Customer service excellence sept2013 wihco nb

  • 990 views
Uploaded on

The Only Purpose Of 'Customer Service'is to change feelings. Not the facts, but the way your customer feels. …

The Only Purpose Of 'Customer Service'is to change feelings. Not the facts, but the way your customer feels.
Seth Godin

More in: Business , Education
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
  • i was really impressed to saw this presentation i tried to downlod but i cant so please i need it mail me my mail id is shivkumar.nds@gmail.com
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
  • Dear Mr. Leahcim Semaj,

    Kindly email this presentation to me on my email address hrpawais@hotmail.com

    I will be very thankful to you for this

    Regards

    Awais Salman Khan
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
990
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
2
Likes
1

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 1 TOTAL CUSTOMER SERVICE:  The only way forward
  • 2. Mobile: 876.383.5627 Skype: LSemaj Office: 876.948.5627 Twitter: LSemaj Email: Semaj@LTSemaj.com FaceBook: Leahcim.Semaj.PhD www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 9/20/20132 “Providing Thought Leadership, Inspiration and Solutions” If you have the need, the wish or the desire, we will provide the Motivation and Transformation Leahcim Semaj www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj
  • 3. 39/20/2013 39/20/2013 3 “We have all that we need to create what we want because all the resources we need are in our minds” Theodore Roosevelt 9/20/2013 3www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj
  • 4. Total Customer Service RATIONALE FOR THIS SEMINAR 1. THE ROLE OF SERVICE IN THE NEW WORK ORDER: • How Customer Service impacts the bottom-line 2. YOUR INTERNAL CUSTOMERS: • Working with the team 3. THE POWER OF COMMUNICATION • With your internal customers • With your external customers • In Person, In Writing, On the telephone • Recognizing the signals of customer irritation • Dealing with difficult customers 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 5
  • 5. Total Customer Service 4. ROUTINE PROCEDURES VS. QUALITY SERVICE • The use of Standard Operating Procedures • Know the job, Know the role • The Role of Service Standards 5. THE MEANING OF QUALITY SERVICE IN THE NEW WORK ORDER • Solving a problem to the mutual satisfaction of both sides • How to quickly find a workable solution to resolve the customer’s problem 6. HOW DO YOU RESOLVE CONFLICTS? • How to manage stressful situations more effectively 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 6
  • 6. Total Customer Service 7. WHAT PREVENTS YOU FROM GIVING QUALITY SERVICE • To Internal Customers? • To External Customers? 8. WHAT CAN BE DONE TO IMPROVE THE QUALITY OF SERVICE? • To Internal Customers • To External Customers 9. Effectively Managing Your Time • The Time-Stress Connection • Steps Towards Effective Time Management • Planning Your Time, Your Priorities • How to Streamline Demands on Your Time • Communication Methods That Save Time • The 80/20 Rule 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 7
  • 7. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 8 Rationale For Customer Service  Favorable impressions lead to rewards •as measured by money, power or friendship
  • 8. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 9  Ads can bring customers in the door, •but market share is won by pleasing customers one at a time Rationale For Customer Service
  • 9. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 10  Customers with bad experiences tell the world on Facebook & Twitter  Those with good experiences tell only an average of 6 people Rationale For Customer Service
  • 10. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 11 It costs 5 times more to replace a customer than to retain an old one Rationale For Customer Service
  • 11. The Only Purpose Of 'Customer Service'  is to change feelings.  Not the facts, •but the way your customer feels. •Seth Godin 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 12
  • 12. The Only Purpose Of 'Customer Service'  The facts might be the price, • or a return, • or how long someone had to wait for service.  Sometimes changing the facts is a shortcut to changing feelings, • but not always,  changing the facts alone is not always sufficient anyway. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 13
  • 13. THE ONLY PURPOSE OF 'CUSTOMER SERVICE'  If a customer service protocol • (your call center/complaints department/returns policy)  is built around • stall, deny, begrudge • and finally, to the few who persist, • acquiesce,  then it might save money, • but it is a total failure. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 14
  • 14. The Customer Who Seeks Out Your Help  isn't often looking to deplete your bank account.  He is usually seeking • validation, • support • a path to feeling the way he felt •before you let him down 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 15
  • 15. The Best Measurement Of Customer Support is whether, after the interaction, the customer would recommend you to a friend. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 16
  • 16. How Your Customers Feel  Time on the line, refunds given or the facts of the case • are irrelevant.  The feelings • are all that matter,  Changing feelings • takes humanity and connection, • not cash. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 17
  • 17. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj ‹#›
  • 18. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 19 Values Change From PROTECTIVE TO PRODUCTIVE The team succeeds or fails together Customer satisfaction must be primary task
  • 19. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 20 Total Quality Service that exceeds customers expectation  Continuous improvement  Employee involvement  Customer focus  Measurement
