Failing our boys oct2013 back2 life

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Are Our Boys Failing or Are We Failing Our Boys? …

Are Our Boys Failing or Are We Failing Our Boys?
BACK2LIFE Foundation: Public Forum October 23, 2013, 5 pm, Mico University College.

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  • 1. BACK2LIFE Foundation October 23, 2013 Leahcim Semaj, PhD
  • 2. Mobile: 876.383.5627 Office: 876.948.5627 Email: Semaj@LTSemaj.com Skype: LSemaj Twitter: LSemaj FaceBook: Leahcim.Semaj.2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj
  • 3.  Two Basic Needs 1. WORK 2. INTIMACY 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 3
  • 4. +10 WORK OPTIMAL DEVELOPMENT -10 +10 INTIMACY -10 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 4
  • 5.    10/23/2013 God made man and placed him in the garden of Eden “to dress it and keep it” (Gen 2:15) Adam given work to name all the animals (Gen 2:19) Then God provided him with a woman (Gen 2: 21-24) www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 6
  • 6.  A Parent Until you are able to Pay Rent 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 7
  • 7. 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 8
  • 8. 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 9
  • 9.  begins when the 1 egg released for the month by a woman unites with one of the millions of sperms produced by a man in the same month. Only the fittest of the fittest survives.  Between conception and birth, reproductive waste is largely male.  This struggle continues until death.  10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 10
  • 10.  Home  Parents, Siblings  School  Teachers, Principal, Board  Community ▪Peers, Media 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 11
  • 11. What students bring from home predicts achievement more than any other variable  about 50%  Teachers are by far the most profound influence on student achievement within schools (30%)  School, principal and peer effects   each less than 10%  But they must work together as a team 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 12
  • 12.     Mother and Father and extended family Mother and Father My mother who fathered me Now exit the mother 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 13
  • 13. Children living with:  Both parents – 58%  Mother & Step-father – 13%  Father & Step-mother – 4%  Mother only – 19%  Father only – 5% ▪ 1957 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 14
  • 14.  There are more high school places for girls than for boys  therefore more girls will “pass” the GSAT than boys  Peter Espeut ▪ Gleaner, July 4, 2007 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 15
  • 15.  boys are often put to sit at the back  the students in front get more attention from the (usually female) teacher 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 16
  • 16.   high schools for boys only  7 high schools for girls only  14 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 17
  • 17. The average boys' high school is smaller than the average girls' school Co-educational high schools admit many more girls than boys     sometimes over 60% girls More Jamaican girls will get to high school than boys 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 18
  • 18.  takes place at age 11  when girls are psychologically more developed than boys  If it were a straight competition for high school places based on performance  girls have a big (and unfair) advantage over boys 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 19
  • 19.  That are suspended from school  there are 250 boys  Who are expelled from school,  there are 335 boys  In special education,  there are 217 boys  With a learning disability,  there are 276 boys  With an emotional disturbance diagnosed,  we have 324 boys  Diagnosed with ADHD – (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder)  There are 400 boys Ali Carr-Chellman (TED – 2011) 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 20
  • 20. At primary and secondary school girls are out performing boys worldwide 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 21
  • 21. Boys are more likely to be held back or drop out while girls stay in school longer 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 22
  • 22.  Females have vaulted the University gap  70% of graduates 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 23
  • 23.  60% of BA degrees are going to women now, a significant shift  getting close to 70% female population in universities  administrators very nervous,  girls don't want to go to schools that don't have boys 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 24
  • 24.  African American college male for every 100 female       80 – 1970 74 – 1976 66 – 1978 50 – 2004 30 - 2011 Every 100 UWI Graduates  15 males 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 25
  • 25.  Our educational policies after slavery were designed to protect plantation labour supply  So sugar areas  like Trelawny, St. Thomas and Vere, Clarendon   and banana areas - like St. Mary had no high school admitting boys until relatively recently 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 26
