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Yute why career prep Yute why career prep Presentation Transcript

  • 6/21/2011
    www.jobbank-ja.com
    1
    Career Planning
    June 2011
  • Chief Ideator & Resultant
    Mobile: 876.383.5627 Skype: Lsemaj
    Office: 876.942.9057 Twitter: LSemaj
    Email: Semaj@LTSemaj.comFacebook: Leahcim Semaj
    Blog: TheSemajMindSpa.Wordpress.com
    www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj
    6/21/2011
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    2
  • 6/21/2011
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    Career Planning
    CAREER PLANNING is a lifelong process
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    CAREER PLANNING includes
    Choosing an OCCUPATION
    Getting a JOB
    GROWING in your job
    Possibly CHANGING CAREERS
    Eventually RETIRING
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    The JobBank Career Alignment Model
    The dimensions on which people differ can be specified and measured
    Each type has a characteristic set of interests, values and attitudes
    Jobs and work environments can also be classified along the same dimensions
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    The JobBankCareer Alignment Model
    When people work in compatible careers and compatible environments
    they are more likely to feel satisfied with their careers
    and make more valuable contributions to their organization
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    The JobBankCareer Alignment Model
    This can help us to identify the persons type
    and the careers and work environments that they will be most effective in
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    CAREER PLANNING: The Four Step Process
    Self assessment/evaluation
    Options
    Match
    Action
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    Step 1:SELF ASSESSMENT
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    Self Assessment
    • Is the process of gathering information about yourself in order to make an informed career decision
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    A Self AssessmentTakes Into Account Your
    Values
    Interests
    Personality
    Skills
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    Values
    The things that are important to you:
    Achievement
    Status
    Wealth
    Autonomy
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    Intrinsic values are related to the work itself and its contribution to society
    Extrinsic values include external features such as physical setting and earning potential
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    Interests
    What do you enjoy doing?
    Playing football
    Going to parties
    Socializing/hanging out with friends
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    The JobBankCareer Alignment Model
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    Realistic (R) Individuals
    Prefer realistic careers such as
    Mechanical engineer
    Production planner
    Building inspector
    Safety engineer
    Marine surveyor
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    The R Type
    usually has mechanical and athletic abilities
    enjoys working outdoors
    likes to work with tools and machines
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    The R Type
    Generally prefers to work with things rather than people
    People usually describe the R type as being:
    Conforming, frank, genuine, humble
    Modest, practical, natural
    Persistent
    Thrifty
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    Investigative (I) Individuals
    Prefer investigative careers such as
    Biochemist
    Orthodontist
    Anthropologist
    Economist
    Researcher
    Management analyst
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    The I Type
    Usually has mathematical and scientific abilities
    Enjoys working alone
    Enjoys research
    Likes to solve problems
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    The I Type
    Generally favors working with ideas rather than with people or things
    People describe the I type as being:
    Analytical, curious, methodical
    Rational, cautious, independent
    Precise, reserved, complex
    Intellectual
    Modest
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    Artistic (A) Individuals
    Prefer artistic careers such as
    Architect
    Copy writer
    Technical editor
    Story editor
    Composer
    Stage director
    Interior decorator
    Commercial designer
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    The A Type
    Usually has artistic skills
    Enjoys creating original work
    Has a good imagination
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    The A type
    usually enjoys working with ideas rather than things
    People describe the A type as being:
    open, imaginative, original
    intuitive, emotional, independent
    idealistic, and unconventional.
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    Social (S) Individuals
    Prefer social careers such as
    Teacher
    Clinical psychologist
    Psychiatric case worker
    Personnel manager
    Paralegal assistant
    Speech therapist
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    The S type
    usually has social skills
    is interested in human relationships
    likes to help others with problems
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    The S type
    likes to work with people rather than with things
    People describe the S type as being:
    helpful, responsible, warm, cooperative
    idealistic, sociable, tactful, friendly
    kind, sympathetic, generous
    patient, and understanding
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    Enterprising (E) Individuals
    Prefer enterprising careers such as
    Public relations representative
    Financial planner
    Real estate agent
    Sales representative
    Stockbroker
    Attorney
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    The E Type
    Usually has leadership and speaking abilities
    Is interested in economics and politics
    Likes to be influential
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    The E Type
    Likes to work with people and ideas rather than things
    People describe the E type as being:
    Adventurous, energetic, optimistic
    Agreeable, extroverted, popular
    Sociable, self-confident
    Ambitious
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    Conventional (C) Individuals
    Prefer conventional careers such as
    Accountant
    Cost clerk
    Bookkeeper
    Budget analyst
    Business programmer
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    The C type
    has clerical and arithmetic abilities, prefers working indoors, and likes to organize things
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    The C type
    enjoys working with words and numbers
    People describe the C type as being:
    conforming, practical, careful
    obedient, thrifty, efficient
    orderly, conscientious, and persistent.