  • 20. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 21 What Does The Consumer Want? SELF PRODUCTS & SERVICES SOCIETY
  • 21. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 22 CONSUMERS WANT PRODUCTS & SERVICES THAT REFLECT OR ENHANCE THEIR SELF IMAGE IDEAL APPARENT SOCIALPERCEIVED ACTUAL
  • 22. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 23 THE BUYER’S BLACK BOX CULTURAL SOCIAL PERSONAL PSYCHOLOGICAL CULTURE, SUB-CULTURE, SOCIAL CLASS AGE, LIFE-CYCLE STAGE, LIFESTYLE, SELF-CONCEPT, ECONOMIC CIRCUMSTANCES, PERSONALITY, OCCUPATION REFERENCE GROUP, FAMILY, ROLES, STATUSES MOTIVATION, ATTITUDES, PERCEPTION, BELIEFS, LEARNING
  • 23. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 24 The C.E.O.  Commitment to Customer Service must start from and be communicated from the top to all employees
  • 24. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 25 CULTURAL BARRIERS Servitude Servility Service
  • 25. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 26 SERVICE IS NOT SERVITUDE
  • 26. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 27 Who is a Customer?  Doctor  Lawyer  Teacher  Bank  Airline  Insurance  Cable  Patient  Client  Student  Account  Fares  Policies  Subscribers
  • 27. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 28 Who is a Customer?  C&W JA.  NWC  NHT  Radio  TV  Newspaper  Politician  Lines  Connections  Housing Solutions  Listeners  Viewers  Readers  Voters
  • 28. How Does Customer Service Impact The Bottom Line? DISCUSSION 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 29
  • 29. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 30 2. LET’S LOOK AT THE INTERNAL CUSTOMERS Are you a team? LET’S LOOK AT TEAMS
  • 30. Rule # 1: The “TEAM” is Spiritually Significant  Jesus formed a team •Even Jesus knew he could not change the world by himself •You need to coordinate the energies of a range of complementary people working towards the same goal 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 31
  • 31. Jesus on Team Building  He had a plan •He had a clear picture of the big picture and always gave his team clear instructions  He trained his replacement • He constantly reminded his team that • “Greater things than I have done shall you do” 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 32
  • 32. Jesus: Lead by Example  He set an example •The team was shocked when he took off his garment and washed their feet •His answer was simple, •“I am doing this to set an example for you” 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 33
  • 33. Jesus: Teams Should Have Fun  He was constantly is a state of celebration •His first “miracle” was turning water into wine (not grape juice) •He was always invited to parties and dinners •The night before his arrest he gathers his staff to sing and dine •The constant message was •“Why worry? Look at the flowers” 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 34
  • 34. Understand The Definition of Team  A group of interdependent people  They master effective communication  They are able to play a variety of complementary roles 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 35
  • 35. Definition of Team They agree on a goal They accept that the best way to achieve this goal is to work together 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 36
  • 36. Definition of Team  They foresee each other’s needs  They make useful suggestions to each other  They enhance each other’s strengths  They compensate for each other’s weaknesses 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 37
  • 37. Definition of Team  The result of this process is usually a synergistic level of increased efficiency and productivity 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 38
  • 38. Team: Relationships  Effective Teams  Trusting  Respectful  Collaborative  Supportive  Ineffective Teams  Suspicious and partisan  Pragmatic, based on need or liking  Competitive  Withholding 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 39
  • 39. Team: Information  Effective Teams  Flows freely up, down, sideways  Full sharing  Open and honest  Ineffective Teams  Flows mainly down a weak horizontally  Hoarded, withheld  Used to build power  Incomplete, mixed messages 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 40
  • 40. Team: Conflict  Effective Teams  Regarded as natural •even helpful  On issues •not persons  Ineffective Teams  Frowned on •avoided  Destructive  Involves personal traits and motives 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 41
  • 41. Team: Atmosphere  Effective Teams  Open  Non-threatening  Non-competitive  Participative  Ineffective Teams  Compartmentalised  Intimidating  Guarded  Fragmented  Closed groups 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 42
  • 42. You Must Work Through The 5 Stages Of Team Development 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 43 Forming Storming TransformingNorming Performin g
  • 43. Jamaica’s Greatest Team Achievement 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 44
  • 44. FORMING The start-up stage Purpose and expectation unclear 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 45
  • 45. Members Test the Waters to Determine •Acceptable behavior •The nature of their task •How the group will get its work done •They want to be told what to do •Interactions are superficial •Tend to be directed to the formal leader 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 46
  • 46. STORMING  This stage is characterized by conflict and resistance to the group’s task and structure  Team members express concerns and frustrations  Freely exchange ideas and opinions 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 47
  • 47. STORMING  Team is learning to deal with differences in order to work together to meet its goals  A team that doesn’t get through this stage successfully is usually more divided and less creative 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 48
