Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

07 lm planning-resilience ws 2014

64

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
64
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. 4 marzo 2014 - 07 2014 Workshop Conoscenza e tecnologie appropriate per la sostenibilità e la resilienza in urbanistica Knowledge and Appropriate Technologies for Sustainability and Resilience in Planning Funda Atun, Maria Pia Boni, Annapaola Canevari, Massimo Compagnoni, Luca Marescotti, Maria Mascione, Ouejdane Mejri, Scira Menoni, Floriana Pergalani
  • 2. LAUREA MAGISTRALE DELLA SCUOLA DI ARCHITETTURA E SOCIETÀ Laboratorio organizzato da Luca Marescotti
  • 3. Cover 2014 Workshop Conoscenza e tecnologie appropriate per la sostenibilità e la resilienza in urbanistica - Knowledge and Appropriate Technologies for Sustainability and Resilience in Planning 04 marzo 2014 Misurare efficacia e efficienza nella costruzione della resilienza. Effectiveness and efficiency measurements in resiliency European Environment Agency, Technicl Reports, European Green Capital Award.
  • 4. REDUCING DISASTER RISK The linkages between development and disaster risk are not difficult to visualize. Any development activity has the potential to either increase or reduce disaster risk. When a school or a health centre is destroyed in an earthquake, we have to remember that this same school or health centre was once a development project, whether funded from national budgets or external development assistance. Mark Pelling et al/UNDP 2004 Luca Marescotti 4 / 69
  • 5. Per esempio: i terremoti in Italia Rischio sismico - Protezionecivile.it Luca Marescotti 5 / 69
  • 6. Per esempio: i terremoti in Italia In 2500 anni, l’Italia è stata interessata da più di 30.000 terremoti di media e forte intensità superiore al IV-V grado della scala Mercalli) e da circa 560 eventi sismici di intensità uguale o superiore all’VIII grado della scala Mercalli (in media uno ogni 4 anni e mezzo). Solo nel XX secolo, ben 7 terremoti hanno avuto una magnitudo uguale o superiore a 6.5 (con effetti classificabili tra il X e XI grado Mercalli). La sismicità più elevata si concentra nella parte centro-meridionale della penisola - lungo la dorsale appenninica (Val di Magra, Mugello, Val Tiberina, Val Nerina, Aquilano, Fucino, Valle del Liri, Beneventano, Irpinia) - in Calabria e Sicilia, ed in alcune aree settentrionali, tra le quali il Friuli, parte del Veneto e la Liguria occidentale. Rischio sismico - Protezionecivile.it Luca Marescotti 6 / 69
  • 7. Per esempio: i terremoti in Italia In Italia, il rapporto tra i danni prodotti dai terremoti e l’energia rilasciata nel corso degli eventi è molto più alto rispetto a quello che si verifica normalmente in altri Paesi ad elevata sismicità, quali la California o il Giappone. Ad esempio, il terremoto del 1997 in Umbria e nelle Marche ha prodotto un quadro di danneggiamento (senza tetto: 32.000; danno economico: circa 10 miliardi di Euro) confrontabile con quello della California del 1989 (14.5 miliardi di $ USA), malgrado fosse caratterizzato da un’energia circa 30 volte inferiore. Ciò è dovuto principalmente all’elevata densità abitativa e alla notevole fragilità del nostro patrimonio edilizio. [fonte: Rischio sismico - Protezionecivile.it] Luca Marescotti 7 / 69
  • 8. Planning and designing resilience but … 0 (hazard) x population x vulnerability = 0 (risk) hazard x 0 (population) x vulnerability = 0 (risk) hazard x population x 0 (vulnerability) = 0 (risk) Luca Marescotti 8 / 69
  • 9. USA, PLANETIZEN, a digital review Resilience is a term much bandied about these days in the planning and development professions. Buildings, plans, economies and even cities are expected to be resilient to unforeseen externalities in a world of rapidly changing technologies, climates, and cultures. With this in mind, Kevin C. Desouza and his colleagues at the Metropolitan Institute at Virginia Tech would like to engage you, the planning and development community, in a discussion of what exactly it means to be resilient in a planning context, whether this is a laudable goal, and, if so, how we can achieve it. Eric Park Jaimy Alex Kevin C. Desouza Trevor Flanery, “Getting Serious About Resilience in Planning”, Planetizen, 31 July 2012 - 5:00pm Luca Marescotti 9 / 69
  • 10. “Getting Serious About Resilience in Planning” Luca Marescotti 10 / 69