  • 26.  who would cut cane or weed bananas?  So it is not so much that the system favours girls  as it disadvantages boys 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 27
  • 27.  The Roman Catholic have only one boys' high school  but all of 5 high schools for girls only  None of the single-sex schools were established by government 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 28
  • 28.  Boys and girls of the same age are put in the same class  This means that girls will nearly always do better  Potential negative psychological impact on boys 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 29
  • 29.  high schools should all be single sex  each gender can progress at their optimal pace 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 30
  • 30. Men smoke more lungcancer-causing cigarettes  Men drink more cirrhosisof-the-liver-producing alcohol  Men take more mind bending hard drugs  10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 31
  • 31.  Men have higher death rates for all 15 leading causes of death;  from accidents to AIDS  10/23/2013 Men eat more unhealthy, cardiovascular-disease producing red meat www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 32
  • 32.    Men expose themselves to more on-the-job disabling hazards Men account for 94% of all onthe-job fatalities Drive faster and more recklessly  to kill and be killed 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 33
  • 33.  Men possess more firearms and other deadly weapons  to take each others’ lives  10/23/2013 Men have more stress and tension building competitive personalities www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 34
  • 34.  Women complain of a shortage of marriageable men  and they will be right!  More men at the bottom of the economic ladder than women  And more men involved in crime 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 35
  • 35. 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 36
  • 36.  And so we're starting to see the establishment of men centers and men studies to think about how do we engage men in their experiences in the university. 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 37
  • 37.  A successful lifetime career as a DJ?  10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj Or as a doctor? 38
  • 38. 70% of Jamaica prison population is unskilled and functionally illiterate - (PIOJ) 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 39
  • 39. 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 40
  • 40. YEAR MURDERS 1998 46% 1999 56% 2000 53% 2001 52% 2002 56% 2003 50% 2004 53% Average 52% 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj MAJOR CRIMES 51% 54% 58% 54% 55% 54% 53% 54% 41
  • 41. AGE MURDERS SHOOTING ROBBERY BREAKING RAPE CARNAL ABUSE 16–20 128 129 191 151 101 58 21-25 241 241 255 176 88 52 26-30 157 158 143 144 96 31 TOTAL 526 528 589 471 285 141 % 72% 77% 75% 60% 67% 66% NATION 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 42
  • 42. AGE MURDERS SHOOTING ROBBERY BREAKING RAPE 16–20 149 225 157 44 255 21-25 265 347 328 149 138 26-30 273 328 353 316 64 TOTAL 687 900 838 509 457 % 47% 54% 40% 25% 50% NATION 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 43
  • 43.  More investment  More investment in education in occupational training 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj in welfare in police in prisons 44
  • 44. DENY YOUTH ACCESS TO PRODUCTIVE MEANS USE DESTRUCTIVE MEANS PARASITES PREDATORS 10/23/2013 USE REPRODUCTIVE MEANS PREGNANCY BABY MOTHER www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 45
  • 45. Male Young Uneducated Unmarried Unemployed Unemployable The Economist, Sept 28, 1996 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 46
  • 46. Prime candidates for violent or otherwise deviant behaviour  A major concern for the Jamaican society  These delinquent males will be   Unqualified  Uneducated  Unskilled  unemployable adults 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 47
  • 47. 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 48
  • 48.  Different in its outward manifestation  But driven by similar forces 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 49
  • 49.  10/23/2013 who is not developing the competence required for viability in the New Work Order  is inclined towards using reproductive means to compensate www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 50
  • 50.   10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj With precocious interest and activities that are sexual in nature These behaviours then begin to compete with academic and other age-specific activities 51
  • 51. Demonstrate more competence in anti-social activities  Then facilitate greater exposure with respect to promiscuity, unwanted pregnancy  Increasing her risk for contracting HIV/AIDS and other STDs  10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 52