  • 48. Transforming Differences are aired and resolved Disruptive elements converted or removed 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 49
  • 49. NORMING STAGE A sense of group cohesion develops in this stage 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 50
  • 50. NORMING  Members accept the team and develop norms for resolving conflict, making decisions, and completing assignments  Members enjoy meetings and freely exchange information  Shared leadership emerges  Risk of stagnating into groupthink 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 51
  • 51. PERFORMING STAGE Now team work really begin This is the payoff stage 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 52
  • 52. Performing  Team has structure and purpose  Ready to tackle task  Members take initiative  Problem-solving and decision- making procedures emphasize results 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 53
  • 53. As the Team GELLS  It receives recognition from other parts of the organization  Complacency is a risk  May show up in missed deadlines or a lack of creative spark  The bad habits of earlier stages may reappear 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 54
  • 54. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 55 The Meaning Of Work How do they feel about their job?
  • 55. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 56 How Do You Feel About Your Job? Man who enjoys his job will never have to work a day in his life Confucius
  • 56. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj ‹#›
  • 57. How is This Team Doing? DISCUSSION 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 58
  • 58. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 59 Customer Service (Internal and External) is largely driven by communication
  • 59. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj ‹#›
  • 60. Communication is The Life Blood of The Team  Timely and Accurate  People who have learned to support and trust one another share what they know freely  Pass on the information that members need to operate more effectively 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 61
  • 61. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 62 Communication Is  A huge umbrella that covers and affects all than goes on between human beings
  • 62. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 63 Communication Is  The single most significant factor that determines the kind of relationships we have and what happens to us
  • 63. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 64 For The Message To Get Through People Must Believe That You Are  Trustworthy  Likeable  Represent warmth  Represent comfort  Represent safety
  • 64. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 65 This Happens Without Words We plug into thousands of preconscious cues
  • 65. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 66 The First Brain: The Non-reasoning Non-rational Part  Seat of human emotion  The brain stem • Provide immediate instinctual response  Limbic system • - The emotional centre
  • 66. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 67 The New Brain: The cerebral cortex  Seat of conscious thought  Memory  Language  Creativity  Decision making
  • 67. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 68 To Get To The New Brain The message must first pass through the first brain
  • 68. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 69 Effective Communication…  is based on emotional impact  we must be believed to have impact  ALL FIRST BRAIN  LIKABILITY IS THE SHORTEST PATH •TO BELIEVABILITY AND TRUST
  • 69. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 70 How Much Time Do You Spend Communicating? We spend between 50 and 80% of our waking hours communicating
  • 70. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 71 Eye Communication Your #1 skill  Believability • Verbal - 7% • Vocal - 38% • Visual - 55%  Connects mind to mind
  • 71. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 72 The Benefits of Good Eye Communication...  Connects First Brain to First Brain  Use involvement in business/social •5 to 7 seconds of eye contact
  • 72. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 73 Dress and Appearance  You never get a second chance to make a good first impression  The first 2 seconds programmes the impression  Makes emotional contact  Clothes as costume
  • 73. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 74 When People Can’t See You  (As on the phone)  The intonation and resonance  Auditory delivery  Count for 84% of your emotional impact and believability
  • 74. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 75 Making A Good First Impression On The Phone  Customers calling on the telephone form an opinion about us within 4 to 6 seconds • Nancy Friedman • The Telephone “Doctor”
  • 75. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 76 The Power Of Communication  With your internal customers  With your external customers •In person •In writing •On the telephone
  • 76. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj ‹#›
  • 77. How is The Communication in This Team? DISCUSSION 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 78
  • 78. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 79 THE ROLE OF SERVICE IN The New Work Order
  • 79. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 80 Customer Service in The Old Order Customer Service as janitor
  • 80. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 81 Customer Service in The New Work Order Standard Operating Procedures 80%
  • 81. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 82 BETTER ROUTINE PROCEDURES  The use of Standard Operating Procedures  Know the job  Know the role
  • 82. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 83 Your Core Values Must permeate your business culture As well as your product offerings What are the things that are important … To you? To your company?