  • 11. “Getting Serious About Resilience in Planning” Turin, Italy, for example, is a city that has shown resilience, when compared to its American counterpart, Detroit. After Fiat abandoned its Lingotto automobile factory in 1982, Turin lost over 100,000 jobs in a decade, and witnessed continuous industrial decline for longer. Yet, today, the city is a symbol of how to be resilient. The old factory plant was repurposed to accommodate shopping malls, hotels, and even a helicopter landing pad. New sectors of the economy, such as tourism and food, received investment and have taken off. In addition, 60% of Turin’s once abandoned land has been repurposed, and its residents enjoy a higher per capita GDP than the rest of the country. Turin is a good example of a resilient city, as it not only dealt with the shock, and recovered, but it has defined a 'new normal' for itself, which some might say is even more advanced that its previous state. Eric Park Jaimy Alex Kevin C. Desouza Trevor Flanery, “Getting Serious About Resilience in Planning”, Planetizen, 31 July 2012 - 5:00pm Luca Marescotti 11 / 69
  • 12. “Getting Serious About Resilience in Planning” Luca Marescotti 12 / 69
  • 13. “Getting Serious About Resilience in Planning” Consider the case of city of the Vienna (Wien), Austria. Over the last several years, Vienna has ranked #1 in the Mercer Quality of Living Survey and has made great strides in becoming a smarter city by focusing on intelligent urbanity. At its core, Vienna's smart city initiative focuses on how to build a city that is resilient to several factors, such as changing demographics. Vienna will become the youngest Austrian city (measured by the age of residents) by 2050 (today, around 25% are 60 years or older). It will also witness a 13% rise in population by 2030 and 22% by 2050. The city is involved in a massive planning effort that is focusing on a number of initiatives that will reduce the city's impact on its environment and account for rapidly changing population demographics. One example is the city’s focus on enabling cycling as a clean technology for urban transportation by improving its bicycle infrastructure. The city is also engaged in a social campaign to make biking more 'cool' and educate its populace on the variety of options, both social and professional, around biking. If one was to examine Vienna's approach to cycling, both as a planning process and as outcomes, it would be hard to arrive at any practices that are not temporally and spatially responsible. Eric Park Jaimy Alex Kevin C. Desouza Trevor Flanery, “Getting Serious About Resilience in Planning”, Planetizen, 31 July 2012 - 5:00pm Luca Marescotti 13 / 69
  • 14. Estratto da Planetizen: Ecco ad oggi i nostri principali risultati - 1 In questo contesto, si intende per resilienza la capacità di adattarsi, riorganizzarsi, reindirizzare le informazioni per i decisori e usare le risorse e le capacità individuali per funzioni che non erano state previste. Eric Park Jaimy Alex Kevin C. Desouza Trevor Flanery, “Getting Serious About Resilience in Planning”, Planetizen, 31 July 2012 - 5:00pm Luca Marescotti 14 / 69
  • 15. quoted from Planetizen: Here are our main findings to date - 1 Resilience and resiliency are terms that are used casually in the literature which diminishes their value and obfuscates their meaning. It is common to think of resilience as the ability of an object or entity, to absorb some shock, internal or external, and then recover from it in an effective and efficient manner towards either a previous state (when considering physical objects) or a new normal (when considering socio-technical systems). Resilience is also a function of being operational in times of stress. Can a given entity still maintain operations when under stress? Here, resilience refers to having the capacity to be able to adapt, reorganize, and reroute information for decision-making and use one’s resources and capabilities for functions they were not designed for. Eric Park Jaimy Alex Kevin C. Desouza Trevor Flanery, “Getting Serious About Resilience in Planning”, Planetizen, 31 July 2012 - 5:00pm Luca Marescotti 15 / 69
  • 16. Estratto da Planetizen: Ecco ad oggi i nostri principali risultati - 2 La resilienza dipende dal contesto. Eric Park Jaimy Alex Kevin C. Desouza Trevor Flanery, “Getting Serious About Resilience in Planning”, Planetizen, 31 July 2012 - 5:00pm Luca Marescotti 16 / 69
  • 17. quoted from Planetizen: Here are our main findings to date: 2 Resilience is context-specific. Resilience as a concept is spatially and temporally bounded. Simply put, we cannot be resilient to everything nor have resilience towards an infinite future. As such, it is critical to specify resilience to what and across what time horizon? Eric Park Jaimy Alex Kevin C. Desouza Trevor Flanery, “Getting Serious About Resilience in Planning”, Planetizen, 31 July 2012 - 5:00pm Luca Marescotti 17 / 69
  • 18. Estratto da Planetizen: Ecco ad oggi i nostri principali risultati - 3 La resilienza orienta la pianificazione e la progettazione per ottenere piani resilienti e prodotti resilienti. Eric Park Jaimy Alex Kevin C. Desouza Trevor Flanery, “Getting Serious About Resilience in Planning”, Planetizen, 31 July 2012 - 5:00pm Luca Marescotti 18 / 69