  • 52.  naturally attracted to, and attracts males who are usually older  and more steeped in anti- social and/or criminal activities 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 53
  • 53.   10/23/2013 Serves to accelerate her devolution into more antisocial behaviour At this stage she tends to be beyond the socialization abilities of most parents and teachers www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 54
  • 54. 2008 Drama Festival 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 55
  • 55. 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 56
  • 56. Fatherless boys commit more crimes  A man in the home is more important than any other single factor  10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 57
  • 57. Shambafrika Kennels Old Golden Spring Road Stony Hill BREED: German Shepherd SEX: COLOUR: Black & Gold DATE OF BIRTH: 8 April 2008 GRAND PARENTS SIRE: Gayville's Roberto REGN#: AE01516103 J.K.C. REGN #: DATE OF REGN: Phone: (876) 942-2671, 816-9175, 383-5627 Email: Semaj@LTSemaj.com; LTSemaj@Gmail.com PARENTS SIRE PEDIGREE OF: P.O. Box 114, Kingston 9 Jamaica, W.I. Larus Von Batu VDH 2010154 G.G PARENTS DAM: Binah Shambafrika's Binah REGN#: 661/2003 Gender F F F M M 10/23/2013 SIRE: Shambafrika's Jake of Kresnox Dean - REGN# 263/2002 G.G.G.PARENTS SIRE: Yasko Vom Farbenspiel VDH 2010154 SIRE: Ursus Von Batu VDH 1932624 DAM: Jitta Von Batu SIRE: Rocko DE Quevedo SZ1975499 VDHSZ1983812 DAM CH Gayville's Italia (Re-Import) 1457CM BRED BY: Dr. Leahcim Semaj OWNED BY: SIRE: Hinnerk Vom Kiemoor VDH 1981421 DAM: Aika Vom Furstenburg (IMP DEU) AA0901231 SIRE: REGN: 124/2001 Gayville's Italo at Frienden DAM: REGN: 438/95 Kresnox's Kalf of Haldeon SIRE: REGN #: 342/97 DAM: REGN#: 728/2000 Hychas Iron Will-Guss Shambafrika's Bloomberg of Oliver DAM: REGN #: 947/94 Taffy of Hychas DAM: Connie Vom Farbenspiel VDH1903611 DAM: Danni Vom Wildsteiger Land SZ1880894 SIRE: Vando Vom Moorbeck VDH1905990 DAM: Lissie Vom Kiamoor VDH1804339 SIRE: Warro Vom Larchenhain VDH1910544 DAM: Palme Vom Larchenhain VDH1910544 SIRE: Hinnerk Vom Kiemoor VDH 1981421 DAM: Aika Vom Furstenberg AA 0901231 SIRE: CH. Chanask Spelbinda at Frienden 1007/94 DAM: Rothsville Blaze of Haldeon 297/92 SIRE: CH. Altels Davandens Arko of Jutone 615/95 DAM: CH. Hychas Dolly of Doreville 485/89 SIRE: CH. Hychas Kimbo 1299/91 DAM: Hychas Shzz-A-Dream 751/90 NAMES MEANING ORIGIN Lulu Leyla Lesedi Lerato Lekan Pearl Night Light Love My wealth increased Tanzanian Arabic South African - Tswana South African - Sesotho Yoruba www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 58
  • 58.  There is a growing amount of science to back up the idea that the presence of a father has powerful and apparently unique effects on children 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 59
  • 59. 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 60
  • 60.  "There's no substitute for a father's presence”  10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj Randall Flanery  Pediatric psychologist  Saint Louis Behavioral Medicine Institute 61
  • 61.  the risk of  juvenile delinquency  substance abuse  sexual abuse  early pregnancy  dropping out of high school  10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 6 times higher for children whose biological fathers are not part of their lives 62
  • 62.  Fathers become especially critical during adolescence  Fathers are better at setting limits with teenage boys 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 63
  • 63.  10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj Teenage boys on the brink of losing control calm down quite a bit by having their dads show up  It can keep things from escalating further 64
  • 64.  The quality of the relationship between a teenage daughter and her father  is predictive of the quality of committed relationships she will have in her young adult years 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 65
  • 65.  Girls who grow up without their biological father are likely to mature faster physically  reach puberty earlier than their peers  and get pregnant earlier 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 66
  • 66. The earlier and longer the exposure to a stepfather or other unrelated male adult in the household  the stronger the effect  10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 67
  • 67.  Puberty is delayed by the presence of the biological father in the household  The more fathers interact with their daughters when they’re young  the more puberty is delayed 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 68
  • 68.  10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj the trouble with early physical maturity is the likelihood that girls will not be emotionally mature enough to cope with male attention 69
  • 69.  As a result of their precocious sexuality  They find No Panty Day attractive and exiting 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 70
  • 70.  The range of positive educational outcomes found when fathers are involved in their children’s learning and in their schools  is not simply a result of better- resourced-and-educated fathers being more involved. 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 72
