the complex problem once\nYour mileage may vary\nDepends a lot on the frequency you will reject generated spaces with\nFor EM this is about 1 in 50, and we can generate a maze without guidance on the order of 2ms\nQuick maths and at 60fps - 2.56x10^-14 chance of slowing down even a frame\n
  • Frequent question\nEssentially boils down to P vs NP\nVerification is a very simple process\nGuiding generation is way more complex\nDo we solve the simple problem multiple times, or the complex problem once\nYour mileage may vary\nDepends a lot on the frequency you will reject generated spaces with\nFor EM this is about 1 in 50, and we can generate a maze without guidance on the order of 2ms\nQuick maths and at 60fps - 2.56x10^-14 chance of slowing down even a frame\n
  • Frequent question\nEssentially boils down to P vs NP\nVerification is a very simple process\nGuiding generation is way more complex\nDo we solve the simple problem multiple times, or the complex problem once\nYour mileage may vary\nDepends a lot on the frequency you will reject generated spaces with\nFor EM this is about 1 in 50, and we can generate a maze without guidance on the order of 2ms\nQuick maths and at 60fps - 2.56x10^-14 chance of slowing down even a frame\n
  • Frequent question\nEssentially boils down to P vs NP\nVerification is a very simple process\nGuiding generation is way more complex\nDo we solve the simple problem multiple times, or the complex problem once\nYour mileage may vary\nDepends a lot on the frequency you will reject generated spaces with\nFor EM this is about 1 in 50, and we can generate a maze without guidance on the order of 2ms\nQuick maths and at 60fps - 2.56x10^-14 chance of slowing down even a frame\n
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  • Analysis needs context\nIn particular for tracking Fringe Cases - Heather mentioned\nHow can we inspect events in a player's game when that content is being generated on the fly?\nNeed to have the ability to export configurations of levels along with analytics data\nSo also need to be able to bypass PCG system and load up a specific maze for replay\n
  • Analysis needs context\nIn particular for tracking Fringe Cases - Heather mentioned\nHow can we inspect events in a player's game when that content is being generated on the fly?\nNeed to have the ability to export configurations of levels along with analytics data\nSo also need to be able to bypass PCG system and load up a specific maze for replay\n
  • Analysis needs context\nIn particular for tracking Fringe Cases - Heather mentioned\nHow can we inspect events in a player's game when that content is being generated on the fly?\nNeed to have the ability to export configurations of levels along with analytics data\nSo also need to be able to bypass PCG system and load up a specific maze for replay\n
  • We have parameters that we're using\nfor generation\nfor verification\nfor ingame properties\nSo it isn't hard to see that if we start manipulating these parameters we can start varying the difficulty\nLarger mazes, more mines, faster moving mines, increase the branching of the maze\nAs the game progresses, we can control the tone of the spaces being created\nSee Tiny Wings for a good example of this in action\n
  • We have parameters that we're using\nfor generation\nfor verification\nfor ingame properties\nSo it isn't hard to see that if we start manipulating these parameters we can start varying the difficulty\nLarger mazes, more mines, faster moving mines, increase the branching of the maze\nAs the game progresses, we can control the tone of the spaces being created\nSee Tiny Wings for a good example of this in action\n
  • We have parameters that we're using\nfor generation\nfor verification\nfor ingame properties\nSo it isn't hard to see that if we start manipulating these parameters we can start varying the difficulty\nLarger mazes, more mines, faster moving mines, increase the branching of the maze\nAs the game progresses, we can control the tone of the spaces being created\nSee Tiny Wings for a good example of this in action\n
  • We have parameters that we're using\nfor generation\nfor verification\nfor ingame properties\nSo it isn't hard to see that if we start manipulating these parameters we can start varying the difficulty\nLarger mazes, more mines, faster moving mines, increase the branching of the maze\nAs the game progresses, we can control the tone of the spaces being created\nSee Tiny Wings for a good example of this in action\n
  • We have parameters that we're using\nfor generation\nfor verification\nfor ingame properties\nSo it isn't hard to see that if we start manipulating these parameters we can start varying the difficulty\nLarger mazes, more mines, faster moving mines, increase the branching of the maze\nAs the game progresses, we can control the tone of the spaces being created\nSee Tiny Wings for a good example of this in action\n
  • We have parameters that we're using\nfor generation\nfor verification\nfor ingame properties\nSo it isn't hard to see that if we start manipulating these parameters we can start varying the difficulty\nLarger mazes, more mines, faster moving mines, increase the branching of the maze\nAs the game progresses, we can control the tone of the spaces being created\nSee Tiny Wings for a good example of this in action\n
  • We have parameters that we're using\nfor generation\nfor verification\nfor ingame properties\nSo it isn't hard to see that if we start manipulating these parameters we can start varying the difficulty\nLarger mazes, more mines, faster moving mines, increase the branching of the maze\nAs the game progresses, we can control the tone of the spaces being created\nSee Tiny Wings for a good example of this in action\n