  • 19. quoted from Planetizen: Here are our main findings to date - 3 Resilience in the context of planning can be viewed as 2X2 matrix. Resilience as a verb is tactics that we include within the processes of planning and designing. Resilience as an adjective is how we judge the finished artifact – a given plan or an artifact. Eric Park Jaimy Alex Kevin C. Desouza Trevor Flanery, “Getting Serious About Resilience in Planning”, Planetizen, 31 July 2012 - 5:00pm Luca Marescotti 19 / 69
  • 20. quoted from Planetizen: Here are our main findings to date - 3 (figure) PLANNING Resilience tactics in a process PLANS with Resilience as a product DESIGNING Resilience tactics in a process PHISICAL ARTIFACTS with Resilience as a product Elaborazione da: Eric Park Jaimy Alex Kevin C. Desouza Trevor Flanery, “Getting Serious About Resilience in Planning”, Planetizen, 31 July 2012 - 5:00pm Luca Marescotti 20 / 69
  • 21. quoted from Planetizen: Here are our main findings to date - 3 Thinking of resilience offers us a way forward towards being precise in our usage of the term. When we evaluate planning or designing for resilience we are really concerned with the features of the process. In comparison, resilience of plans or physical artifacts is a function of the features of the object. There is a relation between the four elements – plans, planning, designing, and physical artifacts – in terms of how the resilience of one impacts the other. However, these relations are not always obvious or simple. For instance, does resilient planning lead to construction of resilient plans? Do resilient plans incorporate elements that allow for resilient designs? Eric Park Jaimy Alex Kevin C. Desouza Trevor Flanery, “Getting Serious About Resilience in Planning”, Planetizen, 31 July 2012 - 5:00pm Luca Marescotti 21 / 69
  • 22. Estratto da Planetizen: Ecco ad oggi i nostri principali risultati - 4 I fallimenti sono causati da: errori di comunicazione, cattiva allocazione delle risorse, poca chiarezza nei processi decisionali. Eric Park Jaimy Alex Kevin C. Desouza Trevor Flanery, “Getting Serious About Resilience in Planning”, Planetizen, 31 July 2012 - 5:00pm Luca Marescotti 22 / 69
  • 23. quoted from Planetizen: Here are our main findings to date - 4 Consider the simple question: why do plans fail? Put another way, why are plans not resilient to their environments? Our findings indicate three common causes for disconnects--between the drivers (planning and designing processes) and the actual outcomes (plans and physical artifacts)--that result in a failure to achieve resiliency: breakdowns in communication, failure to allocate resources appropriately, and a lack of clarity in the decision-making process. Encompassing these basic causes are the challenges presented by time and scale. Often by the time a plan gains approval and is implemented, it is obsolete and no longer responsive to the current environment due to changes within the system. Likewise, the scale of the plan may in itself be too ambitious to achieve resiliency in terms of its capacity to effectively adapt in the face of shocks. Resilient systems must be able to temporally mitigate interactions between its past (artifacts), present (goals), and future (possibility/probability) while maintaining spatial vitality across environmental, social, and economic dimensions of a society. Eric Park Jaimy Alex Kevin C. Desouza Trevor Flanery, “Getting Serious About Resilience in Planning”, Planetizen, 31 July 2012 - 5:00pm Luca Marescotti 23 / 69
  • 24. Estratto da Planetizen: Ecco ad oggi i nostri principali risultati - 5 Nei fondamenti della teoria della pianificazione si deve introdurre un principio: quanto più la pianificazione è interdisciplinare, tanto più robusto o resiliente sarà il prodotto (il territorio costruito). Eric Park Jaimy Alex Kevin C. Desouza Trevor Flanery, “Getting Serious About Resilience in Planning”, Planetizen, 31 July 2012 - 5:00pm Luca Marescotti 24 / 69
  • 25. quoted from Planetizen: Here are our main findings to date - 5 A major assumption underpinning planning theory is: the more interdisciplinary the planning approach, the more robust or resilient the outcome will be. This notion that diverse sets of stakeholders within a planning process will inevitably lead to resilient plans is widely accepted. However, this assumption may not be as solid. While interdisciplinary teams can potentially bring diverse expertise to bear on a problem, consider a larger set of challenges and potential solutions, and even think more holistically about scenarios; they are no panacea when it comes to resilience in planning. Eric Park Jaimy Alex Kevin C. Desouza Trevor Flanery, “Getting Serious About Resilience in Planning”, Planetizen, 31 July 2012 - 5:00pm Luca Marescotti 25 / 69