  • 71.  Frequency of fathers’ reading to 1-2 year olds  is linked with their greater interest in books later □ A significant relationship is found between positive father engagement at age 6,  and IQ and educational achievement at age 7 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 73
  • 72.  A father’s education level is an important predictor  of his child’s educational achievement  Low paternal interest in children’s education has a stronger negative impact on children’s lack of qualifications  than contact with the police, poverty, family type, social class, housing tenure and child’s personality 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 74
  • 73.  In low income communities,  fathers’ influence has been found to be more significant than mothers’  for boys escape from disadvantage  10/23/2013 Fathers exert greater influence than mothers  on boys’ educational choices www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 75
  • 74.  Fathers’ risk-avoidance behavior  has a positive impact on sons’ educational attainment  Fathers’ income  predicts sons’ years of schooling 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 76
  • 75.   Children with involved, caring fathers have better educational outcomes. A number of studies suggest that fathers who are involved, nurturing, and playful with their infants  have children with higher IQs  as well as better linguistic and cognitive capacities 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 78
  • 76. 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 79
  • 77. go on to start school with higher levels of academic readiness  They are more patient and can handle the stresses and frustrations associated with schooling   more readily than children with less involved fathers. 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 80
  • 78. extends into adolescence and young adulthood.  Numerous studies find that an active and nurturing style of fathering is associated with   better verbal skills, intellectual functioning,  and academic achievement among adolescents 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 81
  • 79.  Highly involved biological fathers  had children who were 43% more likely than other children to earn mostly As  10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj and 33% less likely than other children  to repeat a grade 82
  • 80.  The way fathers play with their children  has an important impact on a child's emotional and social development 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 83
  • 81. spend a much higher percentage of their oneon-one interaction with infants and preschoolers in stimulating, playful activity than do mothers.  From these interactions,   children learn how to regulate their feelings and behavior. 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 84
  • 82.  can teach children how to deal with aggressive impulses and physical contact  without losing control of their emotions 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 85
  • 83. fathers also tend to promote independence and an orientation to the outside world.  Fathers often push achievement while mothers stress nurturing,   both of which are important to healthy development. 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 86
  • 84. children who grow up with involved fathers  are more comfortable exploring the world around them   and more likely to exhibit self-control and pro-social behavior. 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 87
  • 85.  found that children with good relationships with their fathers  were less likely to experience depression  to exhibit disruptive behavior  to lie  and were more likely to exhibit pro-social behavior 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 88
  • 86.  found that boys with involved fathers had fewer school behavior problems  and that girls had stronger self-esteem 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 89
  • 87. numerous studies have found that children who live with their fathers  are more likely to have good physical and emotional health  to achieve academically  to avoid drugs, violence, and delinquent behavior  10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 90
  • 88.  fathers have a powerful and positive impact upon the development and health of children 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 91
  • 89. who see themselves as simply an "extra set of hands" are not in a position to help the family fully flourish.  While the direct relationship a father has with his child is of paramount value,  fathers also exercise a strong influence on their children through the type of life they live in and outside the home.  10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 92
  • 90. 1. 2. 3. 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj Spending time together enables a father to get to know and to be known by his child. A father can best discover his child's virtues and vices, hopes and fears, and aspirations and ideals Tends to be better at caring. 93