  • We have parameters that we're using\nfor generation\nfor verification\nfor ingame properties\nSo it isn't hard to see that if we start manipulating these parameters we can start varying the difficulty\nLarger mazes, more mines, faster moving mines, increase the branching of the maze\nAs the game progresses, we can control the tone of the spaces being created\nSee Tiny Wings for a good example of this in action\n
  • We've talked about making the level\nWe've talked about catering the level to the player\nHow can we guide the player?\nSignposting is how designers subtly influence player perceptions\nLights under "important" doors\nCan we generate these signs on the fly?\nIn EM, we're playing with how we can use our collectibles and hazards to help the player flow towards the goal (or misdirect)\n
  • We've talked about making the level\nWe've talked about catering the level to the player\nHow can we guide the player?\nSignposting is how designers subtly influence player perceptions\nLights under "important" doors\nCan we generate these signs on the fly?\nIn EM, we're playing with how we can use our collectibles and hazards to help the player flow towards the goal (or misdirect)\n
  • We've talked about making the level\nWe've talked about catering the level to the player\nHow can we guide the player?\nSignposting is how designers subtly influence player perceptions\nLights under "important" doors\nCan we generate these signs on the fly?\nIn EM, we're playing with how we can use our collectibles and hazards to help the player flow towards the goal (or misdirect)\n
  • We've talked about making the level\nWe've talked about catering the level to the player\nHow can we guide the player?\nSignposting is how designers subtly influence player perceptions\nLights under "important" doors\nCan we generate these signs on the fly?\nIn EM, we're playing with how we can use our collectibles and hazards to help the player flow towards the goal (or misdirect)\n
  • We've talked about making the level\nWe've talked about catering the level to the player\nHow can we guide the player?\nSignposting is how designers subtly influence player perceptions\nLights under "important" doors\nCan we generate these signs on the fly?\nIn EM, we're playing with how we can use our collectibles and hazards to help the player flow towards the goal (or misdirect)\n
  • We've talked about making the level\nWe've talked about catering the level to the player\nHow can we guide the player?\nSignposting is how designers subtly influence player perceptions\nLights under "important" doors\nCan we generate these signs on the fly?\nIn EM, we're playing with how we can use our collectibles and hazards to help the player flow towards the goal (or misdirect)\n
  • We've talked about making the level\nWe've talked about catering the level to the player\nHow can we guide the player?\nSignposting is how designers subtly influence player perceptions\nLights under "important" doors\nCan we generate these signs on the fly?\nIn EM, we're playing with how we can use our collectibles and hazards to help the player flow towards the goal (or misdirect)\n
  • We've talked about making the level\nWe've talked about catering the level to the player\nHow can we guide the player?\nSignposting is how designers subtly influence player perceptions\nLights under "important" doors\nCan we generate these signs on the fly?\nIn EM, we're playing with how we can use our collectibles and hazards to help the player flow towards the goal (or misdirect)\n
  • <picture>\nThe basic principles of what I’ve described in this level generation algorithm hold true here - grid world, connecting prefab pieces together etc etc\nTHIS IS DIABLO!\n
  • <picture>\nThe basic principles of what I’ve described in this level generation algorithm hold true here - grid world, connecting prefab pieces together etc etc\nTHIS IS DIABLO!\n
  • <picture>\nThe basic principles of what I’ve described in this level generation algorithm hold true here - grid world, connecting prefab pieces together etc etc\nTHIS IS DIABLO!\n
  • <picture>\nThe basic principles of what I’ve described in this level generation algorithm hold true here - grid world, connecting prefab pieces together etc etc\nTHIS IS DIABLO!\n
  • <picture>\nThe basic principles of what I’ve described in this level generation algorithm hold true here - grid world, connecting prefab pieces together etc etc\nTHIS IS DIABLO!\n
  • <picture>\nThe basic principles of what I’ve described in this level generation algorithm hold true here - grid world, connecting prefab pieces together etc etc\nTHIS IS DIABLO!\n
  • <picture>\nThe basic principles of what I’ve described in this level generation algorithm hold true here - grid world, connecting prefab pieces together etc etc\nTHIS IS DIABLO!\n
  • If your designer needs to get you to rewrite AI code to tweak the algorithm...\nYOU ARE DOING IT WRONG\n
  • If your designer needs to get you to rewrite AI code to tweak the algorithm...\nYOU ARE DOING IT WRONG\n
  • If your designer needs to get you to rewrite AI code to tweak the algorithm...\nYOU ARE DOING IT WRONG\n
  • If your designer needs to get you to rewrite AI code to tweak the algorithm...\nYOU ARE DOING IT WRONG\n
  • If your designer needs to get you to rewrite AI code to tweak the algorithm...\nYOU ARE DOING IT WRONG\n
  • If your designer needs to get you to rewrite AI code to tweak the algorithm...\nYOU ARE DOING IT WRONG\n
  • If your designer needs to get you to rewrite AI code to tweak the algorithm...\nYOU ARE DOING IT WRONG\n
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  • Transcript

    • 1. Skynet and YouGame AI for the MassesLuke Dicken@LukeD
    • 2. Who the Hell is this Guy?