  • 83. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 84 Mission, Vision, Values and Work: Aligning The Organization for Higher Levels of Personal Satisfaction and Productivity Workforce ALIGNMENT Company Mission SHARED Mission Vision SHARED Vision Values SHARED Values Satisfaction Levels HIGH Satisfaction Levels Synchrony
  • 84. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 85 Service Standards • Organizations that are able to consistently attract and retain good staff while delivering quality service • have largely done so by developing and living by their Standard Operating Procedures • This becomes their Service Standards.
  • 85. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 86 SOP Driven Mission Statement Core Values Service Standards
  • 86. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 87 The Numbers  In any year Franchises report a success rate of 95% • in contrast to the failure rate of new independently owned businesses 50%  Where 80% of all businesses fail in the first 5 years, •75% of all Franchises succeed!
  • 87. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 88 Communication Contact Customer
  • 88. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 89 SOPs for Initial Contact with Customers Telephone Drive ins / Exit
  • 89. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 90 The Reason Standard Operating Procedures
  • 90. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 91 How to Write a Standard Operating Procedure  A Standard Operating Procedure or SOP • is a document containing step-by-step instructions •on how to perform a task from start to finish  It ensures that routine jobs  get performed correctly the first time and every time • and in compliance with applicable regulations
  • 91. Preparing an SOP  is a good opportunity for companies/departments that are committed to continuous improvement • to become more efficient, • increase cost-effectiveness, • and improve quality  The SOP development process is an excellent way for managers, workers, and technical advisers • to cooperate for everyone’s benefit 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 92
  • 92. Writing An SOP  Just think about the process and how you perform the task  Then write it down  The SOP should make it clear that you do a job function in a certain way at a specified time  You can write an authoritative Standard Operating Procedure on any task •by following these steps 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 93
  • 93. Step 1 – What SOPs Do You Need?  Decide on the specific task that you will tackle  This is important in order to stay focused •and to produce a useful document 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 94
  • 94. Step 2 - Produce a First Draft  This draft should map out all necessary steps in the procedure.  Do a first draft by listing everything you do to get the task done.  List the steps in the order in which they are done.  Avoid describing multiple steps in the same sentence.  Break down complex steps into smaller steps.  Create a simple flow chart if necessary. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 95
  • 95. Review  what you have written to ensure that you have captured everything.  Make sure to keep the language and tone of the document conversational.  This list is now a draft of the procedure. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 96
  • 96. Step 3 – Review the First Draft  You should expect the document to undergo several drafts before you have a final document  Ask a co-worker who already performs the task to review your First Draft  Encourage him/her to suggest changes that will make the procedure easier to understand • or more accurate or will improve performance of the task. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 97
  • 97. The Feedback  Get feedback and input on how the job should be performed  You will sometimes find that a co- worker has a more efficient way of completing a task  Incorporate suggestions into the document and re-read for clarity 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 98
  • 98. Step 4 - What Format Should You Use?  Formats and language style generally depend on the person writing them.  However, having a standard format or template for employees to use is beneficial. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 99
  • 99. Step 5 – Test the SOP  An effective SOP can be read and followed by a novice and the task will be performed correctly  There is only one way to be absolutely certain that a procedure is well written, •it must be tested 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 100
  • 100. The Test  Have someone who is not familiar with the task test the SOP by reading and performing each step exactly as it is described  The SOP writer should be on hand to watch 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 101
  • 101. Step 6 - Post  Once the SOP is completed, date the document and have it signed by the appropriate regulatory personnel.  Email the SOP to the other members of your department and to the manager(s) responsible for implementing the procedure and for the task the SOP describes. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 102
  • 102. Posting  Print a copy  Add it to the folder in which you will keep all the SOPs your department creates 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 103