  • 91.  Time spent together makes a father more sensitive to his child's  needs for love, attention, direction, and discipline.  children often do see time  as an indicator of a parent's love for them 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 94
  • 92.  85% of all children that exhibit behavioral disorders come from fatherless homes   (Source: Center for Disease Control) 80% of rapists motivated with displaced anger come from fatherless homes  (Source: Criminal Justice & Behavior, Vol 14, p. 403-26, 1978.) 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 96
  • 93.  71% of all high school dropouts come from fatherless homes  (Source: National Principals Association Report on the State of High Schools.)  70% of juveniles in state-operated institutions come from fatherless homes  (Source: U.S. Dept. of Justice, Special Report, Sept 1988 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 97
  • 94.  85% of all youths sitting in prisons grew up in a fatherless home  Children have a higher rate of  asthma, headaches, anxiety,  depression, and behavioral problems 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 98
  • 95.  Teenagers are at greater risk of alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug use, and suicide  Adolescent girls are 3 times more likely to engage in sexual relations by the time they are 15,  5 times more likely to become a teen mother 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 99
  • 96. How do we diagnose them? How do we reclaim them? This is my recommendation
  • 97. Educating, Assessing And Socializing The Youth
  • 98.  The E.A.S.Y. programme “Educate, Assess and Socialize The Youth” was developed to  investigate the factors causing adolescent delinquency and deviance in individuals during the secondary school years  It was also designed to assist in the re-socializing process  so as to increase the instances of pro-social behaviour in these young persons 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 102
  • 99.  The E.A.S.Y. Programme targeted adolescent males who were causing concern to school officials  The objective was to make these adolescents more functional and less disruptive in the school environment 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 103
  • 100.  Conducted in collaboration with the Guidance & Counselling Unit of the Ministry of Education, Youth & Culture  with 24 boys from 5 schools in the Kingston Metropolitan area  The students’ grade in school ranged from Grade 7 to 9  These boys were identified by their schools’ administration as students in need of re-socialization The pilot was conducted in 21 sessions from October 6, 2003 to March 9, 2004   using facilities at St. George’s College 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 104
  • 101. We first assessed the level at which the boys were reading  It is important to establish whether or not a student has the necessary abilities to learn effectively   Or if he lacks basic knowledge thus making the grasping of complex concepts more difficult  Thereby reducing his ability to cope in class 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 105
  • 102. We measured the boys’ personality types To gain further insights into the forces driving the boys’ behaviour 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 106
  • 103. Number of Students With Disorders Pre-Test Disorders Post-Test Students Student % Students Major Depression (DEP) 12 52.2% 3 Conduct Disorder (CND) 11 47.8% 3 Substance Abuse Disorder (SUB) 9 39.1% 2 Anger/Violence Proneness (AVP) 9 39.1% 2 Interpersonal Problems (IPP) 9 39.1% 2 Academic Problems (ADP) 6 26.1% 1 Self-Concept (SCP) 5 21.7% 0 Oppositional Defiant Disorder (OPD) 4 17.4% 3 Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) 4 17.4% % 1 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 107
  • 104. Mean Disorder Scores Mean Disorders Pre-Test Post-Test Substance Abuse Disorder (SUB) 65.6 55.8 Anger/Violence Proneness (AVP) 62.7 59.3 Major Depression (DEP) 62.0 60.9 Conduct Disorder (CND) 61.8 58.3 Interpersonal Problems (IPP) 61.8 58.3 Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) 58.4 57.6 Academic Problems (ADP) 58.0 57.1 Oppositional Defiant Disorder (OPD) 56.6 57.8 Self-Concept (SCP) 56.0 47.5 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 108
  • 105. Mean BarOn EQ Scores Mean Pre-Test Total EQ Post-Test 92.3 98.0 INTRA-PERSONAL 92.9 98.3 INTER-PERSONAL 82.7 86.2 STRESS MANAGEMENT 99.4 104.8 ADAPT-ABILITY 92.2 97.6 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 109
  • 106. Change in Behaviour determined by number of Sessions Sessions Attended Behaviour Improved Anger Management Improved More than 10 50% 83% 5-9 50% 67% Less than 4 0% 0% 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 110
  • 107.  The programme was effective in effecting change in the behaviour of the boys  The more sessions that they attended,  The greater the improvement  The boys showed improvement on all the tests administered  This was not only reported by the boys themselves  but also by the Guidance Counsellors and other concerned parties 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 111