    • 3. Who the Hell is this Guy?
    • 4. Who the Hell is this Guy?
    • 5. Who the Hell is this Guy?
    • 6. Who the Hell is this Guy?
    • 7. Who the Hell is this Guy?
    • 8. Who the Hell is this Guy?
    • 9. Who the Hell is this Guy?
    • 10. Who the Hell is this Guy?
    • 11. Who the Hell is this Guy?
    • 12. The Game AI World Tour
    • 13. What is AI?
    • 14. What is AI?
    • 15. What is AI?
    • 16. What is AI?
    • 17. Why is AI important in games?
    • 18. Where do we see AI?
    • 19. Why is AI Scary?
    • 20. Why is AI Scary?
    • 21. Why is AI Scary?
    • 22. Is that fun?Is it the point?
    • 23. Losing With Style
    • 24. Losing With Style•Blizzard’s Schwab called the role of AI ingames “Losing with style”
    • 25. Losing With Style•Blizzard’s Schwab called the role of AI ingames “Losing with style”• “Being a good dad”
    • 26. Losing With Style•Blizzard’s Schwab called the role of AI ingames “Losing with style”• “Being a good dad”•The point isn’t to beat the player
    • 27. Losing With Style•Blizzard’s Schwab called the role of AI ingames “Losing with style”• “Being a good dad”•The point isn’t to beat the player• It’s about creating a beatable challenge
    • 28. Losing With Style•Blizzard’s Schwab called the role of AI ingames “Losing with style”• “Being a good dad”•The point isn’t to beat the player• It’s about creating a beatable challenge• Managing frustration
    • 29. Losing With Style•Blizzard’s Schwab called the role of AI ingames “Losing with style”• “Being a good dad”•The point isn’t to beat the player• It’s about creating a beatable challenge• Managing frustration•Making sure that the player can win
    • 30. Losing With Style•Blizzard’s Schwab called the role of AI ingames “Losing with style”• “Being a good dad”•The point isn’t to beat the player• It’s about creating a beatable challenge• Managing frustration•Making sure that the player can win• Provided they play reasonably
    • 31. BatmanArkham Asylum
    • 32. Is that all it is?
    • 33. The Best Game Ever Made
    • 34. The Roles of the DungeonMaster
    • 35. The Roles of the DungeonMaster•The Dungeon Master is the guy whodecides how to interpret the rulesframework
    • 36. The Roles of the DungeonMaster•The Dungeon Master is the guy who decides how to interpret the rules framework•He is part storyteller, part game designer and part referee
    • 37. The Roles of the DungeonMaster•The Dungeon Master is the guy who decides how to interpret the rules framework•He is part storyteller, part game designer and part referee•The fundamental responsibility of the Dungeon Master is to ensure that the players have a good gaming session
    • 38. The Roles of the DungeonMaster•The Dungeon Master is the guy who decides how to interpret the rules framework•He is part storyteller, part game designer and part referee•The fundamental responsibility of the Dungeon Master is to ensure that the players have a good gaming session• Not removing the challenge, but managing it
    • 39. Interactive Storytelling
    • 40. Interactive Storytelling•The first job of the DM is to build a story for the campaign
    • 41. Interactive Storytelling•The first job of the DM is to build a story for the campaign•Generally they need a setting and some concept of how they want the story to evolve
    • 42. Interactive Storytelling•The first job of the DM is to build a story for the campaign•Generally they need a setting and some concept of how they want the story to evolve•Importantly, the players are going to frame the plot, so the setting can’t be too rigid, and the DM needs to adapt
    • 43. Designing Combat
    • 44. Designing Combat•As the players play through campaign, theywill come to situations that must be resolvedby combat
    • 45. Designing Combat•As the players play through campaign, they will come to situations that must be resolved by combat•The DM is responsible for building up that encounter, how strong the creatures are, what the layout of the room is etc.