  • 26. Estratto da Planetizen: Ecco ad oggi i nostri principali risultati - 6 Bisogna indurre processi adattivi, che utilizzano capacità collettive (sistemiche) di percezione dei cambiamenti, di accesso e scambio delle informazioni, di strutture decisionali e organizzative non gerarchiche. Eric Park Jaimy Alex Kevin C. Desouza Trevor Flanery, “Getting Serious About Resilience in Planning”, Planetizen, 31 July 2012 - 5:00pm Luca Marescotti 26 / 69
  • 27. quoted from Planetizen: Here are our main findings to date - 6 Another highly adaptive collective life form, bacteria, structure their colony resiliency using adaptive processes that utilize collective sensing of changing conditions, collective access to the information, and collaborative and nonhierarchical decision-making and task assignment. We see many systemic improvements in urban infrastructure such as smart city applications as well as collaborative planning as functionally similar strategies. However, some forms of collaborative planning can damage resiliency in planning processes, plans, and physical environments because they use collective processes for only broad, information-gathering or public comment purposes. More resilient planning brings the people responsible for utilizing and living within the results or artifacts of plans (buildings, roads, commercial areas) into direct and flexible experimentation and design for their future adaptations. The failure of design and planning processes to adequately involve local stakeholders results in less resilient places if basic feedback functions are lacking that support learning, adaptability, and consequent resilience. Eric Park Jaimy Alex Kevin C. Desouza Trevor Flanery, “Getting Serious About Resilience in Planning”, Planetizen, 31 July 2012 - 5:00pm Luca Marescotti 27 / 69
  • 28. United Nations Development Programme Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery www.undp.org/bcpr Luca Marescotti 28 / 69
  • 29. United Nations Development Programme Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery www.undp.org/bcpr Natural disasters exert an enormous toll on development. In doing so, they pose a significant threat to prospects for achieving the Millennium Development Goals in particular, the overarching target of halving extreme poverty by 2015. Annual economic losses associated with such disasters averaged US$ 75.5 billion in the 1960s, US$ 138.4 billion in the 1970s, US$ 213.9 billion in the 1980s and US$ 659.9 billion in the 1990s. The majority of these losses are concentrated in the developed world and fail to adequately capture the impact of the disaster on the poor who often bear the greatest cost in terms of lives and livelihoods, and rebuilding their shattered communities and infrastructure. Today, 85 percent of the people exposed to earthquakes, tropical cyclones, floods and droughts live in countries having either medium or low human development. Mark Malloch Brown Luca Marescotti 29 / 69
  • 30. United Nations Development Programme Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery www.undp.org/bcpr I disastri naturali richiedono un tributo enorme allo sviluppo, tanto da costituire una grave minaccia al raggiungimento degli Obiettivi di Sviluppo del Millennio, in particolare l'obiettivo globale di dimezzare la povertà estrema entro il 2015. Le perdite economiche annuali associate a tali disastri per i soli Stati Uniti ammontavano a 75,5 miliardi dollari nel 1960, a US 138,4 miliardi dollari nel 1970, a US 213,9 miliardi dollari nel 1980 fino a US 659,9 miliardi dollari nel 1990. La maggior parte di queste perdite sono concentrate nel mondo sviluppato e non riescono a far cogliere adeguatamente l'impatto del disastro sui poveri, che spesso sopportano il maggior costo in termini di vite umane e mezzi di sussistenza, e poi in termini di ricostruzione delle loro comunità in frantumi e delle infrastrutture. Oggi, l'85 per cento delle persone esposte a terremoti, cicloni tropicali, inondazioni e siccità vivono in paesi a medio o basso sviluppo. Luca Marescotti 30 / 69 Mark Malloch Brown
  • 31. United Nations Development Programme Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery www.undp.org/bcpr When we decided to produce a global report on development and disaster risk, we wanted to highlight these development choices. Disaster risk is not inevitable, but on the contrary can be managed and reduced through appropriate development actions. This is the message we want to convey in this Report to our programme countries, our donors, our partners in the United Nations system, regional and international organisations, civil society and the private sector. A great deal of support was provided in preparation of this publication, known as the World Vulnerability Report when the process began in 2000, and we acknowledge many generous contributions. Luca Marescotti 31 / 69
