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Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes
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Design veg garden in low desert 1 pwnotes

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  • What grows in the Phoenix Low Desert naturally.
  • What can be grown here.
  • More difficult growing areas of the Low Desert.
  • What can be done in an area similar to ours to grow plants. This is a coffee plantain in Yemen, very similar to here.
  • A greener terraced area, similar to our hilly areas.
  • More what we are hoping for here. This is in the low desert.
  • Questions to ask yourself.
  • What type of gardener are you? What are you looking for from your garden.
  • Take some time and think about it.
  • Go to your potential garden area, spend some time really looking at it and visualizing what you would like there.
  • Have the class stand and face south. Show them using arm positions the equinox and solstice patterns and tell them that they can use this to get a better idea of where sun and shadows will fall at different times of the year on their property.
  • Municipal water – high in salts, heavily treated & chlorinatedRainwater – ideal for soils, is free, can pull salinity away from root zonesGreywater – excellent and overlooked source of water for many garden situations, care needed in installation and use of detergentsCanal Flood – perfect for orchards and agricultural applications, will bring in weed seeds and is untreatedWells – can be contaminated, should be tested before use
  • Good link for easy calculation of water you receive from the sky.
  • Check your winds.
  • Lead from leaded gasoline, paint, etc can be in soil as well as a variety of other toxic pollutants. Chemical testing is available to determine if your property has these present.
  • Step 1Dig a hole 1-2 feet wide and 2 feet deep in an area of your yard. (If your yard area is large, dig several holes in different areas with varying foot traffic and light exposure.)Step 2Fill each hole with water to the rim, noting on a piece of paper the time each was filled.Step 3After several hours, note the level of the water in each hole. Soil with proper texture will drain at the rate of 1-2 inches per hour. Soils that drain more quickly or slowly than that rate need amending to improve them.
  • Simple soil test, with simple equipment.
  • Link to a very good company to test your soil. Any test you might need for the garden, they will be able to do for you.
  • You have heard the phrase “urban heat island” and that our city has been getting hotter over the years as more pavement and buildings are developed. By reducing the tree canopy and creating large heat absorbing surfaces, we have created a large ‘microclimate’ in our cities that holds heat. The same thing happens at a small scale in your yard with naturally cooler and hotter areas.
  • Bucky naturally seeks out the cool microclimate under the peach trees along the north side of Liz’s house.
  • A large pecan tree with citrus banked for later planting under the middle, with a compost area on the right to keep it a bit more moist and working better. Also supplies some shade for the times it needs to be worked.
  • This sloping area in a local park has berms and swales in place to slow water runoff. A perfect time to check your property for naturally low and high areas is after a rain storm, look for any standing water.
  • Softscape – Plants, Trees, Grass, Groundcovers (living and mineral), … pervious surfacesAlso look at this on your property to see what you want to keep and what you want to change.
  • “Hardscape”- Buildings, Fences, Patios & other Impervious SurfacesA lot of newer homes have only patios and courtyard spaces predominately finished with impervious surfaces.Yet even in this environment notice the trees and green planting on the right, indicate areas where with very small changes you can grow vegetables for yourself.This also can be a good area for potted gardening projects.
  • Always call first!!!
  • Use the cold pockets for any plantings with chill requirements, like apples, peaches, etc…
  • Gloves would be good for most of us!
  • Does not take much to start.
  • When you decide to expand you tools.
  • Always Blue Stake first and know what you are doing or get someone that does. These types of machinery save a lot of hard work or destroy a lot of things, depends on the operator.
  • Very versatile but needs to be used with care.
  • Only for the serious problems and best to be done by experience people.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Sustainable Living Series
      Vegetable Garden Design
      For Desert Dwellers!
      Part 1 of 4
      with Chris Byers
      June, 2010
    • 2. What grows in the Phoenix Low Desert naturally.
    • 3. What can be grown here.
    • 4. More difficult growing areas of the Low Desert.
    • 5. What can be done in an area similar to ours to grow plants. This is a coffee plantain in Yemen, very similar to the Arizona low desert foothills.
    • 6. A greener terraced area, similar to our hilly areas.
    • 7. More what we are hoping for here in the low desert.
    • 8. Gardening Goals
      What do you like to eat?
      Why do you want to garden?Sustainability? Pesticide free? Financial Concerns?