    • 46. Designing Combat•As the players play through campaign, they will come to situations that must be resolved by combat•The DM is responsible for building up that encounter, how strong the creatures are, what the layout of the room is etc.•Some encounters can be randomised, but others are part of plot devices or need specific components
    • 47. Controlling Minions inCombat
    • 48. Controlling Minions inCombat•In combat, the enemy pieces are movedaround the map and attacking the players
    • 49. Controlling Minions inCombat•In combat, the enemy pieces are moved around the map and attacking the players•The DM controls these pieces
    • 50. Controlling Minions inCombat•In combat, the enemy pieces are moved around the map and attacking the players•The DM controls these pieces•Has to balance doing what’s “right” for the enemy units against not crushing the players
    • 51. Controlling Minions inCombat•In combat, the enemy pieces are moved around the map and attacking the players•The DM controls these pieces•Has to balance doing what’s “right” for the enemy units against not crushing the players• Players do not want charity
    • 52. Controlling Minions inCombat•In combat, the enemy pieces are moved around the map and attacking the players•The DM controls these pieces•Has to balance doing what’s “right” for the enemy units against not crushing the players• Players do not want charity• They don’t want to never be challenged
    • 53. Controlling Minions inCombat•In combat, the enemy pieces are moved around the map and attacking the players•The DM controls these pieces•Has to balance doing what’s “right” for the enemy units against not crushing the players• Players do not want charity• They don’t want to never be challenged• Equally they don’t want to be overly frustrated
    • 54. Improvisation:“Yes, and...”
    • 55. Improvisation:“Yes, and...”•A big part of being a good DM is giving yourplayers the freedom to do what they want
    • 56. Improvisation:“Yes, and...”•A big part of being a good DM is giving your players the freedom to do what they want•A lot of that comes back to classical “improvisation” in acting
    • 57. Improvisation:“Yes, and...”•A big part of being a good DM is giving your players the freedom to do what they want•A lot of that comes back to classical “improvisation” in acting• No script, just a general description of a scene and then the actors must take it forwards
    • 58. Improvisation:“Yes, and...”•A big part of being a good DM is giving your players the freedom to do what they want•A lot of that comes back to classical “improvisation” in acting• No script, just a general description of a scene and then the actors must take it forwards•One of the key rules of good improvisation is“yes and...” - you always agree with whatthe last person said and then add your owndetails
    • 59. Understanding Players
    • 60. Understanding Players•Finally, DMs need a good understanding oftheir players
    • 61. Understanding Players•Finally, DMs need a good understanding of their players•Certain players will react in specific ways to situations
    • 62. Understanding Players•Finally, DMs need a good understanding of their players•Certain players will react in specific ways to situations•Knowing your players means you can tailor your content to their way of thinking
    • 63. Understanding Players•Finally, DMs need a good understanding of their players•Certain players will react in specific ways to situations•Knowing your players means you can tailor your content to their way of thinking• Or find new ways to mess with them
    • 64. Game AI as the DM
    • 65. Game AI as the DM•In video games, we don’t have a Player DMavailable
    • 66. Game AI as the DM•In video games, we don’t have a Player DM available•What we typically do is try to pre-bake most of the DM system such as narrative and encounter design
    • 67. Game AI as the DM•In video games, we don’t have a Player DM available•What we typically do is try to pre-bake most of the DM system such as narrative and encounter design•By far the majority of Game AI focuses on solely on controlling minions in encounters
    • 68. Game AI as the DM•In video games, we don’t have a Player DM available•What we typically do is try to pre-bake most of the DM system such as narrative and encounter design•By far the majority of Game AI focuses on solely on controlling minions in encounters•But as we’ve just seen, so much more is required to truly manage the game experience
    • 69. AI for Storytelling
    • 70. AI for Storytelling•Branching narrative - player chooses pathsthrough the story.Choose your ownadventure books, Mass Effect
    • 71. AI for Storytelling•Branching narrative - player chooses paths through the story.Choose your own adventure books, Mass Effect•Planned narrative - sections of story are moved and retold to match a narrative pacing
    • 72. AI for Storytelling•Branching narrative - player chooses paths through the story.Choose your own adventure books, Mass Effect•Planned narrative - sections of story are moved and retold to match a narrative pacing•Adaptive narrative - the story is evolving as the player interacts with it