  • 108.  To identify students who are at the ‘pre-problem’ stage  This is in order to devise and implement strategies to head off the problems early enough 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 112
  • 109.   It is anticipated that there will be some adolescents who will be goaded/forced into these anti-social behaviours by members of their family and/or residential community We will not be able to modify/change these behaviours for as long as they remain at the same place of residence 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 113
  • 110. Means: Changing Attitudes & Behaviours
  • 111.  Learned  relatively enduring feelings  about objects, events or issues 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 122
  • 112. 1. Evaluation A positive/negative meaning 2. Belief What you know and accept as true 3. Action Implications as to how one should act 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 123
  • 113.     Parents – Set base and foundation 1. What they reward/punish 2. Example they set 3. Control the information you get  What TV shows you see  Where you go  What you bring home 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 124
  • 114.  From Age 6 – early teens  strong influence  1. Via fear of rejection  so we conform  2. We choose groups that express similar attitudes to ours 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 125
  • 115.  1. Powerful influence  TV  Radio  Movies, Video Games  ▪ The BET-ization of Jamaica 2. Often the only source of information on events 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 126
  • 116. Getting People to do The Right Thing
  • 117. FOR YOU 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 130
  • 118. FOR people 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 131
  • 119. Your partner, children 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 132
  • 120. people 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 133
  • 121. THEMSELVES 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 134
  • 122. which increase or decrease the probability of people changing themselves 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 135
  • 123. Wishful Thinking Threats Punishment Promises Rewards Motivation Inspiration www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 10/23/2013 136
  • 124. Means: Changing Attitudes & Behaviours
  • 125. To do what?     To accept guidance from those who have their best interest at heart To pursue academic excellence To participate in positive, values-building activities To learn to settle disputes and differences with non-destructive methods 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 138
  • 126. PARENTS? Include your boys in the things you do Work and play Spend more time with them Spend some time doing the things they love to do Listen to them and their problems Insist that they bring their friends home Give them chores at all levels  teach responsibility 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 139
  • 127. HOW? Parents should know your son’s teacher Meet at least once per term As soon as you see a “problem”, get help Social, personal … Anger Management issues should be immediately addressed Set and maintain limits on child's behaviour As child matures, be willing to negotiate options 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 140
  • 128.  Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe  H.G. Wells 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 141
  • 129. In the final analysis it is not what you do for your children  but what you have taught them to do for themselves   that will make them successful human beings ▪ Ann Landers 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 142
  • 130.  Children need models rather than critics ▪ Joseph Joubert (17541824) French Philosopher 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 143
  • 131.  The most important thing a father can do for his children  is to love their mother ▪ Theodore Hesburgh 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 144
  • 132.  There are only two lasting bequests we can hope to give our children  One of these is roots  the other, wings ▪ Hodding Carter 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 145
  • 133.  Your children need your presence more than your presents ▪ Jesse Jackson 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 146
  • 134. How do children spell love? T-I-M-E 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 147
  • 135. We spend so much time trying to give our children what we never had  That we neglect to give them what we actually got   Dr. Carolyn Cooper 10/23/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 148
  • 136. Mobile: 876.383.5627 Office: 876.948.5627 Email: Semaj@LTSemaj.com Skype: LSemaj Twitter: LSemaj FaceBook: Leahcim.Semaj.2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj
  • 137. JobBank Presentation