  • 103. Step 7  Train everyone with the Approved SOP  This step in the SOP writing process • cannot be neglected  Train or retrain everyone to follow the procedure exactly  Even with very detailed steps, • it is necessary to train all users  Otherwise, individuals could interpret the meaning of procedures in different ways • leading to inconsistency in work routines and task performance 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 104
  • 104. Managing and Monitoring the SOPs  SOPs must be readily available to users  A master SOP file should be kept in a central location so that all workers/users can review little-used SOPs when necessary  Make both printed and digital documents available 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 105
  • 105. What SOPs Do You Need? DISCUSSION 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 106
  • 106. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 107 Customer Service in The New Work Order Problem Solving Skills 20%
  • 107. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 108 THE MEANING OF QUALITY SERVICE Solving a problem to the mutual satisfaction of both sides
  • 108. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 109 CONFLICTS MANAGEMENT STYLES?  Win-Lose /Compete  Accommodate  Compromise  Avoidance  Win-Win
  • 109. How Do You Manage Stressful Situations? DISCUSSION 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 110
  • 110. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 111 Service Management Today  Not enough effort has gone into studying the psychology of service encounters  The feelings that customers experience during these encounters  Feelings so subtle they probably couldn’t be put into words
  • 111. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 112 Want to Perfect Your Company’s Service? Use Behavioral Science Based on Harvard Business Review
  • 112. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 113 The 5 Attributes Price Service Access Experience Product
  • 113. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 114 Model For Consumer Relevancy Relationship Levels Price Service Access Experience Product Seeking Level 3 Preference Level 2 Acceptance Level 1 Distrust Level 0 Transaction Attributes
  • 114. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 115
  • 115. Seven marketing sins – Seth Godin  Impatient... great marketing takes time. • Doing it wrong ten times costs much more and takes longer than doing it slowly, but right, over the same period of time.  Selfish... we have a choice, • and if we sense that this is all about you, not us, our choice will be to go somewhere else. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 116
  • 116. Seven marketing sins – Seth Godin  Angry... at us? • Why are you angry at us? It's not something we want to be part of, thanks.  Self-absorbed... • you don't buy from you, others buy from you. • They don't care about your business and your troubles nearly as much as you do. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 117
  • 117. Seven marketing sins – Seth Godin  Deceitful... see selfish, above. • If you don't tell us the truth, it's probably because you're selfish. • How urgent can your needs be that you would sacrifice your future to get something now?  Inconsistent... • we're not paying that much attention, but when we do, it helps if you are similar to the voice we heard from last time. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 118
  • 118. Seven marketing sins – Seth Godin  Jealous... • is someone doing better than you? • Of course they are. • There's always someone doing better than you. • But if you let your jealousy change your products or your attitude or your story, we're going to leave. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 119
  • 119. Seven marketing sins – Seth Godin  Of course, they're not marketing sins, they're human failings.  Humility, empathy, generosity, patience and kindness, • combined with the arrogance of the brilliant inventor, • are a potent alternative. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 120
  • 120. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 121 Principle 1 Finish Strong
  • 121. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 122 Most Service Providers Believe that the beginning and end of an encounter are equally weighted in the eyes of the customer The so-called service bookends
  • 122. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 123 This Is Not So  The end is far more important because it’s what remains in the customer’s recollections
  • 123. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 124 A Company Is Better Off With A relatively weak start and a modest upswing at the end Than with a great start and a so-so ending
  • 124. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 125 Put Yourself In Your Customers’ Shoes  Imagine their journey  Visualize every moment they spend with you and your employees  Which of their encounters should be lengthened?  Which should be shortened?
  • 125. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 126 Put Yourself In Your Customers’ Shoes Where in a process are distractions most effective? Where should you offer choice to the customer?
  • 126. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 127 Put Yourself In Your Customers’ Shoes  Which process rituals should not be violated?  What are the last images of your service that customers take away?  How can you enhance them?