    • 73. Encounter Design:Procedural Content
    • 74. Encounter Design:Procedural Content•You could build every encounter or level byhand
    • 75. Encounter Design:Procedural Content•You could build every encounter or level byhand• Time consuming
    • 76. Encounter Design:Procedural Content•You could build every encounter or level byhand• Time consuming• For some games, more content needed than can be created in the time
    • 77. Encounter Design:Procedural Content•You could build every encounter or level byhand• Time consuming• For some games, more content needed than can be created in the time• Low replayability
    • 78. Encounter Design:Procedural Content•You could build every encounter or level byhand• Time consuming• For some games, more content needed than can be created in the time• Low replayability•Instead, you can make an AI system that willgenerate the levels you want
    • 79. Player-Tailored Content
    • 80. Player-Tailored Content•With the right analytics you can learn a lotabout your players
    • 81. Player-Tailored Content•With the right analytics you can learn a lot about your players•Then you can use that to customise the spaces you are procedurally generating
    • 82. Player-Tailored Content•With the right analytics you can learn a lot about your players•Then you can use that to customise the spaces you are procedurally generating•Imagine a game involving mazes and optional powerups
    • 83. Player-Tailored Content•With the right analytics you can learn a lot about your players•Then you can use that to customise the spaces you are procedurally generating•Imagine a game involving mazes and optional powerups• Recognise a player exploring more and generate larger spaces for them
    • 84. Player-Tailored Content•With the right analytics you can learn a lot about your players•Then you can use that to customise the spaces you are procedurally generating•Imagine a game involving mazes and optional powerups• Recognise a player exploring more and generate larger spaces for them• A player intent on dashing to the end of the maze could have more hazards put in his path
    • 85. Putting this into Practice
    • 86. Putting this into Practice
    • 87. Putting this into Practice
    • 88. Putting this into Practice
    • 89. Easy Money? demo
    • 90. Simple Maze Creation
    • 91. Simple Maze Creation•Creating mazes isnt overly hard
    • 92. Simple Maze Creation•Creating mazes isnt overly hard•Just placing appropriate pieces into theworld where there is a “road to nowhere”
    • 93. Simple Maze Creation•Creating mazes isnt overly hard•Just placing appropriate pieces into the world where there is a “road to nowhere”•Very efficient approach
    • 94. Simple Maze Creation•Creating mazes isnt overly hard•Just placing appropriate pieces into the world where there is a “road to nowhere”•Very efficient approach
    • 95. Simple Maze Creation•Creating mazes isnt overly hard•Just placing appropriate pieces into the world where there is a “road to nowhere”•Very efficient approach
    • 96. Simple Maze Creation•Creating mazes isnt overly hard•Just placing appropriate pieces into the world where there is a “road to nowhere”•Very efficient approach
    • 97. Simple Maze Creation•Creating mazes isnt overly hard•Just placing appropriate pieces into the world where there is a “road to nowhere”•Very efficient approach
    • 98. Algorithmic Maze Creation
    • 99. Maze Verification
    • 100. Maze Verification•We use some simple checks to validate themazes produced are interesting
    • 101. Maze Verification•We use some simple checks to validate themazes produced are interesting• Number of dead-ends placed in the maze
    • 102. Maze Verification•We use some simple checks to validate themazes produced are interesting• Number of dead-ends placed in the maze• Straight-line Distance from start to end
    • 103. Maze Verification•We use some simple checks to validate themazes produced are interesting• Number of dead-ends placed in the maze• Straight-line Distance from start to end• Number of pieces that have been placed
    • 104. Maze Verification•We use some simple checks to validate themazes produced are interesting• Number of dead-ends placed in the maze• Straight-line Distance from start to end• Number of pieces that have been placed•If any of these checks fail, the maze isrejected and a new one generated
    • 105. Post-hoc Verification vsGuided Generation
    • 106. Post-hoc Verification vsGuided Generation•Verification is a very simple process
    • 107. Post-hoc Verification vsGuided Generation•Verification is a very simple process•Guiding generation is way more complex
    • 108. Post-hoc Verification vsGuided Generation•Verification is a very simple process•Guiding generation is way more complex•Do we solve the simple problem multipletimes, or the complex problem once
    • 109. Post-hoc Verification vsGuided Generation•Verification is a very simple process•Guiding generation is way more complex•Do we solve the simple problem multipletimes, or the complex problem once• Your mileage may vary
    • 110. Analytics