  • 32. United Nations Development Programme Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery www.undp.org/bcpr Today, 85% of the people exposed to earthquakes, tropical cyclones, floods and droughts live in countries having either medium or low human development. … … Some 75% of the world’s population live in areas affected at least once by earthquake, tropical cyclone, flood or drought between 1980 and 2000. Disaster Risk Index (DRI) Luca Marescotti 32 / 69
  • 33. United Nations Development Programme Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery www.undp.org/bcpr Urbanisation does not necessarily have to lead to increasing disaster risk and can actually, if managed properly, help reduce it. Luca Marescotti 33 / 69
  • 34. United Nations Development Programme Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery www.undp.org/bcpr Luca Marescotti 34 / 69
  • 35. United Nations Development Programme Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery www.undp.org/bcpr Luca Marescotti 35 / 69
  • 36. United Nations Development Programme Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery www.undp.org/bcpr Luca Marescotti 36 / 69
  • 37. United Nations Development Programme Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery www.undp.org/bcpr Luca Marescotti 37 / 69
  • 38. United Nations Development Programme Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery www.undp.org/bcpr Rischio = f [pericolo, esposizione, vulnerabilità] Luca Marescotti 38 / 69
  • 39. United Nations Development Programme Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery www.undp.org/bcpr Rischio = f [esposizione fisica per frequenza e forza, vulnerabilità] Luca Marescotti 39 / 69
  • 40. United Nations Development Programme Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery www.undp.org/bcpr Rischio = f [sommatoria dei rischi] EVENTI SISTEMICI Luca Marescotti 40 / 69
  • 41. United Nations Development Programme Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery www.undp.org/bcpr Luca Marescotti 41 / 69
  • 42. Quoted from Mark Pelling, Andrew Maskrey, Pablo Ruiz and Lisa Hall (eds.), A Global Report - Reducing Disaster Risk. A Challenge For Development, United Nations Development Programme - Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery, New York, 2004. Luca Marescotti 42 / 69
  • 43. Alan Randall, Precautionary Principle Precautionary Principle: when making multi-dimensional public decisions, acting to avoid and/or mitigate potential harmful consequences should be accorded high priority. Quando il processo decisionale pubblico coinvolge molte dimensioni, si deve dare la massima priorità a togliere o mitigare potenziali conseguenze dannose. Luca Marescotti 43 / 69
  • 44. Alan Randall, Precautionary Principle Examples from PP statements Uncertainty about harmful consequences does not justify failure to take precautionary action (Bergen Declaration 1990) Plausible but uncertain harm justifies precautionary intervention (UNESCO 2005) Uncertain harm requires intervention, and the burden of proof is shifted to the proponent of the proposed risky action (Wingspread Statement) Applications Multinational orgs – EU, UNESCO National laws – US endangered species laws / Regulatory policy – fisheries International agreements – Montreal protocol Trade disputes – hormones in beef, GMO commodities International food aid – Zimbabwe Luca Marescotti 44 / 69
  • 45. Alan Randall, Precautionary Principle Box 1.1 Murphy (2009) on asbestos Proving cause and effect is a difficult undertaking. Consider the example of asbestos and mesothelioma. Asbestos was suspected of harming human health as far back as 1906. In 1911, studies of asbestos on rats suggested harm. In the 1930s and 1940s cancer cases were reported in workers involved in the manufacture of asbestos. Not until 1998–9 was there a complete ban on asbestos in the European Union and France. A Dutch study estimated that 34,000 lives could have been saved in the Netherlands alone if precautionary measures had been taken in the 1960s when it was deemed likely, but was still unproven, that asbestos caused mesothelioma (UNESCO 2005). Luca Marescotti 45 / 69
  • 46. Resilienza nella UE: le capitali della sostenibilità Luca Marescotti 46 / 69