  • 127. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 128 More Important It can change the impressions that your customers remember •Refer back to •Pass on to future customers
  • 128. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 129 Making Customer Value Your Ultimate Goal “Business must be run at a profit… or else it will die But when anyone tries to run a business solely for profit… then the business must die also, for it no longer has a reason for existence” Henry Ford
  • 129. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 130 Applying Emotional Intelligence In Business
  • 130. Emotionally Intelligent Teams Work Best  Our specie has probably gone as far as we can based on cognitive Intelligence alone  The rest of the journey will require greater development of Emotional Intelligence 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 131
  • 131. Emotional Intelligence (EQ)  The ability to sense, understand, and effectively apply the power and acumen of emotions • as a source of human energy, information, trust, creativity and influence 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 132
  • 132. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj ‹#›
  • 133. Emotions: Conventional vs. High Performance Meaning  CONVENTIONAL HIGH PERFORMANCE  Signs of weakness - Sign of strength  No place in business - Essential in business  Avoid emotions - Emotions trigger learning  Confuse - Explicate (clarify)  Table them - Integrate them  Avoid emotional people - Seek them out 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 134
  • 134. Emotions: Conventional vs. High Performance Meaning  CONVENTIONAL HIGH PERFORMANCE  Pay attention only to thoughts of - Listen for the emotions in  Use of non emotional words - Use of emotional words  Interfere with good judgement - Essential to good judgement  Distract us - Motivate us 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 135
  • 135. Emotions: Conventional vs. High Performance Meaning  CONVENTIONAL HIGH PERFORMANCE  Sign of vulnerability - Make us real and alive  Obstruct, or slows down reasoning - - Enhance, or speeds up reasoning  Form a barrier to control - Build trust and connection  Weaken fixed attitudes - Activates ethical values 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 136
  • 136. Emotions: Conventional vs. High Performance Meaning  CONVENTIONAL HIGH PERFORMANCE  Inhibit the flow of objective data - Provide vital information and feedback  Complicate management planning - Spark creativity and innovation  Undermine authority - Generate influence without authority 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 137
  • 137. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 138 Avoid Saying Things Like  "It is company policy"  "I am not authorized to do that”  "There is nothing I can do”  "You should have gotten the person's name"
  • 138. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 139 Old Order - New Order  You’re wrong  I don’t have time  It’s against policy  Sorry, no refunds  Here’s another way to look at it  I’m under some pressure right now, can I get back to you?  Here’s what I can do…  I’m happy to help you exchange this
  • 139. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 140 OLD ORDER Vs. New Order  No Personal checks •Manager’s checks only please  Line starts here •Service starts here
  • 140. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 141 OLD ORDER Vs. New Order  Please wait • We’ll be right back  Pay before pumping gas • Please arrange your fill-up inside  This window closed • Other windows open
  • 141. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 142 OLD ORDER Vs. New Order  Place payment here • Thank you for your payment  No shoes, no shirt, no service • We appreciate proper attire
  • 142. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 143 OLD ORDER Vs. New Order  Teller closed • Please use other teller  Stay off the grass • Fragile: seedlings in progress
  • 143. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 144 OLD ORDER Vs. New Order  No throwing coins in fountain •Save your coins, no charge for wishes  Wait for your number •We look forward to serving you  No smoking •Smoke-free area
  • 144. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 145 OLD ORDER Vs. New Order  Payment due when service rendered • We appreciate your payment  If you break it, you buy it • Please handle items with care
  • 145. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 146 Customer Service  Look for and validate feelings  Ask what would help the customer feel better  Set goals for key customer feelings  Track them and manage them  Use a simple scale such as 0-10 for each feeling
  • 146. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 147 Key Feelings You Want Your Customers to Have  Respected  Important  Remembered  Acknowledged  Satisfied  Helped  Understood
  • 147. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 149 Activities: Customer Service Alignment How would you like your customers to feel? •Your Internal Customers? •Your External Customers?
  • 148. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 150 Activities: Customer Service Alignment  What will you do to ensure how your customers feel? • Your Internal Customers? • Your External Customers?
  • 149. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 151 Activities: Customer Service Alignment  What are your strategies to improve the Quality of Service to • Your Internal Customers? • Your External Customers?
  • 150. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj ‹#›
  • 151. What is Your Time Worth 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 153 Managing Your Time
  • 152. If you had 26 hours in the day, what would you do with the extra two?  How many hours do you have left in your life?  Time in Europe •NOMADS •SEASONS  Time in Japan 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 154
  • 153. AFRICAN TIME PRESENT PAST DISTANT PAST 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 155
  • 154. MANAGING TIME  All we have to work with is time, we all have the same amount  The only difference is how we use and what we do with it 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 156
  • 155. The Future You create Someone else create Circumstances create 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 157
  • 156. What is time worth? 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 158  The easiest way to get a sense of how much time is worth is to calculate how much your company pays for your time  Most managers underestimate the cost of their time  When things like benefits • the cost of training, pension costs, and vacations are calculated • a typical manger’s time is estimated to be worth about U$100 per hour • Note: It is always better to overestimate the value of your time. The amount you allot to each hour may be even higher than his  The figure you decide on can give you a guideline that is useful in many situations.