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    Very Few People Are “Pure” Types
    Having the characteristics of only one of the types
    It is important to recognize that most people have a combination of characteristics that may reflect two or more types
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    Personality
    A person’s individual
    Traits
    Motivational drives
    Needs
    Attitudes
  • The Secret of a Happy Life
  • Hiring Criteria Change- From Narrow Qualifications to D.A.T.A.
    DESIRE- They really want the job
    ABILITY- They are good at the tasks required
    TEMPERAMENT- Their personality fits the situation
    ASSETS- They have other resources that the work requires
  • THE RESULT
    What people know is less important than who they are
    Hiring is about finding people with the right mind-set
    What you know changes, who you are rarely does
    What people have done is the best predictor of what they will do
    Identify characteristics of your best people and hire more like them
    FAST COMPANY 4/1996
  • Where Should You Begin?
    BEGIN WITH A PERSONALITY PROFILE TEST
  • THE MENTAL PROCESSES
    JUDGING
    PERCEIVING
    SENSING
    INTUITION
    THINKING
    FEELING
  • Where is Your Energy Naturally Directed?
    • Extraverts' energy is directed primarily outward, towards people and things outside of themselves.
    • Introverts' energy is primarily directed inward, towards their own thoughts, perceptions, and reactions.
    • Extraverts tend to be more naturally active, expressive, social, and interested in many things
    • Introverts tend to be more reserved, private, cautious, and interested in fewer interactions, but with greater depth and focus.
  • PLEASE CHOOSE ONE: Extravert (E)  or    Introvert (I)
    Extraverts often:
    Have high energy
    Talk a lot
    Think out loud
    Like to be around people a lot
    Are easily distracted
    Introverts often:
    Have quiet energy
    Talk less
    Think before they act
    Are comfortable spending time alone
    Have good concentration
  • Where Do We Direct Our Energy?
    EXTRAVERT
    The real world is around you
    Energy comes from outside
    Sociable, comfortable and confident in unfamiliar surroundings
    Likes organisations, groups , community gatherings, parties
    Dislikes being alone
    INTROVERT
    The real world is within you
    Energy comes from within
    Tends to be unsociable, prefers reflection to activity
    Feels lost in large gatherings, prefers own thoughts to conversation
    At best when alone or in small familiar groups
  • EXTRAVERTS AT WORK
    Like variety and action
    Often impatient with long slow jobs
    Interested in the activities of their work and in how other people do it
    Often act quickly, sometimes without thinking
    When working on a task, find phone calls a welcome diversion
    Develop ideas by discussion
    Like having people around
  • INTROVERTS AT WORK
    Like quite for concentration
    Tend not to mind working on one project for a long time uninterrupted
    Are interested in the facts/ideas behind their work
    Like to think a lot before they act, sometimes without acting
    When concentrating on a task, find phone calls intrusive
    Develop ideas by reflection
    Like working alone
  • Extraversion Communicating
    Communicate energy and enthusiasm
    Respond quickly without long pauses to think
    Focus to talk is on people and things in the external environment
    Need to moderate expression
    Seek opportunities to communicate in groups
    Prefer face-to-face over written communication
    In meetings, like talking out loud before coming to conclusions
  • Introversion Communicating
    Keep energy and enthusiasm inside
    Like to think before responding
    Focus is on internal ideas and thoughts Need to drawn out
    Seek opportunities to communicate one-on-one
    Prefer written over face-to-face communication
    In meetings, verbalise already well thought out conclusions
  •  2. What Kind of Information do you Naturally Notice and Remember?
    • Sensors notice the facts, details, and realities of the world around them
    • Intuitives are more interested in connections and relationships between facts as well as the meaning, or possibilities of the information.
    • Sensors tend to be practical and literal people, who trust past experience and often have good common sense.