  • 47. Resilienza nella UE 2010 Stoccolma, capitale della sostenibilità. Per il 2010 è stata segnalata come “European Green Capital” la città di Stoccolma per gli elevati standard ambientali raggiunti grazie alla capacità di pianificazione, di programmazione e di attuazione dimostrata per lungo tempo. Il verde urbano è composto da 1.000 parchi, sette riserve naturali all'interno della città e oltre 200 nei dintorni, una riserva culturale e un parco nazionale interamente interno ai limiti amministrativi. Nel centro urbano erano censiti 12.000 alberi, disponeva di 24 spiagge ufficiali. Era in funzione la rete di raffreddamento più estesa del mondo e prevedeva di essere indipendente per il 2050 da combustibili fossile e al suo interno operavano 2700 società a tecnologie pulite. In media per ogni cittadino si ottengono 95 kg di materie derivate dal trattamento dei rifiuti. Luca Marescotti 47 / 69
  • 48. Resilienza nella UE 2010 Stoccolma, capitale della sostenibilità. Il piano strategico per il 2030 prevede rinnovo urbano, sedi per la ricerca e bibliotecarie, ammodernamento delle infrastrutture -ferroviarie, aeroportuali, portuali e stradali-, operando su scienza e cultura, su vita sociale e lavoro, su architettura e ambiente. La prima assegnazione del premio “European Green Capital” ha avuto un valore anche sperimentale. Per la valutazione delle candidature si è ricorso a terze parti e sono stati individuati dieci indicatori rilevanti: 1) contributo locale al riscaldamento globale; 2) mobilità locale e trasporti pubblici; 3) disponibilità di aree verdi pubbliche; 4) qualità locale dell'aria; 5) inquinamento acustico; 6) produzione e gestione dei rifiuti; 7) consumo idrico; 8) gestione delle acque reflue; 9) gestione locale dell'ambiente; 10) uso sostenibile del suolo. Luca Marescotti 48 / 69
  • 49. Resilienza nella UE 2010 Stoccolma, capitale della sostenibilità. Il piano strategico per il 2030 prevede rinnovo urbano, sedi per la ricerca e bibliotecarie, ammodernamento delle infrastrutture -ferroviarie, aeroportuali, portuali e stradali-, operando su scienza e cultura, su vita sociale e lavoro, su architettura e ambiente. La prima assegnazione del premio “European Green Capital” ha avuto un valore anche sperimentale. Per la valutazione delle candidature si è ricorso a terze parti e sono stati individuati dieci indicatori rilevanti: 1) contributo locale al riscaldamento globale; 2) mobilità locale e trasporti pubblici; 3) disponibilità di aree verdi pubbliche; 4) qualità locale dell'aria; 5) inquinamento acustico; 6) produzione e gestione dei rifiuti; 7) consumo idrico; 8) gestione delle acque reflue; 9) gestione locale dell'ambiente; 10) uso sostenibile del suolo. Luca Marescotti 49 / 69
  • 50. Resilienza nella UE 2010 Stoccolma, capitale della sostenibilità. 1- local contribution to global climate change, 2- local mobility and passenger transportation, 3 - availability of local public open areas, 4 - quality of local ambient air, 5 - noise pollution, 6 - waste production and management, 7 - water consumption, 8 - waste water management, 9 - environmental management of the local authority 10 - sustainable land use. Luca Marescotti 50 / 69
  • 51. Luca Marescotti 51 / 69
  • 52. Resilienza nella UE 2011 Amburgo, capitale della sostenibilità. Amburgo sette indicatori su dieci erano sopra la media. In particolare gli esaminatori hanno apprezzato la capacità di raggiungere gli obiettivi prefissati nel passato e di predisporne piani ambiziosi per il futuro, intervenendo in maniera sistematica per ridurre il proprio impatto sul clima, per ridurre il consumo di energia e di acqua e per migliorare la gestione dei rifiuti, seguendo con coerenza le strategia dell'Agenda Locale 21. conseguendo alte dotazioni di spazi verdi e di standard ambientali. Nel corso di un secolo le superfici boscate sono aumentate, raggiungendo 4.700 ettari, pari al 16,8% delle disponibilità regionali; quasi il 90% della popolazione risiede a meno di 300 m da un parco e un milione di persone fruisce settimanalmente di queste risorse. Luca Marescotti 52 / 69
  • 53. Resilienza nella UE 2011 Amburgo, capitale della sostenibilità. In Amburgo risiedono 1,7 milioni di abitanti nell'area centrale e 4,5 milioni nell'area metropolitana. Il suo porto è uno dei maggior porti europei per la movimentazione delle merci, ma ciononostante è stata selezionata European Green Capital per il 2011 usando gli stessi criteri adottati per Stoccolma e Per Il trasporto pubblico è diffuso e di facile accesso per tutti e la circolazione ciclistica è protetta con percorsi ciclo pedonali diffusi. Le linee di autobus coprono circa 11.500 chilometri con 10.500 fermate, il che significa che il 99% della popolazione ha una fermata a meno di 300 m, così servendo 656 milioni di passeggeri all'anno. Le politiche energetiche adottate hanno permesso di ridurre le emissioni di anidride carbonica dal 1990 al 2006 del 15% per abitante; mentre quelle programmate puntano a arrivare al 40% per il 2020 e all'80% per il 2050. Inoltre, alla minore emissione di gas serra, l'efficienza nell'uso dell'energia comporta risparmi economici considerevoli: basti pensare che dal 1990 sono stati ridotti i consumi annui di 46.000 Mwh e che solo l'uso di lampade a basso consumo in 400 edifici pubblici fa risparmiare 3,4 milioni di euro all'anno. Luca Marescotti 53 / 69