  • 157. The critical nature of time 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 159  The Boston Consulting Group conducted a 10-year study which investigated what factors made companies successful.  Its conclusion, after examining hundreds of companies: •Time is rapidly becoming the most crucial factor in business success
  • 158. The critical nature of time 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 160  Because of the increased pace of product cycles • rapid advances in technology • the competitive pressures of world markets  Time has become the manager’s most important concern • More than costs • More than sales levels • More than production refinements
  • 159. The critical nature of time 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 161  The emphasis on time affects many areas of a business, including; •Delivery times •Research and development •Response to competitors •Speed in addressing customer concerns
  • 160. The Critical Nature of Time 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 162  One company which has demonstrated how time awareness can yield greater profit is Federal Express  In a single year, it reported a 34% increase in sales  It achieved success by quickly putting into place a system that guaranteed overnight delivery of packages
  • 161. Managing Your Time 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 163  The Time-Stress Connection  Define Your Job: •How do you spend your time?
  • 162. Managing Your Time 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 164  Auditing Your Time  Planning Your Time, Your Priorities  Work Goals and Personal Goals  How to Streamline Demands on Your Time
  • 163. Managing Your Time 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 165  Organizing your Office For Maximum Efficiency  How to Buy time  Meetings: •The Biggest Time Waster
  • 164. 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 166 
  • 165. Time-saving tips for meetings 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 167  The following techniques come straight from the experts • successful managers who have found simple ways to ease the hassles of meetings and increase their effectiveness  Incorporate them into your next meeting.
  • 166. Meeting Agenda Form 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 168  Date of meeting  Place  Start time and end time  Person Calling Meeting  Purpose of Meeting  Desired Outcome of the Meeting  Agenda Items and Time Allotted • The most important items should be listed at the top of the agenda and should be discussed first  Necessary Participants  Optional Participants
  • 167. 4th Generation  Focus on managing ourselves not time Focus on preserving and enhancing relationships Focus on accomplishing results 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 169
  • 168. TIME MANAGEMENT MATRIX 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 170 IMPORTANT NOT IMPORTANT URGENT NOT URGENT I 3 42
  • 169. TIME MANAGEMENT MATRIX 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 172 IMPORTANT NOT IMPORTANT URGENT NOT URGENT I 3 42
  • 170. 3 -Not Important / Urgent 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 173 ACTIVITIES:  Interruptions  Some calls  Some mail  Some meetings  Pressing matters  Popular activities RESULTS:  Short-term focus crisis management  Goals and plans seem worthless  Feel victimized and out of control  Shallow or broken relationships
  • 171. 4 - Not Important / Not Urgent 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 174  ACTIVITIES:  Trivia  Busy work  some mail  Some calls  Time wasters  Pleasant activities  RESULTS: Total irresponsibility Fired from jobs Dependent on others or institutions for basics
  • 172. TIME MANAGEMENT MATRIX 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 175 IMPORTANT NOT IMPORTANT URGENT NOT URGENT I 3 42
  • 173. 2 - Important / Not Urgent 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 176 This is the heart of effective personal management  Activities:  Preventing, Relationship building,  recognizing new opportunities  planning  recreation  Ask yourself - "What one thing could you do in your personal and professional life that, if you did on a regular basis, would make a tremendous positive difference in your life?"  THESE ARE THE THINGS IN THIS QUADRANT.
  • 174. THE RESULTS Vision Perspective Balance Discipline Control Few crisis 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 177
  • 175. Lee Iococca  The ability to concentrate and to use time well is everything 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 178
  • 176. Action Exercises 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 179  Make a list of all the key goals, • activities, projects and responsibilities in your life today  Which of them are, or could be • in the top 10% or 20% of tasks that represent,  or could represent, • 80% or 90% of your results?
  • 177. Resolve today 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 180  that you are going to spend more and more of your time working in those few areas  that can really make a difference •in you life and career  and less and less time •on lower value activities.
  • 178. Benefits 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 181  could be physical rewards, •purposeful work •or emotional quality  Pursue the goals with the highest value.