    • Intuitives tend to be imaginative, theoretical people who trust their hunches and pride themselves on their creativity.
  • PLEASE CHOOSE ONE: Sensor (S) or    Intuitive (N)
    Sensors often:
    Admire practicality
    Focus on the facts & specifics
    Have straightforward speech
    Are more realistic - see what is
    Are more present-oriented
    Intuitives often:
    Admire creativity
    Focus on ideas & the big picture
    Have roundabout thoughts
    Are more imaginative - see possibilities
    Are more future oriented 
  • HOW DO WE RECEIVE AND PROCESS INFORMATION? What do we naturally notice and remember?
    SENSORS
    Trust the certain and concrete
    Value realism and common sense
    Tend to be specific and literal
    Oriented to present
    Like to hone established skills
    INTUITIVES
    Trust inspiration and inference
    Value imagination and innovation
    tend to be general and figurative
    Oriented to future
    Like to learn new skills
  • SENSING AT WORK
    Like using experience and standard ways to solve problems
    Enjoy applying what they have already learned
    May distrust and ignore their inspirations
    Seldom make errors of fact
    Like to do things with a practical bend
    Like to present the details of their
    Prefer continuation of what is, with fine tuning
    Usually proceed step-by-step
  • INTUITION AT WORK
    Like solving new complex problems
    Enjoy learning a new skill more than using it
    May follow their inspirations, good or bad
    May make errors of fact
    Like to do things with an innovative bent
    Like to present an overview of their work first
    Prefer change, sometimes radical, to continuation of what is
    Usually proceed in bursts of energy
  • Sensors Communicating
    Like evidence (facts, details, and examples) presented first
    Want practical and realistic applications shown
    Rely on direct experience to provide anecdotes
    Use an orderly step-by-step approach in presentations
    Like suggestions to be straightforward and feasible
    Refer to a specific example
    In meeting, are inclined to follow the agenda
  • Intuitive Communicating
    Like global schemes, with broad issues presented first
    Want possible future challenges discussed
    Rely on insights and imagination to provoke discussion
    Use a round-about approach in presentations
    Like suggestions to be novel and unusual
    Refer to a general concept
    In meeting, are inclined to use the agenda as a starting point
  • 3. How do you Come to Conclusions?
    • Thinkers make decisions based primarily on objective and impersonal criteria--what makes the most sense and what is logical.
    • Feelers make decisions based primarily on their personal values and how they feel about the choices.
    • Thinkers tend to be cool, analytical, and are convinced by logical reasoning.
    • Feelers tend to be sensitive, empathetic, and are compelled by extenuating circumstances and a constant search for harmony.
  • HOW WE MAKE DECISIONS
    THINKING
    Value logic, fairness and justice
    Naturally see flaws
    May seem heartless and insensitive
    Desire achievement
    Truth more important than tact
    FEELING
    Value empathy and harmony
    Naturally like to please others
    May seem illogical and weak
    Desire to be appreciated
    Tact and truth important
  • PLEASE CHOOSE ONE: Thinker (T)   or   Feeler (F)
    Thinkers often:
    Are cool & reserved
    Are objective
    Are honest & direct
    Are naturally critical
    Are motivated by achievement
    Feelers often:
    Are warm and friendly
    Get their feelings hurt easily
    Are sensitive & diplomatic
    Try hard to please others
    Are motivated by being appreciated
  • THINKING TYPE AT WORK
    Use logical analysis to reach Conclusions
    Can work without harmony
    May hurt people’s feelings without knowing it
    Tend to decide impersonally, sometimes paying insufficient attention to people’s wishes
    Tend to be firm-minded and can give criticism when appropriate
    Look at the principles involved
    Feel rewarded when job is done well
  • FEELING TYPE AT WORK
    Use values to reach conclusions
    Work best in harmony with others
    Enjoy pleasing people, even in unimportant things
    Often let decisions be influenced by their own and other people’s likes and dislikes
    Tend to be sympathetic and dislike, even avoid, telling people unpleasant things
    Look at the underlying values in situation
    Feel rewarded when people’s needs are met
  • Thinkers Communication
    Prefer to be brief and concise
    Want the pros and cons of each alternative to be listed
    Can be intellectually critical and objective
    Convinced by cool, impersonal reasoning
    Present goals and objectives first
    Consider emotions and feelings as data to weigh
    In meetings, seek involvement with tasks
  • Feelers Communication
    Prefer to be sociable and friendly
    Want to know why an alternative is valuable and how it affects people
    Can be interpersonally appreciative
    Convinced by personal information, enthusiastically delivered
    Present points of agreement first
    Consider logic and objectivity as data to value
    In meeting, seek involvement with people
  • 4. What Kind of Environment Makes you Most Comfortable?