  • 54. New criteria post 2011 for EGC european Green Capital The selection of a city to be awarded the European Green Capital for 2014 will be assessed on the basis of twelve environmental indicators. Information to be provided by the applicant cities. The information requested is based on the EMS principles: plan, do, check and act. Plan: Present details of the original and / or most recent Action Plan, including any relevant disadvantages resulting from historical and / or geographical factors which may have influenced this indicator area negatively. Do & Check: Details of those targets achieved or not, to date (within the last 5 – 10 years). Provide a review of how both situations occurred and lessons learned. Act: Plans to meet or revise key targets for the future and proposed approach to achieve these. Luca Marescotti 54 / 69
  • 55. New criteria post 2011 for EGC european Green Capital Local contribution to global climate change Local transport Green urban areas incorporating sustainable land use Nature and biodiversity Quality of local ambient air Noise pollution Waste production and management Water consumption Waste water treatment Eco innovation and sustainable employment Environmental management of the local authority Energy performance Luca Marescotti 55 / 69
  • 56. New criteria post 2011 for EGC european Green Capital Livello della pianificazione in corso: dettagli attuali del piano e del programma iniziale e dei successivi aggiornamenti, in grado di comprendere eventuali svantaggi rilevanti derivanti da fattori storici o geografici. Livello dell’attuazione e del controllo: dettagli degli obiettivi raggiunti o negli ultimi 5 - 10 anni, con la valutazione degli aspetti positivi e negativi e quindi dei nuovi processi costruiti in funzione dell’efficacia delle azioni intraprese. Livello di programmazione delle azioni future a medio e lungo termine: definizione dei nuovi obiettivi strategici, elaborati in conferma o revisione dei risultati, dettagli dei piani e dei programmi operativi per raggiungerli. Luca Marescotti 56 / 69
  • 57. Resilienza nella UE 2012 Vitoria-Gasteiz, capitale della sostenibilità. Vitoria-Gasteiz è in senso ampio veramente una delle città più verdi dell'Europa più di 100 ha di parchi e giardini urbani e con un ambizioso progetto di cintura verde (Anillo Verde/Green Belt). Il continuo incremento demografico degli ultimi decenni è accompagnato da politiche ambientali di grande rilevanza. Luca Marescotti 57 / 69
  • 58. Resilienza nella UE 2012 Vitoria-Gasteiz, capitale della sostenibilità. Capitale dei Paesi baschi con 240.000 abitanti e 276 kmq di superficie (864 ab/kmq), sottoscrisse nel 1995 la Carta di Aalborg e nel 1998 adottò l'Agenda Locale 21 e nel 2002 il primo piano operativo ambientale In città sono censiti 130.000 alberi e un terzo della superficie comunale è forestata (479 mq/ab di foresta). Vi sono 210 fondi di agricoltura organica. Gli spostamenti quotidiani sono per metà fatti a piedi, vi sono 90 km di percorsi ciclistici protetti. Il trasporto publico si basa su una rete ammodernata di autobus e due due linee tranviarie, offrendo praticamente a tutti una fermata entro 300m con intervallo massimo è di attesa un'ora, ma per 9 linee la frequenza garantita è di 10 minuti. Luca Marescotti 58 / 69
  • 59. Resilienza nella UE 2012 Vitoria-Gasteiz, capitale della sostenibilità. Vitoria-Gasteiz is one of Europe’s greenest cities, in more than one sense. It has over 10 million m2 of parks and green spaces, and its flagship Green Belt project has attracted international recognition. Its green credentials are all the more remarkable in a city that has experienced major population growth over recent decades. Capital city of the Basque Country paesi baschi and of the province of Alava. Population: 240 580. Area: 276.8 km². Population density: 864 hab/km2 First provincial capital in Spain to adopt the Local Agenda 21 in 1998. Rapid population growth and urban development since the 1960sAll residents have access to public open and green space within 300 m, 613 hectares of Green Belt, 479 m2 of forest per capita (covering one-third of the municipal area), 210 organic farming plots, 130 000 trees in city streets Two tram lines and 90 km of bicycle lanes, Half of all journeys are made on foot. First provincial capital in Spain to adopt the Local Agenda 21 in 1998. First Environmental Action Plan adopted in 2002. Luca Marescotti 59 / 69