      Are you trying to reach a target? 25% of your veg from your gardens? 50%?
      Are you growing to can, dehydrate, freeze?
      Realistic time & resources available?
      Questions to ask yourself.
    • 9. Gardening Goals - Example
      Type of gardener – Lazy!
      Food preferences – green leafy & fruits
      Why? – I’m on flood irrigation prefer edible landscapes over just bermuda
      Not interested in maximizing food production, want to utilize plants that are easy, perennial and tasty!
      Willing to put in time to research plants and prepare garden beds, not lots of ongoing maintenance ~10 min daily, just harvest and prepare is my goal!
      What type of gardener are you? What are you looking for from your garden.
    • 10. Where do you start?
      Take some time and think about it.
    • 11. *PermaculturePrinciple*
      ObservationProtracted and thoughtful observation rather than protracted and thoughtless labor.
      Go to your potential garden area, spend some time really looking at it and visualizing what you would like there.
    • 12. Observe
      Sunshine
      Water
      Wind
      Soil
      Grade or Slope
      Existing Conditions
      Microclimates
      Activity Zones   
    • 13. Sunshine – How it moves
    • 14. Solar Access
    • 15. Solar Access
      Time for the Sun Dance
    • 16. Water
      Whereis your water coming from?
      Municipal water – high in salts, heavily treated & chlorinated
      Rainwater – ideal for soils, is free, can pull salinity away from root zones
      Greywater – excellent and overlooked source of water for many garden situations, care needed in installation and use of detergents
      Canal Flood – perfect for orchards and agricultural applications, will bring in weed seeds and is untreated
      Wells – can be contaminated, should be tested before use
    • 21. What Rain?
      Annual irrigation demand in Tucson, AZ of low water use, dry season adapted native mesquite trees met by rainwater supply from roof runoff
      From Fig. 11.9 Rainwater Harvesting by Brad Landcaster
    • 22. What Rain?
      Annual irrigation demand in Tucson, AZ of higher water use dry season – susceptible, exotic citrus tree met by rainwater supply from roof runoff and supplemented with greywater in dry times.
      From Fig. 11.10 Rainwater Harvesting by Brad Landcaster
    • 23. What Rain?
      Annual irrigation demand in Tucson, AZ of 225 sq ft section of water hungry turf met by rainwater supply from roof runoff. Tank Stores water in times of plenty to slowly dole it out in the dry season’s times of need. Note: It is much more difficult and costly to use greywater to irrigate the relatively small root networks of thousands of individual grass plants, than it is to irrigate the relatively large and expansive root network of a few trees and shrubs.
      From Fig. 11.11 Rainwater Harvesting by Brad Landcaster
    • 24. Basic Techniques
    • 25. http://www.virtualsecrets.com/annual-rainfall-water-calculator.html
      #2 - Calculate How Many Gallons Of Annual Rainfall A Geographic Region Receives : Select LocationThis calculator is useful when you need to determine how many gallons of annual rainfall are received by soil for a general geographic region. If you know the annual rainfall amount in inches for a specific geographic location, use the first calculator. Select general geographic region with annual rainfall recorded Press this button to have the calcuation answers shown below 0.10165416666666667
      Gallons of water received weekly by one square foot of soil 0.4066166666666667
      Gallons of water received monthly by one square foot of soil 4.8794
      Gallons of water received annually by one square foot of soil 213686.24
      Gallons of water received annually by one square acre of soil
      Good link for easy calculation of water you receive from the sky.
    • 26. Wind
      Check your winds.
    • 27. Soil Conditions
      Soil Characteristics in Phoenix Area
      • Predominately Clay in Valley
      • 28. Low Organic Material
      • 29. Alkaline
      • 30. High in Minerals
      • 31. Low in Nitrogen
      • 32. Potential pollutants/toxins
      Lead from leaded gasoline, paint, etc can be in soil as well as a variety of other toxic pollutants. Chemical testing is available to determine if your property has these present.
    • 33. Soil Percolation Test
      Photo Credit: ©2000 Dolezal Publishing/Reed Estabrook
    • 34. Soil Jar Test
      Simple soil test, with simple equipment.