    • Judgers prefer a structured, ordered, and fairly predictable environment, where they can make decisions and have things settled.
    • Perceivers prefer to experience as much of the world as possible, so they like to keep their options open and are most comfortable adapting.
    • Judgers tend to be organized and productive
    • Perceivers tend to be flexible, curious, and nonconforming.
  • PLEASE CHOOSE ONE:  Judger (J)  or Perceiver (P)
    Judgers often:
    Are serious & formal
    Are time-conscious
    Like to make plans
    Work first, play later
    Like to finish projects best
    Perceivers often:
    Are playful & casual
    Are unaware of time or late
    Like to wait-and-see
    Play first, work later
    Like to start projects best
  • DO WE PREFER A STRUCTURED OR A SPONTANEOUS WORLD?
    JUDGING
    Happiest after decisions are made
    Work first, play later
    Set goals and work towards them
    Product oriented
    Satisfaction from finishing projects
    Time is a finite resource
    Take deadlines seriously
    prefer to know what getting into
  • PERCEIVING
    Happiest leaving their options open
    Enjoy now, finish job later
    Change goals as new information becomes available
    Process oriented
    Satisfaction from starting projects
    Time is a renewable resource
    See deadlines as elastic
    Like adapting to new situations
  • JUDGING AT WORK
    Work best when they can plan their work and follow their plan
    Like to get things settled and finished
    May not notice new things that need to be done
    Tend to be satisfied once they reach a decision on a thing, situation, or Person
    Reach closure by deciding quickly
    Seek structure and schedules
    Use lists to prompt action on specific tasks
  • Judging Communication
    Want to discuss schedules and timetables with tight deadlines
    Dislike surprises and want advance warning
    Expect others to follow through, and count on it
    State their positions and decisions clearly
    Communicate results and achievements
    Talk of purpose and direction
    In meetings, focus on the task to be done
  • PERCEIVING AT WORK
    Enjoy flexibility in their work
    Like to leave things open for last-minute changes
    May postpone unpleasant task that need to be done
    Tend to be curious and welcome a new light on a thing, situation, or person
    Postpone decision while searching for options
    Adapt well to changing situations and feel restricted without change
    Use lists to remind them of all the things they have to do someday
  • Perceiving Communication
    Willing to discuss the schedule but are uncomfortable with tight deadlines
    Enjoy surprise and like adapting to last-minute changes
    Expect others to adapt to situational requirements
    Present their views as tentative and modifiable
    Communicate options and opportunities
    Talk of autonomy and flexibility
    In meetings, focus on the process to be appreciated
  • What are the types?
    ISTJ ISFJ INFJ INTJ
    ISTP ISFP INFP INTP
    ESTP ESFP ENFP ENTP
    ESTJ ESFJ ENFJ ENTJ
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    Understanding Your Personality Type
    By determining your personality type you are able to assess your:
    Career options
    Work related strengths and weakness
    Career satisfiers
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    is determined by
    Where We Focus Our Attention
    How We Perceive
    or Take In Information
    PERSONALITY TYPE
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    PERSONALITY TYPE
    is determined by
    How We Make Judgments
    or Decisions About Information
    How We Deal with the Outer World
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    Where Do We Direct Our Attention or Energy?
    This dimension assesses whether individuals are oriented to the outer or inner world
    Extraversion
    Introversion
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    Careers for Dominant Sensors
    ISTJ ISFJ ESTP ESFP
    Need to be able to collect and use the many facts you notice
    Areas that let you gather information
    Use your keen powers of observation
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    Careers for Dominant Intuitives
    INTJ INFJ ENTP ENFP
    Work that allows new ways of solving problems
    Use of unconventional approaches
    Not limited by what has been done in the past
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    Careers for Dominant Thinkers
    INTP ISTP ENTJ ESTJ
    Allows you to use objective criteria
    Fair set of standards and principles
    Reward logical decisions
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    Careers for Dominant Feelers
    ISFP INFP ESFJ ENFJ
    Feel good about the work you do
    The impact it has on people
    How humanely and kindly you and others are treated
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    CAREERS FOR TYPES
    ISTP
    Military Officer
    Engineer
    Farmer
    ISTJ
    Dentist
    School Principal
    Computer Professional
    Law Enforcement
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    ESTP or ESTJ?