  • 60. Resilienza nella UE 2012 Vitoria-Gasteiz, capitale della sostenibilità. Da tutte le case il verde pubblico non dista più di 300 metri. Un piano di percorsi verdi permetterà di unire la città con i 613 ha della Cintura Verde. Luca Marescotti 60 / 69
  • 61. Resilienza nella UE 2013 Nantes, capitale della sostenibilità. A Nantes, European Green Capital per il 2013, il 95 % della popolazione ha una fermata del trasporto pubblico a 300 m da casa, e tutti entro la stessa distanza trovano un'area verde. Il 60 % del suolo comunale è occupato da attività agricole, da aree naturali o da parchi, tanto che all'interno dei confini si trovano 4 aree di Natura 2000 e 33 zone di interesse speciale (ZNIEFF Zone Naturelle d'Intérêt Écologique, Faunistique et Floristique definizione delle zone di rilevanza ambientale da censire secondo una legge francese del 1983). Luca Marescotti 61 / 69
  • 62. Resilienza nella UE 2013 Nantes, capitale della sostenibilità. Nel 1985 ha inaugurato 2 nuove linee tranviarie, rilanciando così, prima città in Europa, una tecnologia del trasporto pubblico allora considerata obsoleta. Luca Marescotti 62 / 69
  • 63. Resilienza nella UE 2013 Nantes, capitale della sostenibilità. Le scelte amministrative sono orientate da tempo alla sostenibilità, sia adottando un programma ispirato a Agenda Locale 21, per cui la città ha vinto un premio, sia partecipando a molti progetti europei (Concerto, Concerto-Act2, Jupiter 2, Innovation ECCE, Civitas, R.E.T.E., Tapestry, Vivaldi). I risultati di una strategia coerente e perseverante si manifestano su molti fronti, non ultimo quello della divulgazione e disseminazione. Luca Marescotti 63 / 69
  • 64. Resilienza nella UE 2014 Copenhagen, capitale della sostenibilità. Copenaghen è stata scelta come European Green Capital per il 2014. Copre una superficie di 74,4 kmq e ha 542.000 abitanti al 2011 (7.285 ab/kmq). La giuria ne ha apprezzato il valore di modello urbanistico e architettonico, ma anche di vivibilità. È una delle città del mondo meglio attrezzata per i ciclisti: attualmente il 35% della popolazione usa la bicicletta per andare a scuola e al lavoro, ma per il 2015 si punta a soddisfare il 50% della domanda. Questa è una delle linee di azione per raggiungere l'ambizioso obiettivo di essere neutrale per le emissioni di CO2 entro il 20125. Luca Marescotti 64 / 69
  • 65. Resilienza nella UE 2014 Copenhagen, capitale della sostenibilità. Luca Marescotti 65 / 69
  • 66. Resilienza nella UE 2014 Copenhagen, capitale della sostenibilità. Luca Marescotti 66 / 69
  • 67. Resilienza nella UE 2014 Copenhagen, capitale della sostenibilità. La capacità di pianificare e attuare le misure per conseguire alti standard qualitativi e quantitativi ambientali con costanza negli anni ne ha fatto un modello di riferimento studiato a livello internazionale. Nel 2011 in due ore di tempesta la pioggia ebbe un'intensità tale come mai si era registrato in due secoli, provocando danni per 700 milioni di euro, di cui un decimo non coperti da assicurazioni. Il piano di adattamento ai cambiamenti climatici assume dall'IPCC Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change le informazioni per orientare la pianificazione e la programmazione delle opere in modo da far fronte ai fenomeni ambientali prevedibili a lungo termine e ridurre i rischi di danni rilevanti. Luca Marescotti 67 / 69
  • 68. Resilienza nella UE RIFERIMENTI European Environment Agency, Climate change, impacts and vulnerability in Europe, EEA, Copenhagen, 2012, ISBN 978-92-9213-346-7. European Environment Agency, Urban adaptation to climate change in Europe. Challenges and opportunities for cities together with supportive national and European policies, EEA, Copenhagen, 2012. City of Copenhagen, Climate Adaptation Plan 2012, Copenhagen 2011. Luca Marescotti 68 / 69
  • 69. UN, State of the World's Cities 2008/2009 – Harmonious Cities. “Cities embody some of society’s most pressing challenges, from pollution and disease to unemployment and lack of adequate shelter. But cities are also venues where rapid, dramatic change is not just possible but expected. Thus they present real opportunities for increasing energy efficiency, reducing disparities in development and improving living conditions in general. National and local governments can promote harmonious urbanization by supporting pro-poor, inclusive and equitable urban development and by strengthening urban governance structures and processes. History demonstrates that integrated urban policy can be a solid path towards development”. UN, State of the World's Cities 2008/2009 – Harmonious Cities, March 26, 2009. Dalla presentazione del segretario generale delle Nazioni Unite Ban Ki-moon. Luca Marescotti 69 / 69

×