    • 111. Analytics•Working out what the player is doing in yourgame is majorly important
    • 112. Analytics•Working out what the player is doing in yourgame is majorly important
    • 113. Analytics•Working out what the player is doing in yourgame is majorly important
    • 114. Analytics•Working out what the player is doing in your game is majorly important•You need to pay attention and dig into the data to discover what’s actually going on
    • 115. Analytics•Working out what the player is doing in your game is majorly important•You need to pay attention and dig into the data to discover what’s actually going on
    • 116. Analytics•Working out what the player is doing in your game is majorly important•You need to pay attention and dig into the data to discover what’s actually going on
    • 117. Analytics•Working out what the player is doing in your game is majorly important•You need to pay attention and dig into the data to discover what’s actually going on
    • 118. Analytics•Working out what the player is doing in your game is majorly important•You need to pay attention and dig into the data to discover what’s actually going on
    • 119. Analytics•Working out what the player is doing in your game is majorly important•You need to pay attention and dig into the data to discover what’s actually going on
    • 120. Analytics•Working out what the player is doing in your game is majorly important•You need to pay attention and dig into the data to discover what’s actually going on
    • 121. Export and Replay of Content
    • 122. Export and Replay of Content•Analysis needs context
    • 123. Export and Replay of Content•Analysis needs context•We need to have the ability to exportconfigurations of levels
    • 124. Export and Replay of Content•Analysis needs context•We need to have the ability to export configurations of levels•Also need to be able to bypass PCG system to load up a specific maze
    • 125. Procedural Difficulty
    • 126. Procedural Difficulty•We have parameters that were using:
    • 127. Procedural Difficulty•We have parameters that were using:• for generation, for verification, for ingame properties
    • 128. Procedural Difficulty•We have parameters that were using: • for generation, for verification, for ingame properties•So it isnt hard to see that if we start manipulating these parameters we can start varying the difficulty
    • 129. Procedural Difficulty•We have parameters that were using: • for generation, for verification, for ingame properties•So it isnt hard to see that if we start manipulating these parameters we can start varying the difficulty•As the game progresses, we can control the tone of the spaces being created
    • 130. Procedural Difficulty•We have parameters that were using: • for generation, for verification, for ingame properties•So it isnt hard to see that if we start manipulating these parameters we can start varying the difficulty•As the game progresses, we can control the tone of the spaces being created
    • 131. Procedural Difficulty•We have parameters that were using: • for generation, for verification, for ingame properties•So it isnt hard to see that if we start manipulating these parameters we can start varying the difficulty•As the game progresses, we can control the tone of the spaces being created
    • 132. Procedural Difficulty•We have parameters that were using: • for generation, for verification, for ingame properties•So it isnt hard to see that if we start manipulating these parameters we can start varying the difficulty•As the game progresses, we can control the tone of the spaces being created
    • 133. Procedural Difficulty•We have parameters that were using: • for generation, for verification, for ingame properties•So it isnt hard to see that if we start manipulating these parameters we can start varying the difficulty•As the game progresses, we can control the tone of the spaces being created
    • 134. Procedural Signposting
    • 135. Procedural Signposting•How can we guide the player?
    • 136. Procedural Signposting•How can we guide the player?•Signposting is how designers subtlyinfluence player perceptions
    • 137. Procedural Signposting•How can we guide the player?•Signposting is how designers subtlyinfluence player perceptions• Lights under "important" doors
    • 138. Procedural Signposting•How can we guide the player?•Signposting is how designers subtlyinfluence player perceptions• Lights under "important" doors• Cover position suggesting enemy locations
    • 139. Procedural Signposting•How can we guide the player?•Signposting is how designers subtlyinfluence player perceptions• Lights under "important" doors• Cover position suggesting enemy locations
    • 140. Procedural Signposting•How can we guide the player?•Signposting is how designers subtlyinfluence player perceptions• Lights under "important" doors• Cover position suggesting enemy locations
    • 141. Procedural Signposting•How can we guide the player?•Signposting is how designers subtlyinfluence player perceptions• Lights under "important" doors• Cover position suggesting enemy locations•Can we generate these signs on the fly?