    ESTP
    Marketing Professional
    Auditor
    Craft Worker
    Manager: Small Business or Government
    ESTJ
    Social Services
    Insurance Agent Or Broker
    Teacher: Trade or Technical
    Purchasing Agent
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    ISFJ or ISFP?
    ISFJ
    Nurse
    Religiously Oriented Occupations
    Food Service
    Librarian
    ISFP
    Storekeeper
    Surveyor
    Chef
    Carpenter
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    ESFP or ESFJ?
    ESFJ
    Office Manager
    Cosmetologist
    Child Care Worker
    Receptionist
    ESFP
    Child Care Worker
    Receptionist
    Food Service Worker
    Factory Supervisor
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    INFJ or INFP?
    INFJ
    Architect
    Fine Artist
    Research Assistant
    Psychiatrist
    INFP
    Physical Therapist
    Social Scientist
    Counsellor or Social Worker
    Laboratory Technologist
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    ENFP or ENFJ?
    ENFJ
    Optometrist
    Artist or Entertainer
    Designer
    Physician - Family, General Practice
    ENFP
    Teacher - Arts, Health, Special Education
    Writer or Editor
    Public Relations
    Musician or Composer
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    Some Career Options forINTJ and INTP
    INTJ
    Management Consultant
    Lawyer or Judge
    Human Resources
    Executive Manager
    INTP
    Research Assistant
    Surveyor
    Photographer
    Computer Professional
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    ENTP or ENTJ?
    ENTP
    Credit Investigator or Mortgage Broker
    Marketing Professional
    Construction Worker
    Artist or Entertainer
    ENTJ
    Sales Manger
    Administrator - Health or Education
    Computer Professional
    Human Resources
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    Skills
    The activities that you are good at:
    Computer programming
    Writing
    Teaching
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    Skills
    When deciding what field to enter, you need to determine what skills you possess
    You should also consider the time you are willing to spend on acquiring more advanced or new skills
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    Skill
    Is defined as the ability to do something well, especially as a result of experience
    Most skills are transferable to other work settings and can be grouped in many ways
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    One way is to showfunctional skillsof working with people, data or information, and things or objects
    Another way is to look at intellectual, aptitudinal, creative, leadership and problem-solving skills
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    Skills
    Employers are interested in knowing which skills you can bring to their organization
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    The Foundation Skills
    Basic skills
    Reading
    Writing
    Arithmetic
    Mathematics
    Speaking
    Listening
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    The Foundation Skills
    Thinking skills
    Thinking creatively
    Making decisions
    Solving problems
    Knowing how to learn
    Reasoning
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    The Foundation Skills
    Personalqualities
    Self-esteem
    Sociability
    Self-management
    Integrity
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    Competencies
    Resources
    Identifies, organizes, plans and allocates resources
    Interpersonal
    Work with others
    Information
    Acquires and uses information
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    FiveCompetencies
    4. Systems
    Understands complex interrelationships
    5. Technology
    Works with a variety of technologies
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    AdditionalConsiderations
    If your self assessment indicates that a particular occupation matches your interests, skills and values
    It does not mean it SHOULD be your choice
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    AdditionalConsiderations
    • Similarly, if your self doesn’t indicate that a particular occupation is appropriate ,
    • Doesn’t mean you should discount it entirely
    • You just need to do some more research
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    Step 2: Options
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    Occupational Information
    Explore the occupations
    That you are interested in
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    Occupational Information
    Gathering occupational information is an important part of the career planning process
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    Occupational Information
    This information includes
    Employment outlook
    Salary
    Related occupations
    Education and training
    Job duties
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    Research the INDUSTRIESin which you would like to work
    Research the JOB MARKET
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    Step 3Match
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    Match
    During this phase of the process, you will:
    Identify possible occupations
    Evaluate these occupations
    Explorealternatives
    Choose both a short term and a long term option
  • 6/21/2011
    www.jobbank-ja.com
    107
  • 6/21/2011
    www.jobbank-ja.com
    108