  • 179. The Italian Economist Pareto 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 182  was the creator of one of the most widely known principles in business circles  The 80/20 Rule
  • 180. Vilfrado Pareto 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 183  July 15, 1848, Paris • August 19, 1923, Geneva  discovered the rule when he noticed that 80% of the wealth was owned by 20% of the population
  • 181. In 1906 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 184  he made the famous observation  that 20 percent of the population  owned 80 percent of the property in Italy
  • 182. later 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 185  generalized by Joseph M. Juran and others into the so-called •Pareto principle •also termed the 80-20 rule  and generalized further to • the concept of a Pareto distribution
  • 183. Since then 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 186  people have realized the principle works quite accurately for all sorts of things,  from the theory that 80 percent of your business complaints • come from 20 percent of your customers,  to 80 percent of your revenue • is generated by 20 percent of your sales items
  • 184. The 80/20 Rule 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 187  You can easily apply it to almost any area of your life to create more of anything • more free time • increased income • more enjoyment
  • 185. The 80/20 Rule 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 189 is one of the most helpful of all concepts of time and life management.
  • 186. For example, 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 192  this rule says that 20% of your activities will account for 80% of your results  20% of your customers • will account for 80% of your sales  20% of your products or services • will account for 80% of your profits  20% of your tasks • will account for 80% of the value of what you do, and so on
  • 187. This means that 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 193  if you have a list of 10 items to do  2 of those items will turn out to be worth as much or more than the other 8 items put together
  • 188. The Greatest Payoff 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 194  Here is an interesting discovery  Each of these tasks may take the same amount of time to accomplish  But one or 2 of those tasks • will contribute 5 or 10 times the value as any of the others
  • 189. Often, 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 195  one item on a list of 10 things that you have to do •can be worth more than all the other 9 items put together  This task is invariably the one that you should do first
  • 190. The Most Valuable Tasks 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 196  The most valuable tasks you can do each day are often the hardest and most complex  But the payoff and rewards for completing these tasks efficiently can be tremendous.
  • 191. For this reason, 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 197  you must adamantly refuse to work on tasks in the bottom 80%  while you still have tasks in the top 20% left to be done
  • 192. Before you begin work 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 198 always ask yourself, "Is this task in the top 20% of my activities •or in the bottom 80%?"
  • 193. Getting Started 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 199 The hardest part of any important task is getting started on it in the first place
  • 194. Once 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 200  you actually begin work on a valuable task, you seem to be naturally motivated to continue.  There is a part of your mind that loves to be busy working on significant tasks that can really make a difference.  Your job is to feed this part of your mind continually.
  • 195. Managing Your Life 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 201  Time management is really life management, personal management.  It is really taking control over the sequence of events.  Time management is control over what you do next.  And you are always free to choose the task that you will do next.
  • 196. Your ability 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 202  to choose between the important and the unimportant is the key determinant of your success in life and work.  Effective, productive people discipline themselves • to start on the most important task that is before them.
  • 197. As a result, 9/20/2013 www.LTSemaj.com 203  they accomplish vastly more than the average person •and are much happier as a result.  This should be your way of working as well.
  • 198. ISSUES for Work Groups to Explore 1. Becoming Number One in the Jamaican marketplace 2. Hiring and retaining the right people 3. What do External Customers want? 4. What do Internal Customers want? 5. Living your Mission and Values 6. Establishing Service Standards 7. Designing SOPs to standardise the Quality of Service 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 204
  • 199. Part 2: Charting The New Paths  Participant Work Groups •30 Minutes  In this session, the participants will join small working groups to explore issues of specific interest to them.  They will identify the challenges, the strategies for change and the help that will be required. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 205
  • 200. Structure of Responses 1. The source of the problem 2. What is the desired situation? 3. What can you do get there? 4. What help will you need? 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 206
  • 201. Part 3: The Way Ahead - Participants & Facilitator  In this session, the participants will share experiences, insights and conclusions from the working group discussions with the full gathering.  The Facilitator will respond to the presentations and share his insight on options for the path forward. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 207
  • 202. 208 Give And You Will Get  Give to others and God will give to you…  The measure you use for others is the one that God will use for you • Jesus •Luke 6:38  Give employees what they need  Give customers what they want  And great shall be your reward •The JobBank Spiritual Management
  • 203. 9/20/2013 www.SlideShare.net/LSemaj 209 Your Action Plan: Time Frame YOU Your Team Immediately Next 4 Weeks Next 4 Months