    • 142. Procedural Signposting•How can we guide the player?•Signposting is how designers subtlyinfluence player perceptions• Lights under "important" doors• Cover position suggesting enemy locations•Can we generate these signs on the fly?•In EM, were playing with how we can useour collectibles and hazards to help theplayer flow towards the goal (or misdirect)
    • 143. Beyond Indie
    • 144. Beyond Indie•The principals here can be applied in avariety of contexts
    • 145. Beyond Indie•The principals here can be applied in a variety of contexts•You can put them into almost any type of game
    • 146. Beyond Indie•The principals here can be applied in a variety of contexts•You can put them into almost any type of game• And also any scale
    • 147. Beyond Indie•The principals here can be applied in a variety of contexts•You can put them into almost any type of game• And also any scale•Here’s an example
    • 148. Beyond Indie
    • 149. Beyond Indie This is Diablo 3
    • 150. What Else?
    • 151. What Else?•If we’re going to make all these shiny AIalgorithms, that’s brilliant.
    • 152. What Else?•If we’re going to make all these shiny AIalgorithms, that’s brilliant.• Nobody cares.
    • 153. What Else?•If we’re going to make all these shiny AIalgorithms, that’s brilliant.• Nobody cares.•Exposing the tools to designers is key
    • 154. What Else?•If we’re going to make all these shiny AIalgorithms, that’s brilliant.• Nobody cares.•Exposing the tools to designers is key•We need visual ways of changing NPCbehaviours, change parameters
    • 155. What Else?•If we’re going to make all these shiny AIalgorithms, that’s brilliant.• Nobody cares.•Exposing the tools to designers is key•We need visual ways of changing NPC behaviours, change parameters•A big part of being an AI developer is actually being a Tools programmer
    • 156. What Else?
    • 157. Summary
    • 158. Summary•AI is such a powerful tool, we’re only justbeginning to see the potential of what it cando for games
    • 159. Summary•AI is such a powerful tool, we’re only just beginning to see the potential of what it can do for games•AI can give us a lot more flexibility when we design games to make excellent replayability and to allow the players more freedom
    • 160. Summary•AI is such a powerful tool, we’re only just beginning to see the potential of what it can do for games•AI can give us a lot more flexibility when we design games to make excellent replayability and to allow the players more freedom•AI does not need to be scary!
    • 161. Plugs!
    • 162. Plugs!• Check out “Easy Money?”:
    • 163. Plugs!• Check out “Easy Money?”:• http://easymoney.robooverlord.co.uk
    • 164. Plugs!• Check out “Easy Money?”:• http://easymoney.robooverlord.co.uk• AltDev Student Summit
    • 165. Plugs!• Check out “Easy Money?”:• http://easymoney.robooverlord.co.uk• AltDev Student Summit• Focused on explaining realities of industry life
    • 166. Plugs!• Check out “Easy Money?”:• http://easymoney.robooverlord.co.uk• AltDev Student Summit• Focused on explaining realities of industry life• November 10th/11th - free, online
    • 167. Plugs!• Check out “Easy Money?”:• http://easymoney.robooverlord.co.uk• AltDev Student Summit• Focused on explaining realities of industry life• November 10th/11th - free, online• IGDA Scholarships
    • 168. Plugs!• Check out “Easy Money?”:• http://easymoney.robooverlord.co.uk• AltDev Student Summit• Focused on explaining realities of industry life• November 10th/11th - free, online• IGDA Scholarships• Free pass to attend GDC, E3, Develop, Casual Connect, TGS, CEDEC
    • 169. Plugs!• Check out “Easy Money?”:• http://easymoney.robooverlord.co.uk• AltDev Student Summit• Focused on explaining realities of industry life• November 10th/11th - free, online• IGDA Scholarships• Free pass to attend GDC, E3, Develop, Casual Connect, TGS, CEDEC• 2013 info soon http://igda.org/scholarships
    • 170. Contact Info @LukeDluke@robotoverlord.co.uk http://lukedicken.com/

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