    • 35. https://www.midwestlabs.com/content/view/61/199/
      BASIC SOIL TEST PACKAGES       S1A (Basic): Organic Matter, Available Phosphorus (P1 Weak Bray and P2 Strong Bray) Exchangeable Potassium, Magnesium, Calcium and Hydrogen, Soil pH, Buffer Index, C ation Exchange Capacity, Percent Base Saturation of Cation Elements  With Recommendations:  $10.00   Without Recommendations: $8.80
      Link to a very good company to test your soil. Any test you might need for the garden, they will be able to do for you.
    • 36. Maximizing Microclimates
    • 37. Maximizing Microclimates
      Bucky naturally seeks out the cool microclimate under the peach trees along the north side of Liz’s house.
    • 38. A large pecan tree with citrus banked for later planting under the middle, with a compost area on the right to keep it a bit more moist and working better. Also supplies some shade for the times it needs to be worked.
    • 39. Activity Zones
      Another observation point is to see where you travel in your home and property and how often. As we design using permaculture we want to be as energy efficient as possible so knowing the patterns of travel are important to an energy efficient design.
      Make your own map usage map to make it easier to decide a good place for your plantings.
      Visit Multiple times daily
      Visit Once Daily
      Visit Weekly
      Visit Monthly
    • 40. Grade
      This sloping area in a local park has berms and swales in place to slow water runnoff. A perfect time to check your property for naturally low and high areas is after a rain storm, look for any standing water.
    • 41. Existing Conditions – “Softscape”
      Softscape – Plants, Trees, Grass, Groundcovers (living and mineral), … pervious surfaces
      Also look at this on your property to see what you want to keep and what you want to change.
    • 42. Existing Conditions,“Hardscape”
      “Hardscape”- Buildings, Fences, Patios & other Impervious Surfaces
      A lot of newer homes have only patios and courtyard spaces predominately finished with impervious surfaces.
      Yet even in this environment notice the trees and green planting on the right, indicate areas where with very small changes you can grow vegetables for yourself.
      This also can be a good area for potted gardening projects.
    • 43. CALL BEFORE YOU DIG
      1st
      Critical step
      of Site
      Analysis!
    • 44. Site Location
      Takes all observations into account!
      Light, well drained soil (no water pooling)
      At least six hours of sun
      Eastern (morning) sun exposure best
      Minimal slopes
      No cold pockets
      Protection from the winds
      Min. competition or shade from trees & shrubs
      No overshadowing buildings
      Good, previously gardened soil (notes on grass)
      Any size dimensions
      Use the cold pockets for any plantings with chill requirements, like apples, peaches, etc…
    • 45. Basic Tools Needed
      Gloves would be good for most of us!
    • 46. Traditional Gardening Basics
      Long-Handled Spade
      Spading Fork
      Steel Rake
      Does not take much to start.
      Hoe
      Hand Trowel
    • 47. Optional Handy Tools
      When you decide to expand your tools.
    • 48. Advanced Optional Tools
      Trencher
      Pros:
      Makes putting in drip irrigation MUCH easier!
      Cons:
      Large dangerous equipment, MUST know where utilities are located!!!
      Always Blue Stake first and know what you are doing or get someone that does. These types of machinery save a lot of hard work or can destroy a lot of things, depends on the operator.
    • 49. Advanced Optional Tools
      RotoTiller
      Pros: Can aid in removal of grass without herbicides
      Cons: May not be effective on hard pack desert soils.
      Very versatile but needs to be used with care.
    • 50. Advanced Optional Tools
      Back Hoe & Bucket
      Pros: Removing oleander roots! Create earthworks.
      Cons: Heavy machinery requires skill to operate, easily can destroy property & underground utilities
      Only for the serious problems and best to be done by experienced people.
    • 51. Conclusions for Part 1
      Gardening Goals are an essential part of planning your Gardens.
      Thoughtful observation is the key to success!
      The right tools for the job can be very simple to very complex depending on your goals and site location.
    • 52. Homework Assignments
      Do your Sun Dance at various places around your property to ‘see’ sun pattern and movement
      Jar Test
      Percolation Test
      Rock Shade Test
      Bring your Jars with to the next class if you like
    • 53. Additional Resources
      Hands on workshops
      Permaculture Design Course
      Monthly Sustainable Home Tours
      (we take the summer off…)
    • 54. Coming up Next Week
      What Kind of Garden is Right for Me?
      • Site Preparation
      • 55. Soil Building
      • 56. Types of Gardens
      • 57. Style of Gardens

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